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PREP question for retired (older) folks that prep
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20Gauge View Post
    Well there goes my hurricane bug out bag. ..... lol
    If you haven’t had a hurricane in the last six months, you need to move to another state, where those preps aren’t wasted.
    "...Cry 'Havoc' and let slip the cats of war..."
    Razor sharpening while you wait - Occam
    If it works, it doesn't have enough features. - Windows 10 design philosophy.
    Forget the beer, I'm just here for the doom!
    Humans, just a tool for amino acids to make Swiss watches.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogmanan View Post
    I don't belive in this rule here's why, many years ago I baught a bunch of heavy duty carheart type coats heavy ones I only paid twenty dollars on a close out give away sale, so I braught them home and put them in a air tight barrel, this winter the one I have been wearing for about 13 years messed up so you know what I went the the barrel and pulled out a brand new winter coat.
    So see why I do not follow the six month rule.

    The six month rule is not a way to live and think about prepping.
    I have stuff in my preps that I baught 20/30 years ago that is still good and new, why would I get ride of it just because I have not used it in the last six months.
    You cannot prep using the “six month rule”....

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Profit of Doom View Post
    As long as you wear a right and a left, what does it matter?
    Ha Ha what is a right and a left sock are yours marked right and left mine are not.
    JUST A FEW OF MY SIMPLE THOUGHTS
    LAY LOW WAIT LIKE A WOLF IN THE WILD UNTIL THE TIME IS RIGHT
    Never Pick A Fight With An Old Man He Will Just Shoot You He Can't Afford To Get Hurt

  4. #44
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    THANKS. I needed this thread.
    I just don’t know where to START.

  5. #45
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    Ammo lasts virtually forever and it is the same with many other things. It all depends on how much room you have available. As an amateur machinist I keep almost all metal because I make things off and on all the time. Working in the shop so much I go through many rags which are always things we would normally throw out. And they do get thrown out but only after they have been used as rags and are dirty/greasy.
    Mis-matched socks make emergency cases for pistols. Emergency ammo holders. Socks have almost countless other uses.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bensam View Post
    You cannot prep using the “six month rule”....
    True. I've had arguments in the past with "professional home organizers." Waste of breath. Now I just keep my mouth shut.

    I like the one in/one out rule better. For example, I have underwear and socks stored. When I open a new package, I get rid of the same number of underwear or socks that I took out. When I take out a pair of running shoes from my stash, I toss out the oldest pair.

    That policy, combined with limits (example: no more than 3 pairs of running shoes in use at once -- 1 pair for dirty jobs -- and two pairs that I rotate every other day so they dry out -- I sweat a lot), keeps my closet manageable.

  7. #47
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    I keep a lot of stuff.
    But the socks need to go. Don't Chuck them. Find a shelter or church and donate them. Socks are rarely donated and the less fortunate could really use them.

  8. #48
    Love it ! That works here too. That reminds me of the old lady that lived next door when we first moved in. She would put anything paper, cardboard, leaves etc. out front of her house and let the afternoon wind blow it somewhere else.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogmanan View Post
    Ha Ha what is a right and a left sock are yours marked right and left mine are not.
    A right sock goes on your right foot.
    A left sock goes on your left foot.
    Just like your shoes.
    No, don’t label them, that would be silly.
    If you can’t tell right socks from left socks, it doesn’t matter, but people will still look at you funny.

    Seriously, have heard of people that label socks for day of week, they might have done left/right, don’t remember.
    Just don’t label underwear for month of year.
    "...Cry 'Havoc' and let slip the cats of war..."
    Razor sharpening while you wait - Occam
    If it works, it doesn't have enough features. - Windows 10 design philosophy.
    Forget the beer, I'm just here for the doom!
    Humans, just a tool for amino acids to make Swiss watches.

  10. #50
    Buy a pair of boots. Won't matter if the socks match and if you have a basket full, you never have to buy socks again
    Consider the ravens, for they neither sow nor reap, which have neither storehouse nor barn; and God feeds them. Of how much more value are you than a pesky raven?
    It is difficult to stand idly by and watch the vacuum of ignorance being filled with lies

  11. #51
    For sure, I understand the dilemma! Because of hubby's health issues over the past several years (all minor, in terms of actual health, but all requiring weeks of not being able to work hard physically while recovering from surgery, etc), we've been pretty well dead broke... but have had more time to work together than we've ever had in our lives.

