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BRKG Brand new pedestrian walkway in Miami Florida has collapsed on cars
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  1. #121
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    *ack* -- there's still people under there.




    Julie Garcia
    �� Retweeted
    Orlando Sentinel
    ‏Verified account @orlandosentinel
    4h4 hours ago

    Tearful families wait as bodies remain under failed Florida bridge
    http://bit.ly/2FRNgoI

    Student watched helplessly as bridge came down on top of car, killing his friend

    March 16, 2018 7:04 PM

    A college student who narrowly escaped from a car that got smashed by a collapsing bridge said he watched helplessly as the structure tumbled down on top of the vehicle and killed the friend who was sitting next to him in the driver's seat.

    Richie Humble, who studies at Florida International University, was riding in a car under the pedestrian bridge when he heard a long creaking noise coming from the structure that spanned a busy Miami-area highway. It sounded different from anything he had ever heard before.

    "I looked up, and in an instant, the bridge was collapsing on us completely. It was too quick to do anything about it," Humble said Friday in a phone interview with The Associated Press.

    The falling concrete has already claimed six lives, and rescuers kept looking for bodies in the ruins of the structure, including that of the young woman who was at the wheel, Alexa Duran, whose family said she was dead.

    Relatives and friends of people still missing after Thursday's collapse gathered at the university, longing and praying for miracles as authorities tried to get inside the crushed cars still pinned under slabs of the bridge.

    Once he realized he was alive, Humble also realized that he could not get to Duran. He called to her but got no response. A group of men outside the car started yelling at him to try crawling through the rear window.

    He made his way into the back seat but couldn't squeeze through because the window was crushed. The men outside grabbed a wooden plank and pried open the rear door to pull him free, he said.

    "I was trying to get people to realize my friend was still in there," he said.

    Rescue workers sent him away in an ambulance. He suffered cuts to his leg from glass and a slight fracture to a vertebra, but he was able to walk away from the scene.

    He described Alexa as one of his best friends. They met at a mixer hosted by his fraternity and her sorority, and she had asked him to a semi-formal dance.

    "That's when I saw a light in her, and we became best friends," Humble said. "I want people to know Alexa was one of the downright sweetest girls. People should cherish every moment you have with your friends, because you don't know when it's going to be the last time."

    While families waited for word on their loved ones, investigators sought to understand why the 950-ton bridge gave way during construction. The cables supporting the span were being tightened following a "stress test" when it collapsed, authorities said.

    "This is a tragedy that we don't want to re-occur anywhere in the United States," said Juan Perez, director of the Miami-Dade police. "We just want to find out what caused this collapse to occur and people to die."

    Detectives declared the rubble a homicide scene, and the National Transportation Safety Board arrived to investigate.

    Scheduled to open in 2019, the bridge would have provided safe passage over a canal and six lanes of traffic and created a showpiece architectural feature connecting the campus of Florida International University with the community of Sweetwater, where many students live.

    The $14.2 million project was supposed to take advantage of a faster, cheaper and safer method of bridge-building promoted by the university.

    Authorities have not confirmed the victims' names. The fatalities included a student at FIU. One person died at a hospital, and Perez said five bodies were located with the help of cameras but had not yet been retrieved.

    In a Facebook post, Chelsea Brownfield said she was awaiting any information about her husband, Brandon. According to a Go Fund Me page set up for the family, Brandon Brownfield was driving home from work when the collapse happened.

    "The outpouring of love we have received is incredible," Chelsea Brownfield wrote. "I know you are all concerned for us. We still have not received any news or updates about Brandon Brownfield or the progress of the search (and) rescue."

    The post ended with the hashtag "praying for a miracle."

    Brownfield declined to comment in a message to The Associated Press.

    Jorge and Carol Fraga feared their relative's car was trapped beneath the bridge. Jorge's 60-year-old uncle, Rolando Fraga, lives in the area and frequently takes the nearby turnpike to work, but no one has heard from him since midday Thursday.

    "The waiting is so ... I don't have words for that," Carol Fraga said through tears.

    The bridge was put in place March 10, five days before the collapse.

    When finished, the span would have been supported from above, with a tall, off-center tower and cables attached to the walkway. That tower had not yet been installed, and it was unclear what builders were using as temporary supports.

    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/...16-story.html#
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    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  2. #122
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    Somebody has a Go Fund Me page and they haven't even found him? Good grief.

  3. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garryowen View Post
    Around here, companies doing work for the state would have their quality of materials confirmed. I saw one intersection that had just been completed a few months ago being torn out because the test cores didn't meet the contracted standards. Lab tests could have verified the strength of the materials. The way that alleged bridge came apart appears to indicate very poor concrete quality.
    I've carried an American Concrete Institute (ACI) cert in the past. I've performed crushes, slump test, weathering, and many other test. That said, there are far too many variables to be pointing fingers at anyone thing imo.
    I am always willing to learn something new though. So tell me oh wise one how 'exactly' did you determine the Crete was bad from Illinois? I couldn't make that determination from here, so maybe you know something I don't?
    Facts?? We don't need no stinkin facts...

  4. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garryowen View Post
    Around here, companies doing work for the state would have their quality of materials confirmed. I saw one intersection that had just been completed a few months ago being torn out because the test cores didn't meet the contracted standards. Lab tests could have verified the strength of the materials. The way that alleged bridge came apart appears to indicate very poor concrete quality.
    I do not know how one could possibly conclude that "poor quality concrete" is indicated from the available information.

    A key point is the assumption that this was work being done for the State, which may be incorrect. As best I can tell there was a federal TIGER grant (Obama's "shovel-ready" program) to Florida International University to build the bridge. I do not know how Florida operates, but it is likely that the City of Sweetwater granted a permit to FIU to build the bridge in their right of way, under the condition that all regulatory requirements are met. Everyone assumes that everything is being done to FHWA and FDOT standards, but the "police", Sweetwater and FIU, may have been in way over their heads and/or assuming each other was keeping things in check. It has been my experience that many localities do not have the experience, policies, or engineering "damn the politics this needs to be right" fortitude and, instead, rely solely on shall be built in accordance with... statements in the contract with little or no technical oversight.

