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HEALTH Is Social Security to blame for so many men dying at 62?
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  1. #1
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    15 Is Social Security to blame for so many men dying at 62?

    Well, this is eye opening...

    Michael

    For fair use education/research purposes.

    The link: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2018/0...alth+-+Text%29

    The article:

    Is Social Security to blame for so many men dying at 62?
    By Fox News

    Is the thought of looming retirement and availability of Social Security killing you? Two researchers say yes.

    Maria D. Fitzpatrick of Cornell University and Timothy J. Moore of the University of Melbourne said they analyzed the mortality rates in the U.S. and noticed that many older Americans – but disproportionally men who retire at 62 – are affected by sudden increased rates of death.

    “A lot happens in our early 60s. Some change jobs, scale back working hours or retire. Our health-care coverage may shift. We may have fewer financial resources, or we may begin collecting Social Security," Fitzpatrick told The Wall Street Journal. “About one-third of Americans immediately claim Social Security at 62. Ten percent of men retire in the month they turn 62.”

    The numbers, according to the study, show that there is a two percent increase in male mortality at age 62 in the country. “Over the 34 years we studied, there were an additional 400 to 800 deaths per year beyond what we expected, or an additional 13,000 to 27,000 excess male deaths within 12 months of turning 62,” the professor said.

    The researcher blames the increased mortality on the retirement as retirees tend to withdraw from life and no longer see the point in engaging.

    “Retirement could have positive long-run benefits for your health because you’re taking better care of yourself. Or it could be that, in the long run, retirement has a negative effect. You can think of how a retiree slowly withdraws from the world because he no longer has any reason to engage,” she told the WSJ.

    After all, the retirement brings new risks into life: “If you don’t go to work, you have more hours of the day to be driving around,” the professor said.

    “Medical literature suggests when older men are more sedentary, they’re more likely to be at risk for infection. When they lose their jobs, they increase their smoking rate, linked to the types of deaths we see such as COPD [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease] or respiratory illness.”

    The bottom line, says Fitzpatrick, is that the retirement “may be bad for the health of men, particularly for men who retire at the relatively early age of 62.”

    While she is not advising people against not retiring, especially if their health is poor, people should take precautions and commit to fairly active yet stress-free lifestyle.

    “Stay healthy, see a physician, don’t just sit on the couch, but don’t overdo it either. Be careful about driving. Just be careful. It is a tricky time,” she said.

  2. #2
    It isn't eye-opening because it is too simplistic - I know many many people (men especially) who cling on to jobs as their health goes downhill and then take early retirement at 62 as soon as they know they will have some income and healthcare.

    Unless they do a large review of the HEALTH over all of the population that retires at 62 to find out WHY they choose to retire early; saying it is "retirement" that is killing people is a simplistic conclusion not backed but full evidence.

    Now doctors and medical science has known for YEARS, that men who retire at any age; face a battle when it comes to redefining themselves and many do simply fade away if they don't find a purpose or reason to live (this was especially true back when people took jobs at 19 and kept them until 65).

    But if a lot of men are retiring and suddenly dying at 62, which is EARLY retirement without full benefits; I'd be looking at their health and reasons for retiring before deciding that retirement itself was the main issue.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  3. #3
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    I just turned 62 yesterday, and have been retired 6 years in March.

    In December 2010, I had stents put in my right coronary artery,
    to fix a failed bypass graft. In February the following year,
    I took a cardiovascular accessment test. It basically asked
    me what my heart health history was, parents health,
    siblings health etc. It took me about 45 minutes to
    answer all the questions that were asked.

    At the end, it said to standby while my answers were
    evaluated and a score prepared.

    It came back and said, that my cardiovascular age was
    15 years older than my chronological age.
    I was 55 when I took the exam, so based on what it said,
    my actual age was 70.

    Well that exam looms large for me today,
    as my dear Dad was 77 when he passed.

    Therefore each passing second means a lot,
    and I aint going to give up, and I want to leave this life,
    fighting on a field of battle, someplace in the FUSA.

