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EDUC Political Homogeneity in Academia: Nearly 40% of colleges have no Republicans as faculty
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  1. #1
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    2 Political Homogeneity in Academia: Nearly 40% of colleges have no Republicans as faculty

    https://www.frontpagemag.com/fpm/270...a-jack-kerwick


    Political Homogeneity in Academia

    Nearly 40% of colleges have no Republicans as faculty.

    May 17, 2018
    Jack Kerwick

    Writing in the April issue of Academic Questions, a journal of the National Association of Scholars, Mitchell Langbert reveals some information regarding the state of higher education that should come as no surprise to readers of this column.

    Yet while Langbert’s findings are unsurprising, they still can’t fail to shock the observer who continues to believe, naively, that academia is a marketplace of competing ideas.

    To put it bluntly, academia is a left-wing, Democrat hegemon.

    Langbert’s research centers on a sample of “8,688 tenure track, Ph.D.-holding professors from fifty-one of the sixty-six top ranked liberal arts colleges in the U.S. News 2017 report[.]” Of these, 59.8 percent, or 5,197, are registered either Democrat or Republican.

    And the vast majority are registered Democrat.

    Nearly 40 percent (39%) of colleges have zero registered Republicans, and while “in most of the remaining 61 percent, with a few important exceptions, [there] is slightly more than zero percent” Republicans, the political imbalance remains “absurdly skewed” against the latter.

    “Thus,” Langbert writes, “78.2 percent of the academic departments in my sample have either zero Republicans, or so few as to make no difference.”

    To put this point another way, Langbert found 808 departments that do not have a single Republican within them, while only 225 departments do have at least one registered Republican faculty member.

    Because of what he describes as the U.S. News reports “anomalous” definition of “a liberal arts college,” Langbert includes in his study the military colleges of West Point and Annapolis. Had he not done so, though, the Democratic-to-Republican (D:R) ratio would have been a whopping 12.7:1—rather than the still astronomical 10.4:1 ratio that obtains when these institutions are excluded.

    While it’s true that the D:R ratio is lower in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) than it is in the humanities and social sciences, Democrats continue to outnumber Republicans even there. Langbert supplies a chart in which, having broken down his survey by discipline and department, he identifies the number of registered Democrat professors for every Republican. Below are his findings:

    Engineering, 1.6:1

    Chemistry, 5.2:1

    Economics, 5.5: 1

    Professional, 5.5:1

    Mathematics, 5.6:1

    Physics, 6.2:1

    Computers, 6.3:1

    Political Science, 8.2:1

    Psychology, 16.8:1

    History, 17.4:1

    Philosophy, 17.5:1

    Biology, 20.8:1

    Language, 21.1:1

    Environmental, 25.3:1

    Geoscience, 27:1

    Classics, 27.3:1

    Theater, 29.5:1

    Music, 32.8:1

    Art, 40.3:1

    Sociology, 43.8:1

    English, 48.3:1

    Particularly surprising, and more than a little bit concerning, is that in the religious departments of the top-tier liberal arts institutions in this study, there exists an astounding 70:1 D:R ratio!

    The D:R ratio is 56:0 in anthropology and in communications and what Langbert refers to as “interdisciplinary studies”—fields like “gender studies,” “Africana studies,” and “peace studies”—the ratio was 108:0. Langbert notes that these “interdisciplinary” fields have “their roots in ideologically motivated political movements that crystallized in the 1960s and 1970s”—a fact that could very well explain in large measure why those who specialize in teaching them are exclusively on the left.

    Langbert also offers a list of the liberal arts colleges that he studied and the D:R ratio that he found at each institution (Parents should pay attention!):

    Bryn Mawr, 72:0

    Soka, 20:0

    Wellesley, 136:1

    Williams, 132:1

    Swarthmore, 120:1

    Barnard, 98:1

    Sarah Lawrence, 54:1

    Bowdoin, 53.5:1

    Mount Holyoke, 44.5:1

    Pomona, 39.7:1

    Hobart & W.S., 38.3:1

    Bates, 37.5:1

    Vassar, 35:1

    Amherst, 34:1

    Smith, 32.8:1

    Wesleyan, 31:1

    Connecticut, 26.3:1

    Hamilton, 24.8:1

    Pitzer, 21.3: 1

    Union, 19.6:1

    Trinity, 19.4:1

    Bard, 19.3:1

    Colgate, 19.1:1

    Colorado, 18.7:1

    Grinnell, 18.4:1

    Oberlin, 15.6:1

    Haverford, 15.5:1

    Skidmore, 15.5:1

    Franklin Marshall, 15.4:1

    Occidental, 13.3:1

    Holy Cross, 13.3:1

    Muhlenberg, 13:1

    Colby, 12.1:1

    St. Lawrence, 11.8:1

    There are several other schools on this list. The only two exceptions to this rule of Democratic hegemony are Thomas Aquinas College and St. John’s College. The former has 33 full-time professors, all of whom are Republican. The latter has “above average Republican representation.”