    ETA: I still think this will come down to who developed, reviewed, and executed/inspected the erection plan. (Disclaimer: this is only speculation based on very limited information)
    Last edited by SurfaceTension; 03-16-2018 at 09:42 PM.

  5. #125
    Quote Originally Posted by Lilbitsnana View Post
    There are cranes that can handle 2,000+ ton

    https://www.manitowoccranes.com/en/n...t-lift-to-date
    Yet how many times we've heard how modern man couldn't build the pyramids today.

  6. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by FaithfulSkeptic View Post
    Yet how many times we've heard how modern man couldn't build the pyramids today.
    Typically, those saying that are talking out of their arses. We could in fact build them, but the cost would be exceptionally prohibitive. The latter is what is left out in their statement.
    Facts?? We don't need no stinkin facts...

  7. #127
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    Just sayin:




    And i STILL want to see stats on the materials and the construction plans and protocols.
    Mookie War Creed
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  8. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rayku View Post
    Typically, those saying that are talking out of their arses. We could in fact build them, but the cost would be exceptionally prohibitive. The latter is what is left out in their statement.
    :-) https://despair.com/collections/demo...ts/achievement
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  9. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by SurfaceTension View Post
    Unlike then, we wouldn't need slave labor. The machinery exist to get it done but it isn't cheap.
    I worked up a coffee shop napkin guestimate one time and came up with 23 billion for one of them.
    Facts?? We don't need no stinkin facts...

  10. #130
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    On a more serious note, when it came out today they were doing a stress test with traffic flowing, all I could think was "somebody is going to jail". Traffic should have been stopped while they did that. Regardless of design, process, construction, or materials flaws, the loss of life under that bridge is extreme negligence on the part of whomever ordered that test without first stopping traffic.
    Facts?? We don't need no stinkin facts...

  11. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker View Post
    It'll be interested to see how much of this turns out to have been ego (look at my engineering marvel) vs incompetence vs corruption (this shortcut that puts a little extra money in my pocket won't matter).
    Products of our current school system---where the PC "diversity" that is more important than academic excellence and the "there is no failure and EVERYTHING YOU DO is WONDERFUL" ethos are now reaping what they've sown...


    SHUDDER FOR THE FUTURE as more of these UNeducated (but THINKING they know EVERYTHING) half-taught students TAKE OVER our society

    (and they'll be running our NUCLEAR power plants, as well)....


    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubled…Let no man deceive you by any means…..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved….for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie….
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


  12. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Countrymouse View Post
    Products of our current school system---where the PC "diversity" that is more important than academic excellence and the "there is no failure and EVERYTHING YOU DO is WONDERFUL" ethos are now reaping what they've sown...


    SHUDDER FOR THE FUTURE as more of these UNeducated (but THINKING they know EVERYTHING) half-taught students TAKE OVER our society

    (and they'll be running our NUCLEAR power plants, as well)....


    Some of them already are.
    Facts?? We don't need no stinkin facts...

  13. #133
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    AVE has some interesting down to earth analysis on youtube right now. As an engineer I can say that things like this really keep me up at night.
    How many miles to Galt's Gulch?

  14. #134
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    When finished, the span would have been supported from above, with a tall, off-center tower and cables attached to the walkway. That tower had not yet been installed, and it was unclear what builders were using as temporary supports.

    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/...16-story.html#



    It had NOTHING underneath (or above) to give "temporary" support---

    as is CLEAR from the pictures---


    It is a testimony to the STRENGTH, not weakness, of the concrete, that it managed to hold itself up in a 120-foot span for FIVE days without falling when there was NOTHING HOLDING IT UP.


    Either the engineering firm--or the school--or the media---started this "IT'S BAD CONCRETE!!!" crap to try to COVER THEIR OWN BUTTS because they KNOW they screwed up.


    My husband works for an engineering firm that does "concrete formwork."

    Some of you may know what that is, but I'll explain (best I can, not being an engineer myself but a teacher).

    Have you ever thought about "how" they "form" those concrete pillars and other "shapes" that make up the "skeleton" of a large building?

    It's called "formwork"---literally, large "forms" are first constructed, into which the concrete is POURED.


    Traditionally, that work has been done ON SITE; the difference here with this bridge (as I understand it) is that the concrete pieces were "formed" separately and then "put together"---a MODULAR bridge (think "modular home"---pre-fab).

    Most of us--rightly so---think of "pre-fab" homes as being inherently inferior to "stick-built" homes.

    I personally (as a non-engineer) feel the same would be true of the "skeleton" of a building---it would be stronger "formed in place" that put together like a lego-set on-site.


    So when my husband's firm builds something---whether it be a big-box warehouse, a hospital, a school, a 15-story building in Atlanta ("Streets of Buckhead", anyone?), or a bridge (they built one over the ocean in New Orleans)---before the FIRST BIT of wet concrete hits those "forms" the drafters (like my husband) design according to the engineers' specifications----HOURS have been spent CALCULATING such things as stresses, cross-sectional areas, minimum needed column size to support weight, stresses and loads relative to span lengths, the cure-time required by the concrete, load, how much and what diameter of rebar is required per area---and this is VERY great detail, down to HOW MANY pieces of rebar and even HOW they rebar is CURVED within joints or sections to give the best support (this is called "the cage" because that is what it resembles). Then before all this even STARTS, they have to make sure all the FOOTINGS are correct to specs to support the structure---all this is figured out BY A TEAM of engineers BEFORE It is sent to the draftsmen to draw out the forms according to their specs, and before those plans are then sent to the job site for the workmen to put into action.


    My husband just said you NEVER leave a span unsupported by scaffolding UNTIL the concrete has been poured and set a certain number of days, and he's never heard of a bridge being put up that is a long span WITHOUT ANY SYSTEM OF SUPPORT FIRST BEING PUT IN PLACE to support the bridge--either beams (steel I-beams or concrete beams with rebar) with pillars to hold them up OR the VERTICAL PILLAR and CABLE system of a suspension bridge (which is what was supposed to be the means of support HERE)---the SUPPORT GOES IN BEFORE THE BRIDGE SPAN, in BOTH cases!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Here is an animated video of how a suspension bridge is SUPPOSED to be built over a body of water---I would imagine the process of a much shorter span, over land, would be much the same---but you see that the SUPPORT CABLE SYSTEM is BUILT FIRST--

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_9hk6x3p1so




    That the "engineers" here somehow MISSED the fact that the SPAN was going in--UNSUPPORTED----BEFORE the SUPPORT system was in place---

    Means they were either ASTONISHINGLY IGNORANT...

