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HEALTH The Flu Is Far Worse Than We're Being Told
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  1. #1
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    The Flu Is Far Worse Than We're Being Told

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-0...000s-are-dying

    The Flu Is Far Worse Than We're Being Told

    by Tyler Durden
    Sat, 01/27/2018
    Authored by Cat Ellis via The Organic Prepper blog,

    We all know that this year’s flu season is bad.

    I have been pouring over numbers and reports over the past few days, and it’s actually even worse than we’re hearing about. Tens of thousands of Americans are dying. It’s now worse than the 2009 swine flu outbreak and is on track with the 2014-15 strain. And it’s not showing any signs of slowing down.

    Despite this, the media is downplaying the severity of the flu and the government makes the statistics pretty difficult to find. Are they trying to avoid a panic? Do they know something we don’t?

    Here’s what you need to know about why this year’s flu is so dangerous.


    This Year’s Flu Strain Is More Deadly
    The dominant Influenza strain this year is H3N2. This particular strain has a history of causing more hospitalizations and more deaths. According to the CDC:

    In the past, H3N2-predominant seasons have been associated with more severe illness and higher mortality, especially in older people and young children, relative to H1N1- or B-predominant seasons. Between 1976 and 2007, for example, CDC estimates that an average of 28,909 people died from flu during H3N2 seasons, compared to 10,648 people during non-H3N2 predominant years.


    That’s a difference of 18,261 adults each year. And that’s in a good year.

    In addition to H3N2 producing a more serious infection in general, this year’s particular H3N2 influenza virus is particularly virulent. The number of deaths due to influenza or complications to the flu, such as pneumonia (a secondary bacterial infection following influenza), varies from year to year.

    An August 27, 2010 MMWR report entitled “Thompson MG et al. Updated Estimates of Mortality Associated with Seasonal Influenza through the 2006-2007 Influenza Season. MMWR 2010; 59(33): 1057-1062.,” provided estimates of the range of flu-associated deaths that occurred in the United States during the three decades prior to 2007. CDC estimated that from the 1976-1977 season to the 2006-2007 flu season, flu-associated deaths ranged from a low of about 3,000 to a high of about 49,000 people.

    The Current Flu Has Already Killed 44,116 People
    In comparison, the current flu has already resulted in 44,116 deaths this flu season. To give that number some meaning, this year’s flu has already led to more deaths than the average for H3N2 years.

    Furthermore, we aren’t even in the middle of cold and flu season yet. At 44,116 deaths and counting, we are already nearly to the high end (49,000 people) of the normal flu-associated deaths range.

    Fun With Numbers
    You would think the CDC would publish an easy-to-find running tally of influenza mortality. They don’t. They only post that information for pediatric mortality. Currently, that number stands at 37.

    A total of 37 influenza-associated pediatric deaths have been reported for the 2017-2018 season.

    Additional data can be found at: http://gis.cdc.gov/GRASP/Fluview/PedFluDeath.html.





    They do, however, provide the information for you to do the math for yourself. On the same page as the above graphic, the CDC provides a chart with the mortality rate presented as a percentage. Here’s that chart.

    Below that chart is the option to open up the chart data. This opens an Excel file with the number of people who died from both influenza and pneumonia by week dating back to 2015. I added up the total deaths for the flu and for pneumonia starting in Week 40 (October 2, 2017) and ending in Week 1 (January January 7, 2018). This is what those figures came to:


    If you add those two totals together, you reach a total of 44,146 people dead.

    To make matters even more confusing, the CDC does report lab-confirmed cases of influenza at the top of the same web page. This is the chart.


    This chart is somewhat misleading, as it does not compare apples to apples. It presents only cases of lab-confirmed influenza, but not Influenza-Like Illnesses (ILI). ILI cases are just labeled “Elevated”. Thanks, but I could tell that already by just reading my Facebook news feed.

    The chart also does not include pneumonia cases. This leaves thousands of cases off the chart.

    To add yet another twist, the pediatric mortality total is posted on this same chart. This compares apples to oranges and gives the impression that there are much fewer people sick and dying than there actually are.

    Numbers don’t lie. But, they can mislead. If you do add the lab-confirmed cases of influenza together, you get 19,869 cases. That’s a far cry from the 44,146 deaths recorded so far.

    The Flu Vaccine Is Historically Less Effective on H3N2
    Not only does this influenza strain produce a more intense and deadly flu, the flu vaccine is less effective against it. This Centers for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) article discusses a study published in The Lancet spanning 11 years that demonstrates H3N2 is more resistant to the flu vaccine.

    The study, in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, covered more than 11 flu seasons, from Jan 1, 2004, to Mar 31, 2015. The H3N2 strain has been associated with more severe influenza seasons independent of vaccine effect, according to senior author Edward Belongia, MD, of the Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation (MCRF) in Wisconsin. Among the explanations he and his coauthors offered for the lower strain-specific protection were manufacturing-related factors.

    Also from the above CIDRAP article, the flu vaccine demonstrates only a 33% vaccine effective (VE) rate with the average H3N2 strain. This is down significantly from the VE rates against other strains.

    The research team determined that pooled VE for the 56 studies was 33% (95% confidence interval [CI], 26%-39%) for H3N2, 54% (95% CI, 46%-61%) for type B, 61% (95% CI, 57%-65%) for 2009 H1N1, and 67% (29%-85%) for prepandemic H1N1.

    This Year’s Vaccine Is Even Less Effective than Prior Years
    To make matters worse, this year’s flu vaccine isn’t even close to the average 33% VE rate of prior years. This year’s vaccine is performing at approximately a 10% VE rate. This report from CBS News explains how we know this.

