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HELP Propane wall-mounted heater question
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  1. #1
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    Propane wall-mounted heater question

    As much as I really don't like having propane in the house, I've decided to get a propane wall-mounted heater, at least for now (right now we are heating with a couple of electric space heaters, but it will be getting colder soon). This is what I'm looking at: https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/he...er-30-000-btus or https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/pr...ic-wall-heater

    Either one will heat this little house just fine. But I'm not sure which one I should get. It's going to be mounted in the office, as that's the room where we do the most sitting. The rooms farthest from where the heater will be are the kitchen and utility room; if I'm in those rooms, I'm up and active and have no trouble staying warm enough even if the room is chilly. As long as they don't freeze, they are fine. The heater will be right next to the bathroom and the bedrooms, so they should heat well enough. I would prefer the look of the infrared heater, rather than the blue flame of the other one, but I don't know if one would heat better?

    Also, can anyone give me some idea of how much fuel one of these things consumes? I'm going to have to rent a tank, and need to know how large of a tank to request in order to not need refills all the time. We are in south-central Kentucky -- I don't know yet just how cold it's likely to get here. I think there's a lot of chilly but not really cold weather, at least compared to what I'm used to.

    Thanks.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  2. #2
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    How many square feet?

    How many windows and what type?

    How well insulated?


    I heat about 600 sq/ft (well insulated) with a little 3 burner (18,000 BTU) one on 250ish gal per winter...as a rough idea.


    This is a 30,000 BTU model.




    http://www.heatstarbyenerco.com/prod...e/propane.html
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

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  3. #3
    You can convert propane quantities to BTUs, so if you're running 30,000 you can calc how many pounds per hour. Lots of them out there. Here's one:

    https://www.elgas.com.au/blog/1675-p...-therms-ft-usa

    How will you get the gas to the heater? If you run plumbing you've got a job ahead. If you run flex line you might bring it in through a window and fill the rest of the gap with foam rubber or the like. If you own the house you can drill a hole for the line. In any case, a flex line raises the possibility of it being broken or gnawed through. Do you have zoning or inspection rules in your area?
    Better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war.

  4. #4
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    We have one of each. A blue flame here at home, a radiant at the farm. Both heat equally well, and will work when nothing else does. The only drawback is your having to rent a tank. We have a 250 gallon here, and fill it once a year (usually) for heat & cooking. At the farm, we just use 100# bottles, tho they're getting harder (heavier) to change out.

    I would think 100-125 gallons of propane would do for heat, here. SE Texas, 40 miles N of Houston. Your clime might be different.

    Another heater, https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/pr...r?cm_vc=IOPDP2 Uses only the small 20# cylinders that store inside. My brother has two, that heat his 2600 SF very well, at less than half the cost of his central electric heat. Two of these would run about the same $$ as a single wall mount.

    Good luck in your decision.

  5. #5
    My sister has a wall-mounted propane heater and she loves it. She uses it on a low setting when she's gone working three days a week, because her only other heat is a wood stove.

    Sometimes she'll use it to take the chill off the main rooms because it takes so long for heat to build up from the wood stove.

    Don't know any details about the unit but it's called a Cozy-World. Maybe she bought it from her propane provider?

  6. #6
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    I use propane.. I had the infrared heaters through the house and still had to supplement with electric heaters... The infrared heaters heat the surrounding items in room..

    Last weekend we purchased the blue flame heaters with thermostats and blowers.. Had them installed.. One at each end of a 3000 sq ft home.. I only have the one in the main part of the house on with bedroom doors open in use right now.. Have not had to turn the second one on yet..

    For the first time in 14 years ---no space heaters needed.. The house is warm and even floor is toasty.. I will save quite a bit of money because they only come on as needed when room temps drop.. The infrared heaters came on and stayed on and had to be manually adjusted..


    Infrared heaters-heat items---Blue flame heats the air and acts more like a furnace or space heater..

    So for 400.oo for 2 blue flame 30,000 btu units---I am ecstatic..