    As Langbert notes, these “exceptions to the Democratic-only rule indicate that institutional factors and discrimination might be key reasons for political homogeneity in the liberal arts colleges.”

    Political uniformity, Langbert goes on to contend, should be an abiding concern for all who are invested in preserving the integrity of the academic life, both in respect to teaching and research. Such uniformity creates an ideological bubble that insulates academics from those with opposing perspectives. Consequently, teaching and research promise to be ridden with biases that, in turn, diminish the credibility of academics.

    To support his contention, Langbert adduces a couple of powerful considerations:

    (1) Referencing a recently published anthology on the politically-charged nature of social psychology, he notes that “because of left-wing bias, psychologists are far more likely to study the character and evolution of individuals on the Right than individuals on the Left.”

    (2) Sociologists, some researchers have discovered, “prefer not to work with fundamentalists, evangelicals, National Rifle Association members, and Republicans.”

    Langbert elaborates:
    “Even though more Americans are conservative than liberal, academic psychologists’ biases cause them to believe that conservatism is deviant.”
    Leftist bias impacts whole fields—like gender. “In the study of gender,” Langbert informs us, “Charlotta Stern finds that the ideological presumptions in sociology prevent any but the no-differences-between-genders assumptions of left-leaning sociologists from making serious research inroads.”

    Colleges and universities had been trending leftward for quite some time. Langbert writes: “More than a decade ago, Stanley Rothman and colleagues provided evidence that while 39 percent of the professoriate on average described itself as Left in 1984, 72 percent did so in 1999. They find a national average D:R ratio of 4.5:1.” Not long ago, though, Langbert and some colleagues discovered a D:R ratio of 11.5:1 “in the social science departments of highly ranked national universities.”

    And, of course, Langbert’s most recent study, as we have seen, reveals that the D:R ratio has increased even more to 12.7:1 (when military colleges are excluded).

    With numbers like these, Mitchell Langbert’s conclusion sounds all too sober:

    “The solution to viewpoint homogeneity,” he suggests, “may lie in establishing new colleges from the ground up, rather than in reforming existing ones.”
    Sapere aude

  2. #2
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    They started calling it Reconstruction in 1865. Not sure what the new politically correct name would be. Reconstruction is what caused for the formation of the KKK.
    Alabama - Independent Now and Forever - Noli Me Tangere

    The Confederacy - Fighting Terrorism Since 1861

  3. #3
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    A couple of quick observations about the original post:

    - Few liberals in Engineering major. Gee, why would that be? Probably because "feelings" don't count in Engineering.

    - No military Academies on the list. Even though Academies provide a "liberal" education, it's not "liberal" in the same sense that "Liberal" colleges/universities mean the term At Academies, it means a well rounded education which includes history, philosophy, etc. in addition to the main engineering core. I know because I went to USAFA and still attend alumni events.

  4. #4
    When I was in college in the 1970's, while most professors in the fields I studied (Anthropology and History) were liberal; most departments went out of their way to have at last one conservative member (history tended to have more than one; along with some moderates).

    It was tacitly understood back in the "stone-age" that part of a good education was learning to THINK and that involved dealing with people whose views you might not agree with.

    We even had a very conservative professor in the Anthropology department though he was the physical Anthropology Instructor - which is a close to serious science/engineering as most Anthropologists get - I mean you can argue about what role a bone plays in evolutions but a bone is still a physical object.

    When I got to the graduate level I got to know him more as a person an realized he was not really as "horrible" as I thought; ditto the "History of the Old South" professor who once said (in class) "I don't know why Negroes are so upset, I mean we brought them over as uncivilized barbarians and them taught them civilization and Christianity."