    What’s more, this year’s flu shot may not be up to the task. It is the same formulation that was used during Australia’s most recent flu season — which typically sets a pattern for what the U.S. will face — and it was only 10 percent effective there.

    Nonetheless, the medical community and media are still pushing the ineffective flu vax with all their might.

    Resources and Services Are At Risk
    The other day, I did an informal “Flu Check-In” through my social media accounts. It was a great way to touch base with hundreds of people around the country. There were loads of reports of hospitals reaching surge capacity, school closings due to high numbers of influenza cases, and people being told by their employers to stay home and telecommute if possible.

    Hospitals are at capacity.
    Hospitals and medical facilities are usually extra busy during flu season. However, this year, many hospitals are reaching what is called “surge capacity”. Surge capacity is the ability to handle a sudden and dramatic increase in the number of patients needing immediate care.

    This is happening because there are more patients seeking out emergency care, and they are staying in the hospital longer. This is leading to a scarcity of hospital beds and available staff.

    There seems to be quite a few hospitals at capacity. This is just a tiny sample of hospitals that are either full or almost full.

    Oklahoma City has several hospitals which are full.
    New Jersey hospitals are seeing “patients in the ICU for days and days with influenza”.
    A hospital in Syracuse had to turn people away from the emergency room.
    This Florida hospital had to set up beds in conference rooms.
    All of Augusta, GA hospitals are full with flu patients.
    The LA Times calls the situation local hospitals are facing a “war zone” as they put up tents for the surge of flu patients.
    Whether or not you have the flu, hospitals reaching capacity is a risk to everyone. I wrote about this at length in my book Prepping for a Pandemic. When an epidemic or pandemic disease has led to hospitals turning away patients, it doesn’t matter if you get the disease itself.

    You could have a heart attack, need an emergency c-section, or need have a burst appendix removed. No beds means no beds. At best, you might be directed to go to another hospital. At worst, they may not have any beds either and send you to another facility at capacity.

    School Closings
    There are plenty of school closings as well. This is an important step in saving lives, as the H3N2 strain of influenza hits both the elderly and children harder than adults. This can, however, make it tough on parents that cannot get time off of work. Here are just a few places with schools closing. They span all across the country.

    Maine
    Oklahoma
    Texas
    Idaho
    New Mexico
    Kansas
    Michigan
    Alabama

    Here’s What to Do Right Now
    Peak flu season is still to come. Flu season typically begins in October and can run as late as the following May. February is peak flu season. This month historically sees the most cases of flu or influenza-like illnesses.

    Stay away from enclosed populations with influenza if possible. These can include hospitals, nursing homes, schools, shopping centers, college dormitories, gyms, locker rooms, and anywhere else large numbers of people gather where the air is recirculated.
    If you are visiting someone who is in a care facility, do not bring young children or aging parents. They are more at risk than the rest of the population.
    Wash your hands frequently with soap. Soap provides friction which helps to remove pathogens from your hands.
    Stop touching your face. I know this one is hard, but we don’t need to give the flu any help infecting us.
    Take extra good care of your immune system. You will need to fight the flu! Get plenty of rest. Avoid unhealthy foods. Stay hydrated. Avoid smoking. Here is a great article from Harvard with ideas to support healthy immune function and one from this website about reducing your risk of catching the flu.
    Telecommute to work if possible.
    Disinfect things like doorknobs, handles, phones, and anything that multiple people touch throughout the day.
    The flu has an incubation period of 1-4 days before symptoms show, and is contagious a day before symptoms are obvious. Tidiness, clean linens, and fresh air help prevent the spread of germs before symptoms appear.
    If someone at home gets the flu, have them sleep separately, in a room by themselves. Keep your towels separate and your toothbrushes away from the sick person’s items.
    This one is deadly.
    This virus has the potential to be the worst we’ve seen in a century. You need to take every precaution to keep your family healthy and if someone does get sick, don’t take any risks. Seek medical attention.
    Attached Images

  2. #2
    44,000 deaths just skimmed the Zerohedge article, and I question question the math. Aren’t the pneumonia and influenza numbers in the columns cumulative?

  3. #3
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    Had to take my father to the hospital a couple of weeks ago and the emergency room was overflowing, and not just the waiting room. They were setting up temp rooms in the halls with room numbers. But that wasn't the worst of it. They were considering admitting him for observation but there were no rooms at that hospital or any other hospital in the Charlotte area so in the end they decided a room at home and returning was better than sleeping in a hallway with monitoring.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Athena View Post
    44,000 deaths just skimmed the Zerohedge article, and I question question the math. Aren’t the pneumonia and influenza numbers in the columns cumulative?
    That's what I thought too, at first, but looking closer, they don't always increase. Those are the numbers just for each week. So (apparently) in the first week of 2018, 716 people died of the flu, and 2855 of pneumonia. and the week before, another 503 of the flu and 3176 of pneumonia. So over the past 10-ish weeks, we've lost as many people to pneumonia as we usually do in an entire year of auto accidents.
    E Deploribus Unum

    Oderint dum metuant

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  5. #5
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    Tens of thousands of Americans are dying
    Lost me right there.... I know it's bad, but not THAT bad.

  6. #6
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    I wonder if that Black Plague hasn't hit the USA and we are not told about it.

  7. #7
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    Hmm. It is indeed a very bad year. There wasn't a good match between vaccine & strain. The flu is not tapering off as much and as quickly as is typical.
    KS is said to be hardest hit, with 1% of the pop having contracted a case. Hospitals running out of room is common in many places, if not every flu season,
    at least many of them. Hospitals around here, i.e. SE Nebraska & NE KS have closed themselves to visitors, required visitors to wear masks, and restricted
    children's visits in effort to combat the spread of the illness.

