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BRKG Astronauts escape malfunctioning rocket [UPDATE - Landed post 10/11]
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  1. #1

    Astronauts escape malfunctioning rocket [UPDATE - Landed post 10/11]

    Astronauts escape malfunctioning rocket

    Astronauts are to make an emergency landing after their Russian Soyuz rocket malfunctioned on lift-off to the International Space Station.

    Nasa said there was an "issue with the booster" and the "crew is returning to Earth in a ballistic descent mode".

    This breaking news story is being updated and more details will be published shortly. Please refresh the page for the fullest version.

    You can receive Breaking News on a smartphone or tablet via the BBC News App. You can also follow @BBCBreaking on Twitter to get the latest alerts.

    Share this story About sharing
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-45822845
    Last edited by Melodi; 10-11-2018 at 05:38 AM.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  2. #2
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    https://twitter.com/NASA/status/1050314064344141824

    The Soyuz capsule is returning to Earth via a ballistic descent, which is a sharper angle of landing compared to normal. Search and rescue teams are heading towards the expected touchdown location of the spacecraft and crew. Live updates: http://www.nasa.gov/live

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    I can't believe it took almost 25 minutes to get a non-banned source. Sheesh!

  4. #4
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    https://twitter.com/NASA/status/1050314064344141824

    The Soyuz capsule is returning to Earth via a ballistic descent, which is a sharper angle of landing compared to normal. Search and rescue teams are heading towards the expected touchdown location of the spacecraft and crew. Live updates: http://www.nasa.gov/live

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by KittyKatChic View Post
    I can't believe it took almost 25 minutes to get a non-banned source. Sheesh!
    I saw it on the BBC, but the information was very brief and it was a "breaking news" blurb.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

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    https://twitter.com/NASA/status/1050316612304175104
    NASA
    ‏Verified account @NASA
    1m1 minute ago

    Search and rescue teams report they are in contact with the Soyuz crew, who report they are in good condition. The teams are en route to the landing site. Live updates: http://www.nasa.gov/live

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melodi View Post
    I saw it on the BBC, but the information was very brief and it was a "breaking news" blurb.
    The one source had it posted in under a minute. Quick and dirty but almost verbatim from the NASA live launch feed.

    I thought more people watched space launches =(

  8. #8
    Emergency landing for astronauts as rocket fails
    10:27, UK, Thursday 11 October 2018

    The Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft carrying the crew of astronaut Nick Hague of the U.S. and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin of Russia blasts off


    Image:
    Engine problems hit the Russian rocket after lift-off



    A US and Russian astronaut are making an emergency landing following a rocket failure on a mission to the International Space Station.

    Shortly after lift-off, the Soyuz rocket was reported to have suffered significant engine difficulties which has caused the mission to be aborted.

    Despite the failure affecting the booster rocket, the crew members are "alive and set to land in Kazakhstan" Russian media reported.

    International Space Station (ISS) crew members astronaut Nick Hague of the U.S. and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin of Russia board the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft
    Image:
    ISS crew members Nick Hague and Alexey Ovchinin
    It is understood that helicopters were sent to locate NASA's Nick Hague and Roscosmos' Alexei Ovchinin.

    Search and rescue teams have confirmed that the pair have now been located and are alive.

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    Spaceflight historian Gunter Krebs noted on Twitter that the situation reminded him of another Soyuz rocket failure in 1972, when "an inflight booster failured occurred and the crew was rescued after ballistic reentry."

    Ballistic reentry involves only the forces of gravity and aerodynamic drag, rather than orbital forces helping the returning capsule using orbital forces to slow down the speed of fall.

    https://news.sky.com/story/emergency...fails-11523326
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

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    Quote Originally Posted by KittyKatChic View Post
    I can't believe it took almost 25 minutes to get a non-banned source. Sheesh!
    It takes the media time to figure out how they can squeeze in an accusation or dig at Trump, its hard work being a Journalistic Fiction writer

  10. #10
    SAFE!