    Yes, I saw even his human side when he cheerfully took a Venezuelan Agricultural student under his wing and took him on a tour of North Mississippi farms and factories; since the man was getting his degree in agricultural engineering and wanted to take local knowledge back to his own country (and yep the guy was probably of mixed race).

    Years later, I've thought a lot about what both men; and some of our other "conservative" professors said that at the time I thought was horrific (which is what I still think about that "Negro comment" but never mind) and in many cases I can see their point even if I don't always come to the same conclusion.

    Which is of course, the point of education - learning to think as well as learning to act; some fields like engineering require a lot more thoughtful action and other fields like Cultural Anthropology involve a lot more theory but all of them need critical thinking; even if the student eventually ends up working in another field (in my case the Civil Service) knowing how to THINK will always be a required skill.

    Critical Thinking is a skill that seems to be "written out" of modern education on all levels at least in the US and the UK; not having ANY professors with unpopular views is a BAD idea and does students, especially on the college level, no service what so ever especially when it comes to getting ready for the real world.

    PS - I should mention there were African-American students in the class where Mr. Not Ashamed to Be a Racist made his comments; which at the very last to me was rude, even if that is what he really thought, but he did get students to THINK, I will grant him that.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  5. #5
    "Education is the motor force of revolution!" Bill Ayers, devoted to the overthrow of America, since dedicating himself to fighting from within, the catalyst to the fifth column in education. Many of the Weather Underground where also to become teachers, professors, committed to the violent overthrow of this nation. They have achieved their goals and the final steps are in play. Order out of chaos to a dumbed down society.

  6. #6
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    Apt piece on understanding what's gone wrong in U.S. academia...

    From William Lind's excellent novel illustrating Fourth Generation Warfare Victoria

    http://plausiblefutures.com/wp-conte...5/victoria.pdf

    Chapter One

    My war started May 7, 2016, at the mess night put on by my class at the Marine
    Corps’ Amphibious Warfare School in Quantico, Virginia.
    I got killed.

    A mess night, when it’s done right, is a black tie brawl. It’s a Brit thing, very formallike
    and proper when it starts, with a table full of wine glasses and funny forks and
    Mr. Vice proposing toasts and rules like you’ve got to stand up and ask permission to
    go pee (usually denied). After enough toasts things loosen up a bit, with the aviators
    doing “carrier landings” by belly flopping on the tables and sliding through the crystal
    and the infantry getting into fights. At least, that’s how the good ones go.

    One of the Corps’ better traditions was that we remembered our dead. The mess set a
    table apart, with the glasses and silver inverted, for those who had gone before us and
    never come back. And before the fun began we remembered the battles where they
    had fought and fallen; Tripoli to Chapultepec to Helmand. A bell rang for each, a
    Marine officer stood up and called that battle’s name, and we became pretty
    thoughtful. Another Marine Corps tradition, not one of its better ones in terms of
    what happens in battles, was to try to pre-plan and rehearse and control everything
    so there couldn’t be any surprises or mistakes. “Control Freaks R Us” sometimes
    seemed to be the motto of the officer corps, at least above the company grades. So a
    couple days before the mess night, the battles to be remembered were each assigned
    to a captain.

    Iwo Jima went to a woman.

    We were really steamed. We lost a lot of guys on Iwo, and they were men, not women.
    Of course, these were the years of “political correctness.” Our colonel was running for
    general, and he figured he could kiss ass by being “sensitive to issues of race, gender,
    and class.”

    It’s hard to remember that we even had women in a military, it seems so strange now.
    How could we have been so contemptuous of human experience? Did we think it
    merely a coincidence that all armies, everywhere, that had actually fought anyone had
    been made up solely of men? But these were the last days of the U.S.A., and the
    absurd, the silly, the impossible were in charge and normal people were expected to
    keep their mouths shut. It was a time, as Roger Kimball said, of “experiments against
    reality.”

    Like a lot of young Marine officers at AWS, I was a reader, especially of what the
    Germans had written about war. They were the masters, for a century and a half, and
    we were their willing pupils. I remembered, then and always, an essay written by a
    German general, Hans von Seekt, the man who rebuilt the German Army after World
    War I. The title, and the message was Das Wesentliche ist die Tat—The Essential
    Thing is the Deed. Not the idea, not the desire, not the intention — the deed.
    So I did it. The moment came on May 7, during the mess night. The bell tolled our
    battles: Belleau Wood, Nicaragua, Guadalcanal, Tarawa. Iwo was next. The bell. I was
    on my feet before she started to move. “Iwo Jima,” I cried in my best parade-ground
    voice.

