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WAR Venezuela Regime Change - Ongoing Civil Strife and New National Power Outages
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  1. #1
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    4 Venezuela Regime Change - Ongoing Civil Strife and New National Power Outages

    Housecarl caught this in his Winds of War thread with the article that he posted today:

    Brazil says it recognizes Venezuelan opposition leader as president

    (meaning the it recognizes Venezuela's Congressional leader as the rightful president of Venezuela. Maduro was just sworn in 2 days ago for another term).

    Link: http://news.trust.org/item/20190112140040-1djls

    Read that & then this longer article. But, especially view this 12:53 YT by the Florida Maquis, who has been all over this issue for months. You can skip the embedded video that starts at 2:56 and runs to 10:47. Just watch the beginning & the end. He believes we are watching a spark for something much larger than regime change. He believes we are going to be watching a much wider war in the Americas.

    Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsvGGSKbNok

    Meanwhile, also 2 days ago, the Organization of the American States permanent council approved a resolution to not recognize Nicolas Maduro as leader. They also kicked this resolution up to the UN. Read this article:

    Permanent Council Approves Resolution to Not Recognize the Legitimacy of the Maduro Regime

    On January 10, 2019, the OAS Permanent Council approved a resolution to not recognize the Nicolas Maduro dictatorship. The measure was adopted with 19 votes in favor, 6 against, 8 abstentions and one absent. Ambassador Carlos Trujillo addressed the Council.

    Remarks by Ambassador Carlos Trujillo January 10, 2019

    Mr. Chairman, today is a critical day for those striving to preserve the little that remains of democracy in Venezuela, and for the credibility of the OAS. Today’s sham Presidential inauguration, achieved through a fraudulent election, is another decisive step away from democracy and toward dictatorship by a regime that has repeatedly and wantonly undermined democratic institutions and violated human rights. Today was also a critical test for the OAS, to seize this opportunity to act in defense of democracy and human rights in Venezuela.

    On June 5, 2018, the OAS General Assembly passed a resolution stating that the May 20, 2018 Presidential election – the basis for the sham inauguration today – failed to comply (even minimally) with international standards, and therefore lacked basic legitimacy. We here all know it was an undemocratic sham by any standard.

    Moreover, in its June resolution the OAS General Assembly urged restoration of the full authority of the democratically elected National Assembly, and pressed the Venezuelan government to allow the entry of humanitarian aid to prevent a spreading humanitarian and public health crisis. It also identified increased migration of Venezuelans fleeing the economic and political collapse of Venezuela.

    The General Assembly called upon OAS member states to implement measures to help restore democratic order in Venezuela, and pledged to apply the letter and spirt of the Inter-American Democratic Charter for the defense and preservation of democracy in Venezuela.

    Mr. Chairman, it has been six months since the OAS approved that resolution. Has the situation improved? Has progress been made? Can any member state point to anything that the Maduro regime has done to comply with OAS resolutions? Has the Maduro regime done anything to restore democracy or protect human rights?

    In fact, as we all know, and as we have all discussed many times in various OAS bodies including this one, the opposite is true. The Maduro regime has only stepped up its attack on democratic institutions and deepened its repression of democratic actors. Do democratic governments throw their rivals out of 10th floor windows, use food as a weapon against their own populations, and hold sham elections that are fixed in advance in their own favor?

    Meanwhile, not coincidentally, the humanitarian crisis has gotten dramatically worse. Can any member state cite any credible reason for which the OAS should refrain from acting responsibly in defense of democracy in Venezuela now? If there was room for legitimate debate before, there is none now. Not anymore. Nicolas Maduro’s inauguration is an undemocratic sham, and the OAS Permanent Council should take decisive note of this fact here and now.

    Mr. Chairman, this brings me to our second, perhaps equally important question. Is the OAS serious about protecting democracy and human rights? Is it consequential in carrying out its most fundamental responsibilities? The current circumstance is shaping up as a decisive test case.

    I congratulate the member states of the OAS who stood up for our values and principles in defense of democracy and the protection of human rights. Failure to recognize the situation in Venezuela for what it is not a legitimate option. The facts of the case are unambiguous and glaringly clear. The credibility of the OAS is at stake.

    We thank those member states that stood on the side of democracy and human rights. As Secretary of State Pompeo has stated: “It is time for Venezuelan leaders to make a choice. We urge those who support this regime, from every day employees getting by on food subsidies to the Venezuelan security forces sworn to support the constitution, to stop enabling repression and corruption and to work with the National Assembly and its duly elected leader, Juan Guaido, in accordance with your constitution on a peaceful return to democracy. The Venezuelan people and the international community will remember and judge your actions. Now is the time to convince the Maduro dictatorship that the moment has arrived for democracy to return to Venezuela.”

