Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 24, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


HEALTH Cancer Rates Decline Steeply
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1

    Cancer Rates Decline Steeply

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/cancer-...rs-11546959600

    Deaths from cancer dropped 27% over a quarter century, meaning an estimated 2.6 million fewer people died of the disease during that period, according to a new report from researchers at the American Cancer Society.

    For most of the 20th century, overall cancer deaths rose, driven mainly by men dying from lung cancer, researchers noted. But since the peak in 1991, the death rate has steadily dropped 1.5% a year through 2016, primarily because of long-running efforts to reduce smoking, as well as advances in detection and treatment of cancer at earlier stages, when prognosis for recovery is generally better.

    “There is still a long way to go. A reduction in cancer mortality does not mean it is zero or even close to zero. Cancer is still one of the leading causes of death among Americans,” said Noel Weiss, professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington, who wasn’t involved with the study.

    Amid the good news about the decline in the overall death rate, there are also some troubling signs that researchers said need to be addressed. Endometrial cancer has increased, and about 60% of cases are attributed to obesity, according to Rebecca Siegel, strategic director of surveillance information services at the American Cancer Society and the lead author of the new report.

    “We are probably only seeing the tip of the iceberg regarding the influence of the obesity epidemic on cancer rates,” Ms. Siegel said. Just as tobacco use drove cancer death rates earlier, Ms. Siegel said, obesity could influence future projections.

    Despite the steady decline in overall death rates, the study’s authors also projected in 2019 there would be 1.76 million new cancer cases and close to 607,000 cancer deaths in the U.S. The investigators based their conclusions on data compiled from various federal agencies and cancer registries but noted a lag time in the number of cases and deaths because it takes time to collect and analyze data. The study was published Tuesday in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

    Men die in the greatest numbers from lung, prostate and colorectal cancer, while women die primarily from lung, breast and colorectal cancer, according to the report, which also pointed out differences in cancer incidence and mortality between the sexes. Rates for some common cancers are increasing or stable in women, with the report finding an increase of 0.4% a year for breast cancer.

    Men had a 34% total decline in cancer mortality over the 25 years, compared with 24% for women, largely due to trends in smoking rates. Lung-cancer incidence is declining twice as fast among men as women, which in part reflects the fact that women historically took up smoking in large numbers in later decades and were slower to quit.

    The gap in cancer mortality between blacks and whites has narrowed, mainly due to a drop in smoking among black teenagers from the late 1970s to the early 1990s, the report said.

    New drugs, such as costly immunotherapies, are beginning to transform the treatment of many cancers, including lung cancer, and are fueling deals among pharmaceutical firms looking to shore up their strength in that space.
    Among adults under the age of 55, the incidence of colorectal cancer has continued to increase almost 2% a year since the mid-1990s. Obesity might be a factor, but many researchers also think “something else is also going on,” Ms. Siegel said. “Everyone is scrambling to try to figure it out.”

    Electra D. Paskett, professor of cancer research and associate director of population science at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, said a number of hypotheses try to explain the connection between obesity and cancer and these can vary depending on the cancer. She cited chronic inflammation and changes in estrogen as two possibilities.

    Dr. Weiss, the cancer epidemiologist, said that the trends in colorectal cancer are “worrisome, especially if they continue as people get older.” He also said obesity can cause structural changes in the liver, which might predispose individuals to liver cancer. Experts said more research needs to be done.

    Incidence rates in melanoma, liver, thyroid, uterine and pancreatic cancers also continue to rise. In both men and women, liver-cancer incidence is increasing more rapidly than any other cancer.

    According to the researchers, 71% of liver-cancer cases can potentially be prevented through lifestyle changes, such as not smoking, increasing physical activity, losing weight and preventing hepatitis B and C viruses. About 24% of liver-cancer cases result from chronic hepatitis C infection, the report found, with a threefold rise in reported infections from 2010 to 2016 because of the opioid epidemic, according to investigators.

    The cancer report’s findings, Dr. Weiss said, suggest that “we can make a dent based on our own activities.”
    "The misfortune of many is the consolation of fools" Ancient proverb

  2. #2
    Hopefully this is true - but just about everybody I know who got cancer ultimately died.

    And while this might be true - I just don't believe anything our government says.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Almost Cuba
    Posts
    1,371
    Quote Originally Posted by Coulter View Post
    Hopefully this is true - but just about everybody I know who got cancer ultimately died.
    And sooner or later, you will be able to say just everybody I know who did not get cancer ultimately died -- just a matter of time.

    In 1975, my sister was diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma. She died within 18 month of diagnosis after a grueling treatment regimen.

    In 2015, I was diagnosed with a large-cell lymphoma. Treated for six months with chemo, unpleasant experience, and radiation which gave me cataracts and destroyed my teeth, but I am still here.