    We've spent that time sorting, organzing, and yes, getting rid of a lot of stuff. I gave away several large (55 gallon "drum liner") garbage bags full of fabric... dark colored (black and navy) fleece went to my Amish neighbor, who has used it for lining everything from barn jackets to crib quilts. Lots of craft stuff that I outgrew (bow makers, ribbon, rubber stamps and stamp pads, etc) went to them as well... their early-teen daughters were thrilled into screaming fits. (it was the first time I've ever seen an Amish girl act like an English adolescent!... they're usually quite reserved)

    Most of the rest went to a niece who sews for herself and also does repair work to make a bit of money. She took what she wanted and then passed the rest on to a church rummage sale.

    Yarn (the cheap acrylics, small skein ends and balls, etc) got put in the Salvation Army box... we probably also could have offered it to the local rest home for seniors. I kept hundreds of yards of *good* fabrics- wools, silks, linen, and quality quilt cottons, including the hand printed and dyed batiks that I paid less than $5 per yard for (often much less) and which now sell for $12 a yard or more. All the quilt cottons are sorted by color and are kept in dustproof "suitcases" designed for the job... when I want to start a project, I can pull out exactly what I want, and it's clean and ready to use.

    http://www.nancysnotions.com/product...quarter+bag.do

    When we still had a bit of extra money, I purchased quality cases for thread, etc... it lasts years longer when stored in plastic, out of the sun and where insects, dust, etc can't get to it. I LOVE these: http://www.connectingthreads.com/Too...r__D82068.HTML

    We haven't had the "odd sock" problem much, because years ago I got very tired of finding only one sock of a pair. So, I began buying multiple (a dozen or two at a time) pairs of identical styles and color socks... since we're farmers and generally wear work socks, that's not a problem. And the few pairs of "dress" socks don't usually lose mates... If you continue to have that problem, keep a few strong safety pins next to the hamper or washing machine and pin mates together before putting them in the wash, or use one of the mesh laundry bags usually sold for use in keeping lingerie from twisting up and getting damaged in the washer.

    With the dozen (or more) pairs of identical socks, even when one of a pair wears out (or gets lost), there are plenty of others which match. Yes, we may end up with an odd number for a bit, but then another one wears out and we're back to even numbers again.

    They absolutely do work for dust rags, window washing rags, etc... When we do decide to throw an item of clothing out, I cut it open (slice a sock down the middle, for example) and remove any buttons, zippers, rivets (jeans)... some get put into the sewing supplies, the rest get tossed. Rags get used first for household use (I keep one large mesh "laundry bag" of rags in the bedroom closet for that use), and then when they get too dirty or worn- or we just get too many of them to fit into that bag- they get taken to the machine shed, where they get used for greasy jobs and then burned. We rarely get to a point where we have them piling up!

    Old towels get moved to the indoor "vet" cabinet for use in drying off dogs, as a bed for a sick or injured barn cat or other "dirty" uses. Again, once they get to a point where they simply aren't useful, they get cut into rags. Having clean rags around saves a LOT of money for paper towels, although I usually have a case of them in the basement and use them for really dirty jobs.

    As far as things like making potholders, rag rugs, etc... sure, you CAN. But WILL YOU? Have you ever been interested in that sort of craft? If not... it's not all that likely you will if TSHTF! Contrary to many folk's imaginings, it's unlikely we'll have time to sit and do "fun" crafts (even if the end result is useful) if things really go south. For one thing, we may not have the bright, cheap light that currently lets us work late into the evenings. For another, if we ever lose our "kilowatt slaves", it's going to take us a LOT longer to do just the necessary basics of everyday living. And you'll be mending useful clothing a lot... not making cute potholders. (not picking on anyone above, BTW... I've done my share of all of those craft type things over the years, and if there are younger kids in the family, keeping some materials on hand which will let them keep busy and make useful items is a good idea. But this thread started as ideas for "retirement" age folks...

