Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 24, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


CHAT Any "Sons of Confederate Veterans" here? Have questions.
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 40 of 64
  1. #1

    Any "Sons of Confederate Veterans" here? Have questions.

    Hey,

    Background: A couple/three weeks ago someone (I have tried to remember who it was, but fail) said their G? grandfather was at Gettysburg, and I told them mine was there too, and had their back.

    Around that time it dawned on me (yeah a duh moment) that, that would make me a Grandson of a confederate veteran, so starting looking around. The SCV ask for some pretty specific documentation before joining. I really did some digging then.

    Come to find out he wasn't in the 2nd MS Inf. Reg. but rather the 2nd Miss. Cav. So he wasn't at Gettysburg. His unit rode with Gen. Bedford Forest, and was engaged in most of the local battles. Got a lot of detail on the movements, battles, wounded and killed, his company commander, and BN commander, of his unit.

    A lot of history, and enjoyed reading about what someone in my family went through. There was some pretty good exploits, and some tragedies.

    Now to the question:

    All of this info would be given to SCV to prove (along with genealogy) my kinship. Other than being able to make the claim of SCV what other benefit is there to joining? I don't do re-enactments.

    There is another question that is similar.

    I may have a g? grandfather who was in the Revolutionary War, for a short time. Everything I have run down defaults to ancestry.com, except for one, which has a soldier with my surname listed. So am a bit stuck there.

    Also checked out SAR and there is sort of a catch 22 there. You can't use their genealogy unless you join, and you can't join unless you prove your genealogy.

    Any instructions with the first question (SCV), or any suggestions with the second (SAR) would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    1,228
    My great great grandfather Charles H Clifton, North Carolina,lost his arm at Gettysburg.I have never joined a daughters of the confederacy group but I have thought about it. I found his grave a few years ago. It is in the woods, only marked with a white rock for a headstone and foot stone. He is surrounded by regular stone marked graves... I am told this was a slave cemetery and he is the only white person buried there. I think if I do contact some group they might help with getting him an appropriate headstone?
    Attached Images

  3. #3
    My great-grandfather was in the MI cavalry at Gettysburg. It's amazing how detailed the available records are...I know which days he was off sick! Another : was in the Union navy. When I have time I'm going to do the paperwork for that and the Revolutionary war...no reason except that I can, and it's cool.

    You can make a tree on Ancestry for free, and it would be worth paying for one month to get all the records. You might even he able to get a month free. DAR info is free.

  4. #4
    Hey,

    You might consider contacting the Daughters of the Confederate Veterans, or Sons of Confederate Veterans, and simply asking about it.

    Here is there website: https://www.hqudc.org/

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by bluelady View Post
    My great-grandfather was in the MI cavalry at Gettysburg. It's amazing how detailed the available records are...I know which days he was off sick! Another : was in the Union navy. When I have time I'm going to do the paperwork for that and the Revolutionary war...no reason except that I can, and it's cool.

    You can make a tree on Ancestry for free, and it would be worth paying for one month to get all the records. You might even he able to get a month free. DAR info is free.
    Well we won't hold it against you. LOL just poking at you.

    I have actually thought about doing just that.

    I do have some gaps in my ancestry, specifically, but generally know the direction. I can trace it specifically to NC. And know generally from other family members, who are now dead, that we originally came from VA which is were the one with the same surname entered the 1st VA light Dragoons. His name, and son of my g/x grandfather who served in the CW both have the same Christian name, so am thinking there is kinship there, generally.

    That doesn't mean there was a kinship there, but we are small in number.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Happy on the mountain
    Posts
    60,802
    Southern states paid pensions to their WBTS veterans, and state pension records can be an amazing source of detail as to an ancestor's service. Check with your state's Department of Archives and History or the equivalent and see what they can tell you.

    As far as the Revolution is concerned, give these folks a look -

    http://www.sr1776.org/membership.php
    The wonder of our time isnít how angry we are at politics and politicians; itís how little weíve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    Southern states paid pensions to their WBTS veterans, and state pension records can be an amazing source of detail as to an ancestor's service. Check with your state's Department of Archives and History or the equivalent and see what they can tell you.

    As far as the Revolution is concerned, give these folks a look -

    http://www.sr1776.org/membership.php
    Thanks Dozdoats.

    Actually, the pension records is how I found out a bunch of stuff. Concerning my CW ancestor. His wife applied, and listed a whole bunch of stuff. She was accurate to the inth detail, which made it easy to track a whole bunch of stuff.