    Our honor was safe that night.
    The next morning, I was toast. The colonel’s clerk was waiting for me when I walked
    into the building. “The CO wants to see you at once,” he said. I wasn’t surprised. I
    knew what was coming and I was willing to take it. That’s something else the
    Germans taught me:Verantwortungsfreudigkeit, the “joy in taking responsibility”
    that is central to what character means in an officer.
    The colonel generally specialized in being nice. But I’d endangered his sacred quest
    for a promotion, and in the old American military that was the greatest sin a
    subordinate could commit.

    “You have a choice,” he said as I stood at attention in front of his desk. “You can get
    up in front of the class and apologize to me, to the female captain you insulted last
    night, to all the women in the corps, and to the class, or you can have your written
    resignation from the Marine Corps on my desk before the morning is over.”
    “No, sir,” I replied.
    7

    “What do you mean, ‘No, sir?’ I gave you a choice. Which one will it be?”
    “Neither one, sir.” An early lesson I’d learned about war was that if the enemy gave
    you two options, refuse them both and do something else. “I have nothing to
    apologize for,” I continued. “No woman has the right to represent any of the Corps’
    battles, because those battles were fought and won by men. And people resign when
    they’ve done something wrong. I haven’t.”

    “I’ve already spoken to the Commanding General,” the colonel replied. “He
    understands, and you’d better understand, what happens if word of what you did gets
    to Congresswoman Sally Bluhose, Chairperson of the House Armed Services
    Committee. I’ve been informed several of the female officers here are planning a joint
    letter to her. If you don’t help us head this off, she’ll have the Commandant up before
    the whole committee on this with the television cameras rolling.”

    “Sir,” I said, “I thought when people became colonels and generals and
    Commandants, that meant they took on the burden of moral responsibility that
    comes with the privileges of rank and position. That’s what I’ve always told my
    sergeants and lieutenants, and when they did what they thought was right I backed
    them up, even when it caused me some problems with my chain of command. Is what
    I’ve been telling them true or not?”

    “This has nothing to do with truth,” yelled Col. Ryan, who was starting to lose it.
    “What the hell is truth, anyway? This is about politics and our image and our budget.
    Congresswoman Bluhose is a leading advocate for women’s rights. She’ll be enraged,
    and I’ll take it in the shorts from Headquarters, Marine Corps. Don’t you get it?”
    “Yes, sir, I think I do get it,” I said. “You, and I guess the CG here at Quantico and the
    Commandant, want to surrender to Congresswoman Bluhose and what she
    represents, a Corps and a country that have been emasculated. But the way I see it,
    and maybe this is Maine talking, if we’re supposed to fight, that means we have to
    fight for something. What’s the point in fighting for a country like that? Whatever
    defeats and replaces it could only be an improvement.”
    8

    “I don’t give a damn how you see it, captain,” said the colonel, now icy calm again.
    “You are going to see it the way I see it. Do I get the apology or the resignation?”
    “Neither one, sir,” I said again.

    “OK, then this is how it will be,” Colonel Ryan declared. “You are no longer a student
    at this school. As of this minute. Clear out your locker and get out, now. That’s a
    direct order, and I’ve already cleared it all the way up the chain.” (As if this guy would
    have farted without clearing it first.) “You’re going to get a fitness report so bad Christ
    himself would puke on you if he read it. You’re finished. You won’t even come up for
    major, and you’ll clean heads for the rest of your sorry days in this Corps. Dismissed.”

    So that was that. The word spread fast around the school, as it always did. That was a
    good gut-check for the rest of the class. Most flunked. They parted for me like the sea
    did for Moses as I wandered around collecting my books and few other belongings.
    The handful with moral courage shook my hand and wished me well.
    One, my friend Jim Sampsonoff, an aviator, said something important. “You’re a
    casualty in the culture war,” were his words.
    “The what?” I replied.

    “The culture war,” he said again. “The next real war is going to be here, on our own
    soil. It’s already begun, though not the shooting part, yet. It’s a war between those of
    us who still believe in our old Western culture, the culture that grew up over the last
    3000 or so years from Jerusalem and Athens, Rome and Constantinople, and the
    people who are trying to destroy it. It’s the most important war we’ll ever fight,
    because if we lose our culture, we’ll lose everything else, too.”

