Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 24, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


PREP Some gear reviews
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 37 of 37
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    33,627

    Some gear reviews

    Smith’s Field Dressing Combo Kit, Skinning Knives & Gut Hooks



    Found one of these on clearance for 5 bux, figured WTH...worth a test drive.

    I broke the first gut hook immediately with too much sideways pressure while skinning a pig. The plastic was way to thin and brittle.

    The second one did OK. Haven't used the "knives" for anything...because Morakniv.



    After reading about the Mora Knives here at TB, I picked up one at the LGS for $12 a coupla years ago.

    Some of the best money I've ever spent on gear.

    It has cleaned pigs & deer as well as or better than any of my other carry blades.

    The Mora Companion


    Mora has a pretty huge product line, including work and survival knives. I would guess they are all good stuff.

    There are several sites claiming to be the "US" distributor, some are way overpriced.

    Shop carefully.


    Someone here recommended the China freight "Quantum" headlight.



    I was skeptical, but grabbed one, another case of 12 bux... WTH.

    I'm fairly impressed with it, all metal and fairly solid.

    The slide to focus works better than anticipated. It has good throw 75-100yds and opens up well for close work.

    It's been in service for 3 months and performing better than I expected.

    The three click switch is OK. High, low and strobe, I could do without the strobe function.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    2,682
    Concur on the Mora. I've got a Mora 2000 that has been my go to for field dressing and skinning for at least 12 years now. Easy to sharpen.
    Was known as dairyfarmer but sold the cows.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    17,023
    I just bought several mora`s for 7.95 on sale to give away. Everyone liked them. I love the light as well. As for Smith's all I have are the sharpeners for the mora`s they work good.

    And before you ask I got them at north 40.
    🇺🇸T🇺🇸R🇺🇸U🇺🇸M🇺🇸P🇺🇸
    🇺🇸🇺🇸2🇺🇸0🇺🇸2🇺🇸0🇺🇸🇺🇸

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    33,627
    Quote Originally Posted by medic38572 View Post
    I just bought several mora`s for 7.95 on sale to give away. Everyone liked them. I love the light as well. As for Smith's all I have are the sharpeners for the mora`s they work good.

    And before you ask I got them at north 40.

    The only reason I grabbed the Smith's set was brand recognition. Their diamond products are great. IMO, they went too cheep on the disposable set.

    After looking at the full Mora product line, I may have to get me some Christmas presents.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  5. #5
    nice!


    These are my hog knives by JERO






    pig sticker is F. DICK


    I sharpen them with this initially, then use a steel.



    I use a havalon for hunting, deer and to skin coyotes or other animals. super light and works fine



    bear or elk where I'd like something a bit more substantial I use outdoor edge




    I may go back to a solid reliable blade, swapping razor blades around with frozen fingers is kinda hairy, and If I gotta carry pliers why not just use a solid knife?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    33,627
    I've never been a fan of the belt sanders.

    The drag-thru, carbide sharpeners reset an edge well enough for me.

    A diamond stick and steel do the rest.


    What brand are those commercial knives?
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    The Kingdom Of Nye
    Posts
    15,849
    I discovered mora knives about 4 years ago, have 4 of them now, and love them. You can keep them razor sharp easily, thanks to the Scandi grind they are easy to sharpen, and they hold up to abuse. The worksharp I have been using is the one with the diamond stones that you use on your desktop, never looked at the belt sander type.
    Americans used to roar like lions for liberty; now we bleat like sheep for security.

  8. #8
    JERO

    I like them well enough. The belt sander is really nice I buy belts from red label abrasives instead of work sharp saves some money. I like a polished honed edge, I'm getting some leather belts for the work sharp and compound.

    I have strops already but I think the belt sander with the leather strop will be quicker but we'll see. They're stupid sharp, I had to buy cut gloves for my helpers I felt bad they were cutting digits left and right.