    Sure was wishing the same applied to the Revolution.

    Will check the site out thanks.

    Also may have just made the link between NC, and VA. And like dang if this is true to my line, we go back to 1640, which would be a surprise to me. It's a little hard to believe so some more digging is required.

    Thanks again, and if anyone can add anything, I would appreciate it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Riding my Harley
    Posts
    4,474
    My great grandfather fought in the Civil War, and my grandmother was a real daughter of the confederacy, and a member. I have thought about looking into it myself, but grandparents are long past away, and my father died in 2011, so don't really know how to trace everything back.
    Patriot Guard rider
    www.patriotguard.org

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Happy on the mountain
    Posts
    60,802
    I worked on mine back when it was gasoline and paper records, not an internet connection and online stuff . One of my Alabama WBTS ancestors evaded me until I found out he had gone over across the state line to join up with a favorite cousin

    History is a lot more interesting when you have a blood connection to it. For instance-

    No 57
    Full Name; GARRISON, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN Present Post Office; Sprott Ala Was born on Apr 27th, 1834 at Greenville in the county of Greenville in the state of S Carolina; First entered the service as private on Feb 1862 at Yorktown Va in the Co K 8th Ala Infantry and continued until wounded and disabled at Gainsville June 27th, 1862
    -- http://genealogytrails.com/ala/perry...lwar_1907.html

    He lost the use of an arm due to the wound, and my grandfather could remember as a child scraping apple pulp out of the peel with a spoon to feed him when he was an old man sitting on the porch. He was a census taker for the 1880 census for our beat, and I have seen the original records in his (terrible!) handwriting in the courthouse.
    The wonder of our time isnít how angry we are at politics and politicians; itís how little weíve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Firebird View Post
    My great grandfather fought in the Civil War, and my grandmother was a real daughter of the confederacy, and a member. I have thought about looking into it myself, but grandparents are long past away, and my father died in 2011, so don't really know how to trace everything back.
    There are a couple of things you can do.

    If you know the name of your g grandfather, whether he died during, or after, and was even survived by his wife until sometime after 1903 (?). He or his wife could of made an application for benefits with the state they were living in. Those are free, and online. The app. will give unit mustered into, and dates, and out of, most of which will be April 1865.

    If you don't know, all is not lost. You can use findagrave.com to look for the oldest relative you know, and where buried, and sometimes they give out parents names, siblings, and children.

    I will do what I can to help. If you don't want to give their name out in the open board, pm me.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    I worked on mine back when it was gasoline and paper records, not an internet connection and online stuff . One of my Alabama WBTS ancestors evaded me until I found out he had gone over across the state line to join up with a favorite cousin

    History is a lot more interesting when you have a blood connection to it. For instance-

    No 57
    Full Name; GARRISON, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN Present Post Office; Sprott Ala Was born on Apr 27th, 1834 at Greenville in the county of Greenville in the state of S Carolina; First entered the service as private on Feb 1862 at Yorktown Va in the Co K 8th Ala Infantry and continued until wounded and disabled at Gainsville June 27th, 1862
    -- http://genealogytrails.com/ala/perry...lwar_1907.html

    He lost the use of an arm due to the wound, and my grandfather could remember as a child scraping apple pulp out of the peel with a spoon to feed him when he was an old man sitting on the porch. He was a census taker for the 1880 census for our beat, and I have seen the original records in his (terrible!) handwriting in the courthouse.
    It really does. At least it does for me. I was very fortunate in that a lot of the tombstones, and markers had "son of" written on them, which made it really easy. And the one who served had his unit written on the tombstone.

    And things do get a little muddled when no old folks are around to help sort it out. The one I just found in 1640-1715, in VA seems to be the same guy who was born in 1715 in NC, same named sisters etc.

    And I also used census to help. Still looking.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Happy on the mountain
    Posts
    60,802
    Basics - start with yourself and work back one generation at the time. Gather all the data you can find, but discount anything word of mouth until you can PROVE it from the records. Work to a legal standard, not a rumor standard.

    Keep copies - start with your birth certificate.

    Censuses are a good index but keep in mind, sometimes census takers made stuff up or wrote down what the neighbors told them. Check everything and verify.