    Those are things I know to be true...but tens of thousands dying and hiding the severity? My sense is no, and not really. If anything, the severity is usually
    over hyped, IMHO, in effort to push that Needle.

    https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/index.htm
    neumonia and Influenza (P&I) Mortality Surveillance:

    Based on National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) mortality surveillance data available on January 25, 2018, 9.1% of the deaths occurring during the week ending January 6, 2018 (week 1) were due to P&I. This percentage is above the epidemic threshold of 7.2% for week 1.

    Background: Weekly mortality surveillance data include a combination of machine coded and manually coded causes of death collected from death certificates. Percentages of deaths due to P&I are higher among manually coded records than more rapidly available machine coded records. Due to the additional time needed for manual coding, the initially reported P&I percentages may be lower than percentages calculated from final data. Previous longer backlogs in manual coding have been resolved and death records are now coded within 10 days from receipt of a death record by NCHS.

    Region and state-specific data are available at http://gis.cdc.gov/grasp/fluview/mortality.html.
    INFLUENZA Virus Isolated
    View Regional and State Level Data | View Chart Data | View Full Screen | View PowerPoint Presentation
    Last edited by jward; 01-29-2018 at 09:40 PM. Reason: add cdc link

  8. #8
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    It is very bad here. People are staying home, not going shopping, not going to school, not going to church. My very nice neighbor a mile down the road died of pneumonia yesterday after being in the hospital for two weeks with the flu. Now, my next door neighbor and many others up and down the rural county road that we live on have the flu. Several of them have felt they were over it, only to get sick a second and a third time with a few days between bouts of illness. My daughter who lives about an hours drive from here said that the flu is thriving in her neighborhood.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sleeping Cobra View Post
    I wonder if that Black Plague hasn't hit the USA and we are not told about it.
    **SIGH**

    If you understood the Black Plague you would understand just how outre` that suggestion was.....

    Bubonic plague affects the lymph nodes (another part of the lymph system). Within 3 to 7 days of exposure to plague bacteria, you will develop flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache, chills, weakness, and swollen, tender lymph glands (called buboes—hence the name bubonic).
    Just a TAD hard to miss, and is actually fairly easily treated.

    We USUALLY have a couple dozen victims of Bubonic Plague and USUALLY only lose a few of them each year.....

    We actually pretty much automatically have a thread here at TB about the first 5 or 6 cases in Southern Colorado or environs.....
    Mookie War Creed
    "I am the Sword of my Family and Shield of my Nation. If sent, I will crush everything you have built, burn all that you love, and kill every one of you."
    Welcome to dar al harab -dar al kufre.


    Gentle reminder: It is entirely possible to think that generalizations are true and to judge each real live person you meet as an individual

  10. #10
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    Nasty Flu Season Prompts Experts to Push Immunity-Boosting Foods
    (Copyright DPC)
    By Mary Martin
    Monday, 29 Jan 2018
    www.newsmax.com/t/newsmax/article/840046/16

    This year’s flu season is the worst in nearly a decade, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Every state, but Hawaii, is experiencing widespread influenza outbreaks and one in 15 doctor visits last week were for flu symptoms.

    Hospitals, medical centers, and urgent-care facilities across the country are stretched thin because of the influx of flu patients, health officials report. Many are asking staff to work overtime, set up triage tents, restrict friends and family visits and canceling elective surgeries.

    “We are pretty much at capacity, and the volume is certainly different from previous flu seasons,” Dr. Alfred Tallia, professor and chair of family medicine at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical Center in New Brunswick, New Jersey, told Time magazine. “I’ve been in practice for 30 years, and it’s been a good 15 or 20 years since I’ve seen a flu-related illness scenario like we’ve had this year.”


    Even in a typical year, up to 20 percent of American are felled by the flu – which kills tens of thousands each winter – and the average adult suffers two to three colds.

    While CDC experts say it’s not too late for a flu shot to protect yourself, holistic medicine specialists say you may be able to find relief from winter viruses — or even prevent them — by turning to immune-boosting foods in your refrigerator and kitchen cabinets.

    At the same time, it’s worth taking a hard look at your diet to see what you may be eating that might actually be increasing your vulnerability to seasonal ailments.

    “It is more important to avoid immune-suppressing foods – pork, beef, dairy, and starches [wheat, corn, rice, potatoes],” Stanford Owen, certified by the American Board Of Internal Medicine, tells Newsmax Health.

    “The combination of animal fat plus starch produces toxic cytokine hormones [over 50 identified to date] by the abdominal fat cell, gut, and liver that impair immunity. I label these ‘red’ foods.”

    Owen adds that simple sugar is toxic to immunity and suggests avoiding soda, juice, milk, and sweet tea.

    “It’s the sugar load that’s toxic. Fiber in fruit and vegetables not only ‘hold’ the sugar to be released slowly, the fiber is digested by [good] bacteria in the gut to form many products that can boost immunity,” Owen adds.


    He says “juiced” products break down fruit and vegetable fiber and release the sugar which isn’t as healthful as an option.

    Owen says he personally takes a multivitamin, methyl folate and vitamin D daily to ensure his overall health.

    In addition, here are seven foods, herbs, and supplements that can boost your immunity this cold and flu season:

    Garlic: Thanks to its major active component allicin, garlic has both antimicrobial and antibacterial properties. Researchers have found that people taking garlic supplements have experienced fewer severe colds than those taking a placebo. Although a garlic supplement is beneficial, an actual garlic clove is even better because the active components are more bioavailable.


    Sweet potato: These tubers are a great source of beta-carotene, a form of vitamin A, which plays a key role in your overall health. Your body needs vitamin A in order to fight off infections.

    Cayenne pepper: Capsaicin, the active ingredient in cayenne pepper, thins the mucus in your nasal passages so you’re less congested. You can try the spice in soup or sprinkled on top of a main dish.