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Green Co. View Post
    Another heater, https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/pr...r?cm_vc=IOPDP2 Uses only the small 20# cylinders that store inside.
    I picked up one of those at a rummage sale for about ten bucks. Works great, and very handy to have the tank inside it.
    Better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war.

  8. #8
    In my opinion, and remember I said that, the blue flame doesn't heat as well.

    Pretty and everything, but no one around here uses them, and we are all country folks that use propane.

    This is like the one we use. Radiant. And everyone one else.

    https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/pr...r?cm_vc=IOPDP1

    We use the 3 brick, the one in the photo is a 4 brick.

    One brick (low) will do good enough for upper 40's. and if one brick is all you use, day and night, 100 gallons will last 3 months. If you use 3 bricks day and night 100 gallons will do 1 month. Roughly if you want to use your fingers to count.

    And different people have different levels of comfort. So that can change.

    We use wood now and have the propane for back up. You get roughly 40 degrees out of our wood heater, so in the upper 40's the wood heater would have you sitting out side, and when it's in the teens and below, it needs a little help.

    However, before the wood heater, we used exclusively propane. Our house is about 1000 sq. ft. and with bedrooms, bathrooms closed off, that 1-3 brick heated about 6-700 sq ft. Even on the coldest days, low teens, the house was a bit cool, but we hovered over/around the heater, and did Ok.

    O btw our old 1930's house has no insulation in the walls.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by diamonds View Post
    I use propane.. I had the infrared heaters through the house and still had to supplement with electric heaters... The infrared heaters heat the surrounding items in room..

    Last weekend we purchased the blue flame heaters with thermostats and blowers.. Had them installed.. One at each end of a 3000 sq ft home.. I only have the one in the main part of the house on with bedroom doors open..

    For the first time in 14 years ---no space heaters needed.. The house is warm and even floor is toasty.. I will save quite a bit of money because they only come on as needed when room temps drop.. The infrared heaters came on and stayed on and had to be manually adjusted..

    So for 400.oo for 2 blue flame 30,000 btu units---I am ecstatic..
    This I think answers my question!

    For the other questions, the heated area of the house is about 1,000 s.f. -- at least the parts that need to be kept above freezing. Really only the office and the bathroom need to be warm.

    We own the house, and I am aware of the installation needing a hole through the wall. That was one factor in deciding on the location. Also I wanted to make sure we had a short run from the outside tank to the unit, and a short run from the driveway to the tank.

    The house is old, drafty, and not very well insulated as far as I can tell. Lots of windows, all with storms on.

    If I buy the heater from Tractor Supply, it looks like they will do installation (for a fee, of course). Possibly the propane supplier also does installation -- I'll ask, when I call about getting the tank in a little bit. And I know that my plumber does propane and gas lines. So that's covered.

    Thanks, everyone. That helped!

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  10. #10
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    Upon further reading at TSC, they say the 30k BTU wall unit, on high, uses about 3 gallons of LPG per hour. That's at less than 5000' elevation.

    As BW posted above, consider how you will get your LPG into the house. County/State rules & regs. (I have none at either place) I ran 1/2" copper from the tank into the house.

    Some folks balk at using the cabinet heater because the LPG stores inside the home. My brother has had no problem, LPG has the stinky agent so it's really easy to tell if your connections aren't good, plus there's soapy water in a spray bottle.

    ETA: I see you have done the considerations. Good

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Green Co. View Post
    We have one of each. A blue flame here at home, a radiant at the farm. Both heat equally well, and will work when nothing else does. The only drawback is your having to rent a tank. We have a 250 gallon here, and fill it once a year (usually) for heat & cooking. At the farm, we just use 100# bottles, tho they're getting harder (heavier) to change out.

    I would think 100-125 gallons of propane would do for heat, here. SE Texas, 40 miles N of Houston. Your clime might be different.

    Another heater, https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/pr...r?cm_vc=IOPDP2 Uses only the small 20# cylinders that store inside. My brother has two, that heat his 2600 SF very well, at less than half the cost of his central electric heat. Two of these would run about the same $$ as a single wall mount.

