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POL Two Muslim Women heading for US Congress in 2019
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  1. #1

    Two Muslim Women heading for US Congress in 2019

    Both women will be taking seats held by democrats (John Conyers and Keith Ellison) so they won't be taking republican seats. fwiw.


    This is the first one, she's a given after winning the primary as she is running unopposed. They call her the 'first' muslim woman but there will be two of them so it would be more accurate to call her 'one of the first' muslim woman to hold national office.

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/rashida-t...125553268.html
    (fair use applies)

    Rashida Tlaib Is Set to Become the First Muslim Woman in Congress
    Sarah Nechamkin
    August 8, 2018

    Former Michigan state representative Rashida Tlaib, a progressive Democrat, won her state’s primary in its 13th Congressional District Tuesday, leading her to likely become the first Muslim woman — and the first Palestinian-American — to hold national office.

    Tlaib ran for a House seat formerly held by Representative John Conyers, who resigned in December in the wake of several sexual harassment allegations (and subsequent settlements). She beat five other Democrats for the seat, and since no Republicans or third-party candidates ran, she’s basically guaranteed to take office after the November election. Tlaib ran a grassroots campaign, yet raised the most money of her opponents, topping $1 million.

    Thank you so much for making this unbelievable moment possible. I am at a loss for words. I cannot wait to serve you in Congress.

    Rashida For Congress (@RashidaTlaib) August 8, 2018


    On Tuesday evening, as polls were about to close, Tlaib told the Detroit Newsher day was filled with “happy chaos.”

    “Especially meeting voters and talking to them, they are inspired. One resident said she’s happy for me and it’s already written. It’s been amazing to interact with families at polling locations. I feel very much supported.”


  2. #2
    https://pjmedia.com/homeland-securit...leged-brother/
    (fair use applies)

    State Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) Swore to Apparent Falsehoods in Court — While Divorcing Her Alleged Brother
    By David Steinberg
    August 8, 2018

    Minnesota state Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-60B) is the presumed frontrunner for the MN-5 House seat being vacated by Rep. Keith Ellison (D). The seat is safely Democratic; Hollywood progressives, local party officials, and Minnesota media have all but scheduled the August 14 primary as her coronation. Their enthusiasm is rooted in Omar's identity: she is a photogenic, hijab-wearing Muslim who entered the United States as a Somali child refugee.



    Likely because of this, however, Omar's media and party supporters have been aggressively uninterested in a disturbing allegation about Omar with legal ramifications: that in 2009, she seems to have married her brother. That allegation has been public for nearly two years without Omar addressing its specific foundations.

    Newly uncovered evidence -- exclusively published below -- adds another allegation: Ilhan Omar has since signed off on apparent falsehoods, under penalty of perjury, during her 2017 divorce from the man in question: Ahmed Nur Said Elmi.

    New Evidence, New Allegations

    Minnesota law deems court records of divorce proceedings to be available to the public. In 2017, several months after Omar's marriage history briefly created a national news item, Omar quietly petitioned family court for a default divorce, claiming she could not locate Elmi.

    The above document depicts Omar, under penalty of perjury, attesting to the court that she has not had contact with her legal husband since June 2011.

    To those familiar with the 2016 coverage of this story, this claim should strike as a jaw-dropper. (Ed. note: scroll down below for a summary of the Ilhan Omar backstory.)

    To reference just one example, the three immediately following photos were pivotal elements of the 2016 coverage. These pictures first appeared on Ilhan Omar's personal Instagram account in 2014 (her username at the time was "hameey"), and depict Ilhan visiting Ahmed Nur Said Elmi in London that year.

    In contrast to Omar's attestation of zero contact since 2011, two of Omar's three self-published photos here actually appear to show physical contact some three years later:





    There are many other examples of consistent social media communication -- comments, likes -- between the two since June 2011.

    When confronted with the above pictures in 2016, UK resident Ahmed N. Elmi admitted to a reporter that he was indeed the scarved man in the three pictures. However, he also claimed to not know the name of the woman in the colorful head covering adjacent to him, and that she certainly was not his legal wife. He then gave the reporter a different birthdate for himself than the April 4, 1985, birthdate given for Ahmed Nur Said Elmi in Omar's divorce petition.

    In short, he claimed to simply be a different Ahmed N. Elmi, who coincidentally happened to get photographed with Ilhan Omar at a London event.

    As with Ilhan's self-published photos, this newly discovered post from Elmi's confirmed Instagram account contradicts his claim:



    On October 20, 2013, Elmi posted the above photos of himself in the hospital following minor surgery.

    Clearly, his hospital intake bracelet identifies his date of birth to be April 4, 1985.