  9. #9
    on the belt sander I revitalized an old food slicer (revel food slicer) from way back when..

    removed all the guards and trays, turned on the food slicer and turned on the work sharp and put a nice edge on that old tired slicer blade.


    Did my truck axe too....you DO NOT want to miss the log and hit your leg. I got it skinning sharp, just in case I wanted to process a deer with my truck axe.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    6,772
    This is another good piece of gear: the Bahco Laplander folding saw. It works well and cuts wood like you wouldn't believe. It's also comfortable to hold and carry since every part of the handle is rounded. The price has gone up to $25, but it's a great 7.5" folding saw that locks the blade open or closed. 3"-4" limbs are not a problem with this saw. It's supposed to be good on bone as well, but I haven't tried that.
    https://www.amazon.com/Bahco-396-LAP.../dp/B0001IX7OW <------------------- legendary black/green version
    https://www.amazon.com/Bahco-2-Inch-.../dp/B000288XPY <--------- orange/silver version for $4 more

    EDIT: added the brighter color version. So far as I can tell, they use the same blade but without the black low-friction coating.
    Attached Images
    Last edited by 1911user; 11-20-2018 at 12:28 AM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Happy on the mountain
    Posts
    70,171
    Speaking of folding saws Ö
    ===========================

    http://www.woodpilereport.com/html/index-554.htm

    Yer Ol' Woodpile Report
    This is number 554
    20 Nov 2018

    /snip/
    A little chitchat. My woods-cruising pack is designed to sustain me for three days in the field with no other food sources available or stashed. It's not a bugout bag, it assumes a round trip. It also assumes bad weather, a hostile environment and full deployment of such woodcraft as I have, meaning there are more tools and equipment than supplies. The challenge is always to keep it at fifteen per cent of my body weight or less. So it is I added one thing and changed another.

    While I'm kinda good at short term weather prediction in a country boy sort of way, reliable forecasts are worth having. I added a tiny NOAA weather radio, ridiculously light and smaller than a deck of cards, powered by three AAA batteries. It's on, or off, or in alert mode. It would never be in alert mode. Duh. It's weather only, no clock, no display, no flashlight, no earphone socket, only a volume control. If the NOAA system goes down in a true catastrophe I'm not out much.
    Secondly, chopping wood is noisy. Even in full summer foliage it announces a human presence as surely as gunshots. Unfortunately, even a tarp shelter needs to be framed and "raftered" against snow load in winter. This means woodcutting. So I changed out my little hatchet for a folding saw. The cutting edge of a saw is not readily maintainable like a hatchet, but as I said above, this is a short duration outfit. In a pinch my big knife can stand in for the hatchet. Bottom line, the radio and saw together are better than a one-to-one tradeoff in weight for the hatchet.

    I also traded out some first aid supplies, upgrading mainly, but also to emphasize the minor and major stuff, less for the middling stuff. The theory is, minor stuff is all but inevitable and shouldn't go untreated and major stuff needs immediate treatment with the right kit. I'll depend on the overlap to manage the in between. Everything's a tradeoff.

    My pack includes a Swiss army surplus "volcano stove", formerly: hobo stove, meaning a can-like chimney with a cutout near the bottom for loading fuel and 3/8 inchómore likely one centimeteródiameter holes around the perimeter, top and bottom, for efficient air supply.

    Nested inside is a liter bottle. When assembled, a cup caps the top. It's all aluminum, the whole assembly being about eleven inches tall and four inches in diameter, weighing a measly thirteen ounces, remarkable for an all-in-one mess kit, canteen and stove.

    The stove is made from aluminum sheet stock, two stampings, seam welded. It wouldn't stand up for long if run like a jet engine. The design accounts for this by assuming the cup or bottle is in place.

    I bought mine many years ago, something less than ten bux as I recall. They may not still be available, last time I saw 'em the price was about forty bux each. At that price there are upscale equivalents available. Personally, I'm comfortable with this 'old school' setup. Simplicity plus performance is unbeatable.