    “You mean there’s more to it than whether we’re going to have women in the infantry
    and gays in the barracks?” I asked.
    “You bet,” he said. “Look, you’ll be heading back up to Maine sooner or later. Take a
    detour through Hanover, New Hampshire. That’s where my college is, Dartmouth. Go
    9

    see my old German professor, now retired, Gottfried Sanft. He’s the greatest of
    rarities on an Ivy League campus, an educated man. You need to read some books.
    He’ll tell you which ones.”

    I knew my Marine Corps career was over, but I hung on at Quantico until my AWS
    class graduated, to make my point about not resigning to apologize for my action.
    They assigned me to supervise cutting brush around the base, a point the brass
    carefully made to the mighty “Ms.” Bluhose as they ate toads for her. Come summer, I
    sent in my letter and headed back to Maine.

    Was it worth it? Yes. I made early the choice everyone had to make sooner or later,
    whether to fight for our culture or turn from it and die. As is so often the case in life,
    what seemed like an ending was really a beginning.
    On the way home, I took Jim Sampsonoff’s advice and paid a visit to Professor Sanft.

    CHAPTER 2

    When President Eisenhower of the old USA visited Dartmouth in the 1950s, he said it
    looked exactly the way a college ought to. By the late ’90s it still did, despite the fact
    that they’d built an ultra-modern student center on the traditional green —part of the
    “foul your own nest” maxim that ruled most campuses from the 1960s on. Those were
    the days when “art” was defined as whatever was ugly or shocking or out of place, not
    what was beautiful.

    Professor Sanft had retired from the German department in 2012. Actually, he was
    driven out by the weirdos who then populated college faculties —the feminists, freaks,
    and phonies who had replaced learning with politics. I found him at a house in
    Hanover, which turned out to be not his residence but the college-in-hiding,
    otherwise known as the Martin Institute. It seemed some conservative alumni,
    recognizing that the barbarians were within the gates of their alma mater, had bought
    a house in town, brought in Professor Sanft and a few other genuine scholars, and
    were offering Dartmouth students the courses the college would no longer teach, like
    the great books of Western civilization.
    10

    I knew the prof and I would get along when I saw the Zeppelin poster on his office
    door and smelled the pipe smoke curling out the same. The office was a vast clutter of
    books and papers, pipes and walking sticks, straw hats and the occasional bottle of
    something refreshing; no old Sandinista posters on the walls here. Professor Sanft,
    dressed in a white linen suit for summer and the Raj, with a pink shirt and polka-dot
    bow-tie, bid me welcome. Jim Sampsonoff had written, saying I’d be by. I wasn’t
    quite sure why I was there, but the professor seemed to know.

    “Jim says you’re interested in getting an education,” he opened.
    “Well, I thought I already had one,” I replied. “I graduated from Bowdoin with a premed
    major, before I decided I’d rather make holes in people with a bullet than a
    scalpel. It’s quicker and more fun, though the pay is less.”
    “What do you think an education is?” he continued.

    “Going to college, taking some courses and getting a degree, I guess,” I responded,
    suspecting this was not the right answer.

    “No, that’s just credentialing. It may help you get a job, but it won’t help you,
    yourself, much beyond that. Do you know what the word ‘education’ means?”
    I allowed as I hadn’t thought about that much.

    “It’s from the Latin ex, for ‘out’ or ‘beyond,’ plus ducare, to lead. An education leads
    you out beyond where you were, in terms of your understanding of life, the universe,
    and everything. Did Bowdoin do that for you?”

    “Well, not really,” I guessed. But I wasn’t sure this was leading me where I wanted to
    go, either. “Jim said I should see you because you would help me understand why I
    got fired for doing what I thought was right. Would a real education help me
    understand that?” I asked.
    11

    “Yes, and perhaps a few more things besides,” answered Professor Sanft. “There was a
    fellow named Socrates, some years back, who had a similar experience. Ever hear of
    him?”

    I had, and I remembered something about drinking some bad hemlock wine or some
    such, but beyond that it was hazy.

    “You’re in the same situation as most of the students who come to me here,” he said.
    “You know where you are in space but not in time. You don’t know where you came
    from. You live in Western civilization, but you don’t know what it is. You don’t know
    that this civilization had a beginning and went through some rather remarkable times
    before getting to where we are today.”