    While other men named Ahmed Elmi have lived in the U.S. and London, there simply are no records to be found of another one sharing the exact birthdate as the Ahmed Nur Said Elmi whom Ilhan Omar divorced. Of course, this Ahmed Elmi has also been photographed with Ilhan Omar, and regularly communicated with her on social media.

    Piling on, note that a second known Instagram account belonging to Ilhan Omar, "ilhanmn," commented on the above post in 2013.

    Her comment indicates that she knew how to reach Elmi by phone years after June 2011, another strike against her sworn claims.

    More New Evidence Suggests a Troubling Motive

    Why might Omar apparently risk her political career and serious legal exposure by attesting to that easily challenged "June 2011" claim? Could it credibly be faulted to an honest, if severe, mistake?

    Another document from Omar's 2017 divorce proceedings suggests a more compelling, if speculative, motivation:



    The above document contains extraordinary information.

    First, Ilhan attests that there are no children born "of" her marriage to Ahmed Elmi, but that one of her children was born "during" that marriage. A yellow box notes that the document "has been updated since signed," and an initialed note contains the update:

    The Respondent [Ahmed Nur Said Elmi] has not signed a declaration of non-paternity as the Petitioner [Ilhan Omar] has had no contact with him since before the child was conceived.


    In 2016, Ilhan told the press that her 2009 marriage to Ahmed Elmi was essentially a two-year hiatus from her relationship with Ahmed Hirsi, the legal father of all three of her children. She claimed to have separated from Hirsi, then met and married Elmi, a relationship which failed permanently sometime around June 2011, and then rekindled with Hirsi and had a third child.

    Ilhan is filing for default divorce here. I cannot imagine that a judge would grant a divorce without Elmi even being served if the paternity of a minor child was in question.

    On this point, one last bit of evidence seems to be a Pandora's Box:



    The above Instagram post appeared on Ahmed Nur Said Elmi's account on June 12, 2012.

    That's Elmi himself, holding baby Ilwad at the hospital. She was born the day before to his legal wife, Ilhan Omar. Who attested in court that she has had zero contact with Ahmed Elmi since before Ilwad was conceived, let alone born.

    The silver lining for Elmi here is that he still likely has little reason to fear a process server greeting him in London with a paternity test.

    Because he clearly calls his wife's child ... a niece?

    For Rep. Ilhan Omar, everything about this Instagram post is a Code Red, and she's up for election in six days. PJ Media has emailed her campaign seeking comment multiple times since August 3, but has not yet received a response.

    ------------------------------

    Catch Up


    (For those unfamiliar with the 2016 genesis of the Ilhan Omar saga, read further for a summary of the backstory.)

    In 2016, two Minnesota journalists -- Scott Johnson of Powerline and Preya Samsundar of AlphaNewsMN -- researched an anonymous tip about Ilhan Omar. The tipster had presented evidence that Omar married her brother in 2009, and was still legally his wife as of 2016. The tipster had also asserted that Omar may have done it to help her brother commit immigration fraud. Further, the tipster had noted that Omar has been "culturally" married to, and living with, a second man since 2002 -- the father of her three children.

    Simple online searches of public civil records and social media immediately proved parts of the story to be true.

    Samsundar discovered additional compelling evidence, and even managed to get in touch with the apparent husband/brother, who currently lives in London. He proceeded to talk himself into a pickle trying to answer Samsundar’s questions.

    For doing their jobs admirably, Johnson and Samsundar were subsequently labeled "Islamophobes" and bigots. Omar's own representatives lashed out with such comments.

    The Minneapolis Star-Tribune and “alternative weekly” City Pages -- though they certainly “followed up” on the story -- offered minimal effort beyond publishing official comments from Omar's campaign. After first blaming anti-Muslim bigotry, Omar changed tactics by offering an eyebrow-raising statement that left specific evidence and accusations unaddressed.

    It worked. Virtually all media outlets that covered the allegations seemed content with Omar's official statement. She was soon sworn in -- the first Muslim Somali to be elected to a U.S. state legislature. That achievement landed her the cover of Time.

    Now Omar is pursuing an open federal seat, and a growing list of Democrats, including Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton (D), have endorsed this self-described "intersectional feminist." The district party officially endorsed Omar at a hastily assembled convention; she took 68% of the delegates' votes.

    Perhaps most pivotally, Omar received a timely boost from the entertainment industry in the weeks and months before Ellison even announced he would not run again.

    Time for Ilhan, a documentary about Omar's 2016 election win, just happened to hit the local festival circuit in April. Per the Hollywood Reporter's fawning review, the film blesses Omar and her identity in a manner reminiscent of the introduction given a certain Illinois state senator in the George W. Bush era:

    At the beginning of Norah Shapiro's documentary about Ilhan Omar's political run we're informed that no one of Somali descent has ever been elected to legislative office in the United States. By the end of this inspiring film, that fact has (spoiler alert) been movingly put to rest. Time for Ilhan feels like manna from heaven for liberals and progressives who have been in a state of despair since the last presidential election.