    Good luck in your decision.
    Thanks for this thread, I love the heater that uses the 20# tank. This will be the answer to some of my needs. We have a wood stove that does a good job to hold the electric bill down. Last winter when DH was sick we didn't use the wood heater and our electric bill went through the roof. I had to dig down deep to get it paid.

    Judy

  12. #12
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    With the description of your house, i would get a bigger one. 24k-30k BTU.

    If it has a thermostat, you won't burn any more LP than a smaller one. If you have an extremely cold winter, the extra capacity will save you from having to mess with space heaters.

    Small fans placed high, like on top of book shelves, really help heat distribution.


    If you can put it on an outside wall, the install will be quite easy. Just a singlef 7/8" hole for a 1/2" pipe nipple. A little caulk around it and...WALA!!!
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freeholder View Post
    This I think answers my question!

    For the other questions, the heated area of the house is about 1,000 s.f. -- at least the parts that need to be kept above freezing. Really only the office and the bathroom need to be warm.

    We own the house, and I am aware of the installation needing a hole through the wall. That was one factor in deciding on the location. Also I wanted to make sure we had a short run from the outside tank to the unit, and a short run from the driveway to the tank.

    The house is old, drafty, and not very well insulated as far as I can tell. Lots of windows, all with storms on.

    If I buy the heater from Tractor Supply, it looks like they will do installation (for a fee, of course). Possibly the propane supplier also does installation -- I'll ask, when I call about getting the tank in a little bit. And I know that my plumber does propane and gas lines. So that's covered.

    Thanks, everyone. That helped!

    Kathleen
    You will love it.. I did edit my post..

    Right now I have not had to turn the second one on.. So only one is being used and before the change over this weekend both infrared heaters were in use.. So I am already saving and house is a lot warmer..

    So big difference using the blue flame.. Also I was using pedestal fans to circulate the heat.. Yesterday I put the fans in the storage closet.. Saving there too..

  14. #14
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    Just know that ventless propane heaters put out about 1 oz of water ( vapor) per 1000 btu per hour, so you need to have good air turnover or everything will soon be soggy....
    Ring the bells that still can ring
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  15. #15
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    Our house is small at about 1400 sq ft. We can completely heat it with the centrally located 27,000 btu gas fireplace (similar to a blue flame heater) but I have installed (2) 10,000 btu blue flame thermostatically controlled heaters over summer (one at each end of the house) just in case it gets really cold here. Last winter we got down to 0* a few times.
    I like the blue flame but that is just a personal opinion. I like to see the flame so I can tell at a glance that it is burning properly.
    We are at 7500' elevation here so it does get cold. Our whole house has gas appliances and last year we used a total of 180 gallons of fuel (heating, cooking, and water heating).

  16. #16
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    I now use kerosene space heaters for emergency/supplemental heat. Look at the # of btu's per gallon when comparing. I prefer vented heaters, but that is not always practicable. Surprisingly, if you start and stop the kerosene heaters outside, you get very little odor. The kerosene heaters are a lot safer than I expected. The more I read up on them, the more comfortable I felt in using them. Propane prices vary quite a bit. I use propane for my cabin, and found a discount dealer. You do have to schedule in advance with them, but their prices are 1/3 to 1/2 from the usual.
    My Mate Winston

  17. #17
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    Before our move to Alaska when I was very young, my family lived in a 100+ year old farmhouse with a wall mounted propane heater. My mom used us 6 kids to deal with circulating the warmth through the downstairs on very cold days. I doubt that’s any help to you but I always thought Mom was brilliant in finding a solution with what she had to hand!
    All that is gold does not glitter....

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbbuddy View Post
    Just know that ventless propane heaters put out about 1 oz of water ( vapor) per 1000 btu per hour, so you need to have good air turnover or everything will soon be soggy....
    Ahhh, I was waiting for someone to touch on that. Ventless propane puts out a lot of water vapor.