    Turmeric: This spice, used for centuries in Indian cuisine and curry dishes, is known for its natural anti-inflammatory properties. It is high in antioxidants and may relieve the body of toxins. A study published in the Italian Journal of Biochemistry found that turmeric aids in the production of bilirubin, which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity.

    Dark leafy greens: Spinach, kale, Swiss chard, arugula, and other greens are great sources of vitamin C and deliver a cold-fighting punch. Some research suggests increased vitamin C intake can reduce the duration of a cold. Try sautéing the greens with other healthy spices and foods like turmeric and garlic. A rule of thumb: the darker the green the higher the nutrient content.


    Wild salmon: Vitamin D is essential when it comes to fighting off colds and flu. Foods rich in vitamin D, like wild salmon, are great cold fighters. Research shows that those with adequate levels of vitamin D experience fewer respiratory tract infections than those who are deficient in the vitamin.

    Chicken soup: Turns out chicken soup really is nature’s penicillin. This age-old cold remedy can aid in recovery by soothing your throat and keeping you hydrated. Dr. Own says hot soup, like chicken noodle, can loosen mucus that’s causing congestion. When you cook chicken it releases the amino acid cysteine, which has been shown to positively impact lung function.

  11. #11
    The problem is, the flu us using strong immune systems to kill people! It's a real dilemma... is it possible to have such a strong immune system that you won't catch it? No one knows.

    I do think that Shane's suggestion of taking DiamondX supplement, and making sure your vitamin D and zinc levels are good is important. This is a dangerous flu strain, although it still doesn't seem to be as bad as 2009's H1N1.

    Summerthyme

  12. #12
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    No one talks about all the people who are sick with flu symptoms, but don't go to the doctor or don't get tested. They're not included in the numbers, but many likely have the flu.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by night driver View Post
    **SIGH**

    If you understood the Black Plague you would understand just how outre` that suggestion was.....



    Just a TAD hard to miss, and is actually fairly easily treated.

    We USUALLY have a couple dozen victims of Bubonic Plague and USUALLY only lose a few of them each year.....

    We actually pretty much automatically have a thread here at TB about the first 5 or 6 cases in Southern Colorado or environs.....
    night driver....
    I believe that they were proposing that maybe some of these cases are airborne PNEUMONIC PLAGUE, a not so outrageous thought except it would be impossible to keep it secret if it was true. The symptoms and quick mortality of Pneumonic Plague are VERY MUCH LIKE the symptoms of a particularly virulent FLU with incubation period, and other symptoms much the same as this virulent BIRD/SWINE FLU MIX.


    ALL THREE FORMS OF PLAGUE ARE THE EXACT SAME ( bacteria) GERM...What makes them so different in symptoms, progression and mortality is WHERE Plague first enters and develops in the body!!!

    Sepsis and Influenza - Sepsis Alliance
    https://www.sepsis.org/sepsis-and/influenza/
    Influenza, the flu, is a common, very infectious viral infection. ... People who are infected with an influenza virus may develop sepsis. ... Sepsis and septic shock can result from an infection anywhere in the body, such as pneumonia, influenza, or urinary tract infections.
    You who SEEK revenge,or JUSTICE for the wrongs, crimes and sins done to you, will find it in the same place that God is freely handing out Mercy, At the Cross, where Christ died taking the punishment not only for your sins, but also for the sins committed against you by others!

  14. #14
    Its a crazy threat......

    Because people are not taking the vaccine. Got to scare the pleabs.

    40,000 in a country of 320 million is just like no one.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Stanb999 View Post
    Its a crazy threat......

    Because people are not taking the vaccine. Got to scare the pleabs.

    40,000 in a country of 320 million is just like no one.
    Well, yes... unless it happens to be your 12 year old, or 18 year old, or healthy 70 year old parent who succumbs suddenly after a day or two.

    What was that saying we used around Y2k? "It's not the odds, it's the risk".. It's never a bad idea to take the risk I to account.

    Summerthyme

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bev View Post
    No one talks about all the people who are sick with flu symptoms, but don't go to the doctor or don't get tested. They're not included in the numbers, but many likely have the flu.
    Right, my husband and I never went to the doctor with ours this year. We were to sick to go into the Dr's office. It's really bad stuff

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    Well, yes... unless it happens to be your 12 year old, or 18 year old, or healthy 70 year old parent who succumbs suddenly after a day or two.

    What was that saying we used around Y2k? "It's not the odds, it's the risk".. It's never a bad idea to take the risk I to account.

    Summerthyme
    Its not tho, its the very old. As always.

    Cant you see its just propaganda? To get people to take the mercury.

  18. #18
    Stan... you haven't been paying attention. It IS killing the young and healthy... no, not in the 10s of thousands - than God- but in larger numbers than normal. And *if* this follows the pattern of 2009's H1N1 strain, we will continue to see death's of "young and (previously) healthy" people from subsequent cardiomyopathy. I truly was I'd been wrong in my prediction of that phenomena back then.

    Are they using the deaths as propaganda to try to push the vaccine? Sure... they always do. Is it working? Not that I can see... even the MSM has been mentioning the "poor match" and 10% effectiveness of this batch of vaccine.

    But if this strain has ANYwhere near the virulence of the 2009 H1N1 epidemic, there will be a lot more deaths. It certainly isn't something to take lightly.