    I'm not a great housekeeper... it's difficult with a farm, several long-haired dogs (why DO they always blow their coats in the colder weather, when they're indoors most of the time?!!) and all the homestead chores... my kitchen is essentially a food factory- we make wine, beer, cheese, butter, can all sorts of food, etc... and none of that is a neat process! But I NEED to know where things are, and be able to put my hands on it when I need it. We have several large cabinets in various rooms... a "vet" cabinet in the mud room (and another, larger one in the barn, along with a second one for horse tack, medicines, etc), one in the upstairs bathrooms that holds linens and OTC meds, shampoos, etc. Two in the herb room- one holds various supplements, vitamins and herbs, the other is full of yarn and some of my more valuable silk fabric. Over the past 2 years, we've emptied, sorted and organized all of them, except for the one herb cabinet... that's on my list for this week, God willing. With very limited funds, I simply can't afford to buy anything and then find out I already had it, hiding in the back of a bottom shelf!

    I'd LOVE to have a Conex container or two... hubby isn't impressed when I put preps in a corner of a haymow, and I don't really blame him. But he is fully on board with my prepping, especially as it's proven to be so very useful over the past years of tough finances. It's especially nice that he now tells me when he sees we're getting low on something, or thinks he's taken the last of something from a cupboard.

    I never did subscribe to the "6 month rule"... or even the "1 year rule"... however, I am going to be going through my closet this spring and culling dresses and skirts that I haven't worn in years. They mostly still fit, but we just don't go places that require that level of dress wear very often. I do need to make a couple of dresses appropriate for wearing to funerals, as we have several older relatives getting to "that age", and - obviously- there isn't often a lot of advance notice for needing something like that. But I stocked up on work jeans, long johns, t shirts and sweatshirts, and warm winter coats over the years, finding things on great sales and storing them carefully where they will stay like new until needed. When my chore jacket's zipper died for the last time last fall (I'd fixed the pull twice, and then replaced it once.. it no longer would stay zipped, and was to the point where it would need a full zipper replacement) I was very happy to be able to go to the upstairs closet and pull out the identical replacement I'd bought about 5 years earlier. I'll admit I haven't been able to convince myself to throw the old one away (after all, it does only need a new zipper, and I have the ability, AND the correct zipper, to replace it!)... but I think it's getting tossed when I clean the mud room for Spring in a couple weeks.

    One of the hardest things for us to toss is old footwear... knowing how difficult replacing them will be (Even if it's only because cheap Chinese imports go away). I do keep ShoeGoo around, and we repair good rubber work boots.. until they can't be repaired. But after that, they go. For the "extras" (we do keep a pair of work boots for each of the grown kids, as they often show up wearing expensive running shoes and then want to help with some outdoor project), I bought a couple of racks and hung them in the entryway shed... it keeps the boots up off the floor, in good shape, and prevents them from being infested with spiders or mice.

    The current project has been building shelves in the basement for the 5 gallon pails.. and oh, is it NICE!! No longer having to unstack 4 tiers of buckets to get to the oldest pail of whatever, I can see exactly what I have,.. and we opened every pail, checked every seal, tossed the (thankfully, very few) ones which had poor seals or had otherwise gone bad, and we now have a good handle on exactly what we have in terms of supplies. Hubby is now building shelves for the paints, lubes, etc that have been just tossed willy-nilly in a corner down there, and once we have that stuff stashed neatly, we'll move on to restocking the canned goods cupboards- and THEN I can finally get last fall's canning out of my kitchen! I've refused to take it to the cellar until there is a place for it, as I didn't want to have to move it twice- or 5 times.

    Rubbermaid type containers are a real blessing... Home Depot has a much sturdier version than WalMart sells, for about the same price. If you are storing fabric or something, you can go with the "prettier", clear plastic WalMart type (for one thing, you can more easily see the contents). But for heavier preps, or items you are going to need to move around, go with the sturdier ones. We bought 4 of them last summer to use when we're hauling chicken home from the butcher, and they hold up to 75# of chicken plus 20# of ice without the slightest indication of cracking, even when we lift and move them.