    Thank you.

    The resolution was approved with 19 votes in favor (Argentina, Bahamas, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, United States, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Dominican Republic, and Saint Lucia); 6 against (Bolivia, Dominica, Nicaragua, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, and Venezuela); 8 abstentions (Mexico, St. Kitts and Nevis, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, and El Salvador); and one absent (Grenada).

    Following is the complete text of the resolution:

    RESOLUTION ON THE SITUATION IN VENEZUELA

    (Adopted by the Permanent Council at its special meeting held on January 10, 2019)

    THE PERMANENT COUNCIL OF THE ORGANIZATION OF AMERICAN STATES,
    REAFFIRMING the right of the peoples of the Americas to democracy and the obligation of their governments to promote and defend it as reflected in Article 1 of the Inter-American Democratic Charter,
    RECALLING that, through resolution AG/RES. 2929 (XLVIII-O/18) of June 5, 2018, the General Assembly declared that the May 20, 2018 electoral process in Venezuela lacked legitimacy for not having met the participation of all Venezuelan political actors, its failure to comply with international standards, and for being carried out without the necessary guarantees for a free, fair, transparent, and democratic process,

    CONSIDERING that the 2019-2025 presidential period beginning in Venezuela on the 10th of January of 2019 is the result of an illegitimate electoral process,
    UNDERSCORING the constitutional authority of the democratically elected National Assembly.

    REITEREITING ITS DEEP CONCERN about the worsening political, economic, social and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela resulting from the breakdown of democratic order and serious human rights violations in that state, and the government of Venezuela’s negligence to meet the fundamental Inter-American standards of human rights and democracy;

    RECOGNIZING that, as a consequence, a significant number of Venezuelans are being forced to flee the country because their basic needs have not been met.

    REITEREITING its serious concern about the collapse of Venezuela’s health-care system, which has led to a reemergence of previously eradicated infectious diseases across Venezuela and into neighboring countries and the wider region.

    NOTING that the exodus of Venezuelans is having an impact on the capacity of countries in the region to meet their humanitarian needs and poses challenges to public health and security.

    TAKING NOTE, in this regard, of the Quito Declaration on the human mobility of Venezuelan citizens in the region, of September 4th 2018, and its Plan of Action adopted on November 23rd 2018.

    CONDEMNING in the strongest terms the arbitrary detentions, lack of due process and the violation of other human rights of political prisoners by the Government of Venezuela.

    UNDERSCORING that the Permanent Council and the Meeting of Consultation of Foreign Ministers remain ready to engage in diplomatic initiatives, including good offices, aimed at promoting dialogue in Venezuela, with a view to arriving at a political solution to the crisis in that country.

    RESOLVES:
    To not recognize the legitimacy of Nicolas Maduro’s new term as of the 10th of January of 2019.

    To reaffirm that only through a national dialogue with the participation of all Venezuelan political actors and stakeholders can national reconciliation be achieved and the necessary conditions agreed upon for holding a new electoral process that truly reflects the will of the Venezuelan citizens and peacefully resolves the current crisis in that country.

    To urge all Members States and invite Permanent Observers of the OAS to adopt, in accordance with international law and their national legislation, diplomatic, political, economic and financial measures that they consider appropriate, to contribute to the prompt restoration of the democratic order of Venezuela.

    To call for new Presidential elections with all necessary guarantees of a free, fair, transparent, and legitimate process to be held at an early date attended by international observers.

    To invite Member States and Permanent Observers to implement measures to address the humanitarian crisis in Venezuela and impacted countries, through the support to appropriate international and regional organizations.

    To urge the Venezuelan regime to allow the immediate entry of humanitarian aid to the people in Venezuela, including epidemiological surveillance, to prevent the aggravation of the humanitarian and public health crisis, particularly against the reappearance and propagation of diseases.

    To demand the immediate and unconditional release of all political prisoners.
    To express the Organization’s ongoing solidarity with the Venezuelan people and its commitment to remain seized of the situation in Venezuela and to support diplomatic measures that facilitate the restoration of democratic institutions and the full respect for human rights.

    To instruct the Secretary General to transmit the text of this resolution to the Secretary General of the United Nations.

