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WTF?!? Washington State Bill Proposes ‘Composting’ of Human Corpses
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  1. #1
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    Washington State Bill Proposes ‘Composting’ of Human Corpses

    Washington State Bill Proposes ‘Composting’ of Human Corpses
    Thomas D. Williams, Ph.D.
    2-3 minutes

    Washington State is poised to become the first state in the Union to allow “human composting,” or the “accelerated conversion of human remains to soil.”

    Senate Bill 5001, titled “Concerning human remains,” would allow for human composting, also known as “recomposition” in Washington, local KIRO-TV reported.

    According to the bill, human remains “means the body of a deceased person, includes the body in any stage of decomposition, and includes postreduction human remains.”

    “There’s really only two options for when we die: cremation and burial,” said Katrina Spade, a human composting advocate and CEO of Recompose, the company hoping to become the go-to firm for human composting in Washington if it becomes legal.

    Neither of those options “felt particularly meaningful to me and I think if that’s the case, it’s true for others as well,” Spade said.

    Spade compared human composting to processes already in effect to recycle animal remains.

    “They’ve already done lots of research about the safe and effective ways to recycle animals back to the land on farms,” she said.

    “We proved recomposition was indeed safe and effective for humans as well,” Spade said, referring to a study conducted at Washington State University using the corpses of six human donors.

    According to Spade, human composting involves covering the dead body with natural materials, such as straw or wood chips, which leads to accelerated decomposition over the course of three to seven weeks.

    Families would have first dibs on the resulting “soil,” Spade said, and if they don’t want it, “we’ll partner with local conservation groups around the Puget Sound region so that that soil will be used to nourish the land here in the state.”

    Follow Thomas D. Williams on Twitter

    https://www.breitbart.com/environmen...human-corpses/

  2. #2
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    What do they think this is, Waterworld?
    We are fast approaching the stage of the ultimate inversion:
    the stage where the government is free to do anything it pleases, while the citizens may act only by permission;
    which is the stage of the darkest periods of human history, the stage of rule by brute force.
    -Ayn Rand

  3. #3
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    I'd kind of like to be turned into a diamond.

    The link is much better laid-out, with lots of pictures. Most of the source article is just captions.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/turn...ordanza-2017-7

    Dead people and pets are being forged into sparkling blue diamonds — here's how

    When a person dies, cremation is an increasingly popular option. The practice eclipsed burials in the US in 2015 and is expected to make up more than half of all body disposals by 2020, according to the Cremation Association of North America.

    But instead of storing a loved one's cremains in an urn or sprinkling them outside, a growing number of bereaved consumers are doing something more adventurous: forging the ashes into diamonds.

    This is possible because carbon is the second-most-abundant atomic element in the human body, and diamonds are made of crystallized carbon. Researchers have also improved ways to grow diamonds in the lab in recent years.

    While at least five companies offer a "memorial diamond" service, Algordanza in Switzerland is one of the industry leaders — its services are available in 33 countries, and the company told Business Insider it sold nearly 1,000 corporeal gems in 2016. Algordanza also claims to be the only company of its kind that operates its own diamond-growing lab for cremains — one of two in the world. (The other is in Russia.)

    "It allows someone to keep their loved one with them forever," Christina Martoia, a spokeswoman for Algordanza US, told Business Insider. "We're bringing joy out of something that is, for a lot of people, a lot of pain."

    Here's how the company uses extreme heat and pressure to turn dead people — and sometimes animals — into sparkling gems of all sizes, cuts, and colors.

    Kelly Dickerson contributed to this story.

    1 /
    Making a diamond from a dead person begins with cremation. The process typically leaves behind about 5 to 10 pounds of ashes, a small portion of which is carbon.

    Styles of cremation differ from culture to culture. Some use hotter temperatures for longer, which allows most carbon to escape into the air as carbon dioxide (which may mean a large amount of ashes are needed to form a diamond). Low-temperature cremation is better in that it ensures a larger amount of a person's carbon remains to create a diamond.

    2 /
    Martoia said Algordanza required a minimum of 1 pound of cremains. "That's kind of the magic number, where our engineers can guarantee there will be enough carbon to make a memorial diamond," she said.

    3 /
    When the company receives ashes from a customer, a technician puts a sample into a special oven to see whether there's enough carbon to grow a diamond. If there's not enough, the amount of carbon in a lock of hair can make up the difference.