    And last- LABEL EVERYTHING!! At the least, buy a box of Avery 2"x4" paper labels, and use a Sharpie marker to list the contents of any container. I really like the Dymo labelers, although they are admittedly quite a bit more expensive, because the rolls of plastic "tape" aren't cheap. However, they're waterproof and hold up for years.. in a few cases, we found ourselves having to open a bucket which had a paper label which had worn away enough to be unreadable.

    A master list inventory is very useful, but AT LEAST label everything, and try to stack it in single tiers, so you don't have to look behind several rows to see what you have. If that's the case, the inventory becomes more necessary.

    Oh, and the vacuum seal bags that Millwright mentioned can be really useful. I used several of them to pack up the extra new wool socks, as well as several down comforters, wool blankets and other normally bulky items to store in the attic... they now fit into one large rubbermaid container, where they formerly took up five of them! Yes, it takes some work to "decompress" the comforters after removing them, but it's not really difficult... and if the solar minimum continues to affect our weather, those comforters may be worth their weight in gold.

    I wouldn't, however, spend the money to buy those bags to store odd socks!

    Summerthyme

  12. #52
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    The kindest thing you can do for your children (or heirs) is to clean out everything that you don't need. Don't leave a mess for them to sort through.

    I am traveling very light these days, after having moved from a 2,300-square foot house with a massive garage to a much smaller house.

    That, and I had to give away everything my late husband owned, for my own sanity.

    I am now living as a minimalist, and it is very good for my mental health.

    My father was a hoarder, and I had to clean up his mess. It was awful.

  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Betty_Rose View Post
    The kindest thing you can do for your children (or heirs) is to clean out everything that you don't need. Don't leave a mess for them to sort through.

    I am traveling very light these days, after having moved from a 2,300-square foot house with a massive garage to a much smaller house.

    That, and I had to give away everything he owned, for my own sanity.

    I am now living as a minimalist, and it is very good for my mental health.

    My father was a hoarder, and I had to clean up his mess. It was awful.
    My Dad's garage is floor to ceiling and wall to wall.......not looking forward to that.

  14. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    THANKS. I needed this thread.
    I just don’t know where to START.
    Go to Dollar General and buy a box of DG Contractor garbage bags. Open the door to the room. Grab a chair. Sit down and fill bag. Take bag to garbage can. When can is full put out by the street.
    Have garage sale.
    Rest until trash pickup.
    Repeat
    Consider the ravens, for they neither sow nor reap, which have neither storehouse nor barn; and God feeds them. Of how much more value are you than a pesky raven?
    It is difficult to stand idly by and watch the vacuum of ignorance being filled with lies

  15. #55
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    I would donate them to a shelter or other good cause. Someone who has no socks may appreciate them!

    Crafters often look for things like that in a thrift shop - great for making toys and rugs and probably many other things they could do with them.

  16. #56
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    The odd socks?
    Perhaps there is a pirate’s retirement home that could use them nearby?
    "...Cry 'Havoc' and let slip the cats of war..."
    Razor sharpening while you wait - Occam
    If it works, it doesn't have enough features. - Windows 10 design philosophy.
    Forget the beer, I'm just here for the doom!
    Humans, just a tool for amino acids to make Swiss watches.

  17. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    THANKS. I needed this thread.
    I just don’t know where to START.
    I'm very slowly eliminating clutter. I found it helpful to pick a corner and just concentrate on that quarter of a room. It puts things in manageable bites.

    The six month or one year thing just doesn't work when you have a farm and live miles and miles from the nearest big town. It's imperative to have stashes and back ups of so many items. Like Summerthyme, I have nice dresses and shoes that only get worn maybe once every three or four years, but they're classic styles so it doesn't really matter how long they go between wearings. Funny, I also just bought a couple of knit, black dresses that were on sale with the thought of future funerals in mind!!!

  18. #58
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    The last time my boys helped me move anything they both said, separately, that they'd get a garbage dumpster and toss everything, particularly my books. I'm blessed to be friends with a young couple that are into homesteading of sorts. We all live in the woods. nLittle by little I'm giving her things, like my second food dehydrator. We had to clean out our large upright freezer to make space for a new butchered pig. I had chicken and legs of lamb that I'd gotten in commodities that we gave them. She needs a bigger freezer now, they hunt and they have four beautiful children 5 and under. I told her she has first choice of anything I have when I die. I'm also passing homesteading books along to her but don't want to overwhelm her.