    Summerthyme

  19. #19
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    7 family members in less than a week. Sick as dogs
    Granddaughter busted 104
    1/3 of my employee work force out
    That’s 75 people.
    One very recent retiree in the hospital on Thursday. Died Friday evening from complications of the flu

    Now I’ve seen a bunch of flu seasons and this one appears to b e very very bad

    Just received another text that an office worker has also passed

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by bev View Post
    No one talks about all the people who are sick with flu symptoms, but don't go to the doctor or don't get tested. They're not included in the numbers, but many likely have the flu.
    I think, but am not certain, that some effort is made to reflect those numbers, using population number, and number of reported cases, to extrapolate.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    The problem is, the flu us using strong immune systems to kill people! It's a real dilemma... is it possible to have such a strong immune system that you won't catch it? No one knows.

    I do think that Shane's suggestion of taking DiamondX supplement, and making sure your vitamin D and zinc levels are good is important. This is a dangerous flu strain, although it still doesn't seem to be as bad as 2009's H1N1.

    Summerthyme
    I am having a hard time knowing which approach is best. Do I pump the immune system and take a chance on a cytokine storm and then use curcumin and lomatium ? We are at a loss to know what to do. We are however avoiding all unecessary contact and wearing mask and gloves when we go out.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Littlesister View Post
    It is very bad here. People are staying home, not going shopping, not going to school, not going to church. My very nice neighbor a mile down the road died of pneumonia yesterday after being in the hospital for two weeks with the flu. Now, my next door neighbor and many others up and down the rural county road that we live on have the flu. Several of them have felt they were over it, only to get sick a second and a third time with a few days between bouts of illness. My daughter who lives about an hours drive from here said that the flu is thriving in her neighborhood.
    We are being hammered in our small town.

  23. #23
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    A few schools around me in Michigan actually shut down over flu. Apparently so many kids got it that the schools can't field enough kids to qualify as an instructional day. Not hearing a lot about deaths, but I know I've moved to stay in more. Which is a shame, because nice weekend weather out here is a rarity and we've had a couple fine weekends I wouldn't have minded going out for.

  24. #24
    The two big hospitals by us were diverting patients 3 weeks ago.... they were FULL of flu cases, and could no longer take any patients. I've not seen that before during flu season. Though I also grew up where you just stayed home and drank fluids and rested and waited it out when you had the flu....you didn't go to the hospital to get tested.

    I think it helped for the state to have had "snow" the wed after mlk jr day.....schools and businesses were closed on mon, wed, and alot were closed on thurs, too. It gave people a chance to stay at home and rest and hopefully get better before needing to be out and about much.

    I caught a milder version of the flu from dh's required flu shot. It was worse than a cold....but not as bad as the flu I've had in the past. I was just SO TIRED! Dh ended up sleeping for about 3 days, then he was fine....but he rarely gets sick.....so he processed his shot quickly. And since I got the flu from his shot....it's NOT the version sweeping thru everywhere.....so I could get that still. Lovely.

  25. #25
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    Isn't 44,000+ already tens of thousands?
    Happy is the Nation whose God is the Lord. -Psalm 33:12

  26. #26
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    Ref "Hospitals on Diversion"....

    Diversion is something that happens VERY often in my experience in my neck of the woods (1ce or twice a week on average). If their flack wants to paint it as "...because of the flu..." more power to him/her but that's more likely window dressing.

    You'll know it's bad when comments crop up about floors or wards being opened up, and staff being called in.
    Mookie War Creed
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    Gentle reminder: It is entirely possible to think that generalizations are true and to judge each real live person you meet as an individual

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amazed View Post
    Isn't 44,000+ already tens of thousands?
    Consider that an average year flu kills around 36,000....

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by night driver View Post
    Ref "Hospitals on Diversion"....

    Diversion is something that happens VERY often in my experience in my neck of the woods (1ce or twice a week on average). If their flack wants to paint it as "...because of the flu..." more power to him/her but that's more likely window dressing.

    You'll know it's bad when comments crop up about floors or wards being opened up, and staff being called in.
    We're fairly rural, even the "big" city is small....so diversions aren't normally posted on fb for all to see. It was weird for everyone around here that they did that, due to the flu. But you're right in that if it was truly terrible....they'd be calling people in for extra shifts. And while churches and schools have had smaller attendance in january....I still see normal crowds out and about in our daily goings and doings. My kids are homeschooled, so idk about the local schools....but their weekly co-op had about half the normal crowd last week. I also haven't been in church all month due to my own sickness and some traveling we've done this month....but others have mentioned that the attendance is low.

  29. #29
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    https://www.beckershospitalreview.co...-epidemic.html

    Clinical Leadership & Infection Control
    'Almost every patient in the hospital has the flu': How hospitals nationwide are coping with the influenza epidemic
    Written by Alyssa Rege | January 22, 2018 | Print | Email

    Hospitals in every state are responding to this year's flu epidemic in a plethora of ways, including setting up triage tents, canceling elective surgeries and restricting visitors, among other initiatives, Time reports.

    Here are seven things to know about the nationwide flu epidemic.

    1. Alabama declared a state of emergency Jan. 15 in response to the flu epidemic and in preparation for potential severe winter weather headed toward the state during the next few weeks.

    2. Hospitals in several states, such as California and Pennsylvania, have set up "surge tents" outside emergency departments to accommodate and treat influenza patients. A spokesperson for Allentown, Pa.-based Lehigh Valley Health Network told Time, "We've put [surge tents] into operation a couples times now over the last few days. I think Tuesday [Jan. 16] we saw upwards of about 40 people in the tent itself."

    3. SSM Health St. Clare Hospital-Fenton (Mo.) opened its emergency overflow wing, outpatient centers and surgical holding centers to make more beds available for flu patients, the report states. A nurse at the hospital told Time nurses across all floors are being recruited to help care for flu patients and have been offered an increased hourly rate to work above and beyond their normal schedules.

    "Almost every patient in the hospital has the flu, and it's making their pre-existing conditions worse," the nurse told Time. "Nurses are helping out by staying an extra four hours here and there or coming in early. The thing about nursing is it's a sister/brotherhood; we can't leave each other in distress."

