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CHAT Should I get a puppy?
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  1. #81
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    Our son got a brindle short hair Dutch Shepherd ...... our son got it for his 9 year old daughter for emotional reasons......and was told it would only get to be 40 lbs max.

    At 1 year it is 90 lbs and its feet are so big, the dog doesn't look like he has grown into them yet.

    Daughter loves the dog but Dad gets to run it as he needs the exercise. He thinks the dog will outlive him.
    True North Strong and Free

  2. #82
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    I got our second dog, a Standard Poodle, to help the family make the transition more easily after our aging German Shepherd passes. I also thought it would help keep him more active and live longer. I think another dog would be very helpful for Aja, and of course for yourself, although you have coping mechanisms and understanding that Aja doesn't. Only you can decide if you're up to dealing with a young puppy. My poodle was a semi rescue, was 6 months old, so well behaved already yet still enough puppy. When the breeder called me about helping with another poodle rescue, it was an 8 week old. Oy vey, a lot of work. Before ruling out a rescue completely, consider that you might find an older puppy that loves you outrageously for rescuing it. Mine that nearly died is my Velcro dog. He'll be a hard one to lose.
    Tiger

    ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

    For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, Nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

    Romans 8:38-39

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    I honestly don’t know. But if I do this, I’ll have absolutely no life outside work and the dogs for at least 6 months. Every. Single. Day.
    That's exactly true. Wifey is a bit pissed because we haven't even been able to go away overnight or even go out for the complete day because of the "anchor" we have at home. But she knew this going into it, but it definitely wears on you over time. I know it will get better, but the last 6 months it's been tough.

    I’d not try to own a Malinois as a pet. They’re hard core working dogs. Off-time is not in their makeup.
    That was my first choice or a Belgian Shepard, trained at Level 3. In hindsight, I'm glad I didn't go that route, as they needs tons of exercise and have to be worked everyday. I'm not up to that. Plus, I thought working with the pup from ground zero would be a better choice, and training him around our lifestyle. It's been a hell of an experiment, I hope it works out. Time will tell.

    Also, factor in the money expense in getting a pup. It's been a lot more than I expected (not that I care), but it's really added up the first 9 months.
    ...Rubbin' is Racin'......

  4. #84
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    A lot of people want race cars, but aren't willing to do the 100 mile valve adjustments to keep it running right.

    They end up with a yard decoration and excuses as to why it isn't being driven.

    This does not even touch the training involved in driving one.


    High performance anything is a lifestyle, not a purchase.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  5. #85
    Maybe one a bit smaller....just to be practical.
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    This knowledge is the king of education, the most secret of all secrets. It is the purest knowledge, and because it gives direct perception of the self by realization, it is the perfection of religion. It is everlasting, and it is joyfully performed.

  6. #86
    Should I get a puppy?

    Yes.
    "One day I will leave this world and dream myself to Reality" Crazy Horse
    1874

  7. #87
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    Yes! Doing so honors Hermione's memory.

  8. #88
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    Go for it .Easy! Peasy! Hey. I'm 82 and six years ago we got our Giant Schnauzer pup.

    GGK
    "You want your bubbles in your champagne glass , not in your portfolio. "
    THE DAILY PFENING

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Be Well View Post
    Maybe one a bit smaller....just to be practical.
    No guts, no glory - heh. I had little dogs as a kId. It's hard to describe why I love the giant ones.

  10. #90
    Duuude! You thrive at a higher level of stress! One YES vote, here.



    BTW, 500 hours, 500 schmours...you don’t do it all at once. Besides, you’ve put in more than 500 hours training *US* and we’re worth it, too. Aren’t we? Uh, aren’t we? *crickets*? Uh, where’d you go, Dennis? Amazing things can happen one moment, or one post, at a time.
    Last edited by cjoi; 03-08-2018 at 12:24 AM.

  11. #91
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    No guts, no glory - heh. I had little dogs as a kId. It's hard to describe why I love the giant ones.
    Look at it this way......

    the bigger the dog.... the greener the grass.
    Last edited by vestige; 03-08-2018 at 10:44 AM.

  12. #92
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    Honestly... Look inside... You should do what you think will make you happy and that is all the advice you will need from this board.

    Period.

    Full stop.
    Deo adjuvante non timendum - With God Helping, Nothing is to be Feared

    "You are like a pit-bull..." - Dennis Olson

    I am known for my "snotty gibberish", aren't I?