    By U.S. Mission OAS | 10 January, 2019

    Link: https://usoas.usmission.gov/permanen...maduro-regime/
    Are You... Liberal? Conservative? or Confused? by Richard J. Maybury

    http://www.earlywarningreport.com/books-6confused.html

  2. #2
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    The OAS has been working on/worrying about this situation for some time. Along with the FUSA, which is also an OAS member. Spent some time on the phone with some of my folks at Bragg this AM, no ripples in their waters just yet.
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  3. #3
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    But if they're the usual level of smart, they're re-checking their loadouts and go-bags....
    RULE 1:
    THEY want you DEAD.

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  4. #4
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    How about pushing the idea of a constitutional republic as democracies seem to lead to marxist forms of government no better than they have right now.
    We are fighting democrats that want to turn our country into a democracy which by the way is illegal for them to do.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Publius View Post
    How about pushing the idea of a constitutional republic as democracies seem to lead to marxist forms of government no better than they have right now.
    We are fighting democrats that want to turn our country into a democracy which by the way is illegal for them to do.
    Since when has illegality stood in the way of the democrats?
    I don't want to. I'm not going to. You can't make me. I'm retired!

    Political Correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Publius View Post
    How about pushing the idea of a constitutional republic as democracies seem to lead to marxist forms of government no better than they have right now.
    We are fighting democrats that want to turn our country into a democracy which by the way is illegal for them to do.
    From 1956 to the election of Chavez in the 1990s, Venezuela operated under a constitution that was based on the US Constitution and was, in fact, a Constitutional Republic although just as the US system has morphed over the years, so too had the one in Venezuela.

    But the election campaigns were designed to not conflict with elections in the US so the same "campaign managers" and lobby groups could run both US and Venezuelan elections.

    The major difference between the old Venezuelan Constitution and that of the US was the President served for one five year term; he or she could not run again for 10 years; there was actually one President who did two terms that way 10 years apart but that was rare.

    I believe it was soon are the CIA attempted Coup against Chavez that he got voters to vote for a new constitution; though already by that point there is some question as to that being a legitimate vote and/or if voters really understood what they were voting for (basically a dictatorship).

    So all that would need to happen to re-establish the Constitutional Republic would be to strike down the "new" constitution and bring back the old one; perhaps with a few tweaks or even a constitutional convention.

    Things were in no way perfect under that Constitutional Republic system but then it isn't in the US either; in the US you tend to get corporations and banks owning politicians and in Venezuela, you tended to get Corporations and Cronyism running the show but in both places on paper, the system is designed pretty well.

    However, any time you get humans in charge, any system is going to morph into something less ideal than originally intended but if it works well not so far off that the public can't live with it.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  7. #7
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    It's a banana republic.

    Maduro is in charge until he meets the golden BB.


    I'm highly surprised that he hasn't.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Publius View Post
    How about pushing the idea of a constitutional republic as democracies seem to lead to marxist forms of government no better than they have right now.
    We are fighting democrats that want to turn our country into a democracy which by the way is illegal for them to do.
    How well is that working for Mexico?

    The result will be the same. Only more people will be eligible for the bribes.

  9. #9
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    If you have not subscribed to the Florida Maquis on YT yet, I would recommend him. Here’s his 12:40 long installment for today on this regime change issue (which he says is being controlled completely from Miami):

    1*17*19~ CRISIS ACTORS EXPOSED! DEEP STATE DESPERATELY TRYING FOR REGIME CHANGE IN VENEZUELA!

    Here’s the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuN0Sn6D8YA
    Are You... Liberal? Conservative? or Confused? by Richard J. Maybury

    http://www.earlywarningreport.com/books-6confused.html

  10. #10
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    4 Desperate Venezuelans swarm sewage drains in search of water

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-v...source=twitter

    Desperate Venezuelans swarm sewage drains in search of water
    Brian Ellsworth, Vivian Sequera


    CARACAS (Reuters) - As Venezuela’s five-day power blackout left homes without water, Lilibeth Tejedor found herself looking for it on Monday in the last place she would have imagined - a drain pipe feeding into a river carrying sewage through the capital, Caracas.

    Tejedor, 28, joined dozens of people who had flocked to the Guaire river, which snakes along the bottom of a sharp ravine alongside Caracas’ main highway, to fill up a four-gallon (15 liter) plastic container.

    Unlike the fetid liquid flowing through the Guaire river, the water emerging from the pipe was at least clear. Those who gathered to collect it said the water had been released by local authorities from reservoirs.

    They added, however, that it was being carried through unsanitary pipes and should only be used to flush toilets or scrub floors.

