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CHAT Should I get a puppy?
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  1. #121
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    Dennis, have you read this yet? If not, please do so.

    http://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/hea...shepherds.html

    Describes health issues. Seems that the hip dysplasia has NOT been bred out and they also have elbow issues. I would be very, very careful when choosing a pup. Make sure the breeder supplies full health report on parents and grandparents.

    Quick list of Shiloh Shepherd health problems

    Shiloh Shepherds are vulnerable to the same health issues as other large breeds, particularly German Shepherds.

    That means a high rate of hip dysplasia, which causes lameness and pain and can require expensive surgery. The Orthopedic Foundation of America evaluated the hip X-rays of 1100 Shiloh Shepherds and found over 21% to be dysplastic. That's really bad. Elbow dysplasia occurs at a 7% rate. Panosteitis is a painful orthopedic disorder in young Shilohs.

    A devastating neurological disease, degenerative myelopathy, gradually progresses to paralysis.

    Shiloh Shepherds are at high risk for an emergency gastrointestinal syndrome called bloat, which can kill a dog within hours.

    Chronic allergies cause itchy skin and scratching that can lead to bacterial infections (hot spots).

    Quite worrisome in the breed are hereditary heart diseases (especially irregular heartbeat), and gastrointestinal diseases such as hemorraghic gastroenteritis and pancreatic insufficiency. An eye disease called pannus can lead to blindness.
    Preventing health problems

    Some health problems are inherited. For example, if both parents of your Shiloh Shepherd have certificates proving they were tested and cleared of hip and elbow dysplasia, heart diseases, and degenerative myelopathy, your Shiloh Shepherd has less risk of developing those conditions.

    Other health problems can be prevented, or partially prevented, by the ways you raise your dog. If you're serious about doing everything you can for your Shiloh Shepherd, my best-selling book, 11 Things You Must Do Right To Keep Your Dog Healthy and Happy, shows you how to raise your Shiloh Shepherd puppy (or adult dog) in all the right ways. It will help you be your dog's health care champion!


    In his heart a man plans his course, but the Lord determines his steps.

    Proverbs 16:9




  2. #122
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    Dennis, I would say yes. We tragically lost our Dixie (ACD-Blue Heeler) at a year and a half old. Parvo took her and took her fast. We were lost with a gapping hole in our hearts. We stumbled upon some Blue Heeler puppies for sale very near us. We decided to go take a look. We ended up getting two females, Lucy and Lola. Our healing only began when we got these two adorable pups. So glad we came across them when we did. We still have a 16 1/2 year old dachshund but we know she won't be with us too much longer. This is why we got two pups instead of one. The heelers will always have each other. I love the breed you are interested in. Good Luck! Go for it! It will help you and the other fur baby IMHO.
    "...shall not be infringed"

  3. #123
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    Yes as long as you remember all the work and pick up after. I swear I will never get a puppy again but then, this puppy turned into the best dog in the world. So maybe I would do it again. The only thing I would think about is, if you are getting older, the larger dogs could knock you down and break something on you by accident. Iíd you are still flexible for 10years, go for it.

    Puppies are the best medicine.
    God Bless Us & God Bless America!

  4. #124
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    10

    You need an Airedale, Dennis... no shedding, very territorial and protective, kind and gentle with family and especially children, and there's nuthin' in Texas that an Airedale can't whup!

    If at first you don't secede, try, try again!

  5. #125
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    Jonas, There are a few breeds that I simply cannot stand in terms of how they look: poodles, pit bulls, pugs, Schnauzers, and Airedales. Subjectively for me, blech.


    Ones that I could live will every day: collies, BCs, Huskies, Golden Retrievers, some terrier breeds (like annieosage's pup), and of course, GSDs.

  6. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonas Parker View Post
    You need an Airedale, Dennis... no shedding, very territorial and protective, kind and gentle with family and especially children, and there's nuthin' in Texas that an Airedale can't whup!

    That's a pretty dog!

  7. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    Jonas, There are a few breeds that I simply cannot stand in terms of how they look: poodles, pit bulls, pugs, Schnauzers, and Airedales. Subjectively for me, blech.