    Second, these are VENTLESS, which means all the combustion fumes stay in the house and AREN'T vented outside. Was the OP aware of that?
    ...Rubbin' is Racin'......

  19. #19
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    Check out thriftypropane.com and see if they deliver in your area. I have two identical radiant kero heaters, go by many different retail names, but they are the HMN or CTN 110 series. 10,000 btu/hr. One will keep the chill out of my 1200sqft house, both will keep it warm. You always want to provide ventilation for ventless heaters, crack a window in the room it is operating in. You can still find vented oil heaters. R2 heating oil has more btu's per gallon than propane, about a 1/3 more as I recall. You can gravity feed these from a tank outside. If you have an oil tank outside, in bitter cold you might want to put a heat tape on the line outside, or even get those tank heaters you can get for RV tanks. Many run on 12v and 120v. I had trouble with #2 heating oil gelling up <0F. If I lived in a state bordering Canada, I would definately keep my oil tank inside or underground.
    My Mate Winston

  20. #20
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    About ventless propane heaters. Hundreds of thousands of homes have gas kitchen ranges that obviously are not vented. Each top burner is roughly 10,000 btu's and the oven burner is more than twice that. I have heard nor have I experienced any problems with gas ranges and obviously they are still being sold everyday.
    In the winter many many homes start running humidifiers for the sole purpose of adding moisture to the inside air regardless of their heat source.
    If someone does not want any gas appliances in their house that is fine but honestly gas appliances are safe, efficient, and have no bad side effects. That is why way more than half the homes in the USA contain gas appliances.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Green Co. View Post
    Upon further reading at TSC, they say the 30k BTU wall unit, on high, uses about 3 gallons of LPG per hour. That's at less than 5000' elevation.

    As BW posted above, consider how you will get your LPG into the house. County/State rules & regs. (I have none at either place) I ran 1/2" copper from the tank into the house.

    Some folks balk at using the cabinet heater because the LPG stores inside the home. My brother has had no problem, LPG has the stinky agent so it's really easy to tell if your connections aren't good, plus there's soapy water in a spray bottle.

    ETA: I see you have done the considerations. Good
    Three gallons of propane per hour seems like a lot! Expensive, too.

    No regs to worry about that I know of -- I plan to use the 1/2" copper line.

    The propane tank inside the house seems like a bad idea to me, too, but it seems like a lot of people must be using those units. Do you know how long one tank lasts your brother?

    Thanks again,

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by hiwall View Post
    About ventless propane heaters. Hundreds of thousands of homes have gas kitchen ranges that obviously are not vented. Each top burner is roughly 10,000 btu's and the oven burner is more than twice that. I have heard nor have I experienced any problems with gas ranges and obviously they are still being sold everyday.
    In the winter many many homes start running humidifiers for the sole purpose of adding moisture to the inside air regardless of their heat source.
    If someone does not want any gas appliances in their house that is fine but honestly gas appliances are safe, efficient, and have no bad side effects. That is why way more than half the homes in the USA contain gas appliances.
    I've had propane appliances several times -- cook stoves, a furnace when we lived in the 5th wheel for a winter, a clothes dryer and water heater in one place. I just have philosophical objections to adding explosive gas into my home! Also, I wouldn't use a propane cook stove just because it always scared me to death to light the oven.

    I was going to go with an oil-fired wall-mounted heater, but the cost was mounting up rapidly -- Toyostoves (the brand my brother in Alaska recommended) are expensive, and then the oil tank needs to be elevated on a very sturdy stand that someone has to build. I suppose it costs less to buy an oil tank than a propane tank, but probably not much less. I still need to get an electrician in here to completely re-wire the house before we have a fire from the old wiring, and need to put new tires on my truck soon. Funds are there, but not unlimited. So I think at least for now, I'm going to go with one of the propane heaters.