    ...

    As the campaign grinds on, an exhausted Ilhan sighs, "It's a lot, trying to change the world."

    In late May, Ilhan stunned for a few photogenic seconds in a new music video celebrating progressive feminism from pop band Maroon 5. Ellen Degeneres was featured too, and Jennifer Lopez, and Sarah Silverman.

    Just a week later -- and just hours before the filing deadline for the MN CD-5 ballot -- Keith Ellison announced he would leave Congress to run for MN attorney general. Sudden celebrity Ilhan Omar soon arrived, and filed.

    Ellison has since refused to endorse a candidate for the seat he is vacating. And good luck finding a local Democratic insider willing to claim the party attempted to clear a path for her. However, when several other Democrats showed up on deadline day to file, that aforementioned "hastily assembled" district endorsement convention was soon announced. Oddly, it was scheduled for Fathers' Day, when most of America has other commitments. Ilhan said nothing of note about it, but other candidates complained about the timing, and questioned the need for an endorsement convention at all. Notably, the endorsement convention delegates had all been chosen when Ellison was still the expected candidate.

    Such media/Democratic symbiosis keeps burning the modern Left -- it's "how they got Trump." It's easy to understand the disillusioned Midwest former Obama voters, and the rage against "fake news," amidst such failure.

    In this instance, Minnesota's current governor and 25-plus Democratic elected officials have endorsed a candidate seemingly without bothering to view her publicly available court records from just the past year.

    President Donald Trump portrays the Democrats as lawless, and their identity-based immigration and security platform as juvenile sentimentality. As November approaches, Trump couldn’t possibly find better foils to make those points than Ilhan Omar and the Democrat/media alliance that shepherded her to prominence.

  3. #3
    If you're wondering why Keith Ellison is leaving his seat and his position in Congress, read on. Interestingly, as attorney general he'd be in a perfect position to look into the shenanigans of his successor. Don't hold your breath though.

    https://www.minnpost.com/politics-po...nnesota-attorn
    (fair use applies)

    Why is Keith Ellison leaving a safe seat in Congress to make a risky bid for Minnesota attorney general?
    By Sam Brodey
    06/06/18

    At first glance, Keith Ellison has a good gig: as the representative of Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District — the state’s most liberal, by far — the Minneapolis Democrat could have a seat in the House of Representatives as long as he wanted it.

    Since entering Congress in 2007, Ellison has built a national profile: First gaining national recognition as the first Muslim elected to Congress, Ellison grew into a prominent progressive with substantial clout among the Bernie Sanders wing of the Democratic Party. He’s slated to play a big role in the 2018 midterms as the No. 2 official at the Democratic National Committee.

    But Ellison has decided to give up his enviable setup: on Tuesday, he announced he will run for attorney general of Minnesota, after sitting Attorney General Lori Swanson launched a last-minute bid for governor.

    For someone with a national profile like Ellison, ditching a comfortable seat in Congress for an office like state attorney general may seem like a lateral move — or even a step down in terms of influence, power, and prestige. Facing a competitive DFL primary and what could be enthusiastic opposition from Republicans in the general election, Ellison is also no sure bet to be Minnesota’s next attorney general.

    Why Ellison is making that risky move now is rooted in the realization that in the Donald Trump era, the best place to advance a progressive agenda might not be in Congress, but in the courts.
    A ‘people’s lawyer’

    After he filed his paperwork to run for attorney general at the State Capitol on Tuesday, Ellison spoke with MinnPost and outlined his vision for the attorney general job: a “people’s lawyer,” Ellison said, “who holds people in power accountable and makes sure the average person has a fair shot.”

    Ellison, who practiced civil rights law before first running for Congress in 2006, said he loves being a member of Congress, but sees an opportunity to make more direct impact on people’s lives as attorney general. “As attorney general, you get to enforce the law, and you get to make sure the powerful follow the rules.”

    “There’s some things a member of Congress can’t do. You cannot take immediate action to protect rights of people. A member of Congress can introduce legislation, try to make the law better, but an attorney general can very pragmatically sue to make sure people’s credit card companies are not taking advantage of them.”

    Past attorneys general in Minnesota, including Swanson, made consumer protection work central to the office’s mission. Ellison plans to follow suit, but he also sees the office as a necessary counterweight to what he sees as the destructive policies coming out of Trump’s Washington.

    He argued this political moment makes the attorney general role more essential than ever, and it’s a big reason why he’s running now.

