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EDUC EDUCATION 13 Ways Public Schools Incubate Mental Instability In Kids
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  1. #1
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    EDUCATION 13 Ways Public Schools Incubate Mental Instability In Kids

    http://thefederalist.com/2018/02/21/...tability-kids/

    13 Ways Public Schools Incubate Mental Instability In Kids

    The correlation between public school environments and the deteriorating mental health of children has been intensifying for decades.
    By Stella Morabito


    Why doesn’t anyone investigate the toxic effects of today’s bureaucrat-run mega-schools in the wake of a school shooting? It’s high time we place a share of the blame there.

    Apologists for these noxious systems continue to shift blame for their failures using the media, various left-wing lobbies, and the kids themselves as programmed mouthpieces for statist agendas like gun control. Meanwhile, they keep feeding the beast by mass institutionalizing kids.


    The correlation between public school environments and the deteriorating mental health of children has been intensifying for decades. We ought to consider how these settings serve as incubators for the social alienation that can fuel such horrors.

    First, consider how common it is for a public high school today to house thousands of teenagers for most of their waking hours for four solid years. (More than 3,000 students attend the Florida school where the most recent shooting took place.) During their time in that maze, kids learn to “socialize,” basically by finding their place in a school’s hierarchy of cliques.

    This sort of pecking order dynamic tends to breed resentment, status anxiety, and social dysfunction. Combine that with the toxic effects of social media and family breakdown, and you’ve got a deadly brew. Public schooling is increasingly unhealthy for kids’ emotional stability. Let us count the ways.

    1. The Size and Model of Mass Schooling Is Alienating
    Back in 1929-30, there were about 248,000 public schools in the United States, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. How many today? Far less than half. By 2013-14, the number had shrunk to 98,000.


    When you consider that the U.S. population nearly tripled in that timeframe, there’s no question this factory model of schooling has grown exponentially. The numbers speak to the intense bureaucratization of a public school system that is becoming more centralized with less local control, packing ever-larger numbers of students in one place.

    The natural effect is an emotional malaise that fuels a sense of confusion and detachment. I believe the sociologist Emile Durkheim coined the term “anomie” to describe this sense of isolation. Even the physical architecture of public schools is getting more estranging. They tend to be larger and more looming, almost blade-runner-like in their effect of shrinking and sequestering individuals to irrelevance.

    There’s already much to be anxious about in those settings: the intensity of testing, the long days, the labelling, the constant social—and now, political—expectations that students must meet to fit in. The alienation of amassing larger groups of children enhances that.

    2. Public Schools Are Abnormal Settings That Feel Like Prisons
    Dr. Peter Gray at Boston College has studied in depth the harmful effects of mass schooling on children’s mental health. Gray makes the point that school is simply an abnormal setting for children. But instead of admitting that, our culture prefers to say that the children are abnormal for squirming. In short, school is a prison that actually causes trauma in children. (You can read more on this subject here, here, here, here, and here.)


    Anxiety is a natural effect of being cooped up in a compulsory setting for hours on end, especially when you believe your future depends on your performance there. Yet few consider that environment as the cause or source of depression.

    According to a neighbor of the shooter in the recent Florida case, the shooter “always had his head down. . . He looked depressed.” According to his public defender, “’He’s sad. He’s mournful. He’s remorseful. He is fully aware of what is going on, and he’s just a broken human being.”

    3. Public Schools Are Breeding Grounds for Hierarchical Cliques
    In large settings that promote conformity, people will naturally self-segregate into smaller groups. But the groups tend to be hierarchical. At the top are the “popular” queen bees and jocks, who tend to make it their business to oversee and regulate relationships among their peers.

    The diva students sort and label their peers in various ways, such as brainy, prudish, a-hole, and geeky. Their lesser peers duly gravitate to a group that accepts them. At the bottom are those deemed “weirdos” or “loners,” who tend to face intense ostracism. That dynamic only hardens their situation as isolated, alienated individuals. So why can’t we guess which social strata school shooters tend to come from?

