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CORP/BIZ Nordstrom opening Los Angeles stores that don't sell much of anything
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  1. #1
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    Nordstrom opening Los Angeles stores that don't sell much of anything

    Nordstrom opening Los Angeles stores that don't sell much of anything
    Janine Puhak
    4-5 minutes


    Nordstrom is planning to open two brick-and-mortar Nordstrom Local stores essentially devoid of merchandise.

    The luxe department store chain is preparing to open two more of its relatively miniature locations in Brentwood and downtown, the Associated Press reports. But whereas typical Nordstrom stores sprawl across 140,000 square feet, the first Nordstrom Local store in West Hollywood measures at just 3,000 square feet.

    Nordstrom Local will carry some items for shoppers to try on, but customers are encouraged to order Nordstrom items online to be delivered to the store on the same day.

    If the new stores are anything like the original, which opened its doors in October 2017, fans can look forward to lush amenities like on-site stylists, tailors, manicures, coffee and alcohol, as well as eight dressing rooms and a lounge space, Forbes reported.

    “We aim to bring the convenience and accessibility of our some of the most popular or highly demanded services right to the neighborhoods where our customers live and work,” Shea Jensen, Nordstrom senior vice president of customer experience, told Fast Company in a July 9 interview.

    “We’ve heard loud and clear from our customers that drivability is a factor.”

    Seattle-based Nordstrom and other department stores are wrestling with how to respond to shoppers' shift online.

    The Associated Press contributed to this report.

    Janine Puhak is an editor for Fox News Lifestyle. Follow her on Twitter at @JaninePuhak


    http://www.foxnews.com/lifestyle/201...-anything.html

  2. #2
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    Interesting idea in the Internet age.

  3. #3
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    Is it a demo store? I mean, do they simply have on of everything and then tell you to order?

  4. #4
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    Sounds like it. But when you order on-line, you can pick it up at the store that day.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20Gauge View Post
    Is it a demo store? I mean, do they simply have on of everything and then tell you to order?
    Old practice. It's called "Showrooming." People go to stores to get hands-on with the item, and then if they decide to buy, hit the web for the best price.

    Nordstrom is almost taking advantage of that, it looks like.

  6. #6
    Huge Nordstrom Fan

    but

    why would I drive to their store when I could simply have it shipped to my home?

  7. #7
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    Because at their store, you can figure out what size/color/etc you want. A big shortcoming of online sales is that the customer can't actually see and touch the item. This model is a hybrid. That's why I find it interesting.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacknarwhal View Post
    Old practice. It's called "Showrooming." People go to stores to get hands-on with the item, and then if they decide to buy, hit the web for the best price.

    Nordstrom is almost taking advantage of that, it looks like.
    If that is the case, maybe not a bad idea. Modern day Sears catalog?

  9. #9
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    I didn't get the impression that they carry much of anything in the store. It sounds like you order it ahead of time, it's delivered to the store, you go to the store and try stuff on, and buy the pieces you like. It's actually a good concept -- if it works for them, it may spread.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    Because at their store, you can figure out what size/color/etc you want. A big shortcoming of online sales is that the customer can't actually see and touch the item. This model is a hybrid. That's why I find it interesting.
    Also, no risk of fake merchandise.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20Gauge View Post
    If that is the case, maybe not a bad idea. Modern day Sears catalog?
    Better than the catalog; with the catalog, you see pictures. With this store, you can see it, touch it, try it on, and THEN order it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacknarwhal View Post
    Better than the catalog; with the catalog, you see pictures. With this store, you can see it, touch it, try it on, and THEN order it.
    Yep, that is why a "modern day".....Sears....lol

    I really like the idea

  13. #13
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    A model for stores in high shoplifting areas.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacknarwhal View Post
    Better than the catalog; with the catalog, you see pictures. With this store, you can see it, touch it, try it on, and THEN order it.
    Except that it sounds like they are doing it the other way around -- order it, go to the store and try it on, and then buy it if you like it. Presumably if you don't like it, it gets sent back to the warehouse.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
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  15. #15
    Makes sense. All that retail floor space is expensive to keep open. Wharehousing most of the merchandise is far more efficient for square-foot rent/utilities, and also maintains better security for "loss prevention."

    Their core customer is reluctant to buy premium denim and expensive shoes w/o being able to try them on.
    Returns are by nature a hassle, even at Nordstroms.
    I used to LOVE their stores, but they have been completely out of my price range and budget for more than the last decade. Now, I look back, and I can't believe the kind of money I spent on jeans, purses, and cute shoes. Yikes. Priorities change.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freeholder View Post
    Except that it sounds like they are doing it the other way around -- order it, go to the store and try it on, and then buy it if you like it. Presumably if you don't like it, it gets sent back to the warehouse.

    Kathleen
    It's close. A lot of places like Amazon and that are letting people send back clothes that don't fit, but that costs a mint in shipping. So having a centralized store that lets you try stuff on almost makes sense in comparison. The price of a storefront is hefty, but it might not be as bad as back-and-forth shipping costs.