    “Certainly, it’s a way to push back against some unfair things the Trump administration is doing,” Ellison said. “It’s not just the travel ban, it’s also things around the Internet, climate, a number of things the administration is doing to weaken rights, both social and economic, of Americans. It is at the local level that fight is being waged.”
    Trump era puts attorneys general in the spotlight

    The idea that Democrats should invest significant resources — like time, money, and talent — to win those fights on the local level has become increasingly popular in the age of Trump.

    After hemorrhaging state legislature seats and governors’ seats during Barack Obama’s presidency, the DNC’s new leadership — Ellison and party chair Tom Perez — made a point of renewing efforts to invest in state parties and political networks.

    With Democrats shut out of power in D.C., state attorneys general have become essential figures in the party’s efforts to block Trump’s agenda. Over the past 18 months, the group of 23 Democratic attorneys general have filed 47 lawsuits against the administration, over items like DACA and the travel ban to carbon emission standards for vehicles and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

    The case of the travel ban — the executive order to limit travel to the U.S. by nationals of a select group of countries — may provide the clearest example of why the attorney general gig appeals to people like Ellison.

    In January of 2017, Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson led the first challenge of the so-called travel ban, which prohibited nationals of a group of Muslim-majority countries from traveling to the U.S. That lawsuit, joined by Swanson, ultimately prompted a federal judge to suspend the executive order, forcing the Trump administration to weaken it. (“Is it fair to say a big part of my day now involves the Trump administration?” Ferguson asked in January. “Yes.”)

    In March, the administration’s modified travel ban was challenged by Hawaii Attorney General Doug Chin, which led a Hawaii federal judge to issue to another order blocking the policy. The constitutionality of the travel ban, now in its third iteration, is currently being deliberated by the U.S. Supreme Court.

    The promise of taking on Trump — and the national notoriety that affords — has drawn at least one Democratic star to an attorney general post. Shortly after the 2016 election, then-Rep. Xavier Becerra shocked Capitol Hill by announcing he had accepted an offer to become attorney general of California.

    Indeed, House service may be losing its luster for ambitious Democrats: The party has been stuck in the House minority since 2011, and in the majority-rules chamber, there isn’t much to do beyond cast "no" votes.

    Moreover, top Democratic House leadership posts have been held by the same few people for years: The top three leaders are all over the age of 76, and there’s no indication any are leaving office anytime soon. Becerra was widely considered a viable successor to longtime Democratic House leader Nancy Pelosi, and his exit from Congress was interpreted as a sign that younger, ambitious Democrats did not see a way up as long as the former speaker and her lieutenants were in charge.

    Ellison did not say whether their enduring grip on leadership positions motivated his decision to leave Congress. “I think there’s a wealth of talent in the Democratic caucus,” he said. “I just hope that leadership will continue to give promising young leaders opportunity.”
    Losing an ally in D.C.

    Some Ellison allies in Minnesota and in the progressive movement cheered his move to head back home to be Minnesota’s top prosecutor.

    Isaiah Breen, a former aide to the congressman, said that Ellison may be better positioned as attorney general to impact people’s lives.

    “Keith used to be a lawyer. In Congress, he’s been super interested in civil rights issues, prison reform — that’s exactly the kind of work he’d get to as attorney general,” he said.

    Breen also added that it’s encouraging to see progressive leaders like Ellison taking an interest in these kinds of state-level posts, recognizing what Breen said was Republicans’ effectiveness in leveraging local policy to achieve political and policy goals.

    That point was echoed by Stephanie Taylor, co-founder of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee, a grassroots group Ellison has often worked with.

    “Keith Ellison is a progressive hero who is willing to challenge power on behalf of everyday people,” Taylor said. “As attorney general, he could make a hugely positive impact for Minnesotans — and by challenging the Trump administration in court, for all Americans."

    Whether Ellison wins or loses his race, however, House Democrats will no longer have one of their most vocal, prominent progressives in D.C. come January 2019. According to progressive activists like Heidi Hess, co-director of the group CREDO Action, it’s a big loss.

    “He’s definitely one of our strongest allies,” Hess said. “We don’t want to lose any progressives in the House, ever.” At the same time, she said, “we know that AGs have a huge role to play in pushing back on Trump’s agenda as well. We feel like that’s also a place where he’ll contribute to promoting progressive values and defending folks being attacked by Trump.”

    Ellison confirmed on Tuesday that he will remain in the deputy chair position at the DNC, though his ability to travel the country and stump for Democratic candidates — something that he’s done a whole lot of over the past year and a half — will be severely limited by the demands of a statewide campaign.
    A tough choice

    Some Ellison allies back in Minnesota are dismayed at his choice to relinquish his seat in Congress: Several Democrats said there was an effort on Monday, following Swanson’s surprise announcement, to persuade Ellison not to run for attorney general. That effort was rooted in the desire not to add another messy primary — for both attorney general and to succeed Ellison in the 5th — to the DFL’s existing list of intraparty battles.