    A capsule carrying the crew of a Russian Soyuz rocket that malfunctioned on lift-off has landed safely in Kazakhstan, Russian media report.

    Astronauts escape malfunctioning Soyuz rocket
    24 minutes ago

    The cosmonauts were on their way to the International Space Station
    A capsule carrying the crew of a Russian Soyuz rocket that malfunctioned on lift-off has landed safely in Kazakhstan, Russian media report.

    Russian Cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin and US astronaut Nick Hague were on board but their lives "are not in danger," said Russian state TV.

    The rocket was en route to the International Space Station (ISS).


    The US space agency Nasa said there was an "issue with the booster".

    The crew were returning to Earth in "a ballistic descent mode", according to Nasa.
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-45822845
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  11. #11
    OK reports are confusing, we know they have landed but they may not have been actually located by rescuers yet - I will change the thread title to "landed" rather than Safe, until we get confirmation that everyone is OK and has been rescued.

    Astronauts crash land to Earth after major rocket malfunction on way to ISS
    Andrew Griffin @_andrew_griffin

    Astronauts have crash landed on the ground after a major malfunction with a rocket carrying them to the International Space Station.

    The capsule carrying the crew went into “ballistic descent mode” as it headed towards the ground for a crash landing, crew have said. Footage from inside the Soyuz showed the two astronauts inside being shaken around at the moment the failure occurred, with their arms and legs flailing.

    Emergency search and rescue crews are headed to the location of the landing, Nasa said.



    Astronauts had made their way safely to the ground and are in communication with the rescue forces. But it will take some time to actually reach them where they are, after the emergency landing.

    Watch more


    NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Roscosmos’ Alexei Ovchinin had lifted off as scheduled on Thursday afternoon from the Russia-controlled Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan atop a Soyuz booster rocket.

    They were to dock at the orbiting outpost six hours later, but the booster suffered a failure minutes after the launch. The major operation was triggered when flight controllers identified the problem.

    It was then that the astronauts conducted an emergency landing by separating from the booster and switching into ballistic descent mode. That means the rocket comes in at a much sharper angle than normal, allowing the craft to head as quickly as possible to the ground.

    NASA and Russian Roscosmos space agency said the astronauts were in good condition after their capsule landed about 12 miles east of the city of Dzhezkazgan in Kazakhstan, about 280 miles northeast of Baikonur. Spacecraft returning from the ISS normally land in that region.

    The crew on board the International Space Station have been informed of the emergency, Nasa said.

    The launch failure marks an unprecedented mishap for the Russian space program, which has been dogged by a string of launch failures and other incidents.

    "Thank God, the crew is alive," Russian President Vladimir Putin's spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters when it became clear that the crew had landed safely.

    Relations between the leaders of the Russian and American space programmes are already strained. After a leak was discovered in the International Space Station at the end of August, numerous accusations have been made about who is at fault – including suggestions from Russian officials that Nasa astronauts might have made the hole in the floating lab intentionally.

    Dmitry Rogozin, the director general of Roscosmos, wrote on Twitter that he had already launched an investigation into the failure of the Soyuz-FG rocket. That work had "already started" and was exploring telemetry data to find the cause of the crash, he said.
    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/s...-a8578611.html
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  12. #12
    Emergency landing for astronauts as rocket fails
    The two astronauts - from the US and Russia - have landed in Kazakhstan, where they are described as being in a "good condition".
    11:41, UK,
    Thursday 11 October 2018
    A manned launch to the International Space Station has been aborted following failures to the Russian booster rocket 0:34

    A US and Russian astronaut have made an emergency landing following a rocket failure on a mission to the International Space Station.

    Shortly after lift-off, the Soyuz rocket was reported to have suffered significant engine failures - an unprecedented mishap for the Russian space programme.

    Despite the issue affecting the booster rocket, NASA's Nick Hague and Roscosmos' Alexey Ovchinin are alive and have touched down in Kazakhstan.