    4. Giant Public Schools Are Breeding Grounds for Aggression

    Public mega-schools are breeding grounds for relational aggression, behaviors intended to harm peers’ social standing. This “Mean Girl” dynamic gets reinforced in the schools and youth culture, as it’s modelled and promoted over and over again in hundreds of movies and TV shows geared towards teens.

    5. School Bureaucracy Tends to Reinforce Social Pecking Orders
    There seems to be a special pact between the alpha students and the school bureaucracy. I’ve concluded the bureaucrats in charge actually have a stake in maintaining such pecking orders and the psychically destructive social dynamics that feed status anxiety.

    After years of observation as both a student and a parent of students who attended such mega-schools, I’ve come to compare this cooperative relationship to how prison wardens might single out special prisoners for privileges to keep order over the masses. I suppose this is the effect of an inherent divide-and-conquer impulse sewn into all bureaucracies.

    6. Public Schools Are Increasingly Politicized
    Identity politics and leftist politicization in the schools is pervasive these days. It especially piles on young men the label of guilty oppressor. Schools are becoming hotbeds of all sorts of political activity instigated by administrators and teachers. Privilege theory is now morphing into a new stage in which students engage in tell-all criticism-and-self-criticism sessions disguised as exercises in empathy. The message is loud and clear: take part in this political activism, or your social and academic standing will suffer. It’s now commonplace to get students to take part in political marches and protests, getting them acclimated to acting in concert with a mob.

    7. Reduced Content Knowledge Promotes Conformity
    Radical education reform has gutted school curricula of meaningful content, replacing it with identity politics, fads, and political activism. Kids are increasingly ignorant of the U.S. Constitution, the basics of civil society, and how our system of government works and why.

    This growing ignorance of history, geography, and classics makes it harder for children to find context and their place in the world. It disables their ability to think clearly and independently, and it cripples imagination and creativity. Such ignorance creates a vacuum for a more cynical and nihilistic approach towards life.

    8. Public Schools Disregard Students’ Family and Non-School Lives
    School life and activities take up more and more time. By the time today’s public-school children graduate from high school, they will have spent about 17,000 hours in K-12 schools. When you factor in homework and other activities such as riding the school bus, it’s more than 25,000 hours. That’s a huge chunk of life, especially when kids can learn the basics of reading and math in about 100 hours of attentive instruction.

    That figure comes from John Taylor Gatto, award-winning veteran New York City schoolteacher. Like the Borg, public schools are invading family life and every other aspect of life. Parents and families are increasingly treated as nuisances to the collectivist agenda of training children to conform to politically correct attitudes and emotions.

    Children are also strongly influenced by the age segregation inherent to government schools, which teaches kids to be laser-focused on expectations for their age, judging anyone who might have been “held back.” This has an intensely narrowing effect on perspective.

    9. Schools Are Becoming More Repressive
    The article “The New Face of Punishment in the Public Schools” from the Rutherford Institute gives a raw look at the growing use of force and lockdowns in the public schools, including the use of tasers and shackles. The alarming rise of such measures in schools condition a child to accept school as a police state.

    10. Public Schooling Is Increasingly Hostile to Christianity
    Growing and intense aggression against any form of Christian prayer in the schools has a further alienating effect. It teaches any child who is emotionally hurting that he can’t even seek solace in a private and silent conversation with God without knowing he’d be ridiculed if his peers knew. The hostility towards religion also leads us on a path to utter lawlessness, since the rule of law evaporates when left to the devices of elites.

    11. Enforced Conformity Promotes Peer Victimization
    There are really no universal policies against bullying in public schools that would afford all students equal protection. (Such a policy would actually be Christian.) Instead, schools’ so-called anti-bullying policies pick and choose among various identity groups, in a classic divide and conquer mode.