    But it was also animated by a belief that Ellison is more effective in Washington, and that his robust get-out-the-vote operation in Minneapolis — which some allies credit with boosting the DFL’s fortunes statewide — would not be replicated by his successor.

    Steven Schier, a longtime professor of politics at Carleton College, said Ellison is giving up an opportunity to advance in Democrats’ leadership track in Congress, especially given the possibility Democrats capture the House majority in 2018.

    “He’s certainly leaving some Washington clout on the table by this decision, in that if the Democrats take the House, he will have senior committee positions and agenda power he doesn’t have now,” Schier said.

    It’s also not as if Ellison is trading a safe seat in Congress for a cakewalk to state attorney general; he faces a crowded field of Democratic competitors in the Aug. 14 primary, which includes Commerce Commissioner Mike Rothman, veteran state Rep. Debra Hilstrom, and the endorsed candidate, attorney Matt Pelikan.

    If Ellison prevails in a primary and faces former state legislator Doug Wardlow in the general election, Republicans may see an opportunity to compete in an election they had written off. The Republican Attorneys General Association gave a preview of possible general election arguments with a press release fired off quickly after Ellison’s announcement, framing him as an “extremist” who is “completely unfit to defend the rule of law.”

    Breen, the former Ellison staffer, knows the decision was a difficult one for his old boss. “The image here is not of a guy who is champing at the bit to get out of dodge. I think this was a really difficult decision, and I think it’s not as cut and dry as, he could get more done in this job,” he said.

    “I think this was tough, I think it was measured, and I think it has a lot more to do with the sort of good Keith knows he can do as attorney general rather than being able to do good at all.”

  4. #4

    It's now official:

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry...b0fd5c73cd7760
    (fair use applies)


    Ilhan Omar Wins Democratic Primary For Congress In Minnesota
    If she wins in November as expected, she’ll become one of America’s first Muslim congresswomen.

    By Sarah Ruiz-Grossman
    08/14/2018 10:00 pm ET

    Minnesota state Rep. Ilhan Omar won the Democratic primary on Tuesday for the House seat in the state’s 5th Congressional District.

    Omar defeated four other Democratic candidates in a crowded race to fill the seat that opened up when Rep. Keith Ellison (D) announced his bid to become the state’s attorney general. She’ll face the Republican nominee in November’s general election. In the solidly Democratic district, she’s likely to prevail.

    If Omar wins the seat, she will become one of the nation’s first Muslim women in Congress ― she’ll likely be joined in the historic feat by fellow Democrat Rashida Tlaib, who won her primary for a House seat in Michigan last week, all but guaranteeing her a win in November and a spot in the nation’s history books.

    For Omar ― who was born in Somalia and spent four years in a refugee camp in Kenya before coming to the U.S. at age 12 ― breaking barriers will be nothing new. When she was elected to the Minnesota House of Representatives in 2016, she became the nation’s first Somali-American legislator.

    “I hope my candidacy would allow people to have the boldness to encourage people who don’t fit into [a] particular demographic to seek office,” she told HuffPost that year. “To believe in the good will of the people to select someone they believe shares their vision and not necessarily their identity.”

    Omar, a mother of three who’s lived in Minnesota for two decades, is one of a record number of Muslim candidates running for office in 2018, along with an unprecedented number of women.

    She’s also part of a movement of progressive candidates seeking to push the Democratic Party establishment further left. Omar is running on a progressive platform, including a $15 per hour minimum wage, Medicare for All and abolishing U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. She was endorsed by the Justice Democrats ― the progressive political group that backed Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in New York in her now-famous upset win.

    Omar’s candidacy comes at a particularly trying time for Muslim Americans, who over the past couple of years have faced a spike in hate crimes amid President Donald Trump’s election, as well as Islamophobic rhetoric and policies from the White House and a travel ban upheld by the Supreme Court that targets mostly Muslim-majority countries.

    “Oftentimes, you are told to be everything but bold, but I think that was important for me in running as a young person and running as someone who is Muslim, a refugee, an immigrant,” Omar told HuffPost in 2016. “To believe in the possibility that all of my identities and otherness would fade into the background, and that my voice as a strong progressive would emerge if I was bold and believed in that.”

  5. #5
    State Rep. Ilhan Omar on why she's running for congress.
    3min 10sec

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04KcBqhbaL8

  6. #6
    Two for sure running, mostly unopposed, so basically they are a given. Three more running, I'm not sure of their opposition or chances.