    “I’ve never even seen this before. It’s horrible, horrible,” said Tejedor, preparing to carry the container on a small hand cart back to her home in the neighborhood of San Agustin.

    Tejedor, who works at a computer technology store, has a two-year-old daughter and takes care of two nieces.

    “The ones that are most affected are the children, because how do you tell a child that there’s no water?” she said.

    The lack of water has become one of the most excruciating side effects of the nationwide blackout that the government of President Nicolas Maduro has blamed on U.S.-backed sabotage but his critics call the product of corruption and incompetence.

    The blackout has worsened the situation of a country already facing a hyper-inflationary economic collapse that has spurred a mass migration and turned once-basic items like corn flour and toilet paper into unaffordable luxuries for most people.

    After five days without electricity to pump water, Venezuelans from working-class neighborhoods to upscale apartment towers are complaining of increasingly infrequent showers, unwashed dishes, and stinking toilets.

    Caracas needs 20,000 liters of water per second from nearby watersheds to maintain service, said Jose de Viana, an engineer who ran Caracas’ municipal water authority in the 1990s.

    Last week that had fallen to around 13,000 and since Thursday’s blackout it has halted completely, he said.

    ‘KILLING US’
    Many worry about the spread of disease. The lack of water compounds the inability to buy soap due to soaring prices or chronic shortages.

    Opposition leader Juan Guaido, who in January invoked the constitution to assume the interim presidency after declaring Maduro’s re-election a fraud, led the country’s legislature on Monday in declaring a “state of alarm” over power problems.

    Maduro is facing an unprecedented political crisis and the United States, which backs Guaido, has levied crippling oil industry sanctions meant to starve the government of its sources of foreign revenue.

    Up the road from where Tejedor stood, hundreds of angry residents blocked the highway on Monday to demand that local authorities deliver a 20,000-liter cistern to supply water to the neighborhood of La Charneca.

    “They’re killing us with hunger and thirst,” said Gladys Martinez, 52, a homemaker, who joined the demonstration that blocked two lanes of the highway, snarling traffic and drawing dozens of police and National Guard troops to the scene.

    Frustration rises as Venezuela's blackout continues
    Along the riverbed, teenagers and children accompanied their parents to help carry water. As two children began stomping in the sewage, a woman warned them: “That water’s dirty! Don’t start playing around because remember there’s no medicine.”

    Water trucks, a common sight in Caracas, are increasingly struggling to fill up because state-run reservoirs are running low.

    On the northern edge of Caracas, where the city meets the El Avila national park, hundreds of people lined up to collect water from mountain streams.

    Lack of water, along with the power outage, has become a major concern for hospitals - which have for years suffered from lack of equipment and supplies.

    Jose Velez, 58, a security guard who also arrived at the Guaire to collect water, said the blackout had made life unbearable and wished the country’s politicians would agree on how to resolve the situation.

    “I’m not interested in these politicians, they never agree on anything,” said Velez. “I want my life to go back to normal.”

    Reporting by Brian Ellsworth and Vivian Sequera; Editing by Daniel Flynn and Rosalba O'Brien
    If at first you don't secede, try, try again!

  11. #11
    Holy cow. An object lesson in, Don't Let This Happen to You!
    I expect next week's article will be about how the entire Capitol city came down with a bad case of diarrhea. No joke on those diseases either, at that point people are dangerously dehydrated. According to that other thread, they don't even have electrical power - I doubt they are able to boil all that they need for drinking/handwashing. Those that still can, NEED to leave! NOW. A person can go hungry for a very long time, and still function. Not getting sick from the water is first priority.
    Last edited by Faroe; 03-12-2019 at 02:24 PM.

  12. #12
    If it were only diarrhea. Unfortunately, they’ve got to face a whole host of water-borne diseases running the gamut from mildly annoying to fatal, slowly debilitating to almost-instant death. If they’re suffering from diarrhea, whatever the cause, they’re going to need water to replace the fluids lost. If they couldn’t get clean water to begin with, how are they going to get it when sick, and in larger quantities? How are they going to deal with the clean-up? Where are they going to get the medications that might help? Do they even know what natural remedies they could use, if they could get them?

    Like Faroe said, how are some of them even going to boil water without electricity? Are they going to be tempted to look at a bottle of water they’ve collected and think, “yeah, that looks safe”?
    Can the average Venezuelan differentiate between cholera and other diarrheal diseases so that if they have medications, they know which are best for treating cholera (doxycycline, azithromycin, if the cholera bacteria aren’t resistant) and which would do nothing or make it worse (Imodium, Pepto-Bismol, piperines)?