    Smoke rise as the boosters of first stage of the Soyuz-FG rocket with Soyuz MS-10 space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station, ISS, separate
    Image:
    Smoke rise as the boosters of first stage of the Soyuz rocket fail

    They landed about 12 miles east of the city of Dzhezkazgan, and officials from Russia's space agency said rescue workers have managed to reach the crew - who are now understood to be out of the capsule.

    All Russian manned space launches have been suspended after the incident, according to Russia's RIA news agency.

    "Thank God, the crew is alive," said Vladimir Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, to reporters.

    The deputy prime minister added that they hoped the US would be "understanding" about the Soyuz indent, according to reports.

    All Russian manned space launches have been suspended after the incident
    The ISS crew members currently in orbit have been "notified of the launch contingency", a NASA spokesperson added.


    A spokesman for Russian President Vladimir Putin said: "Thank god, the crew is alive."

    Although the journey was expected to take six hours, it was only a few minutes after blast-off at the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan that problems with the rocket became apparent.

    The managing editor of NASA Spaceflight reports how an onboard view of the launch showed the crew being shaken around during the launch, and says "the staging was clearly off-nominal".

    The Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft carrying the crew of astronaut Nick Hague of the U.S. and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin of Russia

    'Ballistic reentry' involves sharper descent than usual

    Footage broadcast on Russian television shows a series of billowing smoky explosions occurring as the booster rocket stage fails.

    Spaceflight historian Gunter Krebs noted on Twitter that the situation reminded him of another Soyuz rocket failure in 1972, when "an in-flight booster failure occurred and the crew was rescued after ballistic re-entry".

    Now we know the crew survived, let's look at the failure again. Onboard view showed the crew getting shaken around - which can happen - but the staging was clearly off-nominal. pic.twitter.com/zaso6u1yW8

    — Chris B - NSF (@NASASpaceflight) October 11, 2018
    Ballistic re-entry is a much steeper form of re-entry, involving only the forces of gravity and aerodynamic drag to slow down the speed of fall.

    Malfunctions causing ballistic re-entry have occurred a number of times with Russia's series of Soyuz rockets.



    https://news.sky.com/story/emergency...fails-11523326
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    First images of crew.





    From RT, no story (in English).


    They look quite ready for a vodka.


    https://www.rt.com/news/440972-iss-c...-first-photos/
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

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    My NASA DOC buddy tells a story about retrieving a crew that came back from the ISS and didn't QUITE manage to land ANYWHERE NEAR where they were supposed to land.
    After 5 or so hours of searching, he made a quais-legal call to a friend who had a friend who had an in someplace and 45ish minutes later their search craft got a carefully phrased call from somewhere called "Magic Mountain" with a set of coords and some pics of the target Cosmonauts.

    Some guys in Colo got VERY high octane Internal Rusky Vodka for "Christmas", with thanks.
    "The Spoor of an ELEPHANT
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  15. #15
    Soyuz crew rescued following emergency landing
    Updated / Thursday, 11 Oct 2018 12:20


    Cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin (front) and NASA astronaut Nick Hague at the pre-launch ceremony in Kazakhstan

    The two-man US-Russian crew of a Soyuz spacecraft taking them to the orbiting International Space Station had to make an emergency landing in Kazakhstan when a rocket failed in mid-air.

    US astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin landed safely without harm and rescue crews who raced to locate them on the Kazakh steppe quickly linked up with them, NASA, the US space agency, and Russia's Roscosmos said.

    The Soyuz capsule carrying them separated from the malfunctioning rocket and made what is called a steep ballistic descent with parachutes helping slow its speed.

    Paratroopers parachuted to the rescue site, TASS news agency reported.

    Neither man needed medical treatment and NASA TV said both were fine.

    The problem occurred when a booster rocket on the Soyuz-FG launch vehicle, launched from the cosmodrome at Baikonur in Kazakhstan, failed in some way, NASA said.