    4. CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, MD, said Jan. 12 the epidemic appeared to be peaking, but that "it will take many more weeks for flu activity to truly slow down," according to the Time report.

    5. However, the recent government shutdown may affect the department's efforts. While the HHS' 2018 contingency staff plan stipulates the CDC will "continue minimal support to protect the health and well-being of U.S. citizens here and abroad," former CDC director Tom Frieden, MD, told STAT Jan. 17 the 2013 government shutdown posed a "challenging time" for him and his department.

    "[During the shut down] I felt I really couldn't do my job, as CDC director, of keeping Americans safe, because more than 8,500 of my staffers had been told to go home, and they do important things that protect Americans," Dr. Frieden told STAT. "It's unsafe, it's terrible for government, it endangers Americans, and it doesn't save any money. So it's a really bad thing to have happen."

    6. The CDC said Friday the shutdown would temporarily end the department's influenza program. However, in an interview with reporters Friday evening, a CDC official reneged on protocols outlined in the department's contigency plan, according to a second STAT report.

    "[The] CDC will specifically be continuing their ongoing influenza surveillance," the official told reporters. "They'll be collecting data reported by states, hospitals, [and] others and they'll be reporting that critical information needed for state and local health authorities."

    7. The CDC said at least 30 children have died from the flu, to date, this year, USA Today reports.

    Editor's note: This article was updated at 9:55 a.m. to include additional information.

    More articles on quality and infection control:
    HIMSS, Alliance for Nursing Informatics present leadership award to Dr. Catherine Ivory: 4 things to know
    Suspected norovirus outbreak sickens 100 at college in Michigan
    Childhood vaccination rates increase 12% in 6 years
    "In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by jward View Post
    I think, but am not certain, that some effort is made to reflect those numbers, using population number, and number of reported cases, to extrapolate.
    The numbers being reported in these flu "Morbidity Reports" are based on actual patients seen, not extrapolated. My question regarding this numbers game would be how many of the pneumonia patients and deaths attributed to pneumonia are the result of initial Flu infections with pneumonia being actually a secondary cause of death. The Cytokine Storm effects of the lungs filling up with fluid could easily be diagnosed as pneumonia.....which in a way it is....by technical definition.

    You could probably extrapolate non-flu involved pneumonia numbers based on average number of pneumonia patients see during non-flu season of the year.

    As to actual infected numbers..... it would probably be a pretty conservative guess-ta-mate that for every one patient seen or hospitalized, that there are at least two that are treated at home. Soooo triple the number of people diagnosed with actual Flu in clinics and hospitals and add conservatively a third to a half of the diagnosed pneumonia patients and that would probably give you a fairly accurate account of what is going on.

    So if we were to SWAG (Scientific Wild Assed Guess) the numbers we're talking a hellva lot of sick people out there!

    Bottom line is: PREVENTION - PREVENTION - PREVENTION!! Protect yourself by any and all means possible at ALL TIMES. Stay the heck away from any sick people. Now would be a good time to think about being anti-social and a hermit. Stay away from public places and people until this whole thing blows over.....not easily done.
    We have done so much, with so little, for so long....We can now do anything, with nothing, forever.

  31. #31
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    Jul 2001
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    Purdy area, Western WA
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    20

    Last church service I attended (about 3weeks ago ) at my small church which normally has 30-40 in attendence (50 on big holidays), I was shocked to see only about 18-20 there. I am also pretty startled at my OWN (totally out of character) NOT PANIC attitude at being essentially trapped in the house with my vehicle not working!

    Flu is rampant here and maybe I am supposed to be staying home? Since it has been pouring down rain every day, I have not been anxious to do any 12V work/troubleshooting on my van’s dead battery problem (although I have bought a new battery) and I was halted in buying the newer used car I had selected when It too, turned out to have an electrical problem and wouldn’t start! I have become surprisingly calm and accepting of the idea of staying home for a while longer. That is not my normal response to problems like this that pop up. I am prepped more than most and able to “hole up” and wait it out till it passes, having just got new 90 day prescriptions.

    My daughter (an ER Triage nurse/supervisor) is telling me horror stories of how bad the patients and hospitals have it trying to cope with the flood of contagious sick people to the point she said DON’T HAVE A HEART ATTACK OR CAR ACCIDENT NOW because normal ER and hospital care locally is so affected that hospitals all over the PNW area are urging/requiring people to postpone any ELECTIVE SURGERY, and are cracking down on visitors. Hospital Hallways are full of patients on gurneys or beds, not stuck there for hours, but for DAYS! I would rather be sick at home if I got sick, than stuck in a hospital hallway with minimal care, no bathroom, no tv or visitors, to distract me etc.

    Channel 13 local Seattle Fox NEWS just now put out the word from those managing local health care, that normal hospital and ER care in the whole area is becoming impacted and NOW people are NOT to go to the Emergency Room with flu symptoms unless they CALL FIRST and GET PERMISSION TO GO TO ER for flu symptoms!
    Last edited by ainitfunny; 01-30-2018 at 12:16 PM.
    You who SEEK revenge,or JUSTICE for the wrongs, crimes and sins done to you, will find it in the same place that God is freely handing out Mercy, At the Cross, where Christ died taking the punishment not only for your sins, but also for the sins committed against you by others!

  32. #32
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    I have never had more than 1 student per week out with the flu as I teach 49 private music lessons per week. January has averaged 2-3 out per week, and last week I was missing 7 students with the flu. -This is unprecedented.
    "Attention celebrities and entertainers:
    -No one cares what you say or demand. You are dancing monkeys regurgitating the propaganda of your cultural Marxist overlords."