    Ones that I could live will every day: collies, BCs, Huskies, Golden Retrievers, some terrier breeds (like annieosage's pup), and of course, GSDs.
    What, no Malamutes? If I remember correctly, Mals were part of the King Shepherd breed to get size and other things into the breed. You know, all that hair , lol............


    In his heart a man plans his course, but the Lord determines his steps.

    Proverbs 16:9




  8. #128
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    Dennis, you probably have seen this page but it's got all the "good" breeders listed.

    http://www.shilohs.org/breeders/


    In his heart a man plans his course, but the Lord determines his steps.

    Proverbs 16:9




  9. #129
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    I fit were my decision to make, I would think very carefully on it. I do not know your age, but a person's life can change drastically in an instant. I hate to even say it, I really do, but you say that you have the "time" left to raise a puppy. The reality is, we never know if we do or we don't and then what happens then? I honestly say this Dennis only because I was told by my cancer doctor that there was nothing more that he could do for me, and that although he does not have a crystal ball, depending upon what complications arise, he said I have somewhere between 6 to 8 months to live. My wife and I have many cat that will now most likely outlive both of us, with no one to tend to them, and this was not the plan I had in mind.

    Just consider everything my friend.
    Rusty in NC
    Don't tread on me!
    sic semper evello mortem tyrannis
    Wickr tiger133

  10. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post

    Ones that I could live will every day: collies, BCs, Huskies, Golden Retrievers, some terrier breeds (like annieosage's pup), and of course, GSDs.
    Wait, no Labrador Retrievers???

    That's racist!
    ...Rubbin' is Racin'......

  11. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Racing22 View Post
    Wait, no Labrador Retrievers???

    That's racist!
    ^^^ this!^^^

    Well bred labs are the most wonderful dogs! Smart, loving, gentle, loving, soft, did I say loving? Happy, smiley, goofy, loving dogs.
    Ring the bells that still can ring
    Forget your perfect offering
    There is a crack, a crack in everything
    That's how the light gets in.

    ("Anthem" by Leonard Cohen)

  12. #132
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    Just never been a lab fan. I don't hate them, but am neutral. Most dog breeds fit in that category for me.

  13. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Owl View Post
    What, no Malamutes? If I remember correctly, Mals were part of the King Shepherd breed to get size and other things into the breed. You know, all that hair , lol............
    I actually think of Mals and Huskies as the same breed. (Yes, I KNOW they're not, but that's still how I think of them.)

  14. #134
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    OMG Tiger, I'm so sorry to hear that!

    And yes, I know what you mean. Every breath is a gift, and every breath can be your last. By "time" I really meant that I think I'm JUST young enough still (59) to have the energy it takes. But as I've said earlier in this thread, there is almost certainly a lengthy waiting list for a pup, so it's not an "impulse buy."

  15. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    I actually think of Mals and Huskies as the same breed. (Yes, I KNOW they're not, but that's still how I think of them.)
    They are definitely not. Mals are/were bred for heavy hauling of sledges and Huskies for speed and getting a small sled somewhere fast. And there is about a 50 to 60 lb difference in size. Ashly is around 100 lbs. Most females are from 80 to 100. The males can go 90 to 120lbs and they have a much heavier bone structure than Huskies. Much heavier. Think lawn tractor versus farm tractor, lol. Lot's bigger. Ash is HUGE compared to 70 lb Sophie. She is taller than a standard poodle and they are pretty tall.

    I have a lot of people ask if Ashly is a husky and I get her out and let them look at her better. They then say, no, too big, lol. I then say Malamute. There are lot's of huskies around but not so many Mals. And most Mals have a much heavier and longer coat than huskies.


    In his heart a man plans his course, but the Lord determines his steps.