  13. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    Conventional wisdom says to mix the sexes of multiple dogs.
    I have had 5 male dogs at a time with zero problems. I prefer the male dog temperament.

    I have also had up to four dogs at one time with two being female, with no problems.

    I think how you raise them makes the difference. Some people just aren't pack leaders.

    Dennis, you are a dog person. That just doesn't change. You would be honoring Hermione by getting another dog. Aja needs company with you at work, and two dogs are always happier then one.
    Ring the bells that still can ring
    Forget your perfect offering
    There is a crack, a crack in everything
    That's how the light gets in.

    ("Anthem" by Leonard Cohen)

  14. #94
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    Yes!
    Strange times can cause strange measures.

    1Co 13:12 For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.
    1Co 13:13 And now abideth faith, hope, charity, these three; but the greatest of these [is] charity.

  15. #95
    I love the Look of those dogs Dennis they remind me of big teddy bears. I would think a puppy would be a little bit easier to handle since you have Aja to show her the ropes. Puppies seem to train much easier with an adult dog around. Aja would bond better with a pup. I just in the past two weeks purchased a Great Dane puppy. First Great Dane I have had since being a kid. No adult adult dogs here to help show him the ropes so It's going to be a hectic few months in puppyland. So far though he is good about using training pads to do his business on. I just do not look forward to the "I chew up everything" phase. I think if I had not chosen a Great Dane I would have seriously considered looking at those Shiloh Shepherds. They are beautiful Dogs. How much do they usually cost from a good breeder?.

  16. #96
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    Prices vary widely. Near as I can tell there are no “backyard breeders” of this breed. The price range Ive seen is $1700-$2400.

  17. #97
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    Malinois are great dogs but on a 1 to 10 level for high energy they are a 9 or 10. They need vigorous and sustained exercise each day without fail or they will drive you crazy. I got one because I need the exercise and that dog makes me run every day. Hot or cold, day or night, rain or snow they just want to go. You'll never see a fat one for sure. Another reason was because of all the pure breeds they are among the most healthy. My first shepherd had hip displasia and I put her down when the hips gave out and the last one had cancer and wasn't even 8 years old and both had allergies. I love GSD but was getting gun shy.
    What is the lake of fire? What is it's purpose? Is the lake of fire eternal hell? Is there any hope of escape for those cast into this lake?
    http://bible-truths.com/lake1.html

  18. #98
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    Beautiful pictures. Are you sure you really want, are physically able and have the patience to deal with a pup? I'm beginning to wonder if we do. Our "puppy" is only a little over a year old. Really glad we jumped on the training early on. The fur ball is still a handful for us.
    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it. - Mark Twain

  19. #99
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    I just saw this and I can't say how glad I am that you're thinking of another dog, Dennis!

    Yes, your particular breed sure sounds expensive but that's the kind you like. And yes, a puppy will be work and LOTS of it!!!

    However, in the quiet, snuggle time in between chasing, you and Aja will reap the benefits of that sweet puppy as he curls up against Aja's fur or on your lap.

    Hope, healing and bouncing JOY will enter your house once again.

  20. #100
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    YES! Get one. It helps.

  21. #101
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    My only reservation is that you are going to be at work for long hours. Not fair to a pup that wants to play. Didn't read the whole thread. Do you have someone to puppysit?

  22. #102
    Quote Originally Posted by Buick Electra View Post
    Dennis, I'm thinking about adopting this dog https://www.petfinder.com/dog/gypsy-...-county-il435/
    Go for it !!! I am a great believer in adopting from shelters. A great many, after being mistreated; surrendered after a previous owner dies; being strays and living out of garbage, etc, etc and someone adopts them, gives them a good place to live, sleep, feeds them, and gives them loving care, they will become the best friend you could have, and they will give you the same amount of love & kindness !!! I have adopted numerous strays, and adopted several from shelters. I have never, never regretted it. I have seriously loved all of them, and got a great amount of love in return.

    I still love them deeply, and miss them greatly. Several were on the "short list", were seniors, and been there too long. I rescued a couple that were to be put down the next day. It gave me a great feeling that I saved those wonderful, sweet dogs !!!

    Go for it BE, rescue that fur baby ! You will be glad you did !!! Keep us posted !!