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  33. #33
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    20

    It seems obvious that if flu gets any worse in the Pacific NW, in order to preserve some semblance of normal care for OTHER, normal health & ER services, that they are going to have to set up TEMPORARY, SEPARATE FLU TREATMENT “hospitals” or facilities!

    Otherwise you subject your heart attack, car and other accident, burn, surgical, cancer, dialysis, pregnant, and other patients to the ALMOST CERTAIN RISK of contracting a very virilent Flu on top of their present serious medical problem, by their just BEING in close proximity to such an overwhelming presence of so many KNOWN contagious patients, and staff trying to treat everybody!

    Going to the hospital with some OTHER health problem PUTS YOU ON THE VERY FRONT LINE at most risk, OF THE FLU BATTLE, “most likely to die” because you caught the flu “WITH OTHER, UNDERLYING HEALTH PROBLEMS”!! So, think twice about how badly you need to be getting hospitalized for something other than flu!
    Last edited by ainitfunny; 01-30-2018 at 12:44 PM.
    You who SEEK revenge,or JUSTICE for the wrongs, crimes and sins done to you, will find it in the same place that God is freely handing out Mercy, At the Cross, where Christ died taking the punishment not only for your sins, but also for the sins committed against you by others!

  34. #34
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    May 2004
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    Cincinnati
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    if you are sick enough to warrant a trip to the hospital, go to a GOOD one
    a family member is a respiratory therapist at a level one trauma hospital; they have an specific protocol for treatment that seems pretty extreme but it works...one you are not going to get in another Cinci hospital....

  35. #35
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    There are three strains going around, plus many ADULTS are also testing positive for the childhood (usually) RSV virus in addition to having the flu. RSV will often hospitalize children. Its rare for adults. Last night I saw 7 adults that tested positive for both.

    Like I said, in my 20 plus years of nursing I have never seen this much flu. Last week 5 major hospitals in my area were out of beds with a 10 hour wait time in a couple of ER’s.

    Met another nurse this weekend that said in his 40 years of nursing he has never seen this much flu. He is from a different part of the state.

    Boots on the ground reporting here. The shot was less than 10% effective.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by bassgirl View Post
    There are three strains going around, plus many ADULTS are also testing positive for the childhood (usually) RSV virus in addition to having the flu. RSV will often hospitalize children. Its rare for adults. Last night I saw 7 adults that tested positive for both.

    Like I said, in my 20 plus years of nursing I have never seen this much flu. Last week 5 major hospitals in my area were out of beds with a 10 hour wait time in a couple of ER’s.

    Met another nurse this weekend that said in his 40 years of nursing he has never seen this much flu. He is from a different part of the state.

    Boots on the ground reporting here. The shot was less than 10% effective.
    Yep, the virus has mutated from the strain in the shots.

    ****snip****
    H3N2 is also a particularly nasty strain, Fauci said. “We’re seeing now that the vast majority of the strains that are early-circulating now right now in the United States…are this H3N2, which historically is always the worse influenza, for example, than an H1N1,” Fauci said. To put it into perspective, back when H1N1 was making headlines as swine flu in 2009, it infected just over 51,000 folks in Australia. This year, H3N2 sickened over 215,000 Australians.
    ****snip****
    https://qz.com/1143420/the-2017-2018...ve-than-usual/
    “The quieter you become, the more you can hear.”
    ― Ram Dass

  37. #37
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    Jul 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    The problem is, the flu us using strong immune systems to kill people! It's a real dilemma... is it possible to have such a strong immune system that you won't catch it? No one knows.

    I do think that Shane's suggestion of taking DiamondX supplement, and making sure your vitamin D and zinc levels are good is important. This is a dangerous flu strain, although it still doesn't seem to be as bad as 2009's H1N1.

    Summerthyme
    Through out the year 5,000 daily of vitamin D-3, 2000 Vitamin C I was taking Zinc and ran out last year and have forgotten to replenish it thanks I will do that today. And before flu season begins, in Oct we all take elderberry syrup until after the season ends in the spring. I limit my contact with people to just family, if I go to Wal-mart win-co or somewhere to shop I wipe the carts down. If my sons friends start coughing or are snotting and we catch it, he stays home instead of playing until they are done. Nothing pisses me of more than going out to a meeting and people hacking and coughing their heads off.
    I am in competition with no one. I have no desire to play the game of being better than anyone. I am simply trying harder to be a better person than I was yesterday.
    TRUTH

  38. #38
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    Jul 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stanb999 View Post
    Its a crazy threat......

    Because people are not taking the vaccine. Got to scare the pleabs.

    40,000 in a country of 320 million is just like no one.

    How many Stan have taken the vaccine and gotten the flu anyway Stan.
    I am in competition with no one. I have no desire to play the game of being better than anyone. I am simply trying harder to be a better person than I was yesterday.
    TRUTH

  39. #39
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    Mar 2003
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    2,539
    Not only that, but people may die from the flu and it is not reported because they actually died from something else. My Dad recently died from congestive heart failure and he got the Flu and Pneumonia and went into ICU. He was there for 2 weeks before he died. In reality, his congestive failure was ok, but the FLU just wore him down even more.

  40. #40
    This article is from Medscape:
    Lab-Confirmed Flu Virus Linked to Imminent Risk for Acute MI

    (acute MI is a heart attack)

    Steve Stiles
    January 25, 2018


    BOSTON — Patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza were about six times as likely to be admitted for acute MI in the following 7 days compared with the period comprising the prior and subsequent years, results of a cohort study show.[1]

    The risk was especially pronounced in older patients and was independent of flu vaccination status or history of MI hospitalization. There was also a signal that other forms of respiratory infection can similarly raise the risk for MI admission.