    Proverbs 16:9




  16. #136
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    Lots of good advice already, but I wanted to second the concern about the heavy coat. I'm assuming that you plan to stay where you are and not move north again. How do the heavy-coated dogs cope with the heat in that area? Might it be possible to find a wonderful big dog with a smooth coat that would handle the summers there a little better? We are moving to Kentucky with my three dogs; Mac and Ladybug are smooth-coated and will probably be fine, but I am concerned about Cameo, my livestock guardian dog. She's Maremma and Akbash and has a long heavy coat. It's white, which helps a bit, but I'm still concerned. We are at a high elevation in a dry climate, and it's going to be a major climate change for all of us. After we get settled into our new home, I'm going to start looking for another LGD puppy, and will be looking for one with a closer coat. May have to clip Cameo, but we'll see how she does.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  17. #137
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    I just received an e-mail from Airedales.r.us.org... Dennis, won't qualify for Airedale ownership. They suggested "chihuahuas.com/yippydog"...
    If at first you don't secede, try, try again!

  18. #138
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    You should definitely get another Dennis! As for a pup - wow - but at least you know what's involved. I really believe another dog is the right way to go!!
    Annie
    "A dog wags its tail with its heart"

  19. #139
    I say yes. Pups are a LOT of work, but worth it. Aja will be happy too. Just let her have some say in who you bring home if possible. Not as big a deal with a young pup of course. Also, the old rule M/F may be applicable with two younger dogs. F/F can be a problem YMMV

  20. #140
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    My dogs are house dogs, so they live inside unless we're out exercising. Amazing thing, that air conditioning....

  21. #141
    Quote Originally Posted by bbbuddy View Post
    ^^^ this!^^^

    Well bred labs are the most wonderful dogs! Smart, loving, gentle, loving, soft, did I say loving? Happy, smiley, goofy, loving dogs.
    I will back this up 100%!!!! I never met a lab I didn't love
    Therefore be ye also ready; for in such an hour as ye think not the Son of man cometh. Matt. 24:44

  22. #142
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    And they never met a burglar who they wouldn't show where all the jewelry was hidden...


  23. #143
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    And if you change your mind about puppy vs rescue

    http://www.gsdrescuectx.com





    http://www.gsdrescuectx.com
    Attached Images

  24. #144
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    Again, I DO NOT WANT AN ADULT THIS TIME. I don't want another "project dog."

  25. #145
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    Again, I DO NOT WANT AN ADULT THIS TIME. I don't want another "project dog."
    In my life I have only had two adopted adult dogs. One was a Doberman about a year + old and the other was a Rottweiler about the same age. The Doberman was a sweetheart but the Rottweiler ended up threatening every member of the family and eventually left the premises. After the Rottweiler we decided to go with nothing but puppies. Somehow... the females always seem to work out better for us for a variety of reasons.

    I posted a story of two I presently (one is a male) have loved since they were pups in the other dog thread on Main.
    http://www.timebomb2000.com/vb/showt...-Guardian-Dogs

    Go with a pup. (The adult dogs love them too and seem to have no problems adjusting to them.)

  26. #146
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    My opinion... rescue a young dog. check petfinder for your area. Remember, a dog doesn't have to be a specific breed to be a great dog. Just the opinion of a dog rescuer.
    "There is only one success....
    to be able to spend your life in your own way."
    Christopher Morley

  27. #147
    Yes you will not be happy till ya do.
    The most important days in a persons life are the day they were born and the day they find out why!

  28. #148
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    If you go for it, decide upfront whether you can drive home at lunchtime to give the dog an outing (and that 3rd feeding when it's a young one), or if you can hire a dogwalker. If you must, you might leave the dog confined to a secure room with no electrical outlets and electric cords in reach, with tied (not just shut) babygates. Our little pup managed to open the baby gates when she was just a young thing, with her opposable jaws (no opposable thumbs, thank goodness). If we hadn't been home, she might have killed herself, loving cords as she did back then.

    I didn't have time for lunch for months with a pup, having my whole lunch period consumed with the commutes back and forth and her constitutional. It was hectic at best, and when traffic went wrong, really a problem.

    So it's clear, we're discussing a young pup or no dog. No problem there.

    Will you use a crate when you're working? If not, you may be surprised to find the walls chewed up. My sister's dog chewed a hole in the kitchen wall, and while her husband was patching the plaster, the little dear chewed another hole in the far end of the room. Also know a couple locally who tried to use the bathroom as a confinement space, and that dog, a shepherd type, also took a big piece out of the wall. Heard about it cause they were concerned it indicated a dietary deficiency!
    Last edited by almost ready; 03-08-2018 at 02:26 PM.