    The highly politicized nature of today’s public schools serves to draw virtual targets on the backs of students whose beliefs don’t align with its own. A bully is free to target with the taunt “bigot” any child who comes from a traditional Christian home, and the curricula will back them up. The “It Gets Better” campaign provides protection exclusively to LGBT kids. And, if a child’s parents are not on board with the transgender social engineering project, they can lose custody of their children, as the recent case in Ohio demonstrates.

    In sum, the message is this: if you want protection from bullying, take on the persona of a protected identity group. It shouldn’t surprise us at all that “straight white males” are considered fair game for de-humanization.

    12. Public Schooling Stunts Personality Development
    In mass schooling, students who try hard to fit in among peers tend to get their uniqueness beaten out of them. That’s what socialization through mass schooling generally does. As Judith Rich Harris notes in her book “The Nurture Assumption,” socialization “adapts children to the culture, making them more similar.” (Personality development, on the other hand, leads to more differences in individuals.) In this scenario, unique individuals who don’t conform so easily end up being seen and treated as oddballs.

    13. Kids with Special Needs Are Especially Judged as Different
    Anything that identifies a child as out of the mainstream will stigmatize him, no matter how much tolerance a school might claim to teach. This is just a natural effect of enforcing conformity among kids.

    So if a child is called out of a classroom to attend remedial therapy, he gets sized up, especially if it’s a school that touts academic “Blue Ribbon” standing. Taking the “short bus” to another location for special education is basically the kiss of social death in the public school environment.

    Peer grading is another open invitation to noticing and judging differences. And in the wake of school shootings, let’s not forget how horrid government schools are for kids with forms of autism like Asperger’s Syndrome, a symptom of which is inappropriate speech or “weird” (i.e., different) behaviors.

    ‘School Refusal Clinics’ Increasingly Treat Distressed Children
    The Florida shooter used to “bang his head against a cement wall” when he didn’t want to go to school, according to a neighbor. Obviously, he couldn’t stand the school. It seemed to have literally driven him crazy. So what do you suppose the educational establishment proposes be done with such “school refusal” behavior?

    First off, the National Education Association has for a long time proposed that high school graduation be compulsory for everyone until the age of 21. Can you believe that? Twenty-one years old! The NEA’s 12-point action plan to reduce the drop-out age begins with that proposal.

    School refusal seems to be exploding under the radar. So, is it really the children who are the problem?
    What to do with students who get physically sick at the prospect of attending such places? Answer: “School refusal clinics” have sprung up to get the kids right back into that noxious environment, which is never seriously considered as a source of the problem. The aim of these clinics is a type of conversion therapy with the intent of 1) re-institutionalizing the child and 2) if possible, reducing the child’s distress.

    The first such clinic seemed to have started up in Las Vegas several years ago. But the idea has been catching on quickly, with more and more and more and more and more psychiatric centers treating school refusal in children. School refusal seems to be exploding under the radar. So, is it really the children who are the problem? Or is it more likely the toxic environment?

    But never fear. Although people have been writing for decades about the inability of mammoth government bureaucracies to handle children appropriately, there’s always a new fad to the rescue, always another shade of lipstick to apply to the pig.

    The jury should have been in a long time ago. As long as we institutionalize kids into prison-like schools built on a factory model and without any other choices, we’ll get more and more psychic alienation and social dysfunction. In this scenario, gun bans simply mean future mass killings would likely involve more knives, cars plowed into crowds, chemicals, and perhaps more bombs concocted from fertilizer and other household items.

    It is well past time we investigate power elites hell-bent on preserving an alienating mass schooling bureaucracy that controls the minds and lives of all children. When will we stop feeding this beast?

    Stella Morabito is a senior contributor to The Federalist. Follow Stella on Twitter.

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  2. #2
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    Excellent article! I am so glad I homeschooled my daughter. It is the best thing I ever did.
    "Dark and difficult times lie ahead. Soon we will all face the choice between what is right, and what is easy."
    Dumbledore to Harry Potter, Goblet of Fire.