  23. #103
    Quote Originally Posted by Red Baron View Post
    DD -really- wants me to get a dog since I am living alone now.

    Our faithful little miniature Dachshund Rudi passed away about twenty years ago.

    Since then we have had a couple of cats with Max, our grey tabby, now at 17 years of age. He is a great cat but I hate to say, his days are numbered. He is like a little dog. Eats like a mule and always cuddles with you or anybody else in the house. My allergies are too severe to consider another cat.

    Currently I would consider another wiener dog, being small and easy to care for. I love them, they are very special little animals. Ideally I'm looking for a cute female long hair Dachshund. One the other end of the spectrum I would also consider a Doberman as big as a small deer named Heidi or Gretchen.

    I have all kinds of breathing and allergy problems. Thus I am not looking for a big shaggy dog or a new puppy to chase after all day long.

    I'll bide my time and wait for a suitable mature shelter/rescue animal.

    I cannot see chasing a puppy around the house any more.

    That would be my advice to Dennis. Wait for a suitable mature Shepard to become available.
    RB, the shelters always have seniors, and they have a tuff time adopting them out. Most people want a puppy. Sadly, the seniors frequently get put down. Real shame. They always have a lot of love to give. Do a good deed ! Rescue one of those. You will not regret it !!

  24. #104
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    Yes, Dennis, you should get another dog. Whether it be a puppy or a shelter dog, that is something you will have to work out as to what is best for you. But, yes, you should get another dog.

  25. #105
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    You know what's involved, Dennis. You've been there and done it. It's more a vocation than a detail. If you can raise one of these fine animals and train it properly to become an asset and success in life, that's a fine gift to the world, as well as yourself.

    It's not a question of whether you can, or if it's sane, but whether your heart is in it when taking on a huge project like a large, smart dog who must be trained young. If anyone can, you can.

    Good luck. If you choose a smaller breed or older dog to have an easier time of it, then fine, too.

  26. #106
    Quote Originally Posted by OldArcher View Post
    Dennis, I'm one of those who can not, will not, would not, live without at least two pups. I'm one of those crazy people that does not believe Man should live without pups, or even kittens. My late mother said, "Don't hold on to your children or pups too tightly. God doesn't give them to you, He just loans them, for they belong to Him."

    My children are grown, and have their own lives. My pups are my closest companions, and like children, are the embodiment of God's unconditional love. We must treat them, children and pups, or kittens, as God treats us. It keeps us balanced and human.

    By all means, Dennis, for your and Aja's sake, get another pup, so that Aja will never be alone, as well as having a companion to pal around with, and play, when you're at work.

    God Bless You, Dennis, for your love of your pups...

    OldARcher
    OA, your mother was a very, very wise woman. I have long believed what she said !!!


  27. #107
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    Personally I'm more inclined to a rescue, but we all have to make our own choices. God Bless.

    Judy

  28. #108
    Go for it!
    “My religious belief teaches me to feel as safe in battle as in bed. God has fixed the time for my death. I do not concern myself about that, but to be always ready, no matter when it may overtake me. That is the way all men should live, and then all would be equally brave.” - Stonewall Jackson

  29. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Baron View Post
    DD -really- wants me to get a dog since I am living alone now.

    Our faithful little miniature Dachshund Rudi passed away about twenty years ago.

    Since then we have had a couple of cats with Max, our grey tabby, now at 17 years of age. He is a great cat but I hate to say, his days are numbered. He is like a little dog. Eats like a mule and always cuddles with you or anybody else in the house. My allergies are too severe to consider another cat.

    Currently I would consider another wiener dog, being small and easy to care for. I love them, they are very special little animals. Ideally I'm looking for a cute female long hair Dachshund. One the other end of the spectrum I would also consider a Doberman as big as a small deer named Heidi or Gretchen.

    I have all kinds of breathing and allergy problems. Thus I am not looking for a big shaggy dog or a new puppy to chase after all day long.

    I'll bide my time and wait for a suitable mature shelter/rescue animal.

    I cannot see chasing a puppy around the house any more.

    That would be my advice to Dennis. Wait for a suitable mature Shepard to become available.
    If you have allergies, Samoyeds are hypo-allergenic, very good with children, and almost always of good temperament. Ours was so graceful she could sneak up on my lap without my realizing it.