    I truly believe, that men were born to fight wars,
    and that is the proper place, for a man to die,
    not in some bed someplace, with people all around,
    waiting for you to pass.

    Please be safe everyone.

    Regards to all deplorables.

    Nowski
    "Read everything, listen to everyone, believe absolutely nothing,
    unless you can prove it with your own research." Milton William Cooper

    "Life is a glass, half empty, of spoiled milk, sitting in a bed of thorns." Nowski

  4. #4
    Yes, this is true. And another reason why the S.S. (FICA) is a complete scam system that steals the labores from the individual/working poor and their employers. Averages out at about 15% plus compliance of every dollar one earns as income. And more salt in the life blood labores....they can and do often die early. Getting no one bloody cent of their FICA tax back. Every day working poor people die, from what ever, and most get nothing. Yes some have spouses and dependents that qulifiy for the death benefits. But majority don't.

    It's a scam, and the worst kind.... for their means of the working poor. Enforced by our government by jail and worse if you dare not pay up, even if your living in poverty.

  5. #5
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    Neither of our Dads and only 1 Grandfather made it to 62. We wanted to enjoy the money the gov took from us and enjoy life. When hubby had his 60th birthday, I started actively planning our retirement. We knew we couldn't stay in CT so we looked at 5 different states and settled on SC. It's hard being so far from family but we are enjoying life and found a nice community.

  6. #6
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    Yay! I am 63. I made the cut.
    Would someone please let me know how we have spun out of control?
    Has the captain let go of the wheel?
    Or could we please try to find a way to be a bit more kind?
    I see the road to tomorrow in the haze - Queensryche

  7. #7
    I hit 67 in December and I still work, keep busy with gardens in the good weather, but the winter has been tough. I have seen too many guys retire and sit on the porch and within 6 months to a year they are dead. I believe it is the inactivity that does it plus starting to use booze early in the afternoon.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dstraito View Post
    Yay! I am 63. I made the cut.
    Me to!

  9. #9
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    I agree, the Government never gave a darn about us. "People basically work to pay taxes - not work to eat". As soon as a person retires, the Government wants us dead so they don't have to pay Social Security.

    This is the way I feel about the whole situation.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobby.knight View Post
    I hit 67 in December and I still work, keep busy with gardens in the good weather, but the winter has been tough. I have seen too many guys retire and sit on the porch and within 6 months to a year they are dead. I believe it is the inactivity that does it plus starting to use booze early in the afternoon.
    ^^^^ Inactivity! I know some old cow farmers around here in there 70s and 80s. Simply lacking idle time seems to empirically be good for you...
    "You are allowed to be disappointed but not surprised"

  11. #11
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    What Melodi said is on target. The age represents a plateau followed by a cliff - statistical aberration because of unhealthy men grasping for early retirement at 62.

  12. #12
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    Alot of men retire at 62, because the jobs that many of them
    worked for years, have been sent offshore,
    and age discrimination is rampant in the FUSA,
    especially against men in their late 50's.

    Many would continue to work past 62, if the jobs were there,
    which they aren't. Companies what a 25 year old college graduate,
    with 15 years work experience.

    If I had a company, there would be no one working there
    under 50.

    Please be safe everyone.

    Regards to all deplorables.

    Nowski
    "Read everything, listen to everyone, believe absolutely nothing,
    unless you can prove it with your own research." Milton William Cooper

    "Life is a glass, half empty, of spoiled milk, sitting in a bed of thorns." Nowski

  13. #13
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    I'm fairly unhealthy in terms of physical size, but otherwise am in pretty good shape (thank God). I have absolutely no intention of retiring at 62. Chances are that I'll "die in the harness" so to speak. When I wasn't working for several months last summer and fall, I was going slowly nuts. I need to keep my mind occupied, and TV and video games doesn't make the grade.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by WalknTrot View Post
    What Melodi said is on target. The age represents a plateau followed by a cliff - statistical aberration because of unhealthy men grasping for early retirement at 62.
    Yep.