    The big difference, I believe, was simply early diagnosis and treatment.
    "Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit upon his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats."

  4. #4
    Maybe everyone is dying young of diabetes and heart disease, and drug overdoses?
    At what age are most cancer deaths?

    I'm not a statistics expert, by my observations, health is getting worse, not better.

    We outsourced our pollution to China. Maybe that is the reason?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    24,563
    Even so, US life expectancy has been decreasing over the last 3 or 4 years.
    More suicides, more drug addiction, less families.
    Something is drastically wrong with our culture even though medical and other scientific advances continue to be made.
    "When you're dead, you don't even know you're dead.
    It's difficult only for others.
    It's the same when you're stupid."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Eastern MO
    Posts
    4,949
    I don’t believe it. My friend suffered with cancer for 7 years. I took her to Siteman in St. Louis for her treatment. That place doubled in size in the time I took her there. Since she passed, almost three years ago, they added another high rise building. The nurses always told me that the patient load was increasing all the time. They would say the children’s cancers were skyrocketing too. I’d like to see how they came to those numbers.
    marymonde
    +++++++++++++++++++++

    ``Where the Bishop is, there let the multitude of believers be;
    even as where Jesus is, there is the Catholic Church'' Ignatius of Antioch, 1st c. A.D

  7. #7
    Well, using my family, of the gen before us, at least five died of cancer.

    My gen, none even though many of us are older than they were. I have fought off cancer on three fronts and a brother on one.

    Treatment saved us.
    "The misfortune of many is the consolation of fools" Ancient proverb

  8. #8
    It is certain a lot more kids are surviving cancer. It was pretty much a death sentence when I was young and I lost a 4 year old cousin to leukemia 60 years ago. Most types of leukemia in children are very treatable today. Breast cancer in women used to be very deadly but I know several women who have survived it in the last few years, including our DIL.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Southern Born
    Posts
    3,482
    I don't believe it either.
    How many people do you know just in the last 20 years who got cancer? And died of cancer?
    No, I think someone is cooking the books. Now if we can just figure out why?.........
    I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do. I am free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.
    — Robert Heinlein

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by marymonde View Post
    I don’t believe it. My friend suffered with cancer for 7 years. I took her to Siteman in St. Louis for her treatment. That place doubled in size in the time I took her there. Since she passed, almost three years ago, they added another high rise building. The nurses always told me that the patient load was increasing all the time. They would say the children’s cancers were skyrocketing too. I’d like to see how they came to those numbers.
    I've noticed pretty much the same thing here in our area over the last 5-6 years.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by marymonde View Post
    I don’t believe it. My friend suffered with cancer for 7 years. I took her to Siteman in St. Louis for her treatment. That place doubled in size in the time I took her there. Since she passed, almost three years ago, they added another high rise building. The nurses always told me that the patient load was increasing all the time. They would say the children’s cancers were skyrocketing too. I’d like to see how they came to those numbers.
    That was my first question. Why fake it - if not true?

    And then I thought maybe if people thought they were really making progress - they might be more inclined to give more.

    That's my vote.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    678
    Remember the article is about Cancer deaths, not cancer cases and treatments.

    Chap

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    5,167
    I know personally two women who were first diagnosed with Stage IV breast cancer. The oldest was about six years ago, the youngest about five years ago. But are alive and well. Both had treatments that used the genetic signature of the cancers to determine the medicine to fight them.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Oak Ridge
    Posts
    2,050
    Being alive five years after diagnosis is considered surviving cancer. They have gotten better at early diagnosis that is all.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    I'm Not Sure....
    Posts
    2,507
    Quote Originally Posted by Sebastian View Post
    Being alive five years after diagnosis is considered surviving cancer. They have gotten better at early diagnosis that is all.
    Treatment when found is much better, too

    The new killers that will lead the pack will be Obesity and being overweight. Those two encompasses over 2/3rds of the population. The resulting illnesses and medical issues that spin off from them will be the leading cause in the future.
    ...Rubbin' is Racin'......

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Chapulin View Post
    Remember the article is about Cancer deaths, not cancer cases and treatments.

    Chap
    The title is misleading.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Eastern MO
    Posts
    4,949
    Quote Originally Posted by sunny225 View Post
    I don't believe it either.
    How many people do you know just in the last 20 years who got cancer? And died of cancer?
    No, I think someone is cooking the books. Now if we can just figure out why?.........
    When my friend passed away the cause of death listed was something like heart failure, I’ll have to find her death certificate to look at exactly what the term was. I recall being surprised it didn’t say cancer. Well yeah, your heart stops beating when cancer has invaded almost every part of your body.
    marymonde
    +++++++++++++++++++++

    ``Where the Bishop is, there let the multitude of believers be;
    even as where Jesus is, there is the Catholic Church'' Ignatius of Antioch, 1st c. A.D

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.