    4 /
    Once there's enough carbon, the element is extracted and purified of contaminants like salts. "We use an acidic chemical to get rid of impurities," Martoia said.

    5 /
    This bumps the carbon purity of the processed ashes to about 99% or greater.

    6 /
    The other 1% contains impurities like boron — an element and micronutrient that helps humans (and other animals) grow bone, heal wounds, and regulate the immune system.


    7 /
    Boron is the impurity that colors the rare blue diamonds found in nature — and is why many "memorial diamonds" come out blue, too.

    8 /
    "The diamonds can range from clear to very deep blue," Martoia said. "The more boron, the deeper the blue."

    She added that it's impossible to predict the exact color a memorial diamond will take on.

    "But an interesting thing to note is that our technicians are seeing a correlation in people who have had chemotherapy. Their diamonds tend to come out much lighter," Martoia said. This may be because chemotherapy leaches away the body's boron and other important micronutrients.

    9 /
    When Algordanza processes ashes, Martoia says, "it's nearly impossible to separate out the boron from the carbon." This is because the two elements share similar weights and properties.
    Boron and carbon are similar in size and other atomic properties.

    10 /
    To further purify the carbon to 99.9% or more, technicians pack it into a growing cell that contains iron and cobalt — additives that help remove contaminants.

    11 /
    The cell also contains a tiny diamond to help the carbon crystallize into a rough shape, since carbon crystallizes best when it touches an existing diamond.

    The diamond provides a "blueprint" for the carbon to work from, which means the new diamond that eventually forms will require less cutting and polishing.

    12 /
    The final purification step converts the carbon into slippery sheets of graphite — the same type of carbon in pencils. Graphite's microscopic flat sheets of carbon are an ideal starter material for synthesizing diamonds.

    13 /
    Natural diamonds form out of carbon that gets stuck in lava tubes about a mile deep in the Earth's crust.

    14 /
    To emulate that environment, Algordanza inserts the cell (now packed with graphite) into a platter and slides it into a high-temperature high-pressure growing machine.

    15 /
    That machine can heat a growth cell to nearly 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit. It also squeezes the cell under 870,000 pounds per square inch of pressure.

    16 /
    That's like the entire mass of the International Space Station bearing down on the face of a wristwatch — then heating it up to a temperature exceeding that of lava.

    17 /
    Depending on how big a customer wants his or her diamond to be, it can take six to eight weeks in an HPHT machine to coax graphite to crystallize into a gem. "The larger the diamond, the longer it takes to grow," Martoia said.

    18 /
    When enough time has passed, technicians remove the puck of graphite and crack it open.

    19 /
    Inside awaits a rough, uncut, and unpolished diamond.

    20 /
    Some customers take the rough gem, but many opt to have their memorial diamonds cut, faceted, and polished by a jeweler in Switzerland.

    21 /
    Algordanza's prices start at $3,000 for a 0.3 carat diamond. Martoia said the average order was about 0.4 to 0.5 carat, though US customers usually request bigger, 0.8-carat diamonds.

    But Algordanza can make them much larger: The company recently took a $48,000 order for 2-carat diamond. After 10 months of growth, the resulting gem actually wound up being 1.76-carats — but it's still the largest memorial diamond ever made by the company.

    22 /
    Orders for diamonds made from human cremains aren't the only type that Algordanza receives. "First we had the cremains of a German Shepard and now we have cremains of a cat," Martoia said.

  4. #4
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    Leftists always think they're having brilliant new ideas. Instead they're thinking of things people discarded hundreds of years ago. For good reasons.
    Reality cannot be seen through the lens of Marxism.

    Freedom and government-imposed equality are mutually exclusive.

  5. #5
    Kinda odd, but they're already dead so it doesn't really matter. It would just be really nasty if they got dug up too soon somehow.

  6. #6
    Well, let's see...

    burning corpses is traditional in a few cultures...
    burying someone without embalming and vaults & such IS composting... and also traditional...

    and how is this a new idea again?

  7. #7
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    The bloodsucking government has no business even SUGGESTING how remains should be treated.

  8. #8
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    We're going to need those for soylent green.
    In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people. Source – The Declaration of Independence

  9. #9
    Why wait until death? Seems discriminatory. True liberals, like those running the goverments in Washington, should do their green duty and self-compost now.

  10. #10
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    Think of it as a 258th trimester abortion...

  11. #11
    Maybe they want dead bodies to be left in the streets.
    Romans 12:19 Beloved, do not avenge yourselves, but rather give place to wrath; for it is written, “Vengeance is Mine, I will repay,” says the Lord.