    It's a lot easier now than it used to be ...
    The wonder of our time isnít how angry we are at politics and politicians; itís how little weíve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Arkansas
    Posts
    474
    CaryC, if I am reading correctly, you are in Mississippi. I know a man in north MS who is awesome at digging up that information. He is in SAR as well. If you are interested, you can PM me your info and I can pass it along to him.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    16,652
    My Great Grandfather fought in our War of Independence and the Civil War that followed,
    When we were kids he would often tell us stories from the time.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Marthanoir View Post
    My Great Grandfather fought in our War of Independence and the Civil War that followed,
    When we were kids he would often tell us stories from the time.
    You also are likely to know about one of my kinfolk, known as "The Liberator" or "The Emancipator" . . .


    intothegoodnight
    "Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light."

    ó Dylan Thomas, "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night"

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Amongst the Gentle People
    Posts
    6,302
    Our family started arriving here in the US after the Civil War. A co-worker who was a member of the DAR once asked me if any of the women folk in my family were members of the DAR. I told her none would qualify. She asked why. I told her that if any of my relations fought in the Revolutionary War, they were likely on the other side. Lordy, that look on her face was so precious!
    My Mate Winston

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    S.E. Texas U.S.A.
    Posts
    2,319
    This is a clip from some South Mississippi Historical publication. This is my 2nd Great Grandfather on my Mom's side of the family.

    Ladner_Ladnier_Chronicles-087.jpg

    My Dad's side had a 5th Great Uncle who was a Captain in the Revolutionary War. There is a big monument in a cemetery in Mecklenburg, North Carolina for him. It's like a twenty foot obelisk. He and his father, my 5th Great Grandfather are both in the SAR, but I've found nothing to show Grand Paw fought in the war. He was 61 when the war started, and died in 1778 at the age of 63. Still looking.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Happy on the mountain
    Posts
    60,802
    Likely not Jay Halker's - Jayhawkers perhaps?

    MS is pretty far east for genuine Jayhawkers (they were in KS), but there were Unionists in MS too no doubt. Perhaps he ran afoul of a bunch of MS redlegs. Anywhere around Jones Co., MS by chance? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jones_County,_Mississippi
    The wonder of our time isnít how angry we are at politics and politicians; itís how little weíve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by catskinner View Post
    CaryC, if I am reading correctly, you are in Mississippi. I know a man in north MS who is awesome at digging up that information. He is in SAR as well. If you are interested, you can PM me your info and I can pass it along to him.
    That would be correct. PM coming.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    S.E. Texas U.S.A.
    Posts
    2,319
    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    Likely not Jay Halker's - Jayhawkers perhaps?

    MS is pretty far east for genuine Jayhawkers (they were in KS), but there were Unionists in MS too no doubt. Perhaps he ran afoul of a bunch of MS redlegs. Anywhere around Jones Co., MS by chance? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jones_County,_Mississippi
    Yeah, I saw the spelling in that article, but there are other references to "Jay Hawkers" on my searches of him on Ancestry.com. It was probably a generic name to various bushwacker types, or like you say, Rogue Unionist. Then again, one story I came across, was he was executed after being captured in battle. Who knows in the fog of a brutal war.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    Likely not Jay Halker's - Jayhawkers perhaps?

    MS is pretty far east for genuine Jayhawkers (they were in KS), but there were Unionists in MS too no doubt. Perhaps he ran afoul of a bunch of MS redlegs. Anywhere around Jones Co., MS by chance? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jones_County,_Mississippi
    While that is true DD, there were Confederate forces in TX....I think, and maybe Missouri. MS is the abbreviation for Mississippi, Missouri is something else, and is where the redlegs' roamed ask Josie Wales.

    Also, Marion Co. is close to Jones Co. it's not next door. Marion is southeast of Hattiesburg, and Jones Co is North, northeast of Hattiesburg.

    Found this:

    Jayhawkers and red legs are terms that came to prominence just before the American Civil War in Kansas during the Bleeding Kansas era, where they were adopted by militant bands affiliated with the free-state cause during the American Civil War, a freedom fighting movement against slavery and in favor of individual liberty.

    These gangs were guerrillas who often clashed with pro-slavery groups from Missouri known at the time in Kansas Territory as "Border Ruffians". After the Civil War, the word "Jayhawker" became synonymous with the people of Kansas, or anybody born in Kansas.[1] Today a modified version of the term, Jayhawk, is used as a nickname for a native-born Kansan,[2][3][4] but more typically for a student, fan, or alumnus of the University of Kansas.
    I also found this:

    Ladner, Plumer
    First Corporal
    First Corporal
    B
    7th Batt. MS Inf
    That would be Co. B 7th Batt. MS Inf.

