Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 24, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


Seed Anybody up for a seed exchange?
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    12,655

    Anybody up for a seed exchange?

    I have been saving seed for close to 20 years now and I know I have quite a collection. (and no their not 20 year old seed..haha) I have to go through them all once again to get somewhat organized and see if I'm low on anything so I can place an order but I was thinking maybe we could do an exchange as well. I'm not ready to offer yet but will get on this if there's an interest.

    Anyone?
    "Let your food be your medicine, and your medicine be your food." Hippocrates

    Who is Q?

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Vicki View Post
    I have been saving seed for close to 20 years now and I know I have quite a collection. (and no their not 20 year old seed..haha) I have to go through them all once again to get somewhat organized and see if I'm low on anything so I can place an order but I was thinking maybe we could do an exchange as well. I'm not ready to offer yet but will get on this if there's an interest.

    Anyone?


    just ordered seed for redwood creeping wintergreen - looks like it's going to be an interesting seed germination - requires refrigeration for up to 3 months ....
    Illini Warrior

  3. #3
    I'd love to trade for some seeds from the northern part of the country, but I haven't actively gardened for three years and I don't have anything to trade with. And I'm sure you wouldn't care to trade for seeds grown in my Arkansas climate.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    west central Ohio
    Posts
    229
    Come late summer I will have extra egyptian walking onion bulbs to share. My husband has been throwing the extras away, much to my dismay. Would love to share them.

  5. #5
    Walking onions are perfect if you don't want to ever be without onions! I love mine and it's good to know that they do well in a colder climate.

    I've found out something when I use mine. A little goes a long way. They can be really strong! They'd sure zing up a boring diet of beans and rice!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    west central Ohio
    Posts
    229
    I have given walking onion sets to families in the farthest north counties of North Dakota. They are doing quite well in the sheltered from the wind garden spaces. I am not sure if they mulch them over the winter months but I would assume that they do. You are sure right Martinhouse, a little goes a long way. I use them dried and fresh, mainly while cooking. In the spring the planted in the fall bulbs make excellent early green onions.

    I cannot seem to grow any other onions in our (40 years of amended) heavy clay soil, so these are perfect for us.

    And Vicki, I'm game for a seed exchange. I am not sure what I have, will have to take a look. Thanks for the idea.
    Last edited by GrewUpErie; 01-26-2018 at 09:51 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    12,655
    Quote Originally Posted by Illini Warrior View Post
    just ordered seed for redwood creeping wintergreen - looks like it's going to be an interesting seed germination - requires refrigeration for up to 3 months ....
    That's interesting. I have a friend who has wintergreen carpeting the northwest side of a hill on her waterfront property. She was always going to dig me up some but never did. I'm thinking it probably wouldn't grow on my land very well. Good luck with it.
    "Let your food be your medicine, and your medicine be your food." Hippocrates

    Who is Q?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    12,655
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    I'm sure you wouldn't care to trade for seeds grown in my Arkansas climate.
    You made me think on that for a bit. The first thought that came to mind was our forefathers brought seed from across the pond. I don't think it would matter on the seeds that much. The plants will adjust. I have a greenhouse so I believe I can extend the growing season in it quite a bit. Of course soil and temperature can vary greatly. Hope you get back gardening in some way. Thanks!
    "Let your food be your medicine, and your medicine be your food." Hippocrates

    Who is Q?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    12,655
    Quote Originally Posted by GrewUpErie View Post
    Come late summer I will have extra egyptian walking onion bulbs to share. My husband has been throwing the extras away, much to my dismay. Would love to share them.
    Thanks GUE. That's really nice. I have patches of chives everywhere. I have patches of all kinds of things so I'll do an inventory soon.
    "Let your food be your medicine, and your medicine be your food." Hippocrates

    Who is Q?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    12,655
    Quote Originally Posted by GrewUpErie View Post

    And Vicki, I'm game for a seed exchange. I am not sure what I have, will have to take a look. Thanks for the idea.
    Awesome! My MIL used to have so many plants that she started separating and giving them away or selling them for very little. Her gardens grew and grew. lol They loved what she did and she was such an inspiration to me. She was doing what she loved and making a little bit of money by sharing what she didn't need. She was blessed for it. What a concept! Oh I can't wait til spring!
    "Let your food be your medicine, and your medicine be your food." Hippocrates

    Who is Q?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    west central Ohio
    Posts
    229
    Quote Originally Posted by Vicki View Post
    Awesome! My MIL used to have so many plants that she started separating and giving them away or selling them for very little. Her gardens grew and grew. lol They loved what she did and she was such an inspiration to me. She was doing what she loved and making a little bit of money by sharing what she didn't need. She was blessed for it. What a concept! Oh I can't wait til spring!
    Vicki, your MIL sounds like a wonderful person who has blessed many people with her kindness and generosity. I was blessed by such a woman, she shared her perennials with me and I think of her often. Almost all of the flowers planted here at my home are from starts that she gave to me. I am so thankful for her kindness and try to pass it on, giving starts to people as I have extras. I too am looking forward to spring.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Vicki View Post
    That's interesting. I have a friend who has wintergreen carpeting the northwest side of a hill on her waterfront property. She was always going to dig me up some but never did. I'm thinking it probably wouldn't grow on my land very well. Good luck with it.

    actually your area should be good - might have to enrich your soil initially and then a good overspread of compost every year .... I'm on the far west edge of the USA recommended growing area - I'm giving it a try because of the deep shade growing possibilities .... I wish I could afford the cuttings approach - but a small sample is $7 each
    Illini Warrior

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    12,655
    Quote Originally Posted by GrewUpErie View Post
    Vicki, your MIL sounds like a wonderful person who has blessed many people with her kindness and generosity. I was blessed by such a woman, she shared her perennials with me and I think of her often. Almost all of the flowers planted here at my home are from starts that she gave to me. I am so thankful for her kindness and try to pass it on, giving starts to people as I have extras. I too am looking forward to spring.
    That's wonderful GUE. Thank God for those who inspired us like that.