    Russian Deputy Prime Minister Yuri Borisov, quoted by Interfax, said the problem occurred when the first and second stages of the booster rocket were in the process of separating.

    Footage from inside the Soyuz showed the two men being shaken around at the moment the failure occurred, with their arms and legs flailing.

    Rescue crews were quick to reach the site where Colonel Hague and Major Ovchinin came down, Russian news agencies said.

    "Rescue forces are in communication with Nick Hague and Alexei Ovchinin and we are hearing that they are in good condition," NASA TV said.

    Russia immediately suspended all manned space launches, the RIA news agency reported, and Roscomosmos chief Dmitry Rogozin said he had ordered a state commission to be set up to investigate what had gone wrong.

    The failure is a setback for the Russian space programme and the latest in a string of mishaps.

    In August, a hole appeared in a Soyuz capsule already docked to the ISS which caused a brief loss of air pressure and had to be patched.

    Mr Rogozin has said it could have been "sabotage".

    For now, the United States relies on Moscow to carry its astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) which was launched 20 years ago.

    NASA tentatively plans to send its first crew to the ISS using a SpaceX craft instead of a Soyuz next April.

    Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters that the most important thing was that the two men were alive.

    The ISS, launched in 1998, is a habitable artificial satellite in low Earth orbit which is used to carry out scientific and space-related tests. It can hold a crew of up to six people.

    "Rescue services have been working since the first second of the accident," Mr Rogozin wrote on Twitter.

    "The emergency rescue systems of the MS-Soyuz spacecraft worked smoothly. The crew has been saved."

    A Reuters reporter who observed the launch from around 1km away said it had gone smoothly in its initial stages and that the failure of the booster rocket must have occurred at higher altitude.

    In November last year, Roscosmos lost contact with a newly-launched weather satellite - the Meteor-M - after it blasted off from Russias new Vostochny cosmodrome in the Far East.
    https://www.rte.ie/news/world/2018/1...rocket-launch/
    Mr Rogozin said at the time that the launch of the satellite had been due to an embarrassing programming error.

    View image on Twitter
    https://www.rte.ie/news/world/2018/1...rocket-launch/
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  16. #16
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    They look quite ready for a vodka.

    The Rusky space program SWIMS and LIVES on vodka.

    JD is about 5-5 and 105 soaking wet didn't fare well on the planes etc when the bottle(S) get handed around!!

    LOL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melodi View Post
    Astronauts escape malfunctioning rocket

    Nasa said there was an "issue with the booster" and the "crew is returning to Earth in a ballistic descent mode".

    Euphemism for 'hold on to your asski comrade!'
    What is the lake of fire? What is it's purpose? Is the lake of fire eternal hell? Is there any hope of escape for those cast into this lake?
    http://bible-truths.com/lake1.html

  18. #18
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    SO we now have a couple guys who can tell us what it's like to ride an ICBM down.


    KOOL!!
    "The Spoor of an ELEPHANT
    is only RELEVANT
    to an ANT
    or a SYCOPHANT"

  19. #19
    We tend to take space travel for granted, but it is still a very dangerous endeavor. It took around thirty five years from the Wright Brothers first flight to the introduction of the first jet fighter aircraft and the first passenger jets were introduced less than ten years after that. It was sixty years between the Wright Brothers and the first Boeing 747. By comparison, space travel has faced a much longer and more dangerous uphill developmental battle. No commercial passengers would fly if there was a not insignificant chance of malfunction or death on every Airbus or Boeing flight, yet that is where space travel still is today.

    The guys and gals who strap themselves into spacecraft and break the bonds of Earth are still brave pioneers, even after more than a half century of manned space exploration.

    Best regards
    Doc

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    Quote Originally Posted by night driver View Post
    SO we now have a couple guys who can tell us what it's like to ride an ICBM down.


    KOOL!!
    Major Kong sez: Good Mornin' America, How Are Ya?