    However, as a kid (yes, I was weird) I noticed how very many men, after retiring in apparent good health at 65, would drop dead, usually of a massive coronary, within a year. Often a lot less than a year. These weren't guys who had been forced out, and while you cant ever really know someone's financial health, they appeared to have no worries, and those days didn't have the second mortgage and home equity loans that too many people take on too late in their working career.

    And they were mostly the high powered executive types (because those were the circles my dad ran in), and from the talk I heard, most had at least some plans... to travel, play golf, or do stuff around the house.

    My theory as I got older (and I think it probably explains many of those who are thought to be healthy when retiring at 62 and then dying soon after) was formed after working with thoroughbred race horses. Competent trainers knew you *never* took a horse who was fully trained and conditioned to race strength and just turned them out to pasture when the race season was over. You slowly shortened their workouts, cut their feed back and only after a period of weeks, could you turn them out without watching them crash.

    Their nightmare was a race conditioned horse who suffered a sudden injury. Even if it was minor, and in no way career ending, if it required strict rest to heal (tendon and ligament injuries, They knew it was going to be tough.

    A horse turned out to rest without "de-conditioning" would lose weight... often a hundred pounds or more. Their hair coats would get rough and lusterless, even with continued daily grooming. They'd act depressed... have to be tempted and coaxed to eat. And some if them would end up colicking and dying.

    Why? My theory is adrenalin and stress. Men aren't a whole lot different... in the high stress world of business, the competition that goes on in the corporate world, and in the more physical jobs, the combination of physical stress and the psychological stress of competing with younger, stronger men coming up behind them keeps a constant flow if adrenalin going. And that, in turn, keeps them getting up in the morning and going.

    Take away the need yo get up and go to work, and they crash into an adrenal crisis. (It's also probably important to note that many of these guys have been drinking a ton of coffee ever day to keep themselves going and "stay sharp". My own dad almost wrecked his kidneys in his 40s... he was drinking 4 POTS of coffee a day!

    And when they suddenly retire, the sudden loss to their system of the outer caffeine stimulation and the inner adrenaline (and other stress hormones) stimulation leads to various crises... often exacerbating existing conditions they may not even have known they had.

    But yes, these days, someone retiring at 62 is generally doing so because they are already struggling with health issues and simply can't physically handle working any longer.

    Summerthyme

  15. #15
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    Summerthyme, I think there is a lot of truth to what you said about the adrenal crisis. Maybe it would be better for people to gradually taper off working, instead of the abrupt stop. It seems like that is what would normally have happened in the past when most people worked at home - they would have gradually slowed down as they got older, and let their kids pick up the slack. Of course, there was no such thing as retirement.

    The retiring because of health problems is valid, too. My ex retired early last year, just before he turned 61, actually (government job and he had enough time in). He's had cancer and a heart attack, and has developed debilitating neuropathy. He seems to be doing pretty well right now, but I have wondered how much longer he will last.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  16. #16
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    Summertimethyme, thank you for posting this!

    This makes total sense. I see the truth of this on so many levels.

  17. #17
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    Retired from the Navy at 45 after 22 years of service. Yes I could have gone longer, but the closer you get to 30 years of military service in the military the fewer years you survive afterwards. Saw too many guys that retired after 25-30 years and dropped dead with in a year of two of retirement.

    Then went back to school and earned a degree and went into teaching. Ten years later retired from that and became a stay at home dad, mostly to keep our youngest on the straight and narrow. She'd gotten in with a group of kids headed straight for the gutter. She's now in her junior year of university, a double major in the STEM fields and a straight A student. So this coming birthday I'm going to pull the plug and start drawing my SS early.....because I can. I have no desire to rejoin the rat race and am fortunate that I'm able to step off that treadmill. We're not rich. We're not fancy, but we are comfortable, which is just fine by me. Sometimes it amazes me how much you save by not going to work. By not commuting. By not having to have a work wardrobe. By not having meals out and all the little things that add up and increase the cost of living.

    The only problem I have today is far too many projects on our little homestead. I seem to be working harder now than ever before and I've got total pain in the arse bosses.....me and my DW. Terrible task masters!