    “Without the songs and stories of the West, our West , we are impoverished,” he
    continued. “Weightless and drifting, we do not know where we are in history. We are
    what the Germans call mere Luftmenschen – in a free translation, airheads.”
    The mention of history perked me up. Ever since I was about eight years old, I’d read
    a lot of military history. I learned to read not so much in school as by falling in love
    with C.S. Forester’s Horatio Hornblower novels, which followed a British naval officer
    in his career from midshipman through admiral, in the wars of the French Revolution
    and Napoleon. They were fiction, but rooted in fact. I didn’t realize it until much
    later, but they were also a great introduction to military decision-making.
    “In the Marine Corps,” I said, “I saw that people who hadn’t read much military
    history could only follow processes, which they learned by rote. They could not
    understand the situation they were in. They had no context.”

    “That’s an insight most Dartmouth students don’t have,” said the professor. “And it is
    what I’m talking about, on a larger scale. Just as your fellow Marines could not
    understand a military situation, so you can’t understand your situation in the war for
    our culture. Literally, you can’t see your place—situ—in it.”
    12

    “Jim said I was a casualty in the culture war. I always thought wars were fought by
    guys with uniforms and guns. I’m not quite sure what this ‘culture war’ is all about,” I
    said.

    “Sadly, this great culture of ours, Western culture, is under attack,” the professor
    replied. “The universities today are active and conscious agents in its destruction.
    Indeed, they have generated theories as to why Western culture should be destroyed.
    Of course, they aren’t alone. The most powerful single force in America now is the
    entertainment industry, and it is also an agent of cultural destruction. Many of the
    politicians play the game too. The usual code-words are ‘racism, sexism, and
    homophobia.’ When you hear them, you’re hearing the worms gnawing at the
    foundation.”

    I’d been told my high crime was “sexism,” so that clicked, and Col. Ryan was certainly
    a politician. It sounded as if there were a new battlefield I needed to understand.
    “So where do I start?” I asked.

    “By studying our culture – what it is, where it came from, what its great ideas and
    values are and why we hold them to be great,” Professor Sanft answered. “In other
    words, with an education.”

    He’d brought me back to where we’d started, though now I grasped what he meant.
    “That doesn’t mean going back to college,” he continued. “You can do it on your own.
    In fact, to a large degree, you have to do it on your own now, even if you are a college
    student. That’s why we have this institute, and why I’m here. And I can give you a
    small present that will get you started.” He handed me a copy of a book: Smiling
    Through the Cultural Catastrophe
    . “Another Darmouth professor, Jeffery Hart,
    wrote this a few years ago. Think of it as a road map, though I’ve heard it’s dangerous
    to give those to infantry officers,” Professor Sanft said.
    13

    “Thanks, I think,” I replied. Actually, we grunts did get lost a lot, we just tried to keep
    it a trade secret.

    “It tells you what to read, what commentaries are best, and offers a few comments of
    its own,” Professor Sanft said. “The books don’t cost much, a tiny fraction of a year’s
    tuition at Dartmouth, but they’ll do for you what Dartmouth no longer does. They will
    make you an educated man of the West.”

    I thanked Professor Sanft that day, though not nearly as much as I’ve thanked him
    since. I went to the Dartmouth Bookstore and stocked up. Maine would give me time
    for reading.

    When we look back on our lives, incidents that seemed small at the time may take on
    great importance. That half-hour with Professor Gottfried Sanft changed my life.
    Most of my years since that day in Hanover have been spent fighting for Western
    culture, then rebuilding it, piece by piece, once the fighting part was done.
    Thanks to Professor Sanft, this was one infantryman who wasn’t lost."
    Proud member Alt-Right group "Scientists For Trump". (Smart Americans know he's right.)
    A man should only take a wife whose Bible includes Genesis, Leviticus, Deuteronomy, Colossians, Malachi, Isaiah, Ephesians, Corinthians, Hebrews, Timothy, Titus, Proverbs, Mark, Peter & Revelation. Ecclesiastes 7:28 (NIV) tells him the odds.

  7. #7
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    Control education, one of the main goals of communism.

    The sad thing is, they don't even know they are in a box, much less how to think outside it. This incestuous education flaw will lead to future generations making bad decisions.
    Would someone please let me know how we have spun out of control?
    Has the captain let go of the wheel?
    Or could we please try to find a way to be a bit more kind?
    I see the road to tomorrow in the haze - Queensryche

  8. #8
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    The liberalization of Universities really shifted into high gear starting in the 60s and is virtually complete today.
    It will be very difficult, almost impossible to go back to the way it was before.