    As soon as I tried the first one I ordered more for our bugout preps and a couple in reserve for such need as may arise. A user comment led me to a particular MOLLE pack that happened to fit exactly. I believe it's this one . And "fit exactly" means it was a press fit the first time. Afterwards, just snug.

    Both the stove and the cup have fold-out "butterfly" wire handles. When deployed, the stove handle keeper acts as an internal ledge to support the bottle above the fire. It also pivots and snaps over the top to hold the three components together. All is made clear in this video . The page has similar videos listed, at right, which leads to other videos demonstrating modifications various users have made, example: . For my part, if it works I don't fix it.

    The most experience woods cruiser I know of dispenses with a stove altogether. He builds a campfire with a dug side channel, seen from above it resembles an old fashioned keyhole. To boil water or cook he drags live coals into the side channel, sized to act as a support for his cookware. Simple and controllable.

    But the stove is quicker to set up than a campfire, uses less fuel and reduces the light signature. Once the stove is running, careful fuel management will greatly reduce smoke as well. Takedown is quicker than a campfire and there's less evidence to clean up. As with any small camp stove it's impractical as a heat source in cold weather. When you need a campfire, you need a campfire.

    The pack is nominally designed for one day out, one day on site, and one day back. In a Mad Max world this could mean conferring with allies, reconnaissance, a trip to a good fishing place or for other resupply, stuff like that. In merely sketchy times it could mean preparing an alternate bugout site or a routine tour of the extended perimeter. Keeping the weight low allows fast and agile woods cruising when required and additional carrying capacity when it's not.
    /snip/
    The wonder of our time isnít how angry we are at politics and politicians; itís how little weíve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    WI - On the scene, like a sex machine.
    Posts
    39,152
    Quote Originally Posted by eXe View Post
    I discovered mora knives about 4 years ago, have 4 of them now, and love them. You can keep them razor sharp easily, thanks to the Scandi grind they are easy to sharpen, and they hold up to abuse. The worksharp I have been using is the one with the diamond stones that you use on your desktop, never looked at the belt sander type.
    The Mora Companion is one of the best bargains out there. Made in Finland, not China.

    I use a standard carbon steel thin blade Companion as a camp cooking knife. My thick bladed Mora is too wide for precise slicing.

    To prevent staining the carbon blade, I learned of an old school "browning" technique to dull and protect the plain steel blade.

    Simply boil a pint or two of apple cider vinegar.

    Cutoff a water bottle so you can stand the knife straight up in the water bottle.

    Pour the boiling hot apple cider vinegar into the bottle and let the knife blade soak for fifteen minutes. You will see bubbles coming off of the blade. Don't panic.

    Rinse the knife in running water and rub with a little Brasso or Soft Scrub to even out the finish.

    Repeat this two or three more times until the blade is darkened to your liking. The vinegar needs to be boiling hot and anything over a 15 minute soak yields diminishing results. The same vinegar can be boiled over and over for one blade.

    Rinse the knife thoroughly and apply vegetable oil.

    Cheap and easy!
    Attached Images
    "The most intriguing point for the historian is that where history and legend meet."

    "None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who think they are free."

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    North Central Louisiana
    Posts
    9,058
    None of the brands in the OP, but I have a cheapie head lamp that I absolutely love, I have several of them and they are great when the lights go out.

    Judy

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,590
    Mora is my everyday woods, camping, hunting, fishing knife.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    in the middle of GA
    Posts
    2,638
    I use a utility knife on wild pigs with the "german hook" blades to help skin
    my utility knife holds 2 blades one is standard and one is the hook
    For the gutting I use whatever I happen to be carrying at the time--usually a small sheath knife or a decent size folder

    my wife told me that I have too many knives and too many guns--I told her that was not possible

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Southwest (enjoy it!)
    Posts
    4,781
    If you hunt where it is cold then the long cheap Field Dressing gloves are excellent to use. You can leave your jacket on and even wear a pair of light gloves under the plastic Field Dressing gloves and you and your clothes stay clean and blood free. What a great invention! When you are done field dressing the deer, elk, moose then strip off the long plastic gloves so they are inside out and stuff them in a pocket to throw away later. You don't have to fight the cold trying to wash your hands and lament about all the blood on the sleeves of your favorite jacket.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    1,365
    We’ve used Moras for years. Best value period.