    On the humidity, this is a very humid area (especially compared to the high desert, where we'd been living) and I've been dealing with a lot of mold issues -- as soon as we get the house tightened up, I'll get a dehumidifier (or my daughter recommended just getting a small AC, though we coped with the heat last summer pretty well). Right now we'd just be trying to dehumidify the whole outdoors, because of gaps around windows (which will be sealed up shortly). I'm hoping to get my little wood stove installed soon, as well, but probably won't run it much -- it's more for emergencies and severely cold weather when the other heater can't quite keep up. But wood heat does tend to dry the house out, so if I used it often enough, it might balance out the wet propane heat.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  23. #23
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    I was just thinking about the winter that we spent in the old 5th wheel -- I was cooking with propane, and the furnace ran on propane. We had a 100 lb. tank, and two smaller tanks (24 lbs. each, I think) that came with the 5th wheel. If I recall correctly, during the coldest part of the winter, I was having to refill the hundred pounder and one of the small tanks about every three weeks (the other small tank would be left at home hooked up). Does that sound in line with usage for one of the 30,000 BTU wall heaters? How about the smaller units that have the 20 lb. tanks stored in the cabinet?

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Green Co. View Post
    Upon further reading at TSC, they say the 30k BTU wall unit, on high, uses about 3 gallons of LPG per hour. That's at less than 5000' elevation.

    As BW posted above, consider how you will get your LPG into the house. County/State rules & regs. (I have none at either place) I ran 1/2" copper from the tank into the house.

    Some folks balk at using the cabinet heater because the LPG stores inside the home. My brother has had no problem, LPG has the stinky agent so it's really easy to tell if your connections aren't good, plus there's soapy water in a spray bottle.

    ETA: I see you have done the considerations. Good
    I had a vent less propane heater. Just didn't feel comfortable wondering about lethal gasses. Menards had a gas detection/carbon monoxide detector alarm. A little pricey but I felt better.

  25. #25
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    Be aware, Propane is heavier than air, and will sink to the floor and settle into any confined spaces below the floor. Stay on top of checking for leaks with soapy water. I got by for a lot of years using Propane in my little old house. I had a Propane stove/oven, that on cold mornings or days, I'd fire up all four top burners and maybe the oven to warm up the house, but most of my heat came from the oil filled electric radiators they sell at Wal*Mart for $40. I don't like to sleep with a flame going, unless it's just too cold outside. An electric radiator in your bed room or office, will keep it plenty warm for sleeping or watching TV. A Propane space heater is good insurance for an ice storm power outage. I find Electricity is cheaper for heating than Propane, but both are handy to have.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Txkstew View Post
    Be aware, Propane is heavier than air, and will sink to the floor and settle into any confined spaces below the floor. Stay on top of checking for leaks with soapy water. I got by for a lot of years using Propane in my little old house. I had a Propane stove/oven, that on cold mornings or days, I'd fire up all four top burners and maybe the oven to warm up the house, but most of my heat came from the oil filled electric radiators they sell at Wal*Mart for $40. I don't like to sleep with a flame going, unless it's just too cold outside. An electric radiator in your bed room or office, will keep it plenty warm for sleeping or watching TV. A Propane space heater is good insurance for an ice storm power outage. I find Electricity is cheaper for heating than Propane, but both are handy to have.
    Right now we are heating with one of those oil-filled electric space heaters in the bathroom, and one of these in the front room (blowing air into the office where I'm working): https://www.amazon.com/World-Marketi...words=duraheat

    I want something to keep the house warm when the power goes out. Getting my little wood stove installed is going to be a project, though it's on the list (the house has an existing brick chimney, but it hasn't been used in at least thirty years and needs to be inspected and cleaned, and probably re-lined).

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freeholder View Post
    I was just thinking about the winter that we spent in the old 5th wheel -- I was cooking with propane, and the furnace ran on propane. We had a 100 lb. tank, and two smaller tanks (24 lbs. each, I think) that came with the 5th wheel. If I recall correctly, during the coldest part of the winter, I was having to refill the hundred pounder and one of the small tanks about every three weeks (the other small tank would be left at home hooked up). Does that sound in line with usage for one of the 30,000 BTU wall heaters? How about the smaller units that have the 20 lb. tanks stored in the cabinet?