    I think the key is to keep busy, always have something to do and things to get done, in other words - keep working. Only now it's for yourself and your family directly and whatever you do is for your own enrichment, not someone else.

    And now that wife is retired we can go where ever and whenever that we want. We make sure to budget in fun and the world be damned.
    We have done so much, with so little, for so long....We can now do anything, with nothing, forever.

  18. #18
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    I retired at 62 because I could. After Katrina I was done with my usual kind of work, clerical work basically and wanted to do something different. So I was thrilled to get a job at Home Depot as a cashier, not really thinking about what standing all day would do for my feet and back. So retiring I did and I've never looked back. I left my husband and moved to the country to family land that I inherited and not soon enough my husband became my ex husband.

    I spend a lot of my time doing what I did when I worked in an office, sitting in front of a computer, seems to be my comfort place, much to the dismay of my new husband, well we've been together for 4 years. It is what it is. I can feel myself diminishing in strength, but I'm tired. I'll be 71 in a few days. My DH has been in and out of the hospital several times for the last 6 months. He's back in the hospital now. Its very wearing on both of us. He's 74 and retired at 70.

    Judy

  19. #19
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    MY husband retired in 2011, just a couple months shy of the 62 date. He took SS as soon as he was eligible. He was back working, part-time, in a completely different job by 2013. Not only was he napping his life away, but he increased his smoking and had to have a stint put in his heart in less than two years. Also, he was driving me crazy.... his mental acuity was slipping fast. I didn't blame him at at for wanting out of the job he was in; it was brutal physical labor and the bean counters were ruining the ability of anyone to do the job properly. We're both 70 now, and he will work until he can't. I work, too, but something much less stressful than the law offices I spent 25 years in. We both have come to believe that it's not the retirement that kills, but the inactivity and the loss of social interaction.

  20. #20
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    Now know several male friends who are taking Social Security at 62. The reason that this is being frowned upon is that TPTB what us just to be work serfs for the corporations and once we are no longer able to be of their use, they want us to pass away. Do think they really don't want us to retire and 'Enjoy Life'. Look at how many in our society who are even young and middle aged who are not healthy. I look at the obituaries at times and notice how often is people dying in their 50's. Now days how many get cancer or all sort of things and are still young. TPTB have always just looked at us regular people as useless eaters. And once we cannot be their working serfs, then they want us dead bigtime.

    Now as for myself, am 61 and I still have my health. Once I retire and no longer have to work ...plan to live like I have always done - go live in the wilds.
    From an Old Sign Up the South Fork of the Shoshone River near Cody, Wyoming ...

    ' At The End Of The Road Where The Trails and Life begin'

  21. #21
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    Look at how many in our society who are even young and middle aged who are not healthy. I look at the obituaries at times and notice how often is people dying in their 50's.
    That's what it is. When over 30% of the population is overweight, and over another 30% is obese (this includes the younger generations), all the medical issues that come along with those conditions takes it's toll. The population in general, is no where as healthy as generations 40 years ago.

    Everyone should really keep their eyes open the next time you go to the store or out into a big gathering of people. Be alert to the number of people who are barely able to walk at a normal pace, because of some medical condition or their personal condition. It's astounding!
    ...Rubbin' is Racin'......

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by willowlady View Post
    MY husband retired in 2011, just a couple months shy of the 62 date. He took SS as soon as he was eligible. He was back working, part-time, in a completely different job by 2013. Not only was he napping his life away, but he increased his smoking and had to have a stint put in his heart in less than two years. Also, he was driving me crazy.... his mental acuity was slipping fast. I didn't blame him at at for wanting out of the job he was in; it was brutal physical labor and the bean counters were ruining the ability of anyone to do the job properly. We're both 70 now, and he will work until he can't. I work, too, but something much less stressful than the law offices I spent 25 years in. We both have come to believe that it's not the retirement that kills, but the inactivity and the loss of social interaction.
    Well, I'd disagree about the social interaction part; plenty of folks out there, this is the closest thing they get. But inactivity, that's the killer. You've got to have a reason to go on.