    My son has a Mora called a Robust, I think it’s called. A little thicker than the normal Mora, it’s a beast!

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    WI - On the scene, like a sex machine.
    Posts
    39,152
    My favorite headlamp, the Thrunite TH20. Retails for around $29.95.

    My first headlamp was a low end $20.00 Black Diamond. It was OK but I did not care at all for the plastic housing. Changing batteries was a complete pain and I was always waiting for the some little plastic doofinckey to come flying off when I tried reassembling the thing. Biggest problem with the BD was the mushy operating button. It was not positive in operation at all. Thus you had to push down on the button multiple times to get a reaction. Since you were pushing straight down it came down off of your forehead forcing you to readjust the headband. Ultimately you had to use two hands to operate the thing, which is kinda dumb.

    The Thrunite TH20 is all aluminum construction. The operating switch is to the side and is very positive in operation. The single AA sized battery uses a threaded end cap which makes battery changes a breeze. It can use alkaline or rechargeable batteries. The headlamp is very small and very lightweight making it easy to wear for hours on end.

    For the money, I think this is a very good value.

    Product Description

    A high output headlamp with max output of 520 lumens in turbo mode powered by one Li-ion 14500 750mAh battery.
    The logarithmic scale brightness adjustment system allows any brightness from 1.6 lumens to 250 lumens. Furthermore, the TH20 features a built-in SOS signaling mode which is important when roaming out in the wild or confronting dangerous situations.
    Unlike other light-weight headlamps which are made with plastic, the TH20 is made with aircraft grade aluminum which gives it exceptional durability and excellent heat dissipation allowing it to maintain high output for extended periods of time.
    The advanced design gives the TH20 a light weight of 76g (battery excluded).
    The TH20 can also use one common AA battery, which makes it a great choice for daily reading, camping and a tool light when you want your hands free.
    Specifications
    LED: CREE XP-L V6 LED with a lifespan of 20+ years of run time.
    Mode & Runtime (Tested by one Eneloop AA 2450mAh NIMH rechargeable battery):
    -Firefly (0.3 lumens, 14 days)
    -Infinity Low (1.6 lumens, 21 hours)
    -Infinity High (230 lumens, 95 minutes )
    -Turbo (250 lumens, 93 minutes)
    Batteries Applicable: 1x AA battery, 1x 14500 battery.
    Working voltage: 0.9-4.2 V.
    Reflector: Orange Peel.
    Peak Beam Intensity: 1120 cd
    Beam Distance: 67 m (max.)
    Dimensions: 70 mm * 24.5mm
    Weight: 76g (without battery).
    Waterproof: IPX-8 (2 m)
    Impact Resistance: 1 m.
    Material: Aircraft grade aluminum body with premium type III hard anodized anti-abrasive finish.
    Accessories included: O ring, spare rubber slot.
    Operation
    Battery Installation
    Screw off the tail cap (the right cap when the switch is facing up), insert the battery with the positive terminal pointing into the battery tube and then screw on the tail cap.
    Single press the switch to turn the light on/off.
    Change modes
    When the light is off, long press the switch to get firefly. Then long press the switch to ramp between high and low. Double click from any mode to get turbo, another double click to get SOS.
    Memory function
    The light will turn on in the last mode accessed, except for firefly,turbo and SOS.
    http://www.thrunite.com/thrunite-th2...-led-headlamp/
    Attached Images
    "The most intriguing point for the historian is that where history and legend meet."

    "None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who think they are free."

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    WI - On the scene, like a sex machine.
    Posts
    39,152
    Quote Originally Posted by Squib View Post
    Weíve used Moras for years. Best value period.