    Kathleen
    In post #20 I said we used 180 gallons of propane in one year, that is with all heat, cooking, and heating water. Roughly $400 worth for a year living in a cold climate.

  28. #28
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    They pilot burner on the Heatstar units (Mr Buddy too) have a function that kills them if the oxygen level gets low.

    It works well.

    If I don't crack the shop door, mine goes out around 3:00AM.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

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  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Freeholder View Post
    If I recall correctly, during the coldest part of the winter, I was having to refill the hundred pounder and one of the small tanks about every three weeks (the other small tank would be left at home hooked up). Does that sound in line with usage for one of the 30,000 BTU wall heaters?
    We spent a year heating a 1200' area with an open gas 18,000 btu thermostat-controlled fireplace using 20lb tanks. I'd swap the tank about every third day. We're near Seattle, in a fairly mild climate, and the building was well-insulated.
    Better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by bw View Post
    We spent a year heating a 1200' area with an open gas 18,000 btu thermostat-controlled fireplace using 20lb tanks. I'd swap the tank about every third day. We're near Seattle, in a fairly mild climate, and the building was well-insulated.
    That would be about 1-1/3 gallon per day or about $2.50 per day.

  31. #31
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    Well, here's something dfifferent...we live at 1200 approx. elevation...we have a five panel propane in the LR...when we ran it, it dried out everything in the house including our skin. We woke up looking like prunes in the morning. It is ventless, so we kept a pan of water out when we ran it. We now have a woodstove and no longer use the propane heater. Just thought I'd put my two cents in.
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Millwright View Post
    They pilot burner on the Heatstar units (Mr Buddy too) have a function that kills them if the oxygen level gets low.

    It works well.

    If I don't crack the shop door, mine goes out around 3:00AM.
    Excellent, but remember that CO will kill you long before low oxygen. Definitely have CO, propane, smoke detectors.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Profit of Doom View Post
    Excellent, but remember that CO will kill you long before low oxygen. Definitely have CO, propane, smoke detectors.
    As CO rises, O2 drops in the heated space.
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by diamonds View Post
    I use propane.. I had the infrared heaters through the house and still had to supplement with electric heaters... The infrared heaters heat the surrounding items in room..

    Last weekend we purchased the blue flame heaters with thermostats and blowers.. Had them installed.. One at each end of a 3000 sq ft home.. I only have the one in the main part of the house on with bedroom doors open in use right now.. Have not had to turn the second one on yet..

    For the first time in 14 years ---no space heaters needed.. The house is warm and even floor is toasty.. I will save quite a bit of money because they only come on as needed when room temps drop.. The infrared heaters came on and stayed on and had to be manually adjusted..


    Infrared heaters-heat items---Blue flame heats the air and acts more like a furnace or space heater..

    So for 400.oo for 2 blue flame 30,000 btu units---I am ecstatic..
    Wish I had known that before I bought my infrared heater. But it looks like a faux fireplace and is certainly very pretty.
    Not sure I could have gotten the landlord to approve a propane anyway.
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  35. #35
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    I checked the Mr Heaters in my area and all of them said "for outdoor use only"

    Is this just a local regulation or is the retail company just covering in case of accidents with them?
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by hiwall View Post
    About ventless propane heaters. Hundreds of thousands of homes have gas kitchen ranges that obviously are not vented. Each top burner is roughly 10,000 btu's and the oven burner is more than twice that. I have heard nor have I experienced any problems with gas ranges and obviously they are still being sold everyday.

    .
    So, you're going to compare the combustion fumes coming off a range you use for a short time during the day to a heater running multiple times higher outputs 24 hours a day?

    Really?

    They pilot burner on the Heatstar units (Mr Buddy too) have a function that kills them if the oxygen level gets low.

    It works well.
    It works well.... until it doesn't...

    Not sure I want to base my life on a Chinese made part on a cheap heater while I'm sleeping.