  12. #12
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    If I should die before I wake,
    All my bone and sinew take
    Put me in the compost pile
    To decompose me for a while.

    Worms, water, sun will have their way,
    Returning me to common clay
    All that I am will feed the trees
    And little fishes in the seas.

    When radishes and corn you munch,
    You may be having me for lunch
    And then excrete me with a grin,
    Chortling, "There goes Lee again."

    Attributed to Arlo Guthrie
    "Freedom is not something to be secured in any one moment of time. We must struggle to preserve it every day. And freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction."
    -Ronald Reagan

  13. #13
    Good one, Garryowen.

  14. #14
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    How tacky would it be to have your starter wife turned into a ring for your trophy wife?
    "...Cry 'Havoc' and let slip the cats of war..."
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  15. #15
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    Sounds to me like a really good way to spread disease, especially if the process is not properly monitored or protected from the ravages of dogs and wild life or allowed to enter run off into water ways. Lots of "unforeseeable", foreseeable problems there.
    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it. - Mark Twain

  16. #16
    Composted great provided it is dirt cheap. It will never get up and going in our society. It does not take long to happen only a few months in a compost heap.


    When one is berried whole one is composted anyway.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Gray Mare View Post
    Sounds to me like a really good way to spread disease, especially if the process is not properly monitored or protected from the ravages of dogs and wild life or allowed to enter run off into water ways. Lots of "unforeseeable", foreseeable problems there.
    Actually, that is a lot more likely with "traditional" graveyards especially the older ones (like 19th century); badly and partly preserved corpses (with embalming fluid and other techniques) mean a lot of graves haven't totally returned to dust or to skeletons - this comes "up" every time there is a terrible flood that dislodges old graves and exposes the contents.

    There are also real "issues" in terms of potential disease in "sealed" coffins even going back past the Middle Ages and modern archeologists have to be careful; it is now believed a lot of the "mummy's curse" stories came from exposure to both "bad" air and germs from sealed tombs (some of it was also the human imagination and our ability to connect dots that may not exist).

    But actual full and intentional compositing of human bodies in the appropriate way would be one of the least likely ways to transmit disease (along with full cremation).

    I can see this as an alternative for some people and a practical way for Counties to manage their "potter's fields" where they bury those who are "unknown" or the increasingly growing number of the poor who simply can't afford to claim a loved one's body and pay for the burial.

    Personally, for myself I'd prefer cremation and then have my ashes scattered; the result is pretty much the same but the fire just "feels" cleaner to me; which isn't scientific at all but a lot of burial and death customs are based on emotions as well as practicality.

    By the way, the early European Church encouraged burial of the faithful in a simple grave with bodies covered in simple sheets or "shrouds;" this set Believers apart from the previous "Pagan" ways of burial with great tombs, grave goods, and fancy clothing.

    It wasn't officially "composting" but that was pretty much the result-needless to say the Elites totally ignored this idea and continued to have fancy tombs but many of the poor (and religious orders) embraced this sort of burial both with and without wooden coffins.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garryowen View Post
    If I should die before I wake,
    All my bone and sinew take
    Put me in the compost pile
    To decompose me for a while.

    Worms, water, sun will have their way,
    Returning me to common clay
    All that I am will feed the trees
    And little fishes in the seas.

    When radishes and corn you munch,
    You may be having me for lunch
    And then excrete me with a grin,
    Chortling, "There goes Lee again."

    Attributed to Arlo Guthrie
    Your levity is good, it relieves tension and the fear of death.

    The Frigid Times - http://www.frigidtimes.blogspot.com/
    Civil Defense Reborn - http://cdreborn.blogspot.com/
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garryowen View Post
    If I should die before I wake,
    All my bone and sinew take
    Put me in the compost pile
    To decompose me for a while.

    Worms, water, sun will have their way,
    Returning me to common clay
    All that I am will feed the trees
    And little fishes in the seas.

    When radishes and corn you munch,
    You may be having me for lunch
    And then excrete me with a grin,
    Chortling, "There goes Lee again."

    Attributed to Arlo Guthrie
    If it is to help things grow we should just compost liberals as they are full of BS. Being dead can be optional.
    Tax the rich, feed the poor, til there are, rich no more - Ten Years After
    Surely you're not saying we have the resources to save the poor from their lot. -JCSS
    Friend, you cannot legislate the poor into freedom by legislating the wealthy out of freedom. And what one person receives without working for, another person must work for without receiving. The government can't give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody.