    Some say that the mortality rate for untreated cholera is 50-60%. How well is a cholera outbreak going to be managed in Venezuela?

    On the bright side, I guess there would be more food to go around.

  13. #13
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    This is why we prep...

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    This is why we prep...
    As others have occasionally noted on the other thread, it will be coming here.
    I really can't see how the US can stand by and NOT intervene. I'm not supporting that move, but it just seems inevitable. Unfortunately, we are already stretched too far; the effort will drown us. Maybe just pessimistic today (nursing a persistent migraine).

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by school marm View Post
    If it were only diarrhea. Unfortunately, they’ve got to face a whole host of water-borne diseases running the gamut from mildly annoying to fatal, slowly debilitating to almost-instant death. If they’re suffering from diarrhea, whatever the cause, they’re going to need water to replace the fluids lost. If they couldn’t get clean water to begin with, how are they going to get it when sick, and in larger quantities? How are they going to deal with the clean-up? Where are they going to get the medications that might help? Do they even know what natural remedies they could use, if they could get them?

    Like Faroe said, how are some of them even going to boil water without electricity? Are they going to be tempted to look at a bottle of water they’ve collected and think, “yeah, that looks safe”?
    Can the average Venezuelan differentiate between cholera and other diarrheal diseases so that if they have medications, they know which are best for treating cholera (doxycycline, azithromycin, if the cholera bacteria aren’t resistant) and which would do nothing or make it worse (Imodium, Pepto-Bismol, piperines)?

    Some say that the mortality rate for untreated cholera is 50-60%. How well is a cholera outbreak going to be managed in Venezuela?

    On the bright side, I guess there would be more food to go around.
    I figure it's "diarrhea," because most aren't going to get a formal diagnosis, and what would be the point anyway?
    No medicines are available!

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    I figure it's "diarrhea," because most aren't going to get a formal diagnosis, and what would be the point anyway?
    No medicines are available!
    Well, I guess my idea was to get people thinking about what to do to prepare for when it comes here.

    How do you tell the difference between cholera and other diarrheal diseases, especially if you don't have a laboratory to check specimens?

    What medications do you use for which disease?

    Of course, ideally we all have clean water or know how to purify it, but what if there was a breach somehow?

  17. #17
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    It’ll be cholera.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    It’ll be cholera.
    I always get cholera and typhus mixed up.
    Wiki says typhus is from a bacteria spread by fleas, lice, and chiggers.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    I always get cholera and typhus mixed up.
    Wiki says typhus is from a bacteria spread by fleas, lice, and chiggers.
    Anyone here from the CurrentEvent site/days? I know we had reams of info from the green pages and other sources re: illness, preferred tx, dosages, contra-indicators, infectious disease protocols- and scads of wonderful info from goat lady and Summerthyme on herbal txs & their proper preparations and usages. Just seemed a good idea to review- or in my case- find em.
    Thoughts are things. Thus I'm careful of the thoughts I think, & the company I keep.

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    It’ll be cholera.
    Anyone here know the treatment?
    We all should.
    "...Cry 'Havoc' and let slip the cats of war..."
    It’s a real pisser when your belief system gets T-boned by reality.
    I’m not afraid of dying...I just don’t want to be there!
    ...sell your cloak, and buy a sword...Second Amendment 1.0

  21. #21
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    First off, I feel bad for this situation, but it is amazing how people can't get water in a troplical climate.
    Hwæt! Wé Gárdena in géardagum þéodcyninga þrym gefrúnon· hú ðá æþelingas ellen fremedon. - Listen! We of the Spear-Danes in the days of yore, of those clan-kings heard of their glory. How the worthy princes performed courageous deeds!

  22. #22
    ᴛʜᴇ ɪɴᴛᴇʟ ᴄʀᴀʙ Retweeted

    CNW


    @ConflictsW
    2h2 hours ago
    More
    Water in San Diego, Carabobo this morning has turned black. Possibly an oil leak in the water supply? #Venezuela

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonas Parker View Post
    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-v...source=twitter

    Desperate Venezuelans swarm sewage drains in search of water
    Brian Ellsworth, Vivian Sequera


    CARACAS (Reuters) - As Venezuela’s five-day power blackout left homes without water, Lilibeth Tejedor found herself looking for it on Monday in the last place she would have imagined - a drain pipe feeding into a river carrying sewage through the capital, Caracas.