    At this link is a write up on the 7th.

    http://web.archive.org/web/201307020..._Bn_MS_INF.htm

    And a link for Silver Run, MS

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_Run,_Mississippi

    Really can't find anything where the 7th and Jayhawkers came in contact.

    Hope that helps.

    Located at this web site:

    https://msahgp.genealogyvillage.com/...nfantry46.html

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    16,652
    Quote Originally Posted by intothatgoodnight View Post
    You also are likely to know about one of my kinfolk, known as "The Liberator" or "The Emancipator" . . .


    intothegoodnight
    Daniel O'Connell ??

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Marthanoir View Post
    Daniel O'Connell ??
    Something like that . . . <grins>


    intothegoodnight
    "Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light."

    ó Dylan Thomas, "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night"

  24. #24
    you can get a military headstone for him. You will have to get a copy of his service record. Here is where you start the application https://www.cem.va.gov/hmm/ You will have to get the record from national archives, ancestry or fold3

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Alabama, CSA
    Posts
    11,898
    Sent you a pm
    Alabama - Independent Now and Forever - Noli Me Tangere

    The Confederacy - Fighting Terrorism Since 1861

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    8,100
    I think it is so cool that have so many people here that has family that fought for our country early on! I am so proud that both sides of my family fought in the Civil War. My Great great grandfather was a Captain in the Civil war and he was very well known and written about in Missouri. His brother fought for the other side and when he died in battle they allowed my GGGrandfather to come into enemy territory and get his brother and bring him home. My Great grandmother was in the DAR and I have the certificate. I never knew that until my Mother passed away and I found that in her things. I have thought about joining but I just don't know what it would entail.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Happy on the mountain
    Posts
    60,802
    This is a clip from some South Mississippi Historical publication

    That's why I thought MS.

    I always tell people I'm the only person in the south who is not descended from a Confederate officer I've found seven of my eight possibles and all were enlisted.
    The wonder of our time isnít how angry we are at politics and politicians; itís how little weíve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    This is a clip from some South Mississippi Historical publication

    That's why I thought MS.

    I always tell people I'm the only person in the south who is not descended from a Confederate officer I've found seven of my eight possibles and all were enlisted.
    LOL naw mine was only a private, and that is part of the reason for the trouble for following his trail. Usually it comes down to following his Bn, and in a few rare cases they mention which companies involved.

    His …..Brigade (?) CO is mentioned a lot since he was the only soldier to serve actively on both sides. Gen. Frank C. Armstrong. He started with the Northern Federalist, then turned in his resignation and dated it a month or so, in the future. By the time that date had rolled around, he had enlisted with the Southern Rebels.

    When Gen. Armstrong "first organized the Brigade (July 1862) he commented that the horses were in good shape, only three men had guns, and the officer's (of whom was CPT Marion Armstrong of Co. C my GGgrandfather's company) had seen no service."

    I dare say none of them had the famous cavalry sword. LOL

    In their first skirmish along with some other units, they whooped the yankee's and collected their guns for use.

    What a way to fight a war, start with no guns.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    2,274
    I am Sons of Union Veterans
    My direct ancestor was with the 33d Indiana Company A Thus my handle here. Wounded and captured at Thompson station Tennessee. Reseca. Peach tree creek. Siege of Atlanta. Averseys Bourough and BentonVille.
    Wife. A Wixom as in WIxom Michigan. All ancestors for the north.
    Wife, Gilmore (mothers name) from Alabama. SHe has ALL the documents on her maternal great grandfather but I dont recall.
    I do know that since this confederate stature thing started the SCVCW member ship has exploded.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Happy on the mountain
    Posts
    60,802
    three men had guns

    Typical throughout the Confederacy. Arming up in the Confederacy was a long, drawn out, difficult and expensive proposition. Confederate cavalry came to prefer cut-down muzzle loading black powder shotguns and multiple revolvers to generate the maximum firepower available at the time and with available technology.

    ========================

    http://www.oldsouthantiques.com/osnfsp6.htm

    Photos at the link-

    The shotgun shown here is not for sale. It belongs to a fellow collector who generously allowed me to photograph and share it with you.

    When the Confederacy was threatened with invasion by Federal forces in 1861 so many Volunteers flocked to her standard that many were turned away for lack of arms. The different state governments scoured the countryside in search of sporting rifles, old flintlock pistols and shotguns; any weapon that could aid in arming their Volunteers.

    In a short and to the point note dated May 18th, 1861 Confederate Secretary of War wrote to Mississippi Governor Pettus, “Can you give me two regiments for twelve months, armed with heavy double barrel shotguns?”