  20. #20
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    This is an affront to what the Bible dictates as a "christian burial" This is nothing more than the continuing move to a total loss of respect for a human being. I'm sure the lil school children will be taken on field trips to this disgraceful open pit to watch the grotesque horror of open decomposition. The aborted babies thrown on top of the pile will be the cherry on top. Consider this outrageous treatment of the dead, the sister to shit filled streets in the west coasts liberal cities.
    "His golden colored hair and beard gave to his appearance a celestial aspect, His eyes grey clear. He came from racial lines which had blue eyes and golden hair. This granted unlimited freedom provoked the Jews, Jesus of Nazareth spoke rather as a friend of the Romans than of the Jews." http://www.thenazareneway.com/likene...ur_saviour.htm

  21. #21
    And closure is a good potato crop?

  22. #22
    It could be done very cheaply and safely in a bin with hardware cloth to keep out rodents. I actually have two bins like that used to compost any dead poultry or rabbits that I don't want to butcher. Dump in biologically active yard soil, water as needed...stuff breaks down. My bins are approx 6' long, by 2' wide. Hmmm... well, no spare human bodies to try out in one at the moment, sorry.

    Nevertheless, once any commercial organization and .gov gets involved, forget about it. The process will end up hyped, over marketed, legalistic, EXPENSIVE, extra complicated, and NOT green.

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Melodi View Post
    Actually, that is a lot more likely with "traditional" graveyards especially the older ones (like 19th century); badly and partly preserved corpses (with embalming fluid and other techniques) mean a lot of graves haven't totally returned to dust or to skeletons - this comes "up" every time there is a terrible flood that dislodges old graves and exposes the contents.

    There are also real "issues" in terms of potential disease in "sealed" coffins even going back past the Middle Ages and modern archeologists have to be careful; it is now believed a lot of the "mummy's curse" stories came from exposure to both "bad" air and germs from sealed tombs (some of it was also the human imagination and our ability to connect dots that may not exist).

    But actual full and intentional compositing of human bodies in the appropriate way would be one of the least likely ways to transmit disease (along with full cremation).

    I can see this as an alternative for some people and a practical way for Counties to manage their "potter's fields" where they bury those who are "unknown" or the increasingly growing number of the poor who simply can't afford to claim a loved one's body and pay for the burial.

    Personally, for myself I'd prefer cremation and then have my ashes scattered; the result is pretty much the same but the fire just "feels" cleaner to me; which isn't scientific at all but a lot of burial and death customs are based on emotions as well as practicality.

    By the way, the early European Church encouraged burial of the faithful in a simple grave with bodies covered in simple sheets or "shrouds;" this set Believers apart from the previous "Pagan" ways of burial with great tombs, grave goods, and fancy clothing.

    It wasn't officially "composting" but that was pretty much the result-needless to say the Elites totally ignored this idea and continued to have fancy tombs but many of the poor (and religious orders) embraced this sort of burial both with and without wooden coffins.
    I've wondered if the curse with caskets of mummies had to do with exposure to fungus. Europe stored bones in catacombs, but what happened to the bodies first? Shallow burial, and a primitive/casual stage of composting?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Profit of Doom View Post
    How tacky would it be to have your starter wife turned into a ring for your trophy wife?
    Pretty tacky. But there was a certain appeal in being made into an inexpensive diamond for some young couple just starting out. Be a real blessing for them, I figure.

    "Yeah, I couldn't have got her an engagement ring at all, until some guy had his corpse melted down for carbon and turned into one. Said he wanted to put his body to good use since he wasn't needing it any more."

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkelsteinsmom View Post
    This is an affront to what the Bible dictates as a "christian burial" This is nothing more than the continuing move to a total loss of respect for a human being. I'm sure the lil school children will be taken on field trips to this disgraceful open pit to watch the grotesque horror of open decomposition. The aborted babies thrown on top of the pile will be the cherry on top. Consider this outrageous treatment of the dead, the sister to shit filled streets in the west coasts liberal cities.
    Or, conversely, it's people actively working to make fertilizer for plants and help feed people with a thing they didn't really need any more anyway. But then this might be a matter of perspective.

    Oh, and if you have actual text on "Christian burial," you probably should present it. A lot of this is basically just opinion unless God actually said something on the topic.