    Luke 21:36

    A people who no longer recognize sin and evil, are not a people who will recognize tyranny and despotism either. Invar

  3. #3
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    Interesting....Definitely makes going for a GED as soon as feasible then a General Ed or Vocational AA look like the way to go if home schooling just isn't an option.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cardinal View Post
    Excellent article! I am so glad I homeschooled my daughter. It is the best thing I ever did.
    We homeschooled our kids too, best thing ever.
    Patriot Guard rider
    www.patriotguard.org

  5. #5
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    WHY was no mention made of schools making grade school and middle school children WRITE ESSAYS on HOW THEY WOULD COMMIT SUICIDE with details of how where when why!!! They actually put the idea in children's heads!` i have heard it claimed they do that to find which children might commit suicide but just putting the idea in their head is MORE harmful, especially since NO counsel is given that it is NOT a good idea!!
    Why is no mention made of the teachers challenging children's sexual identity when they seem comfortable their natural physical sex? Asking them to imagine and explore what they would have done, been, and lived if they were the opposite sex?
    You who SEEK revenge,or JUSTICE for the wrongs, crimes and sins done to you, will find it in the same place that God is freely handing out Mercy, At the Cross, where Christ died taking the punishment not only for your sins, but also for the sins committed against you by others!

  6. #6
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    I'm still stuck on paragraph 8

    If it only requires 100 hours to learn to read and write, why are we still seeing 3rd graders who can not read and write ?

  7. #7
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    why are we still seeing 3rd graders who can not read and write ?

    Because so much time is spent on indoctrination ...
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  8. #8
    Because 3rd graders, on average, spend MAYBE ten minutes per class, on actual skills. The rest of the time is wasted, getting to class, getting seated, settling down etc. Not to mention time spent on unruly kids in class. Before you know it, the bell rings, time to go to the next class.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    why are we still seeing 3rd graders who can not read and write ?

    Because so much time is spent on indoctrination ...
    This, too.

    ETA: We homeschooled, except for one year when I had to put our two oldest in because I had health issues. My son’s second grade teacher was trying to teach them about similies, metaphors and onomatopoeia. Half the kids could barely read or write. I felt so sorry for that class. Thankfully, we were able to bring them back home the next year. Now my daughter is dealing with public school with her children. The books they bring home from the library are frightening! The illustrations on some of them, look nightmarish.
    Last edited by texkat72; 03-07-2018 at 11:41 PM.

  10. #10
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    First off, for a variety of reasons, I have no children, which is probably for the best. That being said, had I any children, I would NEVER send them to the public fool system. My own experiences within that system were bad enough and that was nearly 50 years ago. With all that goes on these days, I would sooner send children to prison than to a public school, the main reason being that prisoners in general are in a safer environment than students. Ridiculous, yes, but too often the case. The fact that we treat our most precious resource, our children, our very future, in such an appalling manner speaks volumes about our society, none of it good. How far the once great have fallen.
    "You never had the things you thought you should have had and you'll not get them now..."

  11. #11
    Lots of excellent observation and thinking in this article. I hope the author gets taken more seriously by the educational establishment than I did, by pointing it out.

    The move to "centralize" schools - and make them bigger also means that the local community/parents have much less input into the schools. Someone tried to use the "factory model" of efficiency and apply it to socializing/educating human beings who are NOT widgets or blanks of raw materials to be formed into widgets. So, school admins and teachers spend all their time trying to manage these large (and essentially powerful) groups of students by micro-managing their every thought, feeding them "controlling" messages about behavior and massive lies.

    In some schools of thought: this is considered abuse.

  12. #12
    It's all about control. They tout individuality and freedom of expression, yet the PS model drums that out of kids, at an early age.

  13. #13
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    The anti-big school theme does not consider the opposite. Here in VT we have the lowest student-teacher ratio in the nation which is the primary reason for our high property taxes. We spend about $16,000 per kid per year. It isn't huge administrations. It is the commonly found 5 to 10 kids per classroom throughout rural and small town areas which are the majority of the population here. There aren't any big cities and urban areas. The largest city is 42,000 people and after that there are only 7 towns between 10 - 20,000 people. 75% of towns are less than 2,500 people, yet every small town has its own elementary school and the regional Middle/High Schools that serve several towns almost all have fewer than 100 kids per grade. Some high schools have 15 - 25 kids per grade.