  23. #23
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    In 1935 when Social Security was signed into law, the age to begin withdrawing was set at 65. Back then, the average life expectancy for a man was 58-60 (depending on what source you use) and for women was 62-64. So the government was banking on at least half of the potential recipients would die before they qualified to draw. Those "great minds" never took into account the possibility that life expectancy would increase and people just might live into their 70's and 80's and would draw out of that system for a greater amount of time. So it was a program that was doomed from the start but that's another rant.

    I myself have observed that yes, many men seem to pass away within 2-5 years of retirement IF they take the retire part to heart. Those that survive for a long while after are the ones that keep busy. Most of the time they get bored and move into a new job. They follow their passion. My own mother-in-law passed away within a year and a half of my father-in-law's death. Her job was caretaker. First it was her parents. Then her husband and kids. When the kids grew up, it was the grandkids. When her husband passed away, I really believe she saw her job complete and just sat and waited for the good Lord to take her. She was in relatively good health until the last 6 months.
    Needs more cowbell.
    "The Constitution only gives people the right to persue happiness. You have to catch it yourself." --Benjamin Franklin
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  24. #24
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    Without purpose and focus we die. That's how I see it. I burned the candle at both ends and the middle starting at the rip old age of 9. By 10 it was combined hours of work/school of a minimum 2,700 hours. Two years out after being run over at 15, then back at it for the next 35 years. If I didn't work another day until 70, I'd still average 2,080 hours a year over that span of time.

    The body went in full revolt mid last year. Now I focus and train on other things to re-purpose. As long as I have my mind, there will never be a time without purpose or focus.
    Facts?? We don't need no stinkin facts...

  25. #25

    I'll be lucky to see 60.

    Howdy, Folks!

    Way I see it - waste as little time as possible, and make the time you do have, count.

    [ Says the fellow posting to the online forum... ]

    Peace and Love,

    Donald Shimoda

  26. #26
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    What about the immigrants going on SS disability and young people in their 20's getting out of drug rehab going on SS disability? I don't think it was set up for that!!

  27. #27
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    Here's something to shoot for. Photo at link This is from 2010

    http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/...n30-story.html



    It wasn't snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night that stopped Chester Arthur Reed from his appointed round. The mail handler just felt it was time to call it quits at age 95.

    The fork lift operator retired Wednesday as the nation's oldest postal worker, ending a career without taking a single sick day. It's a feat he attributes to a healthy diet of watermelon, alkaline water and an onion sandwich with mayo every day.

    "If everyone in the nation ate watermelons, they'd get rid of all the doctors," Reed said.

    Despite being partially deaf and walking with a stoop, Reed has worked for more years than many of his co-workers have been alive and has accrued 3,856 hours - nearly two years - of sick leave for not missing a shift in 37 years.

    Reed has been a U.S. Postal Service mail handler and forklift operator since he was hired in 1973, making $4 an hour. He hit the $25-an-hour ceiling about 10 years ago.

    Reed said he likes his job because "one, it's a steady income and, two, they don't hassle you." But he also knows when to leave, reasoning: "The Bible says there's a time for everything. Well, it's time to retire, and that's it."

    Reed worked the 2:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. shift and logged in more than 12 hours some days, his 55-year-old manager Mary Brunkhorst said. "We'd have to force him to go home, and he'd say there's still work to do. It takes a special person to work to age 95. Our generation would not do that."

    About 100 people attended a retirement ceremony Wednesday for Reed where he was presented with a plaque bearing about 40 stamps that depict locations he visited or activities he enjoyed. Some in the audience wiped away tears.

    Reed was hired to the postal service after serving in the Air Force, which he joined at age 33. Among the places where he served were Wiesbaden in Germany, Okinawa in Japan, and three Texas bases before ending up in March Field in Riverside where he currently lives.

    Despite his travel during military service, Reed still has wanderlust. He and his 59-year-old son Richard visit a continent each year, recently marking their fifth. He is planning another trip that will include Moscow, Helsinki and Dublin, and a second parasailing adventure in Rio de Janeiro.