    As for the socks, DH has a bunch and I got tired of trying to mate the old ones that are stretched out. Looking on Pinterest for uses is a good idea.

    Am I a hoarder, probably. One problem is that in 2015 DH talked me into selling on ebay, I hated it. We ended up with a bunch of things that did not sell. I found a place that sponsers teen challenge by selling second hand goods, so that is where I'm going to haul do dads and clothes I want to get rid of. Of course I will still have more than enough clothes to last me the rest of my life.

    My biggest problem is getting started, when I do I get overwhelmed and just sit down and do nothing.

    Judy

  19. #59
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    When it takes too long to find something stored away, it's easier just to buy another one. Darned if I couldn't find that special light bulb I was saving for a nightlight. Oh well..... It's a good thing Fluffy can find me, or I'd loose myself.

  20. #60
    Judy,

    I don't know if this will help, but I've spent the last 15 years working on being a minimalist....
    and accomplished it one drawer, one box, one closet at a time. But every day, commit to
    cleaning and reclaiming a space.

    Instead of striving to have a mountain of everything.... just in case....
    work on learning how little you can survive on.

    Every time I clean house I have a '''de-clutter''' bag, and quickly get rid of it.
    Life in the here and now is much less chaotic without tons of ''stuff''

    I have hurricane BOBs that I refresh one time a year, and our prep is about what a person
    would take on a camping trip.

    Its to hard to declutter all at once... baby steps works. One small space every day.
    LeV

  21. #61
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    Well I have many cloths that we got for free from the rich people my wife cleans their house for, well we have cloths for male/femal from babys to adult in many many sizes, should I just throw them out , or here's an ideal when shit hits the fan many will be coming to me proubly with nothing but what is on their back, hummmmmmm maybe I should save them for thoses people so they will have more then what is on their backs to wear dam good idea.
    JUST A FEW OF MY SIMPLE THOUGHTS
    LAY LOW WAIT LIKE A WOLF IN THE WILD UNTIL THE TIME IS RIGHT
    Never Pick A Fight With An Old Man He Will Just Shoot You He Can't Afford To Get Hurt

  22. #62
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    A couple things from me:

    Don't be hasty getting rid of the 'might need it someday' stuff. After my flame out, we drank 10 year old prep coffee , and while not gourmet...I enjoyed every cup.

    We have a practice in our home. We are continually getting rid of stuff, it seems. The goal is to fill the trash cart every week. We pay for it to be emptied, and if it isn't filled on pick up day, that's a waste of money.

    The odd food prep on the back of the top shelf, the forgotten something in the fridge, the pair of socks worn through, or undies with a blower up elastic band......all go into the trash cart.

    Less really is more, and it is liberating.

    We give useable clothing to Salvation Army and DAV, hoping someone can use it. If it isn't usable, they bale it like a store bales cardboard, and it gets sold for recycling materials. We NEVER give anything, nor buy anything, from 'Goodwill'. There are many stories on their misleading business practices, but, they actually hired my criminal brother in law once....and that right there is enough indication to me to never support that business!!!
    Still kicking despite the devil's best efforts.

  23. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogmanan View Post
    when shit hits the fan many will be coming to me proubly with nothing but what is on their back, hummmmmmm maybe I should save them for thoses people so they will have more then what is on their backs to wear dam good idea.
    Bless your heart for being generous! You know, those clothes could bless someone now who is having hard economic times. If you need the room, it's something to consider. I've been greatly blessed when I "pay it forward."

  24. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meemur View Post
    Bless your heart for being generous! You know, those clothes could bless someone now who is having hard economic times. If you need the room, it's something to consider. I've been greatly blessed when I "pay it forward."
    THANK YOU I HAVE BEEN BLESSED WITH STUFF TO GIVE TO THOSES WHO NEED IT.

    Many years ago I talked to my GOD and said hay if you bless me in making my preps I will help every one who you send to me by giving them things they can use to make their life a little better.

    Well you know what guys/gals I have gotten so much stuff toghter with little to know money to do it with that I know my GOD heard what I said and helped me get it all toghter.

    Get ride of stuff that is a bad word to me with the way things are going.