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    Quote Originally Posted by KittyKatChic View Post
    I can't believe it took almost 25 minutes to get a non-banned source. Sheesh!
    Well the MSM in the US don't really run much of a grave shift anymore, and with Hurricane Michael a good share of the resources they do have left are tied up in covering that on going mess. It's been getting worse over the last 20 years.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacknarwhal View Post
    Major Kong sez: Good Mornin' America, How Are Ya?

    Good one!...

  23. #23
    After the hole in the space station I wondered how long it would take for this to happen, guess it was only a few hours - article best seen at link if you want all the photos

    Russia 'launches criminal investigation' into rocket failure
    Two astronauts made an emergency landing following a rocket failure on a mission to the International Space Station.

    15:04, UK,
    Thursday 11 October 2018
    A manned launch to the International Space Station has been aborted following failures to the Russian booster rocket 0:34

    Russia has launched a criminal investigation over a failed rocket launch to the International Space Station, according to reports.

    A US and Russian astronaut were forced to make an emergency landing shortly after the mission got underway, with their Soyuz rocket having suffered significant engine failures.

    It was an unprecedented mishap for the Russian space programme and the AFP news agency claims a criminal investigation is now underway to determine whether safety regulations had been violated during construction.



    Despite the issue affecting the booster rocket, NASA's Nick Hague and Roscosmos' Alexey Ovchinin are alive and have touched down in Kazakhstan.

    They landed about 12 miles east of the city of Dzhezkazgan, and officials from Russia's space agency said rescue workers have managed to reach the crew - who are now understood to be out of the capsule.

    A comparison of the booster separation in a normal Soyuz mission and today's by meteorologist Greg Dutra apparently shows increasing debris and a less-symmetrical jettison stage this morning.


    All Russian manned space launches have been suspended after the incident, according to Russia's RIA news agency.


    Greg Dutra

    @DutraWeather
    I made a comparison between a normal #soyuz booster separation and that of #SoyuzMS10 this morning. Differences are clear. Debris and a less symmetrical look to this mornings failure. cc: @NASASpaceflight

    12:53 PM - Oct 11, 2018
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    "Thank God, the crew is alive," said Vladimir Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, to reporters.

    The deputy prime minister added that they hoped the US would be "understanding" about the Soyuz indent, according to reports.

    The Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft
    Image:
    All Russian manned space launches have been suspended after the incident
    The ISS crew members currently in orbit have been "notified of the launch contingency", a NASA spokesperson added.


    A spokesman for Russian President Vladimir Putin said: "Thank god, the crew is alive."


    Although the journey was expected to take six hours, it was only a few minutes after blast-off at the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan that problems with the rocket became apparent.

    The managing editor of NASA Spaceflight reports how an onboard view of the launch showed the crew being shaken around during the launch, and says "the staging was clearly off-nominal".

    [
    'Ballistic reentry' involves sharper descent than usual
    Footage broadcast on Russian television shows a series of billowing smoky explosions occurring as the booster rocket stage fails.

    Spaceflight historian Gunter Krebs noted on Twitter that the situation reminded him of another Soyuz rocket failure in 1972, when "an in-flight booster failure occurred and the crew was rescued after ballistic re-entry".

    t
    Now we know the crew survived, let's look at the failure again. Onboard view showed the crew getting shaken around - which can happen - but the staging was clearly off-nominal.


    Ballistic re-entry is a much steeper form of re-entry, involving only the forces of gravity and aerodynamic drag to slow down the speed of fall.

    Malfunctions causing ballistic re-entry have occurred a number of times with Russia's series of Soyuz rockets.

    https://news.sky.com/story/emergency...fails-11523326
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  24. #24
    just more food for those who don't believe we ever went to the moon

  25. #25
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    Here's an amazing shot of the mishap from the space station:

    Your levity is good, it relieves tension and the fear of death.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Millwright View Post

    They look quite ready for a vodka.
    And a wardrobe change I'm betting!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

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    Space travel will never be open to the public except for maybe short trips into the upper atmosphere, there is no point in sending humans to other solar system planets as they are totally inhospitable to life.
    The reasons why the deserts and tundra of the Earth are not populated apply to Mars etc, also the total lack of atmosphere on Mars for example makes human habitation impossible. The conditions on other planets make human habitation or even visitation mega impossible. This is not to say I oppose sending unmanned vehicles to other worlds.

