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EQ Yellowstone Super-Volcano Is Not Powered By Earth’s Core, Scientists Reveal
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  1. #1
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    Yellowstone Super-Volcano Is Not Powered By Earth’s Core, Scientists Reveal

    http://s1.ibtimes.com/sites/www.ibti...spot-track.jpg

    Yellowstone Super-Volcano Is Not Powered By Earth’s Core, Scientists Reveal
    By Shubham Sharma
    07/26/18

    For years, the long-dormant super-volcano at Yellowstone National park has drawn at a lot of attention from geologists and scientists in different parts of the world. The volcano isn’t anywhere close to erupting but various teams have been analyzing its features to provide more insight into how formations like this evolve.
    One such study has now suggested we were wrong about the source of heat for this volcano.

    Yellowstone Hotspot Track
    This is the location of Yellowstone's hotspot track. The triangles indicate general locations of the Yellowstone and Snake River Plain age-progressive volcanoes with ages shown in millions of years, plotted on a topography map of the Western United States. Photo: Virginia Tech
    In the past, scientists believed that the Yellowstone super-volcano was powered by the magma plumes coming from the core of our planet, much like most other volcanoes in different parts of the world. The theory was widely accepted, but just recently, Ying Zhou from Virginia Tech College of Science has demonstrated that the rubbing of unusual rocks in the mantle — a theory applicable on volcanoes sitting on edges of tectonic plates — was responsible for it.
    Though Wyoming, where the super-volcano is located, sits somewhere in the middle of North American plate, Zhou supported the case of subduction, in which friction generated by the sliding of rocks generates the heat required to power a volcano’s magma chambers.

    She took X-ray images of Earth’s interior and noted some previously unseen anomalies in the crust that bolstered support for the subduction theory.
    "In this research, there was no evidence of heat coming directly up from the Earth's core to power the surface volcano at Yellowstone," Zhou said in a statement. "Instead, the underground images we captured suggest that Yellowstone volcanoes were produced by a gigantic ancient oceanic plate [named Farallon] that dove under the Western United States about 30 million years ago.”
    This plate, as the researcher described, broke over time, with its parts sinking deep down into Earth. As these pieces of ocean crust rubbed over one another, the rock-melting friction was generated and hot material was pushed up to fill the volcano’s magma chambers.

    “This ancient oceanic plate broke into pieces, resulting in perturbations of unusual rocks in the mantle which led to volcanic eruptions in the past 16 million years," the researcher added in the statement. She also noted that heat generation from the oceanic plate started somewhere around the border of Idaho and Oregon and has slowly been moving since then.
    "The process started at the Oregon-Idaho border about 16 million years ago and propagated northwestward, forming a line of volcanoes that are progressively younger as they stretched northwest to present-day Wyoming," Zhou said.
    Moving ahead, the team plans to produce more high-resolution imageries of the unusual rocks in Earth's interior and run simulations for testing different scenarios of rock melting and magma feeding for the super-volcano at Yellowstone.

    The study titled, "Anomalous mantle transition zone beneath the Yellowstone hotspot track," was published July 25 in the journal Nature Geoscience.

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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by NC Susan View Post
    In the past, scientists believed that the Yellowstone super-volcano was powered by the magma plumes coming from the core of our planet, much like most other volcanoes in different parts of the world. The theory was widely accepted, but just recently, Ying Zhou from Virginia Tech College of Science has demonstrated that the rubbing of unusual rocks in the mantle — a theory applicable on volcanoes sitting on edges of tectonic plates — was responsible for it.

    Though Wyoming, where the super-volcano is located, sits somewhere in the middle of North American plate, Zhou supported the case of subduction, in which friction generated by the sliding of rocks generates the heat required to power a volcano’s magma chambers.
    where is the magma coming from?
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  3. #3
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    Uh, I think the overwhelming vast majority of volcanoes (with maybe the exception of subduction zone volcanoes, which I guess you could argue are entirely a planetary crust phenomenon) are powered by the mantle. I don't know of anyone (at least anyone credible) who has ever claimed that any volcano got its magma straight from the core. Although I freely admit I could be wrong.

  4. #4
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    Upon further thought I think we can also lump subduction zone volcanoes into the Mantle-powered volcanoes category since theoretically the tectonic plates are all being moved around by convection currents in the Mantle. So while the magma in any given subduction zone volcano may not actually come from the Mantle proper (it may come from the melting of the plate being shoved down into the Mantle), it is being powered by forces originating in the Mantle.

    For what it's worth, according to Wikipedia the Mantle makes up just short of 90% of the entire volume of planet Earth. I've read that for the crust and the atmosphere to be accurately drawn to scale (where the whole planet is also drawn) any wider than a single pencil line you'd need a piece of paper at least the size of a regulation basketball court. Which should give you some idea of why the Mantle could be the driver of all volcanoes.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tanstaafl View Post
    Upon further thought I think we can also lump subduction zone volcanoes into the Mantle-powered volcanoes category since theoretically the tectonic plates are all being moved around by convection currents in the Mantle. So while the magma in any given subduction zone volcano may not actually come from the Mantle proper (it may come from the melting of the plate being shoved down into the Mantle), it is being powered by forces originating in the Mantle.

    For what it's worth, according to Wikipedia the Mantle makes up just short of 90% of the entire volume of planet Earth. I've read that for the crust and the atmosphere to be accurately drawn to scale (where the whole planet is also drawn) any wider than a single pencil line you'd need a piece of paper at least the size of a regulation basketball court. Which should give you some idea of why the Mantle could be the driver of all volcanoes.
    Thank you, it's been a while since I've taken a basic geology course, there were things in the OP that was just weird.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  6. #6
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    That's my understanding of it, anyway. If anything I said was seriously wrong I sure hope someone chimes in (with links) to correct it. For those of us getting up there in years, a hefty chunk of what we learned in school is now considered outdated science (and sometimes just plain wrong). So I'm always willing to learn where I need to "upgrade" my brain. My problem comes in getting a mental upgrade and then having my brain spontaneously default back to a previous version!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by tanstaafl View Post
    That's my understanding of it, anyway. If anything I said was seriously wrong I sure hope someone chimes in (with links) to correct it. For those of us getting up there in years, a hefty chunk of what we learned in school is now considered outdated science (and sometimes just plain wrong). So I'm always willing to learn where I need to "upgrade" my brain. My problem comes in getting a mental upgrade and then having my brain spontaneously default back to a previous version!
    That outdated learning is why I haven't posted much. I follow these geology threads avidly, and keep learning.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

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