    It is not being generous it is being a good christien in my mind.
    JUST A FEW OF MY SIMPLE THOUGHTS
    LAY LOW WAIT LIKE A WOLF IN THE WILD UNTIL THE TIME IS RIGHT
    Never Pick A Fight With An Old Man He Will Just Shoot You He Can't Afford To Get Hurt

  25. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    THANKS. I needed this thread.
    I just don’t know where to START.
    Don't take this wrong, but STOP LOOKING FOR GOOD DEALS! How many compasses, fire starters, magnifiers , or other goodies that you've posted about here can you use? I watched a few of those "Hoarders" shows on TV a few years back, and many of them were "bargain hunters " who simply couldn't bring themselves to pass up a good deal. It was shocking how much stuff some of them had which was never even removed from the package after it was delivered or they brought it home!

    Meemur's "one in, one out" is a good rule, especially once one has pretty well achieved their prep goals. Of course, you have to watch out for the "moving goalpost" issue... your original prep goal for undies was enough to replace every pair you have once...but then you get there, and you start thinking, "gee...byt what if TSHTF lasts long enough that I wear out the entire set of replacements?"...and so, you start accumulating more! Stop! If things get that bad, you'll adapt! And absent using machine washing and drying, you'd probably be shocked how much longer elastic, etc will last.

    Then... IIRC, you enjoy handing out useful trinkets along with Christian tracts to people you run into out in public, right? That's fine... but I wonder how many get tossed into the nearest trash bin? You might find that supplying toiletries or socks to the homeless (through a third party, for your own safety) would end up being better appreciated. If you have extras (above and beyond what you can *reasonably* use in your lifetime) of things like hair combs, shampoo, soap, etc, check to see if there are shelters for abused women in your area who could use them.

    But get a container... a Rubbermaid type, or even a sturdy cardboard box, and limit your stash for these projects to what fits inside! Also, pray about it! Ask God how He wants you to allocate your resources.

    The first rule of thumb is when you're in a hole, stop digging.. and when you're buried in stuff, stop adding to it! I think its going to be difficult for you... you are getting a nice little dopamine rush with your purchases and donations, and there's nothing wrong with that. But if the state of your house is making you unhappy, or is actually potentially unhealthy or dangerous, it's time to change. Do you do any simple crafts? There are various organizations that are in need of donations of everything from tiny knitted hat's to keep preemies warm in the hospital to the "quilts of valor" program that solicit twin size quilts for (IIRC) veterans who are in the hospital for long term treatment. I know you don't get around easily, but I'm sure there is some way you can contribute if you look.

    But DON'T go out and buy a bunch of supplies to start a project! That way lies madness!

    Believe me when I say that there's nothing quite like a clean, well organized home! It doesnt have to be empty... but it needs to be livable.

    Summerthyme

  26. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by nomifyle View Post
    Its really hard for me throw away stuff that has any kind of use to it. I am drowning in stuff. This morning I ran across a laundry hamper full of odd socks. I want to get rid of things like this but just can't bring myself to do so. This is just one example. What do you think?

    Judy
    I think that you would be happier, and feel a weight lifted off your shoulders, if you did donate or destroy these things. Take two boxes, or two sacks, one for donating, one for trash, sit on that chair another poster mentioned, and commence to lighten your load!

    I know the boarddies well enough to promise you, on all our behalf, that if the day comes that you need a hamper of socks, we will start a collection!
    Thoughts are things. Thus I'm careful of the thoughts I think, & the company I keep.

  27. #67
    has anyone said ". . . bag up the socks and send em to me?"
    If no one on this board wants your old mismatched socks . . . then you know what they are worth
    Consider the ravens, for they neither sow nor reap, which have neither storehouse nor barn; and God feeds them. Of how much more value are you than a pesky raven?
    It is difficult to stand idly by and watch the vacuum of ignorance being filled with lies

  28. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by raven View Post
    has anyone said ". . . bag up the socks and send em to me?"
    If no one on this board wants your old mismatched socks . . . then you know what they are worth
    I'm with you if you have nothing a bag of missed matched socks is better then what you have.
    I guess I'm just a dumb ass for thinking this way.