  26. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    I've wondered if the curse with caskets of mummies had to do with exposure to fungus. Europe stored bones in catacombs, but what happened to the bodies first? Shallow burial, and a primitive/casual stage of composting?
    I can ask my husband for more details he had to do a study of such things when writing a Ph.d. on "Odin God of Death" whereas I'm just interested in the topic.

    In general, dead bodies are not nearly as toxic as most people are led to believe but after centuries in the ground how toxic they are their graves are varied a lot by area, type of soil, the reason for death etc.

    In Egypt where things are very dry and even naturally buried people tend to mummify in the sand; it is probably dust, spores and yes possibly fungus that kills off early 20th century (and earlier) archeologists who didn't even wear masks when excavating.

    As for "Unchristian", the Early Church didn't call putting naked bodies covered in a sheet directly or in plain wooden boxes "compositing" and they would never have thought of it in that way - but the effect was pretty much composting.

    It was also totally understood by the Early Church that sometimes during mass casualty events: battlefields, famines, plagues etc that giant "mass graves" would be needed and those were pretty much totally "compositing."

    The Priest would consecrate the ground of the mass grave and then the bodies just piled in with layers of dirt and leaves between them (sound familiar?).

    Excavating old "plague pits" is usually considered pretty safe in most environments but precautions are still taken because there are still some risks; especially in swampy and muddy parts of Northern Europe.

    It isn't so much the ancient bodies that are a worry (usually they reduce down to the bone in time) but the toxic stuff (like fungus or germs) that may be in the soil - which either dust or mud can easily be breathed in by living people.

    I think what is really at issue here is the INTENT rather than the process - is the intent to respectfully place a loved on a specially made "sky bed" to allow the birds to return the body to the Creator (Native American and Ancient Persia?)

    Or is the intent to just leave the bodies of the fallen enemy on the battlefield to bring terror to their loved ones and humiliate the dead by seeing them torn apart by birds? That would be the orders given after the Battle of Hastings.

    From the point of view of the result (bird pecked skeletons) the results are the same but the intent in the first case is to honor the dead in the way of their ancestors who the beloved dead are joining; in the second it is a horrific use of real terror especially when you consider that many in the Middle Ages believed the soul would not get to heaven if they were not buried in consecrated ground.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  27. #27
    My only real concern is that the large bones don't break down... after 6 months, they're all that will be left, but you still will have skull, scapula, pelvis and the long limb bones to deal with. Not exactly what you'd want to find while spreadi gcompost on your garden!

    But the process works amazingly well. We've used it for about 20 years on the farm... take a dead cow or horse, put the carcass on a well drained spot of sod, and pile a full load of strawy manure over it. There needs to be at least 12" of cover over the entire carcass.

    Done properly, there is NO odor, and scavengers never even find it, much less dig into the pile. I was really shocked... even the turkey vultures, whose sense of smell is so acute they can find a dead rat or rabbit from several hundred feet in the air, have *never* been seen circling the compost pile. Coyotes, etc, don't bother it, either. And you can walk right up to the pile inhigh summer 2 weeks after placing a large carcass, and not smell any odor at all.

    Still, for us, we'll either opt for cremation, or a "green" burial on our farm (the latter will be considered if our son takes the farm over and keeps it in the family.) What i mean by "green" is no embalming, a plain wooden casket, with the corpse wrapped in a blanket or quilt... within a few years, there won't be anything left underground.

    Summerthyme

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Blacknarwhal View Post
    Or, conversely, it's people actively working to make fertilizer for plants and help feed people with a thing they didn't really need any more anyway. But then this might be a matter of perspective.

    Oh, and if you have actual text on "Christian burial," you probably should present it. A lot of this is basically just opinion unless God actually said something on the topic.
    I actually find decomposition fascinating. Maybe it's the nihilist in me. Tibetan monks have what is called a Sky Burial, and drag the corpse up to the side of a mountain and leave it to feed vultures. I love that idea. Beats polluting the Ganges. I remember reading about a site that leaves bodies out on the surface to decompose, as an aid to forensic scientists to reconstruct activity in cases when bodies are found.

    There is an interesting YouTube channel, IIRC, Ask A Mortician (?), something like that. The mortician lady who makes the videos has a funny/campy/macabre take on the subject, but she is also very informative on questions we all have, but are reluctant to bring up in polite society. I've watched at least a couple dozen of them - lots of odd bits of peculiar history and also science.
    Here is a link to one titled, Exhumation. I haven't watched this one (yet), but it seems apropos. Run time is 8+ min.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0cvVyIEfHI
    Last edited by Faroe; 02-12-2019 at 10:31 AM.