    My son has a Mora called a Robust, I think itís called. A little thicker than the normal Mora, itís a beast!
    I like how lightweight the Moras are. Plus the plastic sheath actually retains the knife decently and the sheath clips on to most anything.

    I don't know about the Robust model but regular Moras do not have a full tang. Not a deal breaker if you are not going to abuse the knife. One can do light batoning (splitting) with a regular Mora but don't go crazy.

    I don't care for axes since I don't use one on a regular basis enough to be proficient. I have a couple of tomahawks but they are too light and too thin for splitting wood.

    For heavy batoning I whip out the Cold Steel Recon Tanto. It has a 1/4" wide blade that is 7" long. This is the original model made from Carbon V steel.

    You can baton the stink out of this knife,
    Attached Images
    "The most intriguing point for the historian is that where history and legend meet."

    "None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who think they are free."

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    33,627
    Good info on the vinegar finish on their blades.

    My regular carry Mora was cutting limes to go in Tecate at deer camp.

    It apparently got drunk and fell off the rail into the grass...and didn't get rescued 'til the AM.

    Meantime, lime juice really nastied up that shiny finish.

    Will try the hot vinegar douche to clean it up.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  21. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Green County, Kentucky
    Posts
    11,025
    I've been picking up rechargeable lights -- I have three now, counting the one in my emergency radio. I have plenty of good knives (nothing terribly expensive, but very functional -- some of them have been functioning since before I was born, I think, since they belonged to my grandparents). But having lived for months to years at a time without electricity, I knew that oil lamps (except Aladdin) and candles are totally inadequate for any real work, or for reading. I've also got rechargeable batteries, and two chargers for them -- one of those is solar powered. Yes, it's slow, but I have enough batteries that I can swap some out and wait for the others to charge up again. Headlamps are great -- I have a couple. But for working in the kitchen, or other places around the house, the rechargeable camping lights are great. With LED's, they can go for a long time on a charge, and they give off a nice bright light that's easy to work by. Mine all stand on a table, and two of them can also be hung up.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    L.os A.ngeles B.asin
    Posts
    12,447
    Quote Originally Posted by Red Baron View Post
    The Mora Companion is one of the best bargains out there. Made in Finland, not China.

    I use a standard carbon steel thin blade Companion as a camp cooking knife. My thick bladed Mora is too wide for precise slicing.

    To prevent staining the carbon blade, I learned of an old school "browning" technique to dull and protect the plain steel blade.

    Simply boil a pint or two of apple cider vinegar.

    Cutoff a water bottle so you can stand the knife straight up in the water bottle.

    Pour the boiling hot apple cider vinegar into the bottle and let the knife blade soak for fifteen minutes. You will see bubbles coming off of the blade. Don't panic.

    Rinse the knife in running water and rub with a little Brasso or Soft Scrub to even out the finish.

    Repeat this two or three more times until the blade is darkened to your liking. The vinegar needs to be boiling hot and anything over a 15 minute soak yields diminishing results. The same vinegar can be boiled over and over for one blade.

    Rinse the knife thoroughly and apply vegetable oil.

    Cheap and easy!
    Great info Red Baron. If Chuck Norris had a Mora, I’d bet he’d do that too!

    I’ve heard many good reports on The Mora. Might ask Mrs. Clause, to allow me one to trade back for my Fred Perrin Street Beat Spyderco blade she Shanghai’ed into kitchen service a few years back.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    WI - On the scene, like a sex machine.
    Posts
    39,152
    Quote Originally Posted by L.A.B. View Post
    Great info Red Baron. If Chuck Norris has a Mora, I’d bet he’d do that too!

    I’ve heard many good reports on The Mora. Might ask Mrs. Clause, to allow me one to trade back for my Fred Perrin Street Beat Spyderco blade she Shanghai’ed into kitchen service a few years back.
    DD ran off with the blackened blade Mora I pictured earlier in the thread.

    I traded her my stainless heavy blade Mora to get that one back.