    Rockets are the most unsafe method of powering a flying craft.
    Last edited by Richard; 10-11-2018 at 02:38 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard View Post
    Space travel will never be open to the public except for maybe short trips into the upper atmosphere, there is no point in sending humans to other solar system planets as they are totally inhospitable to life.
    The reasons why the deserts and tundra of the Earth are not populated apply to Mars etc, also the total lack of atmosphere on Mars for example makes human habitation impossible. The conditions on other planets make human habitation or even visitation mega impossible. This is not to say I oppose sending unmanned vehicles to other worlds.

    Rockets are the most unsafe method of powering a flying craft.
    You lot never got over losing the empire thing did you?

  29. #29
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    Ballistic re-entry=glide path of a brick.
    "...Cry 'Havoc' and let slip the cats of war..."
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    If it works, it doesn't have enough features. - Windows 10 design philosophy.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard View Post
    Space travel will never be open to the public except for maybe short trips into the upper atmosphere, there is no point in sending humans to other solar system planets as they are totally inhospitable to life.
    The reasons why the deserts and tundra of the Earth are not populated apply to Mars etc, also the total lack of atmosphere on Mars for example makes human habitation impossible. The conditions on other planets make human habitation or even visitation mega impossible. This is not to say I oppose sending unmanned vehicles to other worlds.

    Rockets are the most unsafe method of powering a flying craft.
    Richard SpaceX is currently selling tickets for an around the moon trip. Tentative flight schedule is for 2023 and apparently Musk has sold seats. Bring your own roll.
    "They wanted to be left alone to face challenges head-on, and to prosper from their own hard work and ingenuity...harsh country tends to produce strong people."-John Erickson

  31. #31
    You do know that booster was the space launcher version of the SS-9 ICBM or SS-4, simply cant' remember tonight.
    They did an IRBM launch and delivery essentially.
    Quote Originally Posted by night driver View Post
    SO we now have a couple guys who can tell us what it's like to ride an ICBM down.


    KOOL!!

  32. #32
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    Jesus takes His disciples aside for a private conversation. He sits them all down and tells them that it is now their job to spread His word through out the world...'to the 4 corners of the world'. So, naturally, they ask Him why...and He answers them with, "Because I will be leaving you soon". So, again, they ask why. His answer this time is, "Because I have other sheep to tend". Hmmm...if the disciples are to spread His word to every point on earth...then where are these 'other sheep' Jesus has to go and tend to?

    And yes, that's in the Bible...just not in the 'modern english' words I used. It's been a while since I've actually read it, but I believe it was at the end of this 'conversation' that Jesus told a couple of disciples to go into Jerusalem and bring back a young colt for Him to ride on when He enters the city...just before He is tried and convicted and crucified.

    But...where *are* those 'other sheep'?
    You say "trigger-happy cowboy" as if it were a bad thing.

    "If they come a'huntin' me; they can consider themselves lucky if they*don't* find me!"

    No surrender; no retreat!

    If we fight, victory is not certain. If we do not fight, defeat surely is.

  33. #33
    I'm traveling this week, but I heard the breaking news alert when it happened early this morning. Thank you Jesus for saving our space heroes (and they are to me)

    Initially I was thinking the verniers on the outside round the main engines had shut off or lost fuel pressure, which ends up not giving enough speed to escape earth gravity (17,500 mph-orbital velocity).