    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry...b0b15aba92ebf2
    (fair use applies)

    These Candidates Could Be America’s First Muslim Women In Congress
    Ilhan Omar is running for Congress in Minnesota, Fayrouz Saad and Rashida Tlaib for House seats in Michigan, and Deedra Abboud for Senate in Arizona.

    By Sarah Ruiz-Grossman
    07/25/2018 05:46 am ET Updated Jul 25, 2018

    A handful of candidates running for office in 2018 could soon become the first Muslim woman (or women) to ever serve in U.S. Congress.

    Democrats Fayrouz Saad and Rashida Tlaib are running for House seats in Michigan; Ilhan Omar for a House seat in Minnesota; Deedra Abboud for Senate in Arizona; and Tahirah Amatul-Wadud for a House seat in Massachusetts. If any of them get past their primaries and win in November, they would break historic barriers for Muslim women’s representation.

    Their candidacies come at a particularly trying time for Muslim Americans. Over the past couple years, the Muslim community in the United States has faced a spike in hate crimes amid President Donald Trump’s election, Islamophobic rhetoric and policies from the White House, and a travel ban upheld by the Supreme Court targeting Muslim-majority countries.

    The women are part of a record wave of Muslim candidates running for office in 2018, alongside unprecedented numbers of women running since Trump’s election and a movement of progressive candidates seeking to push the Democratic Party establishment further left. Several of the candidates were endorsed by the Justice Democrats ? the progressive political group that backed Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in New York in her now-famous upset win.

    If victorious, they would follow in the footsteps of Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), the first Muslim ever elected to Congress, and Rep. André Carson (D-Ind.), the second and only other.

    “It’s not why I’m running, to be the first anything,” Saad told HuffPost of the possibility of being the nation’s first Muslim congresswoman, echoing other candidates HuffPost spoke to. “It’s really about the issues.”

    But the candidates also acknowledged the significance of what their win would mean for representation, with Tlaib and Saad both celebrating the possibility of finally having a “seat at the table.”

    “What was missing was having a voice at the table, to change the face of leadership,” Saad said. “It’s the ability to break down some stereotypes and misconceptions just by being there.”

    Rashida Tlaib In Michigan

    Former Michigan state legislator Rashida Tlaib is running in the state’s 13th Congressional District, one of a half-dozen Democratic candidates seeking to fill the seat of Rep. John Conyers, who resigned in December amid allegations of sexual harassment.

    If she wins, Tlaib would become ? in addition to being the first Muslim woman in Congress ? the first Palestinian-American woman in the body.

    “People think it’s corny ? I do want to change the world, and I want people like me to have a seat at the table,” Tlaib told HuffPost by phone in early July.

    The Detroit-born mother of two and daughter of Palestinian immigrants already made history in 2008 by becoming the first Muslim woman to serve in the Michigan Legislature.

    In Michigan ? a state with a significant Muslim and Arab-American community ? Democrat Abdul El-Sayed will also be on the ballot in the Aug. 7 primary, in his case hoping to become the nation’s first Muslim governor.

    “People are ready for someone like me,” Tlaib said. “I’m not talking about being Muslim, Palestinian, brown or a woman ? I vote the right way and go beyond that.”

    Tlaib, who grew up the eldest of 14 children, is running on a progressive platform, including supporting Medicare for All and a $15 minimum wage. She told HuffPost she’s “going to abolish ICE” ? a leftist stance that has recently gained traction among a few leading Democrats (including lawmakers expected to run in 2020) since Ocasio-Cortez ran on that idea and won. Tlaib has received Ocasio-Cortez’s backing, and like the New York candidate, doesn’t accept money from corporate PACs.

    As of the end of last month, Tlaib was leading her Democratic opponents in fundraising. In a district that has historically voted Democratic, the winner of the Aug. 7 primary would likely be elected in November’s general election.

    Ilhan Omar In Minnesota

    Minnesota state Rep. Ilhan Omar is running for a House seat in her state’s 5th Congressional District, to fill the spot left open after Rep. Keith Ellison announced his bid to become the state’s attorney general.

    Omar was born in Somalia and spent four years in a refugee camp in Kenya before coming to the U.S. at age 12. She already broke barriers in 2016 when she became the country’s first Somali-American legislator.

    “I hope my candidacy would allow people to have the boldness to encourage people who don’t fit into [a] particular demographic to seek office,” she told HuffPost that year. “To believe in the good will of the people to select someone they believe shares their vision and not necessarily their identity.”

    The mother of three, who has lived in Minnesota for two decades, is running for Congress on a staunchly progressive platform, including a $15 minimum wage, Medicare for All and abolishing ICE.