    He last parasailed two years ago, at age 93.

    Reed was born in 1914 and grew up in St. Clairsville, Ohio, as the son of an auto mechanic and a housewife. After high school, he worked on Ford Model Ts in his dad's auto shop. In 1944, Reed met his wife Iva Katherine, a dance instructor, on the dance floor and enlisted in the Air Force three years later.

    He retired from active service as a sergeant in 1972. He said he heard the post office was hiring, so he went in for an interview and was hired on the spot.

    His military service, which included physical conditioning with pilots, is evident in the rigid discipline surrounding his health. It's his favorite topic of conversation, said Reed's co-worker Verna Ortiz, 50.

    He believes in drinking alkaline water, to minimize acids that can damage digestive system, and eating sandwiches made "with a lot of mayonnaise and get a big slice of onion" because the vegetable is closely related to garlic, one of the healthiest foods you can eat, he said.

    "He taught me to stay away from the two S's: salt and sugar," Ortiz said, adding she lost 10 pounds in six months by taking his advice.

    Reed also likes to point out that his personal hero, the fitness guru Jack LaLanne whom Reed calls "a fine physical specimen," is only one month his senior.

    Reed is one of seven siblings, but has outlived all but the youngest - a 65-year-old who lives near San Diego. Reed's other son died of cancer at age 58 a few years ago, and Reed's wife died soon after.

    Regardless of his longevity, Reed doesn't think he's leaving a legacy. "Put your hand in a bucket of water, put it in all the way to your wrist. Take it out and the hole that you leave will be how much you'll be missed," he said.

    And while he may not be going to a job anymore, he's still working hard.

    "Hey, if Adam and Eve hadn't messed up, they'd be living yet," he said. "So I'm going to try to reach 100."

    Copyright © 2018, The San Diego Union-Tribune

  28. #28
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    Cops can retire in their early 50s. Statistically, they found that many died in their first year after retirement. Now they tell them to sign up at a gym and go daily.
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by marsh View Post
    Cops can retire in their early 50s. Statistically, they found that many died in their first year after retirement. Now they tell them to sign up at a gym and go daily.
    That's very good advice. Need to get out of the house to the gym daily and get that activity to get blood flowing and muscles moving. Then take up some hobbies as well. Do things we enjoy.

  30. #30
    Retirement is a man made concept...... I wont 'retire'......... it would be nice if we could all make money doing what we love........

  31. #31
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    Mid 50s and suffered from a multi year period of under employment. I can say I withdrew quite a bit. Stopped hiking and going to the gym. Left the house very little. I am just now starting to climb back out of the self imposed hole. It sucks.

    I am planning on working till I drop. I don't think that I could handle idle retirement.
    Official TB2K Comedy Relief ; I resemble that remark! ; Aloha Snackbar; Nuke a Gay Whale For Christ and other Political Incorrectness
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  32. #32
    I worked 30 hr weeks the last year and retired at 64. That was in 2009 and I am still here. I was in OK health until I wore out a hip and that cut down my activity but I still worked on the farm. Got a new hip about 1 year ago and that part now works but have gotten gout and that really cut down my walking. I have hobbies and, I spend far to much time in front of a computer but most of that is talking to folks all over the world about things related to my hobbies.

  33. #33
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    There were a bunch of retired guys I knew who met for coffee together at a local cafe several times a week. Some of them lived on curmudgeon hill above me. (All cranky old bachelors.) It kept them going. I guess they had someone else to scowl at and gripe.
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  34. #34
    Sold my business and a very desirable business property in 2008 and "retired" at 49. I was knee deep in political activism and transitioned my focus and time to Bill Ayers and Obama. I spent hours and hours every day sitting with my laptop. Wasn't long before I was diagnosed with Celiac and then had a deep vein thrombosis.... the world changed for me. Gained fifty pounds, from 210 to 265, on six and a half feet. Bad, but not so bad... this past fall dropped down to 235 and active. So far so good, 60 this summer. Now I gotta pay close attention to get two more under my belt, and have gone back into work. As a deer processor I will have a modest income, and a good hard working job to keep me in shape. And I don't see any robots taking this job over too soon.