    I just got checked in to the hotel room, got some food in my stomach (finally-LONG but fascinating work day) and finally saw the in capsule video. Looks like when the boosters separated the turbo pumps delivering fuel to them DID NOT shut off. Essentially the as* end of the rocket became a giant fuel air explosive. The crew jerked back and forth (at probably 3-5 G's) rather than a "clean slam" forward, then back into their seats as staging occurs (the movie Apollo 13 got staging exactly right). The pumps on the sustainer engine didn't get proper fuel flow, so they basically went put put put..........
    A ballistic abort on a Soyuz involves getting rid of the shroud covering the orbital and reentry module first. (the orbital module is the big knob looking thing on the front of a Soyuz spacecraft). Then the orbital module has to be jettisoned, then the reentry capsule has to separate from the service module section (where the solar cells stick out on pics of Soyuz spacecraft). Clearly this was sequenced when the abort handle is pulled.
    So you have the reentry module separated and it's going wherever gravity and inertia take it. There is no means of controlling the reentry capsule in a reentry/abort scenario. The capsule's equipment and such is mounted to afford the vehicle the center of gravity to land in a top/nose up position though (Simple and elegant-it's been done this way since Vostok 1).

    The TV is advertising the astronauts suffered 7 G's during the abort. I'd bet it was more like 12-14 Gs. Those astronauts smiling on the couch in the media pics belie the fact they probably have some extremely sore muscles and bruises where their restraint buckles were on their bodies. Plus, don't forget the reentry capsule fires retro rockets about 15 feet off the ground to reduce the velocity from dropping at 80 feet a second to 15 feet per second for a relatively soft landing. Basically it was like getting hit in the back with a baseball bat after the abort.....
    They're smiling because they're probably popping muscle relaxers like candy.

    It didn't look like much of a ballistic anything-it looked like the capsule went forward a mile or two from the rocket then dropped like a stone. But they're alive and relatively well.

    The Soyuz abort system has been used before-think it was Soyuz 18 in 1975 when the first abort occurred. The capsule dropped the astronauts near a frozen lake in the middle of winter-rescuers had to ski in to get the crew. The Russians have a good communications and tracking system for space flights-there used to be 13 seperate comm stations in the Soviet Union alone for space flight comms.

    Their rescue forces are first rate. The paratroopers that were mentioned in the media jumping to reach the crew are Russian military's version of our Air Force PJ's-and HUGE respect to these guys.

    All in all, glad the astronauts are safe. But I wonder-we spent 65 million dollars for our astronaut to ride this Soyuz to the ISS. Will we get a refund?

  34. #34
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    I guess they wont be.........Putin.........anyone into space today.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheSearcher View Post
    Here's an amazing shot of the mishap from the space station:

    Seems very unlikely to me. I'd want further credible support before I take that picture at its claim.

  36. #36
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    The Russian spin on this deal.
    Several pics at link.



    Emergency escape at 6000 km/h: How near miss Soyuz rocket accident unfolded

    The Soyuz was considered so safe, tweets about a successful launch had already gone out. At the same time, the two men inside were hurtling towards the ground in the worst Russian manned flight accident since Soviet times.

    Baikonur’s first launchpad, the same one used by Yuri Gagarin 57 years ago, 11:39 am Moscow time, Thursday, October 11, 2018. In one minute, the Soyuz MS-10, the 139th flight of the various iterations of the spacecraft, will take off.

    Inside the capsule are Russian commander Aleksey Ovchinin, making his second journey to orbit, and rookie astronaut Nick Hague, an ace test pilot, who has waited five years since his selection as a NASA astronaut for this chance.

    Strapped to their seats in their bulky spacesuits, the two men appear calm, saluting playfully when asked about their state. The on-board video shows two dangling soft toys above them, a dachshund and an owl. These will serve as floating indicators of weightlessness, once they leave the Earth’s atmosphere, but also mascots.
    © Sputnik/Aleksey Filippov

    Thirty seconds left. One by one the umbilical towers that nestle the 300-ton kerosene powered Soyuz FG rocket, which has never failed since its first launch in 2001, fall away.