    COMPLETELY UNEDUCATED....

    UTTERLY INCOMPETENT....

    CRIMINALLY STUPID....


    OR ALL OF THE ABOVE.
    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubled…Let no man deceive you by any means…..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved….for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie….
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


  15. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by mzkitty View Post
    Richie Humble, who studies at Florida International University, was riding in a car under the pedestrian bridge when he heard a long creaking noise coming from the structure that spanned a busy Miami-area highway. It sounded different from anything he had ever heard before.


    The re-bar screaming as it was torn OUT of the concrete, as it gave way under its own UNSUPPORTED weight....
    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubled…Let no man deceive you by any means…..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved….for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie….
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


  16. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rayku View Post
    Agreed, I suspect the design and construction PE firm(s) are in deep caca.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rayku View Post
    I don't think anyone can say for sure why yet, but the lack of cable tower and cables on a suspension design as noted by POD will undoubtedly play heavily into that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rayku View Post
    It's premature to assume anything about the steel. Anyone here have the bidspec?? No?
    There are hundreds of potential causes, not least of which could be bad design and or implementation.
    For the moment maybe it would be better to think about the poor people caught under it and any construction workers that were on it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Countrymouse View Post

    When finished, the span would have been supported from above, with a tall, off-center tower and cables attached to the walkway. That tower had not yet been installed, and it was unclear what builders were using as temporary supports.

    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/...16-story.html#



    It had NOTHING underneath (or above) to give "temporary" support---

    as is CLEAR from the pictures---


    It is a testimony to the STRENGTH, not weakness, of the concrete, that it managed to hold itself up in a 120-foot span for FIVE days without falling when there was NOTHING HOLDING IT UP.


    Either the engineering firm--or the school--or the media---started this "IT'S BAD CONCRETE!!!" crap to try to COVER THEIR OWN BUTTS because they KNOW they screwed up.


    My husband works for an engineering firm that does "concrete formwork."

    Some of you may know what that is, but I'll explain (best I can, not being an engineer myself but a teacher).

    Have you ever thought about "how" they "form" those concrete pillars and other "shapes" that make up the "skeleton" of a large building?

    It's called "formwork"---literally, large "forms" are first constructed, into which the concrete is POURED.


    Traditionally, that work has been done ON SITE; the difference here with this bridge (as I understand it) is that the concrete pieces were "formed" separately and then "put together"---a MODULAR bridge (think "modular home"---pre-fab).

    Most of us--rightly so---think of "pre-fab" homes as being inherently inferior to "stick-built" homes.

    I personally (as a non-engineer) feel the same would be true of the "skeleton" of a building---it would be stronger "formed in place" that put together like a lego-set on-site.


    So when my husband's firm builds something---whether it be a big-box warehouse, a hospital, a school, a 15-story building in Atlanta ("Streets of Buckhead", anyone?), or a bridge (they built one over the ocean in New Orleans)---before the FIRST BIT of wet concrete hits those "forms" the drafters (like my husband) design according to the engineers' specifications----HOURS have been spent CALCULATING such things as stresses, cross-sectional areas, minimum needed column size to support weight, stresses and loads relative to span lengths, the cure-time required by the concrete, load, how much and what diameter of rebar is required per area---and this is VERY great detail, down to HOW MANY pieces of rebar and even HOW they rebar is CURVED within joints or sections to give the best support (this is called "the cage" because that is what it resembles). Then before all this even STARTS, they have to make sure all the FOOTINGS are correct to specs to support the structure---all this is figured out BY A TEAM of engineers BEFORE It is sent to the draftsmen to draw out the forms according to their specs, and before those plans are then sent to the job site for the workmen to put into action.


    My husband just said you NEVER leave a span unsupported by scaffolding UNTIL the concrete has been poured and set a certain number of days, and he's never heard of a bridge being put up that is a long span WITHOUT ANY SYSTEM OF SUPPORT FIRST BEING PUT IN PLACE to support the bridge--either beams (steel I-beams or concrete beams with rebar) with pillars to hold them up OR the VERTICAL PILLAR and CABLE system of a suspension bridge (which is what was supposed to be the means of support HERE)---the SUPPORT GOES IN BEFORE THE BRIDGE SPAN, in BOTH cases!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Here is an animated video of how a suspension bridge is SUPPOSED to be built over a body of water---I would imagine the process of a much shorter span, over land, would be much the same---but you see that the SUPPORT CABLE SYSTEM is BUILT FIRST--

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_9hk6x3p1so




    That the "engineers" here somehow MISSED the fact that the SPAN was going in--UNSUPPORTED----BEFORE the SUPPORT system was in place---

    Means they were either ASTONISHINGLY IGNORANT...

    COMPLETELY UNEDUCATED....

    UTTERLY INCOMPETENT....

    CRIMINALLY STUPID....


    OR ALL OF THE ABOVE.
    I'm going with utterly incompetent and criminally stupid.
    Facts?? We don't need no stinkin facts...

  17. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by BornFree View Post
    Live video of Bridge collapse. Not the best quality, but it shows one side going down.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/OfficialJ...059776/video/1
    Can any of you more tech-savvy folks somehow DOWNLOAD and save this video and send it to me?

    I'd like to have it before it's taken down, as it CLEARLY shows the bridge failing first in the middle, falling under its own weight, and then pulling the (FAR too small) side-pillars down with it as it fell.


    I think this film will soon become "evidence" when this goes to a CRIMINAL NEGLIGENCE case (as it surely will) and I'd like to have a copy of it.


    thanks!
    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubled…Let no man deceive you by any means…..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved….for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie….
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


  18. #138
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    https://www.liveleak.com/view?t=kvFRJ_1521265612
    FIU Bridge Collapse Caught On Dash Cam
    Slowed down dash cam video and zoom in to get a sense of what happened.
    R/T 00:23
    ======================

    Watch the crane on the left... and note the school bus on the right of the dash cam car.
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  19. #139
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    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/03/16...s-surface.html

    Snip;

    Florida’s Department of Transportation said Friday that an engineer left a voicemail just two days before the bridge failure, notifying the department of cracking in the concrete.