    Do you work to live, or live to work? This to me is a key point. I work to live.

  35. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by teedee View Post
    I worked 30 hr weeks the last year and retired at 64. That was in 2009 and I am still here. I was in OK health until I wore out a hip and that cut down my activity but I still worked on the farm. Got a new hip about 1 year ago and that part now works but have gotten gout and that really cut down my walking. I have hobbies and, I spend far to much time in front of a computer but most of that is talking to folks all over the world about things related to my hobbies.

    A lot of folks get gout relief from drinking cherry juice and cutting back on oxalic acid foods. Hope you feel better so you can give that new hip a good work out!

  36. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Columbia River Gorge
    Posts
    6,016
    Quote Originally Posted by Nowski View Post
    Alot of men retire at 62, because the jobs that many of them
    worked for years, have been sent offshore,
    and age discrimination is rampant in the FUSA,
    especially against men in their late 50's.

    Many would continue to work past 62, if the jobs were there,
    which they aren't. Companies what a 25 year old college graduate,
    with 15 years work experience.

    If I had a company, there would be no one working there
    under 50.

    Please be safe everyone.

    Regards to all deplorables.

    Nowski
    I was about 61 when the company I worked for was bought out by a big competitor. The new owners moved production to Mexico, so I was out of a job. I applied to every job that seemed like a good fit for me. I could almost hear my resumes hit the trash can when they figured out I was over 60. In my experience, very few companies will consider hiring "old" people. So, I waited until I could apply for SS. I stay very busy, so it's almost like I still have a job.

    I've made it to 65 so far, and seem to be in pretty good health. I think that being non-productive/sedentary leads to health problems and premature death. So I'm keeping busy!

  37. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    In the Comedy Relief Bunker
    Posts
    8,000
    I have heard more than once said that the biggest killer in old age is retirement. I am a believer.
    Official TB2K Comedy Relief ; I resemble that remark! ; Aloha Snackbar; Nuke a Gay Whale For Christ and other Political Incorrectness
    Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.
    I've had a perfectly wonderful evening. But this wasn't it. FRA

  38. #38
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Fl
    Posts
    6,120
    ...Had a heart attack at age 52 and was forced to retire. Weighed about 180. During the next ten years had a second heart attack, hip replacement, a defibrillator put in, plus several other operations. Result was I went to 234 lbs. Now, at age 75 I am at 190 and haven't had an operation in 5 years. I think the key is having interests that stimulate you mentally. That plus being involved in family is very important.
    1 7 7 6

    Time for a change


    AGAIN

    .................................................. ......................

    "But when a long train of abuses and usurpation s, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government"

    My Blog :http://www.humilityclarityandcourage.com/

  39. #39
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Riding my Harley
    Posts
    4,255
    Quote Originally Posted by bobby.knight View Post
    I hit 67 in December and I still work, keep busy with gardens in the good weather, but the winter has been tough. I have seen too many guys retire and sit on the porch and within 6 months to a year they are dead. I believe it is the inactivity that does it plus starting to use booze early in the afternoon.
    I have seen way too many guys die within 2 years of retirement, it's like they give up on life. No job, no purpose, no reason to dress for the day
    Patriot Guard rider
    www.patriotguard.org

  40. #40
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Sandhills North Carolina
    Posts
    32,073
    Quote Originally Posted by West View Post
    Yes, this is true. And another reason why the S.S. (FICA) is a complete scam system that steals the labores from the individual/working poor and their employers. Averages out at about 15% plus compliance of every dollar one earns as income. And more salt in the life blood labores....they can and do often die early. Getting no one bloody cent of their FICA tax back. Every day working poor people die, from what ever, and most get nothing. Yes some have spouses and dependents that qulifiy for the death benefits. But majority don't.

    It's a scam, and the worst kind.... for their means of the working poor. Enforced by our government by jail and worse if you dare not pay up, even if your living in poverty.

    That money is funneled to SSI
    The junkies convicts illiterate lazy collect for NOT working

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