    In her crowded primary set for Aug. 14, Omar has garnered the Minnesota Democrats’ endorsement. In the solidly Democratic district, the winner of the party’s nomination would likely be elected in November.

    Fayrouz Saad In Michigan

    Former Obama administration official Fayrouz Saad is running for Michigan’s 11th Congressional District in a crowded race to fill the seat of outgoing GOP Rep. Dave Trott.

    “It’s pretty simple for me: I’m the daughter of immigrants. My parents came here over 40 years ago in search of the American Dream,” the Michigan-native and Harvard Kennedy School graduate told HuffPost in mid-July, noting her family owns a small, meat wholesale business in Detroit. “I’m a product of that American Dream.”

    “I understand the American Dream can be fragile, and not everyone always has access to it,” the 35-year-old added. “I want to help protect that for folks.”

    Following her career in public service, first during the Obama administration in the Department of Homeland Security working on terrorism, then as director of Detroit’s office of immigrant affairs, Saad decided to run for public office after Trump’s election, pushed by what she saw as the American Dream “being threatened” by Trump and “the Republican Congress that continues to enable him.”

    Endorsed by Justice Democrats, Saad’s campaign does not take corporate PAC money and pushes a progressive platform including Medicare for All and $15 minimum wage.

    “I’m an Arab-American, Muslim woman who’s worked on national security in this country,” Saad said, noting what sets her apart from her Democratic opponents. “Let’s talk about what the actual threats to national security are ? because it’s not refugees and immigrants.”

    To have a shot at winning in November, Saad first has to beat four other Democratic candidates in Michigan’s Aug. 7 primary. Analysts say the general election could be a toss-up in a district that voted Obama in 2008 and Republican in the subsequent presidential elections.

    Tahirah Amatul-Wadud In Massachusetts

    Civil rights attorney Tahirah Amatul-Wadud is running for a House seat in Massachusetts’ 1st Congressional District. She faces an uphill battle in her Sept. 4 primary against incumbent Democratic Rep. Richard Neal, who has been in Congress for three decades.

    The mother of seven and first-time candidate is running on a progressive platform, including Medicare for all, universal internet access and ending the school-to-prison pipeline.

    “I’ve always navigated in spaces where I’m the only person like me, and a lot of the spaces I’m in are predominantly white,” the black, Muslim candidate based in western Massachusetts told HuffPost in April. “There’s a universality to my story, and my message and my platform that allows people to appreciate me beyond my race.”

    In the safely Democratic district, with no Republican challengers, whoever wins the September Democratic primary would be securing the seat in Congress.

    “My being in the race is already a victory for our entire community,” Amatul-Wadud said. “Regardless of who identifies themselves with me … we’re already winning because we’re amplifying the needs of so many people throughout the district and throughout the country.”

    Deedra Abboud In Arizona

    First-time political candidate Deedra Abboud is running for U.S. Senate as a Democrat in Arizona, seeking to fill the seat of retiring Republican Sen. Jeff Flake.

    “In 2016, I became really concerned about marginalized communities I’d worked with getting thrown under the bus for political gain,” the former immigration attorney and community activist told HuffPost in early July. “I decided to do something about it.”

    Abboud, 46, who has lived in Phoenix for two decades, is running on a progressive platform and is not accepting corporate PAC money. After converting to Islam in her 20s, she founded the Arizona chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations in 2001 after 9/11. Last year, her campaign faced a swarm of anti-Muslim bigotry online and at events ? though such harassment has let up dramatically this year, she noted.

    When asked what it would mean for her to potentially become the first Muslim woman in Congress, she said it would be “very significant,” noting that she’d also be Arizona’s first Muslim Senator, and its first representative to wear a headscarf.

    “Even me running raises the idea that a Muslim woman could do this,” Abboud said. “That’s good for everybody ... for younger generations to be able to look at a strong Muslim woman, standing up to bullies, and not allowing anybody else to decide what her identity should be.”

    Analysts say Abboud is a longshot to win. In her Aug. 28 primary, she’s up against centrist Democrat Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, who is heavily favored. The victor will face the GOP nominee in November ? either Rep. Martha McSally, former state Sen. Kelli Ward or former Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who was convicted of illegally targeting Latinos and whom Trump later pardoned.

    While Democrats haven’t won a U.S. Senate seat in Arizona since 1988, CNN ranked this race among the top 10 seats that could flip in the midterms.

    Abboud, who previously contributed to HuffPost’s open blogging platform, wrote last October that she knew people would look at her as “The Muslim Candidate” if she entered politics. “I am not the Muslim candidate,” she wrote. “I am an American candidate, a Democratic candidate, a grassroots candidate and, yes, I happen to be Muslim.”