    A transcript released Friday shows Denney Pate with FIGG Bridge Group saying the cracking would need repairs "but from a safety perspective we don't see that there's any issue there so we're not concerned about it from that perspective.”
    The span was too long to be unsupported. Montana State University recently developed the means to mass produce 20k concrete considered a super crete. Not even that concrete would have been strong enough for that length of span.

    Concrete has high compressive strength but low shear and tensile strength.




    A span like the one in question is in effect a beam. The longer it is without support the higher the flexular stress. Such a beam is flexed as when it bends. It's under both compression and tensile stress which introduces shear stress by default. If it's supported properly, the span could hold a tremendous amount of weight. Unsupported it flexes under its own weight.

    Then we get to the span being stress tested. According to the report from fox linked above, span was already cracking two days before the stress test.
    The cracking implies the reinforcing steel was already deformed. No competent engineer is going to go forward with any form of stress test in light of that, yet they did anyway.
    The reports mention the cables being the method of stressing. Given the main suspension cables were yet to be installed, the only other cables it could have been were the pre/post stressing cables. Which further means they were tensioning and or untentioning those cables. All the while knowing the span was already cracked. That in turn would very likely add shear tension failure to the mix.

    Bottom line is, this is a result of a series of failures. Engineering and construction management being at the top of the list cascading down to the workers. Materials are the least likely to be at fault.
    Last edited by Rayku; 03-17-2018 at 09:25 AM. Reason: Grammar
    Facts?? We don't need no stinkin facts...

  20. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    https://www.liveleak.com/view?t=kvFRJ_1521265612
    FIU Bridge Collapse Caught On Dash Cam
    Slowed down dash cam video and zoom in to get a sense of what happened.
    R/T 00:23
    ======================

    Watch the crane on the left... and note the school bus on the right of the dash cam car.
    Same video on YouTube
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Ucflj-...ature=youtu.be

    The crane wasn't hooked to anything that I could see. Note the workers directly over the apparent initiation point. The reports of stress testing that day and their location directly over the vertical support between the spans suggest they were tensioning or detentioning cables.

    Edit:

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...likely-n857371

    Chief NTSB investigator Robert Accetta said construction workers were working on the north end of the structure, tightening internal cables that were meant to strengthen the walkway's diagonal members, when the incident occurred.
    Last edited by Rayku; 03-17-2018 at 05:23 AM.
    Facts?? We don't need no stinkin facts...

  21. #141
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    Sadly for those who were injured and the families of the deceased, several years from now this will still be winding its way through the courts as everybody in sight is sued and all of the parties profess innocence and point the fingers at everyone else. Nobody is going to own up to their part in this. They never do. Criminal negligence will as well be under investigation for years.

    If there were already cracks seen in the cement, traffic should have been stopped until the issue was resolved.

  22. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker View Post
    Sadly for those who were injured and the families of the deceased, several years from now this will still be winding its way through the courts as everybody in sight is sued and all of the parties profess innocence and point the fingers at everyone else. Nobody is going to own up to their part in this. They never do. Criminal negligence will as well be under investigation for years.

    If there were already cracks seen in the cement, traffic should have been stopped until the issue was resolved.
    Unfortunately you're probably correct.
    Facts?? We don't need no stinkin facts...

  23. #143
    #139:

    Materials is the least likely to be at fault.
    THIS

  24. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rayku View Post
    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/03/16...s-surface.html

    Snip;



    The span was too long to be unsupported. Montana State University recently developed the means to mass produce 20k concrete considered a super crete. Not even that concrete would have been strong enough for that length of span.

    Concrete has high compressive strength but low shear and tensile strength.




    A span like the one in question is in effect a beam. The longer it is without support the higher the flexular stress. Such a beam is flexed as when it bends. It's under both compression and tensile stress which introduces shear stress by default. If it's supported properly, the span could hold a tremendous amount of weight. Unsupported it flexes under its own weight.

    Then we get to the span being stress tested. According to the report from fox linked above, span was already cracking two days before the stress test.
    The cracking implies the reinforcing steel was already deformed. No competent engineer is going to go forward with any form of stress test in light of that, yet they did anyway.
    The reports mention the cables being the method of stressing. Given the main suspension cables were yet to be installed, the only other cables it could have been were the pre/post stressing cables. Which further means they were tensioning and or untentioning those cables. All the while knowing the span was already cracked. That in turn would very likely add shear tension failure to the mix.

    Bottom line is, this is a result of a series of failures. Engineering and construction management being at the top of the list cascading down to the workers. Materials are the least likely to be at fault.
    That is -very- informative, thanks for posting!

    Note how the expected cracking location seems to match the dash cam video.

    Reminds me somewhat of the Oroville Dam spillway failure.

    Applying a patch job over "superficial" cracks without fully exploring why the cracks are happening in the first place?
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  25. #145
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    We are seeing the contractor, Florida State University and Florida DOT already publicly circling the wagons and starting to CYA and finger point.

    Watch how complicated it is going to be assigning responsibility to which party at which point in time of the design and building process.

    This could be litigated for 10 years?

    What is the future of this bridge project?

    How is the taxpayer and victims going to be made whole?

    Should the bridge project even go forward now?

    Fair Use Cited
    -------------
    FIU says it knew about crack on bridge, and state’s Transportation Department did, too

    By Douglas Hanks, Nora Gámez Torres, Mary Ellen Klas And David Smiley
    Herald/Times Tallahassee Bureau
    March 17, 2018 09:10 AM
    Updated 1 hour 12 minutes ago

    Hours before Florida International University’s new pedestrian bridge collapsed onto traffic, the school met with engineers and the state’s Department of Transportation for two hours to discuss whether a crack on the structure was a safety risk, FIU said in a statement Saturday.

    The disclosure followed a Friday night announcement from FDOT that an engineer hired by FIU had called the agency days before the March 15 collapse to flag the crack and say he did not think it was a safety issue. The voicemail message was not received until Friday, according to FDOT.