    The findings are consistent with a lot of prior research, acknowledged Dr Jeffrey C Kwong (University of Toronto, ON), but much of it associated MI with acute respiratory infections by undetermined pathogens, or with other indirect indicators of flu.

    "This is the first one where we used lab-confirmed influenza as the exposure, and we found this association that was quite strong between influenza and MI," he told theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology.
    Kwong is lead author on the study, which was based on Ontario health insurance records of people tested for respiratory viruses from May 2009 to May 2014 and was published January 24 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

    The results are "no surprise," agreed Dr Scott David Solomon (Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA), who wasn't involved in the study. But, he added, "What's novel here, and improves on prior knowledge, is that it goes down to the individual-patient level, and says that when somebody actually has confirmed influenza, that they are more likely to have an MI."

    Kwong and his colleagues state that the increased MI risk regardless of vaccination status should not be seen as evidence that influenza vaccinations are ineffective; the study wasn't designed to explore that issue. It does suggest, however, "that if vaccinated patients have influenza of sufficient severity to warrant testing, their risk of acute myocardial infarction is increased to a level that is similar to that among unvaccinated patients."

    The study seems to strengthen familiar public health messages about getting flu vaccinations and taking measures to prevent the spread of respiratory viruses, especially for patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Despite such messages, vaccination rates may be low even in such high-risk groups.

    Solomon pointed to a recent analysis based on patients with heart failure in the PARADIGM-HF trial that saw only about a 53% rate of vaccination for influenza in North America.[2]
    "And that was surprising because these were people who are clearly at risk, and would clearly benefit from vaccination," he said.

    Even when the effectiveness of the season's flu vaccination has been questioned, such as the current flu season, "getting some protection is better than getting no protection," Kwong said.

    Secondary prevention patients with heart disease "don't question taking aspirin, they don't question taking β-blockers, they don't question taking blood pressure medications or statins. But a lot of patients question the value of getting a flu shot," he said.

    "If you compare the effectiveness of influenza vaccination in preventing infection to statins in preventing MI, they shouldn't be having second thoughts about getting a flu shot."
    Seven-Day Risk Interval

    The analysis looked at 364 hospitalizations for acute MI in 332 patients that occurred within 1 year before and 1 year after laboratory confirmation of influenza; 48% in were women and 24% of the patients had been previously hospitalized for MI.

    Of the 364 hospitalizations, 20 occurred during the first 7 days after the collection of a positive respiratory specimen, termed the "risk interval." The remaining 344 hospitalizations occurred during the 2-year period made up of the year before and the year after the risk interval, termed the "control interval."

    The risk for MI hospitalization was increased sixfold during the risk interval compared with the control interval. Kwong said the group had expected the risk to fall off gradually, "but we actually saw that it just dropped down to nothing right after the first week. It's really that first week where the risk is concentrated."

    Table 1. Incidence Ratios for Acute MI Hospitalization by Time After Laboratory Confirmation of Influenza

    Interval Incidence Ratio (95% CI)
    Days 1–7 6.05 (3.86–9.50)
    Days 1–3 6.30 (3.25–12.22)
    Days 4–7 5.78 (3.17–10.53)
    Days 8–14 0.60 (0.15–2.41)
    Days 15–28 0.75 (0.31–1.81)

    The group also observed increased MI hospitalization risk associated with respiratory samples positive for viruses other than influenza. The implication may be that respiratory infections per se, not simply influenza, are associated with acute MI, according to Kwong.

    "I think we just found that influenza risk seemed to be higher than that of the other respiratory viruses."

    Risk associated with influenza B was higher than with influenza A; Kwong said his group doesn't have an explanation for the difference.

    Table 2. Incidence Ratios for Acute MI Hospitalization by Specific Infections


    Infection Incidence Ratio (95% CI)
    Influenza A 5.17 (3.02–8.84)
    Influenza B 10.11 (4.37–23.38)
    RSV 3.51 (1.11–11.12)
    Noninfluenza virus, non-RSV 2.77 (1.23–6.24)
    Illness, no respiratory virus identified a 3.30 (1.90–5.73)

    RSV = respiratory syncytial virus.
    aFrom among influenza A, influenza B, RSV, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, human metapneumovirus, coronavirus, or enterovirus.

    Respiratory infections could trigger MI by any of several possible mechanisms, Kwong and Solomon observed.

    Influenza elevates an array of proinflammatory cytokines that can lead to endothelial dysfunction, and possibly plaque rupture, but whether that's the primary mechanism "is really just a postulate. We don't know for sure that's what is contributing," Solomon said.

    People with the flu also have increased oxygen demand, which might produce myocardial ischemia in someone with significant coronary lesions, he observed. Platelet activation is also increased.

    "If the flu can trigger these events in people who are at risk, then it behooves us to do everything we can to minimize the risk associated with influenza," Solomon said. "Obviously that means vaccination. And we are currently testing a strategy that might provide even better immunity in patients who are at risk."

    Solomon is a principal investigator for the ongoing Influenza Vaccine to Effectively Stop Cardiothoracic Events and Decompensated Heart Failure (INVESTED) trial, which has randomly assigned about 3000 of an estimated target of 9300 patients, he said.

    INVESTED is comparing a high-dose trivalent influenza vaccine to a quadrivalent vaccine at a standard dose in patients with a recent history of hospitalization for MI or heart failure and other high-risk features. Mortality and cardiopulmonary hospitalization are the primary endpoints.

    Kwong and Solomon have disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Potential conflicts for the other authors are at nejm.org..

    The charts probably will be better at the original link. If you need to sign up to view, say you're a "student" or "other medical professional", and you'll be fine. WELL worth signing up for, IMHO, as they have solid info that you often won't see in other places.

    https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle...=1546694&faf=1

    Summerthyme

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