  29. #149
    Quote Originally Posted by tiger13 View Post
    I fit were my decision to make, I would think very carefully on it. I do not know your age, but a person's life can change drastically in an instant. I hate to even say it, I really do, but you say that you have the "time" left to raise a puppy. The reality is, we never know if we do or we don't and then what happens then? I honestly say this Dennis only because I was told by my cancer doctor that there was nothing more that he could do for me, and that although he does not have a crystal ball, depending upon what complications arise, he said I have somewhere between 6 to 8 months to live. My wife and I have many cat that will now most likely outlive both of us, with no one to tend to them, and this was not the plan I had in mind.

    Just consider everything my friend.
    So sorry to hear that Tiger13. I will pray for you !

    God Bless !!

  30. #150
    Quote Originally Posted by bbbuddy View Post
    ^^^ this!^^^

    Well bred labs are the most wonderful dogs! Smart, loving, gentle, loving, soft, did I say loving? Happy, smiley, goofy, loving dogs.

    THIS !!!

  31. #151
    Quote Originally Posted by Michigan Majik View Post
    My opinion... rescue a young dog. check petfinder for your area. Remember, a dog doesn't have to be a specific breed to be a great dog. Just the opinion of a dog rescuer.
    Agree 100 %. Rescue dogs need forever homes too !!!

  32. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiger13 View Post
    I fit were my decision to make, I would think very carefully on it. I do not know your age, but a person's life can change drastically in an instant. I hate to even say it, I really do, but you say that you have the "time" left to raise a puppy. The reality is, we never know if we do or we don't and then what happens then? I honestly say this Dennis only because I was told by my cancer doctor that there was nothing more that he could do for me, and that although he does not have a crystal ball, depending upon what complications arise, he said I have somewhere between 6 to 8 months to live. My wife and I have many cat that will now most likely outlive both of us, with no one to tend to them, and this was not the plan I had in mind.

    Just consider everything my friend.
    Tiger, you will be in my prayers. I truly hope you can prove the Drs wrong.
    "Dark and difficult times lie ahead. Soon we will all face the choice between what is right, and what is easy."
    Dumbledore to Harry Potter, Goblet of Fire.

    Luke 21:36

    A people who no longer recognize sin and evil, are not a people who will recognize tyranny and despotism either. Invar

  33. #153
    YES!!!

  34. #154
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    All said, you should get a pup.

    I can't wait for your daily tales of puppy mayhem.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  35. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by almost ready View Post
    If you go for it, decide upfront whether you can drive home at lunchtime to give the dog an outing (and that 3rd feeding when it's a young one), or if you can hire a dogwalker. If you must, you might leave the dog confined to a secure room with no electrical outlets and electric cords in reach, with tied (not just shut) babygates. Our little pup managed to open the baby gates when she was just a young thing, with her opposable jaws (no opposable thumbs, thank goodness). If we hadn't been home, she might have killed herself, loving cords as she did back then.

    I didn't have time for lunch for months with a pup, having my whole lunch period consumed with the commutes back and forth and her constitutional. It was hectic at best, and when traffic went wrong, really a problem.

    So it's clear, we're discussing a young pup or no dog. No problem there.

    Will you use a crate when you're working? If not, you may be surprised to find the walls chewed up. My sister's dog chewed a hole in the kitchen wall, and while her husband was patching the plaster, the little dear chewed another hole in the far end of the room. Also know a couple locally who tried to use the bathroom as a confinement space, and that dog, a shepherd type, also took a big piece out of the wall. Heard about it cause they were concerned it indicated a dietary deficiency!
    He's going to use an ex-pen..... as explained on the previous page, I believe. And he will be working from home the first couple weeks.


    In his heart a man plans his course, but the Lord determines his steps.

    Proverbs 16:9




  36. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    Again, I DO NOT WANT AN ADULT THIS TIME. I don't want another "project dog."
    I just checked the stats on the rescue dogs. Only did the females and half of them are heartworm positive and older dogs.