    Excellent, but remember that CO will kill you long before low oxygen.
    Yep, who wants to be the Test dummy to test that theory here, please raise your hand.
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  37. #37
    a 30,000 BTU unit should run about 3 hours on a gallon of LP, I like the infrared over the blue flame, the infrared is a more comfortable heat, (like a wood stove heat),

    (I have a room in the barn, and first had a blue flame it was never warm, I took it out and replaced it with a infrared unit, and it is comfortable in there now,

    mine have thermostats and click on and off as needed,

    like any thing a lot depends on tightness and insulation, I have two units in the barn and at times have seen moisture problems, (mostly on an insulated wall, where it condenses, in the house we have two units and never have seen any moisture problems but there supmental to either the wood stove or the furnace,

    (was in one one small old house and cleaned it out, and the guy was horder, and little insulation, he had two units, a 30 to 40 thousand and a 15 thousand in the bath room, the bath room was not thermostatic only settings low med and high, he keep the house about 80, and the moisture condensed on the out side wall behind the boxes he had stored on the outside walls, (much mold and even some of the boxes were soaked with moisture), but the units were running all most continuous and very little movement in the house,

    so if your going to close up in a small room and keep things closed off, moisture could be a problem and fumes from the burning could be a problem,

  38. #38
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    I see many here afraid of ventless propane/gas heaters. I'm just the opposite, electric heat scares me. Perhaps because we lost a house to an electrical fire, traced back to the heating unit. First electric heat we ever had, so never again for us. I was raised rural with unvented butane/propane space heaters. You learn to clean the burner (if not burning blue) and adjust the air mixture for best combustion. As far as moisture buildup, any time heated air comes into contact with a cold surface, the moisture in the air will condense on the colder surface. Using our heater here will cause condensation on the windows, because our local humidity runs about 80% and higher this time of year (hell, all year long...) yet when I use my travel trailer out in far west Tx on into Az, using propane heat, I get very little condensation... maybe 'cause the humidity there is like 25%?

    I guess it's all about education, you gotta learn to use the tools you have.

  39. #39
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    Nov 2002
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    We have a propane wall mounted heater and love it. Wherever you mount your heater, make sure it can heat up bathroom and kitchen pipes so they don't freeze. Also, we have a carbon monoxide detector near the unit.
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  40. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
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    Kathleen - A few numbers and observations for your consideration. A gallon of propane contains 91,000 Btu's and weighs 4.2 pounds. A pound of propane contains 21,600 Btu's. A 100 pound cylinder can only be filled to 90%, hence will hold 90 pounds or 21.4 gallons. That translates to 64.8 hours of heating (maximum rate of heaters referenced) from the two heaters you are considering. The item descriptions of each heater mention using a 100 pound cylinder, probably for the tank's surface area needed to vaporize the liquid during cold weather.

    Prior posts have already mentioned combustion byproducts of CO² and CO as well as water vapor from combustion. (RV suppliers carry combined propane/CO detectors that would offer some ease of mind.) I would strongly recommend having a window open a half inch while the heater is in use. For reference, a 36" tall window open ½" would be equivalent to a 4¾" diameter hole in the wall and a 48" window open the same amount would equal a 5½" hole in the wall.

    You mentioned a vented oil fired heater and that would be the longer range target. I had a Monitor (Toyotami) diesel fired heater in a 1600 sq ft 2 story house. The heater was a direct vented (combustion air and exhaust) console model and sat on the floor. The house was in Mendocino county California and normal winter weather was in the high 20s to low-mid 30s at night. The heater would hold the house at temperature until it got down to the mid 20s with 20+ mph wind. The total heating fuel need averaged 140 gallons per year. A gallon of diesel has about 1.5 times as much heat as a gallon of propane. My total heating bill for the year was under $500. The fuel tank was a 250 gallon heating oil tank and had flanges built in to accept 1¼" pipe so one could raise to what ever level needed. It was mounted on 2x6s with pipe flanges on the bottoms of the pipe legs. If it was really high, I would probably put some cross bracing on it to avoid tipping.

    From my perspective, the non-vented propane heaters should be considered a stop gap until you could afford the oil fired heater. Hope this helps.

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