    Dennis, check the rescue organizations for your breed. Many times they take in dogs whose owners are no longer able to care for them. You might hit the jackpot there, and probably a lot cheaper than buying a puppy.
    "Freedom is not something to be secured in any one moment of time. We must struggle to preserve it every day. And freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction."
    -Ronald Reagan

  30. #110
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    Okay, a few thoughts for this morning:

    I have rescued my last three dogs. Hermione was the only dog in my adult life that I bought from a breeder. (Remember Annie the ancient Husky?) Anyway, my emotional state is such that I need the "recharge" that a new life gives off. The innocence of a young pup, for whom all things are new. The fearlessness, the getting in to crazy situations, and above all, the noise and energy.

    As to the cost, any purebred dog from a reputable breeder will cost a relative fortune today. Not sure why. Putting things into perspective, at the time I got Hermione, Kings were going for $1200. Today, they go for $1800-$3000. A "large-bred" AKC German Shepherd from European lines (that is, not crippled in the back end), goes for $3500-$5000. And the prices I just quoted are for "pet quality" dogs.

    Now for the biggie: my own energy level. If I get a pup THIS YEAR, I believe I have the energy necessary to keep up with it. But I promise that in a couple years, I won't. So it's either now or never. And Aja will be there to help burn off that puppy energy. Thank God for that. When Hermione was a pup, there was no doggie companion for her. Odin came later, when she was an adult.

  31. #111
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    Ok, first I know that Dennis has already thought this out so I will just point out a few things for those reading.
    Rescue versus getting a pup from a breeder.

    Rescue at first is a cheaper route but later on can be very costly due to unforseen health problems as you have little idea of paternal and maternal bloodlines and issues. Especially with a big dog. You get one from a breeder and those parents and grandparents have had hip x-rays done on their hips, eye exams and other very important things down the road in an older dog.
    Also, a lot of these shelters immediately vaccinate all dogs leaving. Doesn't matter that the dog may have been vaccinated recently or not. THIS is a MAJOR issue healthwise. The dog's body gets slammed by the virus the vaccine is supposed to prevent plus MOST of those vaccines have thymerasol (mercury) as and adjuvant. Mercury attacks the myelin sheath of the nervous system especially along the spine. (our Luka had this happen to her. She died 18 months after getting slammed by one of these "vaccine cocktails)

    A rescue can have all sorts of issues with temperment and training. Things can go sideways really quickly from shelter dogs. A dog that is caged up with a bunch of other dogs all barking and upset is not a place to try to judge temperment or training. One from a rescue group can have similar issues as the dog/pup will know it's not a forever home within days.

    If Dennis wants a "clean" dog, the only way to be sure is to get a pup from a reputable breeder. He knows what breed and what size HE wants. Not what we would pick but what he would pick. Some of us are big dog people, some are small or tiny dog people. What works for some doesn't work for others.

    Dennis. You do what YOU think best. You have to do the training and raising of this dog. You will live with it for hopefully a long time. You get to decide when to spay/neuter the pup, not some shelter or rescue which usually means way, way too young also creating issues later on. You get to decide when to vaccinate and how many at a time or which ones the pup may not need. Your choice, not some rescue or shelter which just blast them with everything they can find.

    I think this is a great idea. As to sex of the pup. Just because Aja was better with Odin than Hermoine only means he was more outgoing and actually younger than Hermoine was. A young female pup can be just as much a handful as a male pup. We got Sophie as a buddy for Ashly and it's worked out just great. Two boys or two girls usually work fine from what I have observed over the years with many dogs in my life.

    If you go to see the pups to make the choice yourself, let the pups decide which one likes you. Look at all of them.

    Hope this helps a little.


    In his heart a man plans his course, but the Lord determines his steps.

    Proverbs 16:9




  32. #112
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    FWIW I agree that to rescue a pup or to get one from the pound is a noble thing to do. My last two shepherd's were adults when I got them and both were between two and three years old. With the first one I had no idea when I got her that the hips were bad and usually that doesn't show up until they are older and of course I had no idea the other one was going to get cancer. There is no shame in going the breeder route as those dogs are already born and need homes just like the dogs in the pound. The difference is with a reputable breeder you know what you are getting ahead of time, you can look up the pedigree and both parents already passed their OFA tests and have a track record. You can also inquire of owners who have gotten their puppies from the breeder to see how they've developed and if there have been problems and also you sign a contract when you make the purchase. That protects the breeder as well as you. For you, you get a health guarantee and usually if you have to get rid of the dog it goes back to the breeder so you know it will be placed in a reputable home if your unable to follow through. For the breeder they know they are placing the animal in a good home. And with a puppy you get to train it right and if you screw up it's on you and you only have to fix your problems. You get an adult rescue and the problems are yours to fix along with medical and behavioral issues that you don't find out about until later.
    What is the lake of fire? What is it's purpose? Is the lake of fire eternal hell? Is there any hope of escape for those cast into this lake?
    http://bible-truths.com/lake1.html

  33. #113
    YES!!!!