  7. #7
    Got ammo?

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    We are so screwed!! Americans have to be the dumbest people on earth!! I mean come on how can anyone vote the enemy in to represent them over and over?? I have a muslim in the family and she married into the faith and was raised a regular American and she hates her own country now!!! They are NOT in it for us I can tell you that!!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by brokenwings View Post
    We are so screwed!! Americans have to be the dumbest people on earth!! I mean come on how can anyone vote the enemy in to represent them over and over?? I have a muslim in the family and she married into the faith and was raised a regular American and she hates her own country now!!! They are NOT in it for us I can tell you that!!
    I couldn't agree more.

    Besides people just being idiots, maybe its because they dont understand reality - they seem to think life is a funny game and the good times will go on no matter what.

    I dont know, it is depressing. Of course Minn. and Mich. are at the far end of the liberal spectrum.

    I guess those here that say "prepare for war" are about right.

  10. #10
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    Former Michigan state representative Rashida Tlaib, a progressive Democrat...


    A Marxist.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by vestige View Post
    Got ammo?
    Yes and buying more today

  12. #12
    Every time I see this thread, it makes me angry.
    Put a pretty face on Islam, and Americans will vote for it.
    Glorious diversity!
    Americans are so ******g STUPID!

  13. #13
    Join Date
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    Not real sure anymore...
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    That camel is about 50% in the tent right about now.
    Once you master people by force you depend on force for control.

    Better to be an hour early than one minute late.

    "What luck for rulers that men do not think" Adolph Hitler

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by narnia4 View Post
    I couldn't agree more.

    Besides people just being idiots, maybe its because they dont understand reality - they seem to think life is a funny game and the good times will go on no matter what.

    I dont know, it is depressing. Of course Minn. and Mich. are at the far end of the liberal spectrum.

    I guess those here that say "prepare for war" are about right.
    Wrong, wrong, WRONG.

    Red ain't liberal, bub.



    Don't make the mistake so many have before you; Detroit is NOT Michigan.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacknarwhal View Post
    Wrong, wrong, WRONG.

    Red ain't liberal, bub.

    Don't make the mistake so many have before you; Detroit is NOT Michigan.
    You are absolutely right of course. I was wrong, wrong, WRONG in what I said.

    And that gives a little hope: Detroit is not Michigan and Minneapolis is not Minnesota.

    The District in Minn that elected the Muslim woman is the center of the Somali population in the US (about 80.000 in Minnesota - 25,000 or more are in the Minneapolis area). She won with about 60,000 votes (20,000 more than her opponent). Incidentally, this is where (or very very close ) the Somali "officer" murdered the Australian woman. The far majority of other residents of this area are very liberal Black Democrats.

    So I understand a little better how she won. I (we) should not be taken in by the medias spin that this means so much. Those people are still idiots, but its a small degenerate slice of Minneapolis, an even smaller slice of Minn and the rest of the US.
    Last edited by narnia4; 08-15-2018 at 01:26 PM.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacknarwhal View Post
    Wrong, wrong, WRONG.

    Red ain't liberal, bub.



    Don't make the mistake so many have before you; Detroit is NOT Michigan.
    Michigan Republicans 38% Democrats 45%
    Those percentages include hard core party voters and those who lean towards a particular party.
    It's the large number 17% who say they don't lean one way or the other that made the difference in the last election.
    "I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself." -DH Lawrence

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by narnia4 View Post
    You are absolutely right of course. I was wrong, wrong, WRONG in what I said.

    And that gives a little hope: Detroit is not Michigan and Minneapolis is not Minnesota.

    The District in Minn that elected the Muslim woman is the center of the Somali population in the US (about 80.000 in the US - 25,000 of which are in Minnesota, almost all in the Minneapolis area). She won with about 60,000 votes (20,000 more than her opponent). Incidentally, this is where (or very very close ) the Somali "officer" murdered the Australian woman. The far majority of other residents of this area are very liberal Black Democrats.

    So I understand a little better how she won. I (we) should not be taken in by the medias spin that this means so much. Those people are still idiots, but its a small degenerate slice of Minneapolis, an even smaller slice of Minn and the rest of the US.
    Though you're quite right in that both states have one very big problem: a lot of liberal voters focused in one particular segment of the state. Detroit may not be Michigan, but it sure commands a lot of her voters.

  18. #18
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    Oct 2014
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    12,134
    Quote Originally Posted by TerryK View Post
    Michigan Republicans 38% Democrats 45%
    Those percentages include hard core party voters and those who lean towards a particular party.
    It's the large number 17% who say they don't lean one way or the other that made the difference in the last election.
    Also true. Which is why all us conservatives need to get out and vote in November to have any hope of getting Trump moving.

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