    You feel like we did when we lost Luka. After 18 months of vets and constant care for her via everything she needed on an almost constant basis, we needed a pup. Yeah, work it was but not like dealing with a dog who came TO us damaged already. Sigh.

    I hear ya Dennis. Puppy is better.


    In his heart a man plans his course, but the Lord determines his steps.

    Proverbs 16:9




  37. #157
    Quote Originally Posted by bbbuddy View Post
    ^^^ this!^^^

    Well bred labs are the most wonderful dogs! Smart, loving, gentle, loving, soft, did I say loving? Happy, smiley, goofy, loving dogs.
    I agree completely. I have had one pure bred lab, got him when he was a pup. Wonderful dog ! Still greatly miss him. I also have had several non pure bred labs. Have one now. ALL have been wonderful dogs. I have also had some very good Border Collies, an Australian Shepherd / Siberian Husky mix, a wonderful beagle mix, and a number of muts. I still love them all, and miss them all greatly. I thank God for letting me have them, and wish I could have kept them longer !! They were all very good dogs, and very loving

  38. #158
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    All our animals were indoor pets, part of the family.

    When we got our second German Shepard puppy, we already had two adult cats, and apparently the puppy thought she was a cat. She never learned to bark, but would try meowing. It sounded like a half-whine, half-grrr. We usually knew what she was trying to tell us. Sweet, sweet dog.

  39. #159
    Quote Originally Posted by Michigan Majik View Post
    My opinion... rescue a young dog. check petfinder for your area. Remember, a dog doesn't have to be a specific breed to be a great dog. Just the opinion of a dog rescuer.
    I think he has stated quite clearly, he does not want a rescue project dog. Honestly I agree with him he needs a clean slate.

    I know there are some here who may freak out over what I am going to say, but. Most rescue dogs I have seen in my life with friends and family has been a disaster. I have seen very few situations where rescue dogs have worked out. I get there are situations where they do work out. Keep in mind with a rescue dog you are more than likely getting someone else's baggage. That can range from tricky personality disorders to dangerous dogs. A lot of these dogs can be a liability due to previous owners lack of training for the dog to outright abuse.

    I personally have had two rescue dogs in my life and never again. First time the dog out of the clear blue attacked my Husband and then went after me. We were told by the facility that the dog was so "loving", BS. Second dog we rescued, went through our living room window to attack a couple who were walking a toddler and an infant in a stroller. They were across the street from our home just walking and minding their own business. Thank God the dog did not bite the kids but then had a heck of a time pulling that dog back from those very terrified people. So sometimes you get someone else's baggage that's not such a good thing.

  40. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by WestGardener View Post
    I think he has stated quite clearly, he does not want a rescue project dog. Honestly I agree with him he needs a clean slate.

    I know there are some here who may freak out over what I am going to say, but. Most rescue dogs I have seen in my life with friends and family has been a disaster. I have seen very few situations where rescue dogs have worked out. I get there are situations where they do work out. Keep in mind with a rescue dog you are more than likely getting someone else's baggage. That can range from tricky personality disorders to dangerous dogs. A lot of these dogs can be a liability due to previous owners lack of training for the dog to outright abuse.

    I personally have had two rescue dogs in my life and never again. First time the dog out of the clear blue attacked my Husband and then went after me. We were told by the facility that the dog was so "loving", BS. Second dog we rescued, went through our living room window to attack a couple who were walking a toddler and an infant in a stroller. They were across the street from our home just walking and minding their own business. Thank God the dog did not bite the kids but then had a heck of a time pulling that dog back from those very terrified people. So sometimes you get someone else's baggage that's not such a good thing.
    OR they come with a bag full of health problems. For that area, you can get a lot of heartworm positive dogs just for starters and over vaccinated as usually the shelter/rescue has no idea when or if the dog was vaxed. So they just plow ahead and vax for everything and if a pup, they will neuter them. Some as young as 8 weeks old which brings on another set of major problems later on.

    No baggage, means no baggage.


    In his heart a man plans his course, but the Lord determines his steps.

    Proverbs 16:9




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