    So pm me and I will give you my address and let you send it cod ok.
    JUST A FEW OF MY SIMPLE THOUGHTS
    LAY LOW WAIT LIKE A WOLF IN THE WILD UNTIL THE TIME IS RIGHT
    Never Pick A Fight With An Old Man He Will Just Shoot You He Can't Afford To Get Hurt

  29. #69
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    Socks! Same thing here. I went through them and paired and kept fifty pairs and donated the rest. Fifty pairs!!!!! Still way too many socks. I'm getting to the place now where I'm wondering just how many years do I think I have left. I've got too much stuff.

    Food is what I need to concentrate on, it's more useful and more appreciated when passed on.

  30. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rabbit View Post
    Socks! Same thing here. I went through them and paired and kept fifty pairs and donated the rest. Fifty pairs!!!!! Still way too many socks. I'm getting to the place now where I'm wondering just how many years do I think I have left. I've got too much stuff.

    Food is what I need to concentrate on, it's more useful and more appreciated when passed on.
    True but think about them that are left after you are gone maybe they could use it.
    JUST A FEW OF MY SIMPLE THOUGHTS
    LAY LOW WAIT LIKE A WOLF IN THE WILD UNTIL THE TIME IS RIGHT
    Never Pick A Fight With An Old Man He Will Just Shoot You He Can't Afford To Get Hurt

  31. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by Racing22 View Post
    The key is to adopt the "6 month Rule". If you haven't needed it or touched in in 6 months, out it goes.
    Does that include the gold and silver coins?

  32. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rabbit View Post
    Socks! Same thing here. I went through them and paired and kept fifty pairs and donated the rest. Fifty pairs!!!!! Still way too many socks. I'm getting to the place now where I'm wondering just how many years do I think I have left. I've got too much stuff.

    Food is what I need to concentrate on, it's more useful and more appreciated when passed on.
    I'm a bit of a sock-a-holic too. Finally I took a big tub from Walmart, and filled it with socks. I set it on the closet floor, and now have a space for them, and a system that limits me to an ample, but limited number. Did the same with the nightgowns, which leaves the entire longerie dresser free for underwear addiction.

    I think the key to organizing and living comfortably with all the excess, has been deciding ahead of time how much space can be given over to storage of this or that item.
    Thoughts are things. Thus I'm careful of the thoughts I think, & the company I keep.

  33. #73
    If you can find socks of similar sizes and weights, they can be worn as a pair just fine.

    I use socks with holes in them for dusting and cleaning.

    I use old wool socks that can't be mended by cutting of the foot and using the ribbed part as wrist and ankle warmers.
    https://soundcloud.com/user-309670005
    Audio Bhagavad Gita downloadable

    This knowledge is the king of education, the most secret of all secrets. It is the purest knowledge, and because it gives direct perception of the self by realization, it is the perfection of religion. It is everlasting, and it is joyfully performed.

  34. #74
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Betty_Rose View Post
    The kindest thing you can do for your children (or heirs) is to clean out everything that you don't need. Don't leave a mess for them to sort through.

    I am traveling very light these days, after having moved from a 2,300-square foot house with a massive garage to a much smaller house.

    That, and I had to give away everything my late husband owned, for my own sanity.

    I am now living as a minimalist, and it is very good for my mental health.

    My father was a hoarder, and I had to clean up his mess. It was awful.
    For the most part that what my plan is, but not "entirely."

    While it's true we "Conservators of Future Needs" aka "Pack Rats" have a tendency to pack spaces tight, I do clean out every now and then, except for one area. The attic.

    Yes, the attic has stuff and a clean-out for our children after we pass, won't be too, too bad for them, except in 3 major areas. Their toys. I have 3 children and each one begged and pleaded at room clean-out time, to save their favorite toys.

    Me: "Ok"

    (Everyone here already knows what's coming.)

    Well, our precious and wonderful offspring grew, got married, had children and moved into their own houses. Sporadically, we would remind them about their toys and ask to retrieve them and of course, year after year, they made excuses.

    Also year after year, DH would do his anniversary comment of...

    DH: "We really need to get to that attic, Terri."

    and I would give him my yearly response.

    Me: "It's too hot/cold or, we're just too busy."