    A few days later Virginia Quartermaster M. O. Harmon wrote to Virginia Governor Letcher “The Greenbrier Cavalry, a fine body of men arrived today, and I send W. H. Peyton, esq., down to get army pistols, double barrel shotguns, or single barrel shotguns”

    Virginia Colonel (at this time) Jubal A. Early writes to Virginia’s Adjutant General, “There are now eight companies of cavalry here, well mounted and in fine condition, but for the arms necessary for them, which are mostly wanting. Two companies are armed with double barreled shotguns, and two more will soon have them.” In a following letter Colonel Early writes “I have directed them to get all the double barrel shotguns they could.”

    In July of 1861 Kentuckian Wm. T. Withers wrote to the Confederate Secretary of War, “Many Companies of cavalry have tendered their services, who propose to arm themselves with shotguns and revolvers.”

    On July 2, 1861, the Governor of Tennessee tendered the provisional Army of Tennessee to the Confederate President. Offering “twenty-two regiments of infantry, two regiments of cavalry”…. “part of the cavalry armed with revolvers and sabers, the balance with double barrel shotguns.”

    In January of 1862, Col. W. H. Jenifer, commanding five hundred men of the 8th Virginia Cavalry reported that his men were armed with “mostly old shotguns, bowie knives, and a few long range rifles.”

    The Confederate Cavalry’s extensive use of shotguns is frequently attributed to the Confederacy’s severe shortage of firearms early in the war. However, this is not the only reason. As early as August of 1861 the shotguns long term use was foreseen; Captain of Ordnance Wm. R. Hunt wrote to the Secretary of War from Memphis, recommending that contracts be let for 10,000 sword bayonets for double barreled shotguns. Nearly a year later Hunt wrote to Secretary of War J. P. Benjamin, “Colonel Forrest, the most efficient cavalry officer in this department, informs me that the double barrel shotgun is the best gun with which the cavalry can be armed.” A more qualified endorsement of the shotguns use could not be desired; it was the most efficient short range arm used during the war. As late as July 24, 1863, South Carolina Governor Milledge Bonham opines to Confederate Secretary of War Seddon that South Carolina had turned over all of her shotguns to the Confederacy.

    The Confederate Cavalry continued to employ the shotgun for the remainder of the war though with less frequency. The attrition of close-in combat took its toll; cavalrymen began to skirmish at longer ranges and eventually to fight primarily as mounted infantry.

    Where are all those shotguns? I suspect that there aren’t many surviving that had been converted for military use because a sawed off shotgun was of little value after the War. One could hunt game with a rifle or musket, or even a full length shotgun but, a sawed off shotgun is only good for one thing, killing men.

    The only reason this one survives is because it was picked up as a souvenir of the skirmish between Kilpatrick’s Cavalrymen and Confederate Cavalry under “Grumble” Jones and Beverly Robertson in Monterey pass after the battle of Gettysburg.

    The shotgun in its original configuration is of British manufacture. It has been shortened to a carbine length. A sling swivel similar to the one found on Richmond two band Carbines screws into the butt stock; another is attached to the upper ramrod channel. The sling is original to the shotgun. Half of a period silver quarter serves as a front sight blade. Its original wooden ramrod has a ball puller permanently affixed to one end and a forged iron ferule reinforcing the opposite, swelled end.
    The wonder of our time isnít how angry we are at politics and politicians; itís how little weíve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  31. #31
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N. Minnesota
    Posts
    11,387
    I could be in Daughters of the American Revolution and/or Confederacy, but don't really see the point. I think all you have to do is prove lineage from an already accepted military participant or a more recent, already accepted member. I have close-up ancestors who have been accepted previously. But still, not too many generations to prove really - even from the Revolution.

    I'd say, check back in your family history at ancestry.com or familysearch.com for an ancestor who is/was a member. Should make it a lot easier to prove.

  32. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    Likely not Jay Halker's - Jayhawkers perhaps?

    MS is pretty far east for genuine Jayhawkers (they were in KS), but there were Unionists in MS too no doubt. Perhaps he ran afoul of a bunch of MS redlegs. Anywhere around Jones Co., MS by chance? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jones_County,_Mississippi

    Contrary to popular belief, the South wasn't universally in favor of the Confederate cause. Mississippi has a Lincoln County, which - as far as I can recall - was renamed that at the beginning of the Civil War by Union Sympathizers. These beliefs can be multi-generational. I have a good friend (former TB2K member Brutus) who comes from a (very) long line of Lincoln County citizens and he, like his fore-bearers, is firmly of the belief that the Confederacy was wrong. He and I don't agree on the subject, so it's one we rarely discuss ;-) As for myself, my Louisiana family - which is of Swiss and not French origins - has been in North America since well before there was a United States and has lived under several different flags.