  17. #17
    fans can look forward to lush amenities like on-site stylists, tailors, manicures, coffee and alcohol, as well as eight dressing rooms and a lounge space
    Many people like to be coddled. I myself must pay attention value and the “extra services” cost money and raise prices.

    Seattle-based Nordstrom
    Could be a left coast thing but interesting concept.
    Possibly a "socially retarded" redneck rebel!

  18. #18
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    Sounds GREAT! Nothing like going into a store an ordering something then leaving and having to go back [ilater[/i] to actually GET it!

    I think restaurants should do that-you go in, peruse the menu then leave to come back and eat a few hours later!
    "It ain't no secret I didn't get these scars falling over in church."


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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rabbit View Post
    A model for stores in high shoplifting areas.
    No doubt. In Jacksonville the shop lifting is almost a business plan for many of the people who live in the city.

  20. #20
    I loved Nordstroms back in the day when I dressed for success. They had a personal shopper feature where when you found a dress or suit you liked they would bring shoes, purses, jewelry etc. to the dressing room. Sigh, for the good old days when I wore a size 5.

  21. #21
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    I like the concept. I order a lot of clothing online, and get tired of them not fitting properly. It would save time and money on shipping costs if I could actually try it on before ordering. Maybe, this will be a great success, and other retailers will join in.

  22. #22
    The Kohl's near where I grew up is basically the same thing. It is a really small footprint, minimal merchandise compared to the larger stores. They basically want people to order on-line and pick up their stuff. To me this sounds like a huge hassle. I always like to try things on like clothing to make sure it fits before I buy it. Just because a "medium" from XYZ label fit for the last three years, all of a sudden they hire another factory to make the garments and "medium" might be too small. What it sounds like to me is that these clothing makers should just sell through Amazon. If one is going to order clothing on-line figuring the size would be OK, why not just have it deliver to the home instead of having to make a special trip to the store?

    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernBreeze View Post
    I like the concept. I order a lot of clothing online, and get tired of them not fitting properly. It would save time and money on shipping costs if I could actually try it on before ordering. Maybe, this will be a great success, and other retailers will join in.
    I read complaints about the Kohl's noted above. They don't always have the sizes in so if a large is too big and a small is too small, it is still a toss up if a medium (which they don't have in stock because someone purchased all of them) will really fit well or not. Also, people have complained about having say five colors on-line, but only three in the store, so what the color will actually look like in-person is still a mystery until it arrives.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satanta View Post
    Sounds GREAT! Nothing like going into a store an ordering something then leaving and having to go back [ilater[/i] to actually GET it!

    I think restaurants should do that-you go in, peruse the menu then leave to come back and eat a few hours later!
    Actually, this is called "making reservations."


  24. #24
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    I always pick up a menu before I try a new restaurant unless it is recommended by a friend, or find one online.

    Want to know what I might order and how much it will cost.
    True North Strong and Free

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurane View Post
    I always pick up a menu before I try a new restaurant unless it is recommended by a friend, or find one online.

    Want to know what I might order and how much it will cost.
    True. I love checking out menus for possible new places. Doesn't always end well but it's worth the try!

  26. #26
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    I bet one day soon they will drop stores altogether and have an online catalog, very cutting edge, just like Sears & Roebuck did 150 years ago but without the paper. Yes very progressive, LOL.

    "All right. They're on our left; they're on our right, they're in front of us, they're behind us. . .they can't get away this time."


  27. #27
    It was either Lands End or LL Bean... that let you input your measurements and save them with your account to select the correct size when shopping online. Thought that helped avoid a lot of returns for wrong sizes. FIT might still be a problem, mind you... because our shapes and lengths are so unique.

  28. #28
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    Yeah, when you figure on the smaller footprint and rental cost for the space, you can set up in more locations and handle the daily deliveries and returns with maybe a dozen or so trucks from a central regional feeder warehouse fed by a centralized main via truck or UPS/FedEx. On the Men's side of things, figure a space for a "mark up" tailor, fitting room, material samples, ties and a computer terminal. You can fit that into a pretty small space.

    ETA: Add to that, they could keep your measurements on file and provided you didn't expand or contract too much during the holidays it would make ordering another suit or other parts of a wardrobe a lot simpler. Heck the misses (or significant other) could order one as a present without tipping the guy off with such a set up.
    Last edited by Housecarl; 07-12-2018 at 08:10 PM.

  29. #29
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    I run into size variances in the same product, same size, same pile, in the store.
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  30. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Freeholder View Post
    Except that it sounds like they are doing it the other way around -- order it, go to the store and try it on, and then buy it if you like it. Presumably if you don't like it, it gets sent back to the warehouse.

    Kathleen
    This is somewhat a concept of the future. I think it could work with some tweaking like having accessories available to pull an outfit together. I suspect it will really be a boon for male shopping.

    Does anyone know if Nordstrom's sales are still low after the whole Ivanka blowup?

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