    Also in the statement, FDOT said one of its consultants attended a meeting with the FIU bridge team — including executives from Munilla Construction Management, the contractor, and Figg, the engineering contractor — hours before the collapse that killed at least six people. The statement said no “life-safety issues” were discussed. The statement did not mention that the crack in the bridge came up during the meeting. FIU said the crack was the reason the meeting was called, and that it lasted two hours.

    In its own statement Saturday morning, FIU said the crack was discussed in the presence of an FDOT representative. “The FIGG engineer of record delivered a technical presentation regarding the crack and concluded that there were no safety concerns and the crack did not compromise the structural integrity of the bridge,” the statement read. “This meeting lasted approximately two hours and included FIU and FDOT representatives.”

    National Transportation Safety Board Chief Investigator Robert Accetta told reporters Friday it was too early to say if cracks played a role in the FIU bridge collapse. He also said the presence of cracks is not necessarily a red flag for safety.

    “I would have to say that a crack in the bridge does not necessarily mean it’s unsafe,” he said, though NTSB investigators made it clear that they had not confirmed whether there were cracks. “That’s still too early in the investigation for us to determine.”

    The 9 a.m meeting Thursday was called by a Figg engineer to “discuss a crack that appeared on the structure.” The meeting occurred at an MCM trailer on the construction site. It apparently ended at 11 a.m., and the bridge collapsed shortly before 2 p.m.

    FIU President Mark Rosenberg said Friday that crews had been performing stress tests on the bridge before the collapse in an effort to test the “resiliency of the concrete.”

    The dueling statements from Florida’s Transportation Department and South Florida’s only state university highlighted the effort by Gov. Rick Scott’s administration to distance itself from the collapsed bridge.

    Hours after the collapse, the Transportation Department, led by a Scott appointee, issued a fact sheet Thursday evening saying the agency’s involvement “was limited to” traffic-control permits, serving as a funding pass-through, authorizing FIU “to utilize the aerial space above the state road.”

    Rosenberg said he learned of the release as he was heading out to a campus press conference with Scott, where the governor told reporters: “It was not a FDOT project. It was an FIU project. There will clearly be an investigation to find out exactly what happened, and why this happened. We will hold anybody accountable if anybody has done anything wrong.”

    In an interview Friday, Rosenberg said he hasn't spoken to Scott since and did not know the governor was going to say what he did about FIU's responsibility for the project. The state university president said Florida transportation officials were in fact closely involved with the project.

    “We've had a good relationship with FDOT -- I just want to make it clear,” he said. “So we're anxious to find out more about what they think we didn't do. Because they've been involved at every step.”

    Records released Friday by Sweetwater, a partner in the FIU bridge connecting the city with the campus over Eighth Street, showed FDOT officials attending multiple planning meetings throughout 2017 with FIU administrators and private contractors. Minutes of an April 24, 2017 noted the permit needed to build the bridge over the Eighth Street, a state road, was awaiting approval from Scott's then-Transportation Secretary, Jim Buxold. Maydel Santana, an FIU spokeswoman, said on Friday afternoon that FDOT did ultimately approve the bridge design.

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/loca...205660334.html
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  26. #146
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    WPLG Local 10 News
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    13m13 minutes ago

    #BREAKING: Miami-Dade County Police confirmed the identities of four of at least six people who were killed after pedestrian bridge at Florida International University collapsed

    http://bit.ly/2HGRmR7


    Authorities recovered two bodies from the debris Saturday

    Updated: 2:59 PM, March 17, 2018

    SWEETWATER, Fla. - Miami-Dade County Police have confirmed the identities of four of at least six people who were killed after pedestrian bridge at Florida International University collapsed on Thursday.

    Police identified Rolando Fraga, 60, Oswald Gonzalez, 57, Alberto Arias, 53, and Navarro Brown, 37, as among the victims Saturday. A fifth victim, 18-year-old Alexa Duran, was identified by her family.

    The identity of the sixth victim has not been released. Authorities have cautioned that the death toll could rise.

    The bodies of Fraga, Gonzalez and Arias were pulled from debris on Saturday along with their vehicles.

    Brown was pulled from site on Thursday and was rushed to Kendall Regional Medical Center, where he died of his injuries.

    Authorities were working to free the bodies of Duran and the sixth victim on Saturday. Miami-Dade Police Director Juan Perez said crews are expected to be finished by the end of the day.

    Fraga's family had traveled from West Palm Beach to Southwest Miami-Dade County to search for him, but they had feared he was among the dead.

    “His family will miss him terribly, and we love him so much!” his family said in a statement.

    This is a developing story. It will be updated.

    https://www.local10.com/news/florida...s-ronald-fraga
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

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    *snip*

    Alexa Duran, an 18-year-old student Florida International University, and Navarro Brown, a bridge employee working on-site when the pedestrian bridge collapsed, were identified as victims on March 16, according to NBC News.


    https://www.nbcmiami.com/news/local/...lowTwt_MIBrand
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  28. #148
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    Blanolioro explains why the bridge collapsed. He has done many videos on the Oroville Dam. Interesting what he has to say about it along with diagrams of what he thinks happened.



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBDDQLcp6iI

    Video is about 10 minutes long

  29. #149
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    Idiocracy
    "His golden colored hair and beard gave to his appearance a celestial aspect, His eyes grey clear. He came from racial lines which had blue eyes and golden hair. This granted unlimited freedom provoked the Jews, Jesus of Nazareth spoke rather as a friend of the Romans than of the Jews." http://www.thenazareneway.com/likene...ur_saviour.htm

  30. #150
    This guy most likely has the main cause of failure figured out. He really backs up what he is saying, and he provides evidence.
    He even has a set of bridge construction/ installation drawings. Unfortunately there is a little bad language.

    R/T 16:12

    Last edited by BornFree; 03-17-2018 at 09:22 PM. Reason: Added some information
    But not likely to die free

  31. #151
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    Bardou/Born Free

    Thanks for posting those two videos. Very illuminating.

    - That tall central tower is there only as ornamentation. It does not function as a suspension bridge at all.

    - The bridge is a type of truss beam construction.

    - There are -no- steel beams in that thing. Only some steel tensioning rods.