    Best regards
    Doc

  33. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by 33dInd View Post
    I am Sons of Union Veterans
    My direct ancestor was with the 33d Indiana Company A Thus my handle here. Wounded and captured at Thompson station Tennessee. Reseca. Peach tree creek. Siege of Atlanta. Averseys Bourough and BentonVille.
    Wife. A Wixom as in WIxom Michigan. All ancestors for the north.
    Wife, Gilmore (mothers name) from Alabama. SHe has ALL the documents on her maternal great grandfather but I dont recall.
    I do know that since this confederate stature thing started the SCVCW member ship has exploded.
    Well sir, you show your hand. The only way a Federal Unionist in the 33rd Indiana Co. A could possibly know of the upsurge of membership in SCV is through spies in the ranks. LOL just poking at you. No harm no foul intended.

    Hope you can say the same when I inform you that my direct ancestor was also at Thompson's Station March 9, 1863. Except on the Confederate side, and could of been one of the ones that captured yours.

    Is that weird or what? Especially if yours was with Minty's Cavalry, who started the whole thing. LOL

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    S.E. Texas U.S.A.
    Posts
    2,319
    The Ladners from South Mississippi were well represented in the Confederacy. Someone in my family, made this hand written list of local boys who fought.

    Ladner Civil War Soldiers.jpg

    The Ladners were also from Switzerland (direct relatives of mine), one being Christian Ladner, but spelled different back then. They were from French New Orleans, before the Louisiana Purchase. They settled the area of South Mississippi on the Gulf of Mexico. They established the town of Pass Christian, named after Christian Ladner.

  35. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Txkstew View Post
    The Ladners from South Mississippi were well represented in the Confederacy. Someone in my family, made this hand written list of local boys who fought.

    Attachment 153153

    The Ladners were also from Switzerland (direct relatives of mine), one being Christian Ladner, but spelled different back then. They were from French New Orleans, before the Louisiana Purchase. They settled the area of South Mississippi on the Gulf of Mexico. They established the town of Pass Christian, named after Christian Ladner.
    Cool!

    I think, correct if wrong, that up until WWII a lot/most units were made up of communities. Course it was really bad back home when the community units took a hard hit. So seeing a lot of Ladner's in the same unit isn't surprising, but I admit, seeing that many is. Course families back then were rather large, the timing of the war, with a particular age group meant a lot of people near the same age went off to war. My great grandfather was only 11, when his dad went.

    Thanks.

  36. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Happy on the mountain
    Posts
    60,802
    up until WWII a lot/most units were made up of communities.

    The Spanish-American War was pretty much the last hurrah for independent militia units going to a national level war. http://www.spanamwar.com/units.htm
    The wonder of our time isnít how angry we are at politics and politicians; itís how little weíve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  37. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    up until WWII a lot/most units were made up of communities.

    The Spanish-American War was pretty much the last hurrah for independent militia units going to a national level war. http://www.spanamwar.com/units.htm
    Aaa ok DD thanks.

    Maybe it was brothers, I remember the Sullivan brothers going down on the same ship. Anyway, that's not like a whole community.

    There's probably a lot of difference's 'tween now and then. I was reading about Faulkner raising the 2nd MS Inf. in Corinth, and thought that was weird, since it was so different as to when I enlisted.

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Alabama, CSA
    Posts
    11,898
    Alabama - Independent Now and Forever - Noli Me Tangere

    The Confederacy - Fighting Terrorism Since 1861

  39. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Alabama, CSA
    Posts
    11,898
    2nd MS Co C. Unit Information
    Alabama - Independent Now and Forever - Noli Me Tangere

    The Confederacy - Fighting Terrorism Since 1861

  40. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by rhughe13 View Post
    P H Riding
    WOW, Man, that is great! He was part of the unit that surrendered at Citronella, under Taylor. Didn't know that. I'm going to have to try and make a copy of that.

    I guess 33rdInd can rub it back in on me.

    I will have to say though that if anyone notices the date, it is after Lee's surrender at Appomattox, which took place in April.

    Thank you so much for that. I never knew.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.