    Tejedor, 28, joined dozens of people who had flocked to the Guaire river, which snakes along the bottom of a sharp ravine alongside Caracas’ main highway, to fill up a four-gallon (15 liter) plastic container.

    Unlike the fetid liquid flowing through the Guaire river, the water emerging from the pipe was at least clear. Those who gathered to collect it said the water had been released by local authorities from reservoirs.

    They added, however, that it was being carried through unsanitary pipes and should only be used to flush toilets or scrub floors.

    “I’ve never even seen this before. It’s horrible, horrible,” said Tejedor, preparing to carry the container on a small hand cart back to her home in the neighborhood of San Agustin.

    Tejedor, who works at a computer technology store, has a two-year-old daughter and takes care of two nieces.

    “The ones that are most affected are the children, because how do you tell a child that there’s no water?” she said.

    The lack of water has become one of the most excruciating side effects of the nationwide blackout that the government of President Nicolas Maduro has blamed on U.S.-backed sabotage but his critics call the product of corruption and incompetence.

    The blackout has worsened the situation of a country already facing a hyper-inflationary economic collapse that has spurred a mass migration and turned once-basic items like corn flour and toilet paper into unaffordable luxuries for most people.

    After five days without electricity to pump water, Venezuelans from working-class neighborhoods to upscale apartment towers are complaining of increasingly infrequent showers, unwashed dishes, and stinking toilets.

    Caracas needs 20,000 liters of water per second from nearby watersheds to maintain service, said Jose de Viana, an engineer who ran Caracas’ municipal water authority in the 1990s.

    Last week that had fallen to around 13,000 and since Thursday’s blackout it has halted completely, he said.

    ‘KILLING US’
    Many worry about the spread of disease. The lack of water compounds the inability to buy soap due to soaring prices or chronic shortages.

    Opposition leader Juan Guaido, who in January invoked the constitution to assume the interim presidency after declaring Maduro’s re-election a fraud, led the country’s legislature on Monday in declaring a “state of alarm” over power problems.

    Maduro is facing an unprecedented political crisis and the United States, which backs Guaido, has levied crippling oil industry sanctions meant to starve the government of its sources of foreign revenue.

    Up the road from where Tejedor stood, hundreds of angry residents blocked the highway on Monday to demand that local authorities deliver a 20,000-liter cistern to supply water to the neighborhood of La Charneca.

    “They’re killing us with hunger and thirst,” said Gladys Martinez, 52, a homemaker, who joined the demonstration that blocked two lanes of the highway, snarling traffic and drawing dozens of police and National Guard troops to the scene.

    Frustration rises as Venezuela's blackout continues
    Along the riverbed, teenagers and children accompanied their parents to help carry water. As two children began stomping in the sewage, a woman warned them: “That water’s dirty! Don’t start playing around because remember there’s no medicine.”

    Water trucks, a common sight in Caracas, are increasingly struggling to fill up because state-run reservoirs are running low.

    On the northern edge of Caracas, where the city meets the El Avila national park, hundreds of people lined up to collect water from mountain streams.

    Lack of water, along with the power outage, has become a major concern for hospitals - which have for years suffered from lack of equipment and supplies.

    Jose Velez, 58, a security guard who also arrived at the Guaire to collect water, said the blackout had made life unbearable and wished the country’s politicians would agree on how to resolve the situation.

    “I’m not interested in these politicians, they never agree on anything,” said Velez. “I want my life to go back to normal.”

    Reporting by Brian Ellsworth and Vivian Sequera; Editing by Daniel Flynn and Rosalba O'Brien

    Wow, this whole thing is surreal.

    Conditions there had been deteriorating for quite a while, but this is bad...trying to wrap my mind around this. ETA: it really is a hard pill to swallow because i firmly believe this is all being done on purpose. We are all pawns on the globalists' chessboard.

    Because the U.S. is being blamed for setting off an EMP and the diplomats have to leave, this probably means a big escalation. I see this as one of the many harbingers that time is short.

    Come quickly Lord Jesus.
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    Matthew 10:17 But beware of men: for they will deliver you up to the councils, and they will scourge you in their synagogues; 18 And ye shall be brought before governors and kings for my sake, for a testimony against them and the Gentiles. 19 But when they deliver you up, take no thought how or what ye shall speak: for it shall be given you in that same hour what ye shall speak.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    In the US, this would be a regional outage,

    Venezuela is about the size of TX & OK combined, with the same population.

    The contiguous states are about 3,000,000 sq/mi, Venezuela is 352,000.

    It is roughly 10% the size of the US with 10% of the population. (32 million)
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