    - Evidence one of those tensioning rods broke while being tensioned and may have precipitated the failure. Overtensioning may have occurred because the stress tests were not responding as planned.

    - The bridge is monstrously heavy and would have been much lighter if steel was used.

    - There may have been some deviations from the original plan when the bridge was moved. The giant crawlers were not in the original position proposed and load spreader plates were not used as planned.
    "The most intriguing point for the historian is that where history and legend meet."

    "None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who think they are free."

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  32. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bardou View Post
    Blanolioro explains why the bridge collapsed. He has done many videos on the Oroville Dam. Interesting what he has to say about it along with diagrams of what he thinks happened.



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBDDQLcp6iI

    Video is about 10 minutes long
    When he deemed this a Warren truss he lost cred....I'd suggest waiting for more info to come out.

  33. #153
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    Fair Use Cited
    ----------------

    What caused FIU’s bridge to fall? More clues come to light.

    By Andres Viglucci, Jenny Staletovich, Douglas Hanks And Linda Robertson
    March 17, 2018 09:24 AM
    Updated 2 hours 38 minutes ago

    If tightening support cables caused Florida International University’s signature new pedestrian bridge to collapse, as Sen. Marco Rubio has suggested in a tweet, the rubble spread across the Tamiami Trail could contain obvious clues, bridge experts say.

    Adjusting tension cables, which ran like tendons through the 950-ton concrete span and the struts that connected a concrete canopy on the bridge to the walkway, can be a delicate operation. Over-tightening the cables, which are used to reinforce the concrete, can have devastating results, the experts say: It might cause torquing, or twisting, that would cause a specific cracking pattern in the concrete on impact with the road, something investigators would likely detect quickly.

    National Transportation Safety Board investigators have confirmed that crews were tightening tensioning cables in a diagonal truss at the north end of the bridge on the day of the collapse. But they stressed they did not know whether that was the point at which the span failed.

    Indepent experts have zeroed in on the tensioning work as one of a myriad possible causes for the failure of the unfinished bridge, which crumpled to the pavement on Thursday.

    The NTBS investigators, who arrived on Thursday night, began what will likely be an arduous process of reconstructing the accident and assigning a cause. The investigation could take as long as 18 months, the agency said.

    Reports that cracking in the bridge had been discovered days before the collapse drew a flurry of attention on Friday, but its significance remains unclear.

    The Florida Department of Transportation issued a statement saying the bridge’s engineer had called the agency on Tuesday to report cracking in the concrete at the north end of the span — in the same general area where tensioning work was undertaken on Thursday, two days later. According to the call’s transcript, which was released by FDOT, the FIGG Bridge Group engineer said the cracking did not raise a safety issue.

    The design-build team then held a two-hour meeting on Thursday morning, with FDOT participation, during which the cracking was discussed but no safety red flags were raised over it. The meeting broke up at 11 a.m., a couple of hours before the bridge buckled and fell. The precise location of the cracking has not been disclosed.

    An NTSB investigator said Friday that a crack in the bridge is not necessarily unsafe. Cracks in new concrete construction are not uncommon, and can be cosmetic or a sign of more serious trouble, experts say.

    As crews work to remove the massive slab to retrieve vehicles they suspect hold more victims, investigators will begin combing through debris and document the site. The wreckage itself will likely provide telling details — cracks could reveal the precise location where stresses occurred that caused the bridge to fall.

    On Saturday, March 10, a 174-foot long, 950-ton span for the FIU bridge was set on supports over the Tamiami Trail. The concrete span was constructed alongside the road as part of an accelerated construction method that allows roads to remain open while bridges are constructed nearby and then moved into place.

    Interviews with witnesses and video footage could reveal the sequence of events. Investigators may use 3D imaging, preserve larger pieces of the bridge in a local warehouse while the case unfolds and ship other joints or braces back to Washington labs for testing, said NTSB Media Relations Officer Keith Holloway.

    “Each accident is different, so it may require different techniques,” he said.

    Independent experts focused in on work going on Thursday before the bridge fell. Late Thursday night, Rubio tweeted that he was told by workers at the site that cables connected to the bridge had loosened and engineers were instructed to tighten them.

    One subcontractor that provides materials and services for concrete tensioning, Structural Technologies VSL, confirmed on Friday that it had a crew at work on the bridge and that one employee, Navaro Brown, had perished in the accident. Two others were hospitalized.

    Company spokesman Michael Biesiada, wouldn’t say exactly what the crew was doing when the bridge collapsed, but he confirmed the workers were “providing installation support for our products.” Documents from FIU and consultant Bolton Perez & Associates, obtained by the Miami Herald, show that Structural Technologies, LLC (VSL) was paid $439,350 for “post-tensioning work.”

    Whatever did in fact occur to weaken the bridge, one expert said, it could well be tied to work done Thursday. Engineers say that most bridge and building collapses that occur during construction are caused by work errors, not design flaws, though the latter can’t be ruled out this early.

    FIU President Mark Rosenberg told the Miami Herald on Friday there were various tests and construction tasks underway on Thursday. Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez has said the bridge was undergoing stress tests, which typically require placing weights on a structure to test its resiliency,

    “I assume they were tests to see the resiliency of the concrete, the stress on the material,” Rosenberg said.

    Sen. Marco Rubio addressed the bridge collapse during a press conference at Florida International University on Thursday. Rubio said in a tweet that workers were ordered to tighten cables Thursday.

    Rosenberg said he has not spoken to anyone from the bridge contractor, Munilla Construction Group, a politically connected firm in Miami. Rubio said he had spoken to partner Pedro Munilla amid the rubble of the bridge collapse on Thursday, but not about the possible cause.

    The bridge’s 175-foot main span, built by the side of Southwest Eighth Street over a period of months, was hoisted into place over supports at either end in a matter of several hours last Saturday morning — a relatively novel though increasingly common approach known as accelerated bridge construction.

    “It was set on supports on Saturday and it didn’t fall right away, so clearly something happened on Thursday that was different from Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,” said Michael Chajes, a forensic engineering expert at the University of Delaware. “This isn’t the kind of thing that gradually gets weaker over four days. Something weakened it.”