  29. #29
    Thanks Faroe I'd forgotten that Sky Burial was also practiced in Tibet as in many things; context is everything.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    My only real concern is that the large bones don't break down... after 6 months, they're all that will be left, but you still will have skull, scapula, pelvis and the long limb bones to deal with. Not exactly what you'd want to find while spreadi gcompost on your garden!

    But the process works amazingly well. We've used it for about 20 years on the farm... take a dead cow or horse, put the carcass on a well drained spot of sod, and pile a full load of strawy manure over it. There needs to be at least 12" of cover over the entire carcass.

    Done properly, there is NO odor, and scavengers never even find it, much less dig into the pile. I was really shocked... even the turkey vultures, whose sense of smell is so acute they can find a dead rat or rabbit from several hundred feet in the air, have *never* been seen circling the compost pile. Coyotes, etc, don't bother it, either. And you can walk right up to the pile inhigh summer 2 weeks after placing a large carcass, and not smell any odor at all.

    Still, for us, we'll either opt for cremation, or a "green" burial on our farm (the latter will be considered if our son takes the farm over and keeps it in the family.) What i mean by "green" is no embalming, a plain wooden casket, with the corpse wrapped in a blanket or quilt... within a few years, there won't be anything left underground.

    Summerthyme
    Buried under a foot of manure? I'm not surprised you can't smell horse rot through that. Manure can be pretty solid stuff; I know from my days shoveling the stuff with a four-tined pitchfork.

    And yes, cremation does seem the best option, at least for now. Still, that diamond route might not have been bad.

  31. #31
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    Hmmm. Not having someplace to go pay respect to grandma and grandpa would probably be fine with a bunch of kids these days who don't even think about paying their own way in this world.

    I consider this another chapter on making folks dehumamize others and their beliefs, only certain beliefs of course.

    The new york kill a baby laws and now skip the funeral home expense and what not.

    As far as diseases go, they don't care about that. Look at tb and measles and other diseases making a come back as illegal aliens import their crap health with themselves.
    working on unplugging.

  32. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    My only real concern is that the large bones don't break down... after 6 months, they're all that will be left, but you still will have skull, scapula, pelvis and the long limb bones to deal with. Not exactly what you'd want to find while spreadi gcompost on your garden!

    But the process works amazingly well. We've used it for about 20 years on the farm... take a dead cow or horse, put the carcass on a well drained spot of sod, and pile a full load of strawy manure over it. There needs to be at least 12" of cover over the entire carcass.

    Done properly, there is NO odor, and scavengers never even find it, much less dig into the pile. I was really shocked... even the turkey vultures, whose sense of smell is so acute they can find a dead rat or rabbit from several hundred feet in the air, have *never* been seen circling the compost pile. Coyotes, etc, don't bother it, either. And you can walk right up to the pile inhigh summer 2 weeks after placing a large carcass, and not smell any odor at all.

    Still, for us, we'll either opt for cremation, or a "green" burial on our farm (the latter will be considered if our son takes the farm over and keeps it in the family.) What i mean by "green" is no embalming, a plain wooden casket, with the corpse wrapped in a blanket or quilt... within a few years, there won't be anything left underground.

    Summerthyme
    When a cow died at the dairy I worked at, the owner would just make a big burial mound over the carcass. No smell. I found a couple of skulls exposed from the older mounds, and I would put the skulls in the crook of a tree to watch over the pastured cows. The cows suckle us, and are like our mothers. I miss those skulls. I had one on my own place, but left it with the farm when I moved. Sacramento wasn't a suitable place for it.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    14,228
    Quote Originally Posted by biere View Post
    Hmmm. Not having someplace to go pay respect to grandma and grandpa would probably be fine with a bunch of kids these days who don't even think about paying their own way in this world.

    I consider this another chapter on making folks dehumamize others and their beliefs, only certain beliefs of course.

    The new york kill a baby laws and now skip the funeral home expense and what not.

    As far as diseases go, they don't care about that. Look at tb and measles and other diseases making a come back as illegal aliens import their crap health with themselves.
    You hardly need to go to a place to pay respects. Surely you can do that anywhere at any time. That most don't is somewhat irrelevant.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    A Socialist State
    Posts
    23,457
    Think of all the carrots you could grow with little sprouting arms!
    Don't just go to church. BE THE CHURCH!

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