    Women . .. harumph!
    "The most intriguing point for the historian is that where history and legend meet."

    "None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who think they are free."

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


  24. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    L.os A.ngeles B.asin
    Posts
    12,447
    Hereís a fire-starter that is worth looking into.

    https://firesteel.com/gobspark-trium...one-low-price/

    It hurls a gob of sparks onto the tinder or your choice.

    I think tinder is a personal choice, and if Tommy Lee Jones is ever tracking me, I donít want him to know I use the wings of dragon-fly and mosquito drones that I collect with my titanium tweezers; nor that I Ďmightí be carrying one of those huge Tom Brown Tracker blades with no pine pitch resin stains on it yet.

  25. #25
    My son and I are building a small homestead on a 20 acre piece of forest land we purchased a couple years ago. We have cut a 650 foot road into the property and cleared about 2 acres where we will be building our two homes for our families. Plus we have cut a 1000 foot by about 60 foot field along one boarder of our property. We use the fool out of saws. This saw is by far our favorite but it is a bit pricey. Around $80 I believe. If you just need a saw for general purpose it may not be for you. We are tool nuts and want the best of everything. There are other good saws out there at a much cheaper cost but I feel this saw is worth the extra money if you plan to use it much. I will post another video of two more saws we did a review on in the next post. I gotta dig it up.

    https://youtu.be/mo1uC1Z5GcM

    Back when I was a kid.
    Pencil and paper were my keyboard, monitor and printer. My brain was the computer. The mouse was a pesky animal caught in a trap. Phones had dials not buttons. Text was something you "read" not "did".

  26. #26
    So here is another silky saw that is not cheap and being compared to a Corona folding saw that is around $20 I believe. Both good saws. All depends on how much work you will do with it. The Corona does a great job with more effort and not near as long lasting.

    https://youtu.be/zAZ_lVIpqs8

    Back when I was a kid.
    Pencil and paper were my keyboard, monitor and printer. My brain was the computer. The mouse was a pesky animal caught in a trap. Phones had dials not buttons. Text was something you "read" not "did".

  27. #27
    If you like chopping better than sawing this parang (machete) is by far the best tool of its type we have used hands down. We put tools to the test. If you want something that will last in a survival situation or shtf this bad boy is tough as nails and we have worked them extremely hard with no problems what so ever. Other cheaper similar tools have failed us several times in the past.

    In this video you can see where buying the more expensive tool may be the cheapest rout for you. Cheap tools have a tendency to break. Break a couple and you have spent as much as the more expensive tool that is likely more efficient and much longer lasting.

    https://youtu.be/LWpgN7NsZj0

    Last edited by tm1439m; 11-21-2018 at 06:44 AM.
    Back when I was a kid.
    Pencil and paper were my keyboard, monitor and printer. My brain was the computer. The mouse was a pesky animal caught in a trap. Phones had dials not buttons. Text was something you "read" not "did".

  28. #28
    For us beings as we work with our tools on a daily basis efficiency is important. Long lasting quality is also a must. I have always used the standard 16 oz carpenters hammer. Never really tried a larger framing hammer until this company sent two to my son and I to try out. I gotta say its was an eye opener for us both. You get used to doing something a certain way and change is just not something most people desire to do. You tend to get set in your ways.
    We gave these hammers a try and they are awesome! The advantage of extra weight along with the extra reach that saves us from moving our ladder as often is a huge advantage in our electrical contracting business.
    If you are thinking in terms of shtf then it makes sense to have tools that will get the job done faster and more efficiently saving valuable energy for other tasks and allowing you to get more done in a certain amount of time. The nail pulling or just plain prying capabilities of the longer handle hammer is amazing. Again saving energy for other tasks and getting what you need done quick is a huge advantage.
    Trying new things can be a good thing. Its so easy to get set in your ways.

    https://youtu.be/94RFph9UD1s

    Back when I was a kid.
    Pencil and paper were my keyboard, monitor and printer. My brain was the computer. The mouse was a pesky animal caught in a trap. Phones had dials not buttons. Text was something you "read" not "did".