    This year was different. I don't know if it was all those blue moons, supermoons or global warming but he got a "different" answer from me this time last fall. (which is only 1 of 2 seasons to even consider an attic cleanout in Louisiana.)

    Anyway, I turned to him and said,

    Me: "No we're not."

    DH: "What do you mean we're not? At some point, we HAVE to clean out that attic!"

    Me: "We're not going to clean out that attic now or ever!"

    DH: "Whaaaaat???"

    (But I started before he even got to the first adjective.)

    Me: "We were NOT going to clean the attic because the majority of the stuff is the kid's things and they knew how many times we would suggest to them to pick it up, right? Well, I decided I won't bug them ever again and that they're just going to have to deal with it when we die. Now, doesn't that feel better never having to worry about cleaning it?"

    DH: "Now that's just wrong, Terri."

    Me: "No, there's another reason for it. I know darn good and well they're going to be mourning for us and after they have to come and deal with the attic, they are going to be MAD, they'll forget how SAD they are!!!"



    (I'm really am so truly blessed with my DH, children and grandchildren. )

  35. #75
    Join Date
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    I don't store clutter. I do have prep items but they are used, not stored away.

  36. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Racing22 View Post
    The key is to adopt the "6 month Rule". If you haven't needed it or touched in in 6 months, out it goes.
    And I have found that two weeks later you needed what you threw out after storing for months if not years....

    Sometimes you win and sometimes you do not....

    Texican....

  37. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbbuddy View Post
    Who has that kind of money here?

    Besides, no prepper in his/her right mind would ever do that.
    Who said anything about money. The money is already spent, it's sitting there in the piles of junk everyone is hanging onto and NOT using.....

    Based on many responses in this thread, this is probably a selfie of many of the houses:



    Just saving that stuff, well, because it might just be needed in 10 years. Yep, I bet they're "preppers".
    ...Rubbin' is Racin'......

  38. #78
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    Nov 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Racing22 View Post
    Who said anything about money. The money is already spent, it's sitting there in the piles of junk everyone is hanging onto and NOT using.....

    Based on many responses in this thread, this is probably a selfie of many of the houses:



    Just saving that stuff, well, because it might just be needed in 10 years. Yep, I bet they're "preppers".
    My daughter loves watching those shows about people who hoard. One thing we have observed: The trouble starts when there is a terrible tragedy or horrible loss. It seems like something in their psyche decides that they will not suffer another loss - even the loss of a bit of twine or mismatched socks or anything else - and then the hoarding begins, often innocuously at first.

    After my husband's suicide, I realized that I was at great risk of becoming one of those people, and so I purposefully went in the other direction - of giving away EVERYTHING, even family heirlooms, long-cherished antiques, mahogany dining room furniture, bedroom sets and more. Most of it went to friends, which was lovely. I donated my research materials to libraries (I had a large collection of archival materials). I gave expensive cookware away to a friend who loves to cook but has very little money.

    Every now and then, I reach for a casserole dish and realize that it is gone, or I look for a shirt, and remember that I gave it away, but those moments are very rare. At least 98% of the time, I feel great relief that all this STUFF is out of my life. It saved me a lot of money, too. With all that fancy furniture gone, I was able to move into a much smaller house.

    In my case, I couldn't sell the stuff. It was *too* precious, and it was too personal. Finding a good home for these items was immensely satisfying. Those people - who took the stuff - were so very grateful.

    As someone else said, it is very liberating. And for me, it kept me safely away from one more addictive behavior: Hoarding.

  39. #79
    I have used a few old socks by tying them into knots and giving them to puppies or kitties for toys.

  40. #80
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Central Iowa
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    But on the other hand, there are set-ups like this:



    I'm not going to post a photo of my pantry due to OPSEC, but it's very similar. The shelves give me some limits, so I don't go overboard. At the same time, I can SEE what I have at a glance. It's easy to keep things rotated.

    I don't like this next one as well -- I like vertical shelves -- but this is also organized:



    One more:



    Please note that none of these are costly, custom kits. I could do the one above with plastic boxes from the Dollar Store and/or after Christmas sales at Walmart.
    Last edited by Meemur; 04-16-2018 at 10:54 PM.

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