    In graceful slow motion, the rocket soars, then accelerates at an angle into the clear azure sky over the Kazakh desert, towards the orbiting International Space Station, to which the Soyuz will attach in six hours.

    Inside, the two men follow the progress of the rocket on their tablets, while ground control calmly details each stage, and the monitor shows altitude rising together with the speed, measured in meters per second – 1600, 1700, 1800.

    120 second into the flight, the booster rockets, the giant fast-burning firecrackers that power the initial upward thrust are scheduled to detach.

    That never happens as designed. A stuttering video appears to show the two spacemen jerked from their seats – likely entering weightlessness as the rocket lost speed. The feed then cuts out. A ground camera shows flashing fragments disperse from the body of the rocket.

    “A carrier accident,” a voice on the ground says dispassionately.

    “Yes,” confirms another.

    123 seconds into the flight, the emergency escape system activates, and the capsule detaches itself from the rocket, and falls back down towards the ground on a severe ballistic trajectory.

    No one sitting at the controls in Moscow was here on April 5, 1975, the last time the Soyuz booster rockets failed on ascent during a manned flight. The Soyuz 18-1 was carrying two cosmonauts up to Salyut-4, the Soviet space station. That time, the launch vehicle made it 145 km above ground, and the failure occurred between the second and third stages. Vasily Lazarev and Oleg Makarov were subjected to 20 g as they plunged towards a snowy Siberian taiga. Neither died, though Lazarev was reported to have never recovered from the physical strain.

    Ovchinin and Hague are luckier that their failure occurred earlier. Reports say they suffer 6.7 g – worse than the driver of a Formula 1 car pressing hard on the brakes, but less than the maximum they were subjected to during their training at Star City.

    As the Russian space agency continues to post scheduled tweets about the spaceflight that no longer is, 24 teams are dispatched to search for the men. Within minutes radio contact is re-established. The escape capsule landed 400 km from Baikonur, in the Kazakh steppe, 20 km away from the nearest large settlement.
    © Sputnik/Russian Army

    In the barren landscape it is quickly found. The pod is overturned, and Ovchinin and Hague extracted. They appear to have suffered no physical injuries.

    “That was a quick trip,”joked Ovchinin, while they were still descending, and the two men are filmed arriving back in Baikonur, and even eating their dinner, to prove they really are OK.

    Besieged by dozens of phone calls from reporters, his wife Svetlana, says "Thank God, they are OK."

    For the two men, the worst disaster since the 2003 Columbia crash – the last time astronauts died in action – has been averted. If all goes well, they will get another chance.

    For the manufacturers and operators of the Soyuz, formerly a testament to the reliability of the Soviet and Russian space program, a new narrative of analysis and blame begins today, and surely heads will roll, publicly or behind the scenes. As for the crew members already up on the ISS, they can expect a longer-than-planned expedition, while the only space fleet capable of carrying humans to orbit remains grounded.

    https://www.rt.com/news/441025-chron...dent-baikonur/
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by tanstaafl View Post
    Seems very unlikely to me. I'd want further credible support before I take that picture at its claim.
    Confirmed here.....

    https://www.rt.com/news/441031-soyuz...hed-photo-iss/
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  38. #38
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    I thought rt.com was a banned site? One of the sorcha woman's sites?

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by KittyKatChic View Post
    I thought rt.com was a banned site? One of the sorcha woman's sites?
    No, Russia Today ain't Scorcha........
    "The Spoor of an ELEPHANT
    is only RELEVANT
    to an ANT
    or a SYCOPHANT"

  40. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by night driver View Post
    No, Russia Today ain't Scorcha........
    Russia Today is a major TV channel often with good reporting and amazing balanced considering it is the official Russian Broadcaster to the West, and yet it tends to have no more bias than the BBC and probably less than CNN; unless the topic is something like how wonderful President Putin is or similar topics.

    It comes with my TV package and I find it very useful for coverage of disasters and non-Russian politics based events.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

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