    Whatever the case, the collapse is certain to lead to multimillion dollar lawsuits and finger-pointing even as the official investigation proceeds.

    “The reason everyone is so shocked is because this should never have happened,” said John Uustal, a Fort Lauderdale trial lawyer who has won major verdicts against General Motors and tobacco companies. “Now, it’s like a murder mystery, and we’ve got to figure out who did it. At best, someone made a horrible, negligent mistake. But in my experience it tends more often to have its roots in a greedy corporate decision to save money or cut costs.”

    Uustal warned that the official probe could drag on into 2019 because of federal budget cuts.

    “Because of the publicity they might move more quickly, but lately all sorts of government investigations — whether it’s fire, highways, boating, air traffic — are taking longer because these agencies have been losing funding for 20 years.”

    The innovative bridge, set to open in early 2019, was lauded by both the university and the FIGG Bridge Group, the award-winning firm that designed it, as a grand new gesture in both style and construction. University officials said it was intended to tell “the story of the technology of its time” while showcasing the school’s accelerated bridge construction center, the instant-bridge technology now widely used in urban areas to avoid closing roads and keep traffic flowing.

    That fast-track construction is now raising questions. The span, made of concrete poured into place as it was constructed by the side of the road, is typically tested as work progresses. It can also vibrate as it’s moved into place, but that would likely be accounted for during design, experts said.

    Rosenberg said on Friday that crews had continually monitored stress on the span as it was moved into position across Eighth Street and lifted onto the support columns.

    “They were continually monitoring the stress on the concrete with the movement,” he said.

    Bridges are typically “tuned” once they are put in place, to adjust the arc, or camber, in the concrete that occurs when tension cables are pulled tight.

    The FIU bridge also has an unusual design that might have played a part in its failure. It had a heavy concrete canopy, or roof, connected to the walkway slab by v-shaped trusses — the structural element that the NTSB said crews were working to tighten on Thursday before the bridge collapsed.

    An NTSB official said the agency had not encountered a bridge design like it previously.

    It’s possible that the roof, bearing down on the span, was at risk of twisting if tension wires were released, one expert said.

    “If they were releasing tension in the wires to fix the camber,” bridge designer Richard Hartzell said in an email, “it could suddenly increase this twisting (torsional buckling) leading to a quick and sudden collapse.”

    The span was incomplete when it fell. A pylon holding up support pipes, not yet installed, was designed to tower over the bridge, but those structural pieces would attach to the canopy, not the walkway itself. A detailed document on FIU’s website says the bridge was designed to be strong enough to hold up without the pylon assembly. The pylon assembly is meant instead to dampen vibrations on the bridge and provide a dynamic aesthetic element.

    There could be other causes as well, from contractors failing to follow design instructions to problems in the pre-stressed concrete, which was poured and cured as the span was constructed alongside the Tamiami Trail.

    “They’re not going to find out a lot of things until they start poking around,” said Martin Gordon, president of the National Academy of Forensic Engineers and a professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology. “But the first thing is to preserve and record exactly as much as possible. Sometimes that gives clues as to what portion of the bridge failed.”

    Because concrete is so vulnerable to stress — it’s stronger when compressed than when pulled — cracks may provide important clues as to whether contractors followed design speculations. Engineers would have specifically designed for the angle of stress. So if a piece were moved or twisted, or if it’s picked up in the wrong spot, it may weaken.

    “Anywhere they pick it up, they’re going to change the state of stress,” Chajes said. “So we would calculate each one of these movements to know what we’re doing.”

    Using heavy concrete rather than steel has also raised questions.

    “Normally a bridge would use steel trusses because of the pull-push pressures,” Gordon said. “With trusses, some members are compressed and some pulled.”

    Investigators will likely collect debris as possible to identify defective material, Chajes said, and then try to distinguish the damage caused by failure verses the fall.

    “It’s almost like in a fire trying to figure out what was the initiating cause,” he said.

    The exact sequence of events could also quickly lead them to where the stress occurred, which could help reveal what went wrong.

    “What did you notice starting to happen as it failed? Was there twisting involved? You really want to know because the stresses throughout the structure are of a different nature,” Chajes said. “If you knew exactly what was happening on the site for the five minutes before it failed, that’s going to pretty quickly point you to what the causes were.”

    And while the accelerated construction may not wind up being a cause, the collapse may change safety measures.

    “What I don’t understand, and I don’t understand it as a lawyer or as a regular human being, is how do you do this in the middle of the day with people driving underneath,” said construction lawyer David Haber. “That’s not just a bad idea, that’s potentially criminally negligent. It’s insane.”

    A final report on the accident may not come for more than a year, Holloway said. But the agency will likely release updates, as it has with other cases like the El Faro investigation, as facts are confirmed.

    “We’ll look at what’s unique about this particular bridge,” Holloway said. “If we do see something during our investigation that needs to be addressed more urgently, we can issue more urgent recommendations.”

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/loca...205661039.html
    "The most intriguing point for the historian is that where history and legend meet."

    "None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who think they are free."

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


  34. #154
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    Looked at both videos, the first guy is particularly in left field, the second was a lot closer regarding the stress/post tension. They both are missing the support cables. They are not in fact window dressing.
    I get it though, it was found on youtube so it must be true. Carry on.
    Facts?? We don't need no stinkin facts...

  35. #155
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    Watching this stuff unfold, I have to wonder how damn gullible we all are.
    They are building a bridge here, great! It must be safe for traffic to travel beneath it or they would close the road. Right? We take it for granted that these people know what they are doing and are looking out for our safety.
    This demonstrates that they are NOT looking out for our safety. We must all be vigilant every single minute of every single day and not take anything for granted.
    “What the government is good at is collecting taxes, taking away your freedoms and killing people. It’s not good at much else.” — Author Tom Clancy

  36. #156
    Quote Originally Posted by Rayku View Post
    Looked at both videos, the first guy is particularly in left field, the second was a lot closer regarding the stress/post tension. They both are missing the support cables. They are not in fact window dressing.
    I get it though, it was found on youtube so it must be true. Carry on.
    From the article that Red Baron posted above:

    The span was incomplete when it fell. A pylon holding up support pipes, not yet installed, was designed to tower over the bridge, but those structural pieces would attach to the canopy, not the walkway itself. A detailed document on FIU’s website says the bridge was designed to be strong enough to hold up without the pylon assembly. The pylon assembly is meant instead to dampen vibrations on the bridge and provide a dynamic aesthetic element.