    A start would be to remove all federally guaranteed student loans.
    Remove all federal dollars to Universities and colleges unless they are research grants for agriculture or engineering or military.
    "I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself." -DH Lawrence

  9. #9
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    With but a few exceptions (Hillsdale etc) MURRKIN!!! "higher education" is nothing but a communist training ground.
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  10. #10
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    Agreed...

    Quote Originally Posted by TerryK View Post
    The liberalization of Universities really shifted into high gear starting in the 60s and is virtually complete today.
    It will be very difficult, almost impossible to go back to the way it was before.

    A start would be to remove all federally guaranteed student loans.
    Remove all federal dollars to Universities and colleges unless they are research grants for agriculture or engineering or military.
    That would be best, of course.

    Nearly as effective, if after some delay, would be for colleges to make the loans themselves, and to do it by major. A certain amount would be allocated as seed money, then the majors would have to be funded by loan repayments. The engineering students would quickly get decent jobs, for the most part, while the equine precipitant/liberal arts/foo-foo ones? The departments those majors were in would quickly go bankrupt, and good riddance.
    Proud member Alt-Right group "Scientists For Trump". (Smart Americans know he's right.)
    A man should only take a wife whose Bible includes Genesis, Leviticus, Deuteronomy, Colossians, Malachi, Isaiah, Ephesians, Corinthians, Hebrews, Timothy, Titus, Proverbs, Mark, Peter & Revelation. Ecclesiastes 7:28 (NIV) tells him the odds.

  11. #11
    As I have said before if you want to keep the history of "The West" (or anywhere else) alive you don't want to totally abolish REAL History, REAL Anthropology, REAL Classics or even REAL art classes.

    What you want to do is a combination of put them in the context of the old-fashioned idea of a "well rounded education" along with the understanding that actual CAREERS in these fields are VERY LIMITED and they should be seen as HARD and DIFFICULT to achieve - only the best and the brightest; and most of those jobs will be in teaching.

    Then get rid of "teacher's certification" at least for jr. high and high school for this sort of subject, so people like me or even those with P.hd.'s can teach (even part-time or after official retirement) those subject without which civilizations can fall but which do not in and of themselves usually lead to employment in the modern world.

    A really educated person, an engineer like my housemate; still is going to make better personal and civil decisions if they know some history and everyone benefits from at least an introduction to REAL art and REAL music; again those fields don't normally provide careers except for a few people (and an apprentice system as in Germany may be better ways to enter them, with their fierce competition but real certification for the limited jobs on offer limiting those who aspire to them professionally).

    In Germany, my husband has friends (husband and wife team) where he is a Master Sculptor and she is a Master Gold Smith (the same term for both sexes) that is the same as a P.hd. only with more respect and career openings because the number of people who study is limited to the very top notch of students.

    To have a functioning civilization, the majority of people need to have at least a small clue as to where they came from and where they are going; eliminate that and you risk 1984...modern education is making that relatively easy I'm afriad.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  12. #12
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    Melodi...

    1) Most people can't do real Art, no matter how much training they get. (Hint: if no one will buy it, or if an 11-YO child could make it, odds are it's cr*p.)

    2) The best way to learn History these days is to go to a library, and read books by Western male authors written pre-1965.

    3) Music? 99% of it is light entertainment at best (and more than a little of it, like most rap, should be grounds for incarceration). Now, if you want to talk pre-1920 men's poetry, you might be on to something worthwhile for studying.
    Proud member Alt-Right group "Scientists For Trump". (Smart Americans know he's right.)
    A man should only take a wife whose Bible includes Genesis, Leviticus, Deuteronomy, Colossians, Malachi, Isaiah, Ephesians, Corinthians, Hebrews, Timothy, Titus, Proverbs, Mark, Peter & Revelation. Ecclesiastes 7:28 (NIV) tells him the odds.

  13. #13
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    Modern "education" is deliberately creating 1984, Mel - that's its PURPOSE.
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by MinnesotaSmith View Post
    1) Most people can't do real Art, no matter how much training they get. (Hint: if no one will buy it, or if an 11-YO child could make it, odds are it's cr*p.)

    2) The best way to learn History these days is to go to a library, and read books by I male authors written pre-1965.