    They are a ton of work, but it will help you and Aja.

  34. #114
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    I kept a pup from our last litter of working Border Collies and she is a good one. She has been very little trouble, wants to be good, and has settled in to the household routine without much effort on my part. I'll be 70 next year, so obviously I'm optimistic about outliving this pup. Willa brings joy and laughing out loud into my life every day.

    Go for it.

  35. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buick Electra View Post
    I think you SHOULD get a playmate for Aja. I'm a big believer that dogs should have another furry friend.

    That said, if you're up for a puppy, knock yourself out. I myself am done w/the puppy stage. I believe there are plenty of good "used" dogs whose owners have died or become incapacitated that are not 'broken' but who will be if left in a shelter. I;ve found shelters are very forthcoming with the dogs that had to be surrendered by an ailing owner. All you have to do is ask.

    Puppy or not, I TRULY believe Aja needs a furry friend.
    This struck me as a good point. Might well be someone out there right now fretting over what to do with their own furkid they must abandon for one reason or another, and being the person who can take them in could be a good plan.

  36. #116
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    I'm thinking a puppy would be a very good idea if you are up to the care for a dog at that stage of their life.....

    The key is a puppy is more likely to be accepted by other animals in the household than an older dog.

    On the other hand an older dog especially rescue dogs are often left in shelters (even bred dogs) because of their age........

    If you had no dogs at home I'd say older.........but with others.......a puppy might be the way to go.......

    It could be a plus if you could have the opportunity to test an encounter with Aja and a potential new family member first before making the commitment to that specific dog.......but alas circumstances may not allow for that and/or even emotionally that might be hard to do for either of you....

  37. #117
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    I didn't want to mention it, but I suspected that your other dog would be upset by being alone. They get just as attached to their pack members as we do, and I've dealt with it before with my own dogs. Last time, when I had to put down my Uncle's Mal who'd been with us for years, I knew my little black "Golden" would be literally ruined if she had to stay home all day by herself. ( I was still working).

    A quick trip to the shelter, and a forlorn-eyed 6 month old chocolate lab bitch with a "blankie" habit, total body wiggle and a non-stop tail came into the household. The two dogs got along like sisters from the start and all involved were ecstatic. If any pup ought to have been mentally scarred, it was this one - I think she had either been in a VERY abusive, sick home, or had been used as a bait dog for pit bulls. She is missing toes and nails (some partly detached), has wire/chain/rope scars on her feet and legs, missing part of her tail, splits in her ears, scarred face, and when younger, looked like she had burn scars/marks on her belly. So bad and obvious that I immediately made my vet document the damage so I could never be accused of inflicting it. She's a total love, very sensitive, but I've never in all my years known a happier or more positive creature - animal or human.

    As long as you are working, I don't know how a puppy will work out - unless you can come home at lunchtime and give the pup an outside break. That's why I've done 6 month-ish aged shelter dogs lately. Now, being retired, yeah, I'd go for a pup or two again. Anyway, the main problem I see for a pup for you is short-term, dealing with long days at home without a break, but I'm sure you already know that.

  38. #118
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    A pup would be in an ex-pen by the front window during the day, with everything it needs. I'll clean up when I get home each day. The first week or so with the new pup, I'd work from home.

  39. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    A pup would be in an ex-pen by the front window during the day, with everything it needs. I'll clean up when I get home each day. The first week or so with the new pup, I'd work from home.
    Sounds like you already have a good plan. I say, go for it! There's nothing like a new pup in the house to liven things up.

  40. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    A pup would be in an ex-pen by the front window during the day, with everything it needs. I'll clean up when I get home each day. The first week or so with the new pup, I'd work from home.
    Good plan.


    In his heart a man plans his course, but the Lord determines his steps.

    Proverbs 16:9




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