    So not so wrong after all.
    But not likely to die free

  37. #157

    Father of Collapsed Florida Bridge was Obama ‘Champion of Change’ in 2015

    https://canadafreepress.com/article/...change-in-2015

    Father of Collapsed Florida Bridge was Obama ‘Champion of Change’ in 2015

    Celebrated leading visionary bridge engineer Atorod Azizinamini, whose ABC (Accelerated Bridge Construction) technology was used to build the bridge that collapsed yesterday on Florida International University’s campus, was named an Obama era Department of Transportation ‘Champion of Change’ in 2015.

    The event in which Azizinamini was awarded ‘Champion of Change’ status was webcast live at whitehouse.gov/live, no longer online.

    Much will be made in coming days that FIGG Bridge Group designed the bridge and that it was constructed by MCM Construction, in the aftermath of the bridge’s collapse.

    But it was Azizinamini bridge technology all the way:

    “This project is an outstanding example of the ABC method,” said Atorod Azizinamini, the center’s director, in a press release on Saturday. “This bridge is the result of great support from our congressional delegation and the U.S. Department of Transportation,” said FIU CFO Kenneth Jessell in the same press release. “FIU and our surrounding community will benefit from this project for generations to come. (Reason, Mar. 15, 2018)

    “Currently, about 24% of more than 610,000 bridges in the U.S. are deficient, and about 45% of all U.S. bridges are shorter than 60 ft. To address this issue, Azizinamini invented the Folded Plate Steel Bridge System, which provides an economical, long-term solution for replacing outdated short span bridges. It allows on-site construction of a bridge over a few days, using less costly materials and lasting longer, resulting in lower costs and limited impact to traffic.” (White House Honors Atorod Azizinamini as Champion of Change, Oct. 12, 2015)

    “Eight vehicles were reportedly crushed when the 174-foot, 950-ton pedestrian bridge, installed Saturday over Southwest Eighth Street in Miami, collapsed this afternoon. The bridge was supposed to demonstrate methods developed by FIU’s Accelerated Bridge Construction University Transportation Center (ABC-UTC), whose work is also funded by U.S. DOT grants. (Reason)

    “The death toll from the bridge collapse on Florida International University’s campus has climbed to six, police said. (ABC News, Mar. 16, 2018)



    “The bridge, hailed as an engineering marvel, slammed to the ground around 1:30 p.m. on Thursday and immediately trapped at least eight vehicles, authorities said.

    “Ten injured in the collapse were transported to Kendall Medical and labeled as level-one trauma patients, Dr. Mark McKenney, the hospital’s program director, said on Thursday. They ranged in age from 20 to 50. Eight others were admitted with broken bones, bruises and abrasions. Additional patients may have been admitted to other facilities.

    “The NTSB is planning to investigate the collapse and plans to deploy a team of 15 specialists that includes engineering, material-science and survival-factor experts.”

    They’ll have to dig deep down into the concrete to get at the truth.

    “Florida Senator Marco Rubio described the incident as “troubling and tragic,” adding that it affects him personally because he has been an adjunct professor for the university for 10 years. (ABC News)

    “Ironically, it’s a project for safety” that was constructed after a student died last year crossing that intersection, Rubio said during an evening press conference.”

    But Rubio would certainly have been aware that the collapsed Florida International University Bridge was designed and built using a technique the university has been promoting for the last eight years.
    Continued below...

    A 2012 report from the Reason Foundation, which publishes this website, found that 40 percent of the grants in the first two TIGER rounds went to districts represented by Republicans on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. The four highest-ranking Democrats on the same committee each received at least one TIGER grant.

    “Members of Florida’s congressional delegation publicly lauded the TIGER award to FIU. “Thanks to this TIGER funding, FIU students will be able to walk from their student housing to class through a pedestrian bridge across Southwest Eighth Street,” Rep. Debbie Wasserman-Schultz (D-Fla.) said in 2013. “More jobs will be created in our community thanks to this grant, and I look forward to celebrating the project’s success with everyone in South Florida.”

    “Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R‚ÄìFla.) made similar comments on Saturday. “FIU has come a long way since the TIGER grant that funded this pedestrian bridge was awarded in 2013,” he said. “This project represents a true collaboration among so many different partners at local, state, and federal levels, and in both the public and private sectors.”

    “The bridge was the largest pedestrian span in the U.S. moved via self-propelled modular transportation, according to FIU. (BizJournals)

    Touted with Titanic-like boasts, it was said to be the first pedestrian bridge constructed entirely of self-cleaning concrete, which uses titanium dioxide in the concrete to capture pollution and keep the structure white.

    The bridge was supposed to last for more than 100 years and withstand a Category 5 hurricane.

    Instead it came crashing down on people occupied cars within days of its construction.



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  38. #158
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    [QUOTE]Celebrated leading visionary bridge engineer Atorod Azizinamini, whose ABC (Accelerated Bridge Construction)[/QUOTE]

    ABC = Accelerated Bridge Collapse
    "The most intriguing point for the historian is that where history and legend meet."

    "None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who think they are free."

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


  39. #159
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    My first thought was whether a construction crew I worked in Florida with built it. Half stoners, all black and 50% assholes who did a TON of damage to a High School property we worked on.
    "It ain't no secret I didn't get these scars falling over in church."


    I have not failed. I have simple discovered ten-thousand ways things don't work.

  40. #160
    [QUOTE=Red Baron;6808944]
    Celebrated leading visionary bridge engineer Atorod Azizinamini, whose ABC (Accelerated Bridge Construction)[/QUOTE]

    ABC = Accelerated Bridge Collapse
    About Be Collapsed....

    Affirmative action...South Africa meets Idiocracy...

    Them setting that bridge section up there unsupported is akin to you picking a poured sidewalk or slab with some reinforcement, and trying to get it from flexing and falling apart.

    Not made for that on any planet. The rebar and mat in it is not enough to support it. The truss design was crap too. No supporting tendons and it sitting there for 5 days is mind boggling.

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