    3) Music? 99% of it is light entertainment at best (and more than a little of it, like most rap, should be grounds for incarceration). Now, if you want to talk pre-1920 men's poetry, you might be on to something worthwhile for studying.
    I didn't say do real art, though some art/crafts (especially those with skills useful in real life like sewing for both sexes) is a good idea, said STUDY real art - we had to do this in a couple of classes and at today I am no expert but I know the difference between Da Vinci and Jackson Pollack.

    Most people do NOT learn history going to a library reading "pre-1965 books by male authors" if they "get it" at all, it is because they had it as a subject (at least one or two classes) taught by someone who really understood what history means, makes it interesting and understandable; then directs the student how they can continue to learn more about it on their own time.

    In the past, no one of those "male authors" would have been considered educated if they didn't know at least some history and that includes most of the Founding Fathers of the United States too.

    Music has its foundation in MATH; REAL music is hardly light entertainment; there is a reason why the Classical schools from Athens on included the study of basic musical principles for those who would be truly educated.

    Science has also shown that for those able to do so, learning a musical instrument properly can do more to improve the workings of the human brain than many hours spent staring at a teacher droning at them; especially at a young age.

    You are confusing Lyrics (the poetry) with Music; they can be linked together and both are important, but they are not the same thing.

    In a perfect world, little children would be exposed to all of these things at least somewhat (at a level they can understand) those that showed real talent could be encouraged in their area; the rest should again get a higher level of exposure (again at least a class or two) at the college level to have a REAL education.

    Music is related to sound which is related to math which also related to engineering...do you want truly educated people or simple specialists who can only see to the small part of the world in front of them?
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  15. #15
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    It can’t be helped if republicans do not choose to become Professors.

  16. #16
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    The Deep State has done an excellent job infiltrating our schools and because of this, I doubt that the USA as we know it will survive another 10 years....adding to that the death of my generation of voters....and America is and will be screwed. What with a Corrupt Media most Americans won't even notice our demise.

    Additionally, I encountered my first communist prof in 1974 at Portland State University...I dropped his class.

    Folks Please don't send your kids to public schools....
    JOHN 3:16 / John 8:32 And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you FREE.

  17. #17
    So much for a well-rounded education.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flashyzipp View Post
    It can’t be helped if republicans do not choose to become Professors.
    They know they'll never get hired, outside of STEM stuff, and even that is mostly zero-benefit insecure poverty wage work, and anyone with outside options (i.e., not fuzzy studies cr*p majors), who wants that? I looked into teaching as an adjunct at my local 4-year college, and it would have paid under a THIRD of what I make right now in industry work, and even less than driving a taxi did, so F that.
    Proud member Alt-Right group "Scientists For Trump". (Smart Americans know he's right.)
    A man should only take a wife whose Bible includes Genesis, Leviticus, Deuteronomy, Colossians, Malachi, Isaiah, Ephesians, Corinthians, Hebrews, Timothy, Titus, Proverbs, Mark, Peter & Revelation. Ecclesiastes 7:28 (NIV) tells him the odds.

  19. #19
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    Melodi...

    1) Sewing (esp. mending) is an actual useful, often salable SKILL, just as is being a welder, plumber, electrician, mason, etc., and I have full respect and support for anyone who goes into those. It's making a succession of stupid kit macrame, needlepoint that's ugly to all fully-heterosexual males or women who appreciate higher-end beauty, ill-fitting scratchy knit garments, useless thin fragile ruglets/doilies/furniture covers, worse paintings than Jason Pollock or Andrew Warhol did when sober, etc., that have negative value to any person with taste that's willing to be honest to the bored unskilled broke/leechy middle-aged women that seem to crank those out by the truckload.

    2) Music, outside of a few anthems or of course hymns, remains light entertainment that only a VERY few higher-skilled professionals are going to make any kind of living from. The very best will do well, while anyone with an Ipod won't accept crummy quality stuff to put up with even for free.
    Proud member Alt-Right group "Scientists For Trump". (Smart Americans know he's right.)
    A man should only take a wife whose Bible includes Genesis, Leviticus, Deuteronomy, Colossians, Malachi, Isaiah, Ephesians, Corinthians, Hebrews, Timothy, Titus, Proverbs, Mark, Peter & Revelation. Ecclesiastes 7:28 (NIV) tells him the odds.

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