    The tradition of each town having its own elementary school is too deeply ingrained culturally, even if at the price of classrooms with only 5 kids. My district's regional Middle/High School has about 90 kids per grade and is only that high because it attracts school choice kids. They do a pretty decent job but with only 90 kids per grade you just cannot offer the kind of rich curriculum that large suburban high schools in other States have. It is all but impossible for small schools to offer a full array of AP and Honors level courses, let alone a broad STEM curriculum. The suburban high school I went to in a different State has about 800 kids per grade and there is literally no comparison. My wife works for a national scholarship program and has told me again and again how the kids coming from these small high schools just cannot compete academically with the kids coming out of the large suburban schools. It is not that they are less intelligent. They aren't. It is that they are less educated because of the limited curriculums.

    Small is not necessarily better when it comes to schools.

  14. #14
    MountainBiker- that's where online classes (same across the state) can fill in the gaps for those kids willing to take on more advanced work. Then, special programs to put those kids together face to face on special projects/competitions (short duration) and the ability to dual enroll at community colleges... offer enough to keep those kids engaged and motivated.

    It's not uncommon for a kid to graduate with their associate's degree (that often transfers to a 4 yr school) before they graduate HS, around here. That will tell you something, about the quality of HS education (a separate issue) that needs to be addressed.

  15. #15
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    In the late 1950s and '60s, I got a better than adequate education in a small, poor, rural public school. The building was a WPA project from the 1930s, there were only about 300 students in all 12 grades.

    No reason the same things cannot be accomplished now save for the differences in attitudes among the people who run the school system, AND the parental preparation of the students.
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  16. #16
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    Regarding #s 6 and 7---

    my son Stephen showed me this video (made by a UK kid, but VERY applicable here).

    It's a rap called "Don't Stay in School"--it does NOT mean "kids" should drop out of school but that anything taught that had NO PRACTICAL USE to a student's future life should "NOT STAY IN SCHOOL."

    I tend to agree.

    He is passionate--but with good reason.

    Ignore his hair--and listen to (or read-they're on the screen)--his words.

    It will give you an idea WHY kids today are going so bat$hi! crazy--they KNOW this isn't the way it "should" be but they are helpless in the maw of the "education MACHINE"--

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xe6nLVXEC0




    HOMESCHOOL !!!
    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubled…Let no man deceive you by any means…..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved….for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie….
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


  17. #17
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    Those my age were generally lucky in at least one regard. The people who raised and educated us did so with a currently almost unimaginable degree of certainty that THEY KNEW what we needed to know to get through life, and could teach that to us.

    And they did.

    Nowadays? Certainty? You're kidding. No one is certain about anything, it seems. And the "eternal verities" have gone by the wayside in most families, towns and schools.

    Some still manage to preserve them - I see a refreshing amount of eternal verity here in my little corner of Appalachia - but it seems rare in lots of places in the FUSA.
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  18. #18
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    worth a BUMP
    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubled…Let no man deceive you by any means…..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved….for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie….
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


  19. #19
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    The destruction of the FUSA government skool systems,
    started on this date, and it has been downhill ever since.

    May 17th 1954, Brown vs Board of Education.

    Every terrible issue, that has occurred with the government skools,
    since this most terrible decision, has this decision as the genesis.

    Please be safe everyone, and please arm up.

    Regards to all deplorables.

    Nowski
    "Read everything, listen to everyone, believe absolutely nothing,
    unless you can prove it with your own research." Milton William Cooper

    "Life is a glass, half empty, of spoiled milk, sitting in a bed of thorns." Nowski

  20. #20
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    I agree with everything in the article.
    So tell me why there are fewer murders in public schools no than in the 90s. At least that's the statistic thrown around by Fox, when talking about the school shootings..
    "I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself." -DH Lawrence

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