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    33,627
    Two years back, I was in Lowe's and had cold ears. These were hanging by the flashlightsl, so I grabbed one in a WTH moment.

    It has proved to be very handy, if it dies I'll get another.

    Not super bright, but great for unlocking gates, grabbing firewood and other close work.

    The only downside is that you can't pull the electric guts out to wash it, a careful hand wash is all you get. The battery pack and lights tend to interfere with a skull-crusher night vision harness, You have to turn it sideways for clearance...easier just to use a plain one.





    https://www.panthervision.com/
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  30. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    33,627
    Another vital piece of gear is my 40oz cup. I usually get tea in the morning on my way out. These will keep ice most of the day, even in summer.

    Yeah, it's a wallyworld thing, but for 10 bux...a great deal. I saw them on clearance for $6 and bought all they had for spares and Christmas gifts.





    ETA: Keeps your margaritas just right and saves trips to the blender.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  31. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Millwright View Post
    Another vital piece of gear is my 40oz cup. I usually get tea in the morning on my way out. These will keep ice most of the day, even in summer.

    Yeah, it's a wallyworld thing, but for 10 bux...a great deal. I saw them on clearance for $6 and bought all they had for spares and Christmas gifts.





    ETA: Keeps your margaritas just right and saves trips to the blender.
    Did you see my wife while you were there?

    She has several of these and left one on the table beside where I sit while I type this.

    Fit really well in a vehicle cup holder but kinda top heavy. (No remarks about my wife being top heavy.)

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Tampa Bay Area
    Posts
    5,153
    Mora knives are made in Mora, Sweden since 1891:

    https://morakniv.se/en/about-us/our-history/

    Marttiini knives are made in Finland, since 1928:

    https://www.marttiini.fi/epages/Mart...ttiinin_tarina

    Both good brands, I have a slight preference for Mora knives.
    Buckle up, boys and girls. This could get a bit rough.

    Gardening: the next great hobby!
    Got Seeds?
    - Tristan

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    First Coast
    Posts
    1,228
    Great gear reviews folks! Liked the Mora knife so much I ordered the heady duty carbon steel version which just arrived today. Really nice. Great handle too.
    I have a bottle of Perma Blue. Would that be as good, better or worse than vinegar "browning"?

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    33,627
    Game Winner, 20lb Meat Mixer

    I picked up one of these for mixing the raw diet for the dogs. This is the Academy $100 version. Have seen it in the LEM brand for half again as much.

    Every 6 days, I mix 10lb of ground meat, eggs & other stuff. Hand stirring this in a big bowl was getting old.

    So far, I'm very happy with this mixer. It incorporates all the ingredients really well and in just a coupla minutes. Clean up is easy enough.

    It will come in handy for making deer sausage, no doubt.





    https://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/gam...-lb-meat-mixer
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  35. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Southwest (enjoy it!)
    Posts
    4,781
    I wonder if that would be an easy way to knead a big batch of dough?

    Here is the same one for $75

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Chard-Meat-...EAAOSw~X1dwFEx

  36. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    33,627
    Quote Originally Posted by hiwall View Post
    I wonder if that would be an easy way to knead a big batch of dough?
    I don't think so.

    The action isn't right.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  37. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Millwright View Post
    Game Winner, 20lb Meat Mixer

    I picked up one of these for mixing the raw diet for the dogs. This is the Academy $100 version. Have seen it in the LEM brand for half again as much.

    Every 6 days, I mix 10lb of ground meat, eggs & other stuff. Hand stirring this in a big bowl was getting old.

    So far, I'm very happy with this mixer. It incorporates all the ingredients really well and in just a coupla minutes. Clean up is easy enough.

    It will come in handy for making deer sausage, no doubt.





    https://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/gam...-lb-meat-mixer
    Looks like it would be good for mixing dough as well.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.