    Well I managed to reorganize my seed tub but have yet to go through it all. I already know I have more then an abundance of sunflower, squash's and beans. I'm sure there's more then enough of many other varieties as well but it's a big job and I haven't had the time to tackle it further. Please be patient, I will get this done.
    "Let your food be your medicine, and your medicine be your food." Hippocrates

    Who is Q?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    12,655
    Quote Originally Posted by Illini Warrior View Post
    actually your area should be good - might have to enrich your soil initially and then a good overspread of compost every year .... I'm on the far west edge of the USA recommended growing area - I'm giving it a try because of the deep shade growing possibilities .... I wish I could afford the cuttings approach - but a small sample is $7 each
    You made me think of a list I gathered a few years back. It's a long list but I'll post it here for those interested.

    Light, temperature and planting chart

    Light requirements: High—6-8 hours of sunlight; Medium—4-6 hours; Low—4 hours

    Temperature: Warm—(around 15C) needs warm soil and air temperatures; doesn’t tolerate frost; Cool—will grow in cooler temperatures; may survive a light frost

    Planting: Seeds—best planted as seeds; Seedlings—best planted as seedlings


    Beans
    Light: High
    Temp.: Warm
    Planting: Seeds or seedlings
    Tips: For a continuous crop of bush beans, sow every 2 to 3 weeks throughout midsummer

    Beets
    Light: Medium
    Temp.: Cool
    Planting: Seeds
    Tips: Keep well watered to prevent scab

    Broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and kale
    Light: Medium
    Temp.: Cool
    Planting: Seedlings
    Tips: Grow in 22-litre containers. Spray with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) or use a row cover to prevent insect damage

    Carrots
    Light: Medium
    Temp.: Cool
    Planting: Seeds
    Tips: For shallow containers, choose varieties with small, ball-shaped roots

    Cucumbers and melons
    Light: High
    Temp.: Warm
    Planting: Seeds or seedlings
    Tips: Three cucumber or 2 melon vines will grow well in a 90-litre garbage pail. Both need their flowers pollinated by bees; otherwise hand-pollinate with a paintbrush in the morning

    Eggplant and peppers
    Light: High
    Temp.: Warm
    Planting: Seedlings
    Tips: Don’t plant outside until weather and soil are warm; otherwise growth and fruiting will be set back

    Leeks
    Light: Medium
    Temp.: Cool
    Planting: Start seeds 10-12 weeks before last spring frost date
    Tips: Use containers at least 45 cm deep. Fill with 20 cm of soil; plant seedlings. As they grow, top up containers with soil to keep stems blanched

    Lettuce
    Light: Low
    Temp.: Cool
    Planting: Seeds or seedlings
    Tips: In hot weather, does best with morning sun and afternoon shade

    Onion
    Light: Medium
    Temp.: Cool
    Planting: Seeds or sets
    Tips: Keep well watered to prevent small, pungent bulbs

    Asian greens
    Light: Low
    Temp.: Cool
    Planting: Seeds or seedlings
    Tips: Follow package instructions for when to plant each specific type and how to avoid problems with bolting

    Peas
    Light: Medium
    Temp.: Cool
    Planting: Seeds
    Tips: For autumn crop, sow 2 months before first fall frost

    Potatoes
    Light: Medium
    Temp.: Warm
    Planting: Tubers
    Tips: Containers should be at least 45 cm deep. Keep well watered to avoid scab

    Radishes
    Light: Medium
    Temp.: Cool
    Planting: Seedlings
    Tips: Small, round radishes can be grown in a container as shallow as a shoebox; best grown in spring and fall

    Spinach
    Light: Low
    Temp.: Cool
    Planting: Seeds
    Tips: Best grown in spring and fall; will bolt to seed in summer

    Squash
    Light: High
    Temp.: Warm
    Planting: Seeds or seedlings
    Tips: Best grown in a 90-litre garbage pail. Flowers must be pollinated by bees or hand-pollinated in the morning

    Swiss chard
    Light: Low
    Temp.: Cool
    Planting: Seeds or seedlings
    Tips: Water well to keep from bolting to seed

    Tomatoes
    Light: High
    Temp.: Warm
    Planting: Seedlings
    Tips: For large varieties, use 22-litre containers; fill with soil to within 7.5 to 10 cm of top. Plant seedling slightly deeper than it was growing. As seedling grows, remove lower leaves and add more soil



    Which plants will put up with lower light levels?

    A general rule is that plants grown for their stems, leaves or buds generally tolerate light shade fairly well. Those grown for roots or fruits tend to need more sun.

    That said, even many of these crops will also tolerate light shade, simply providing smaller yields. These are noted on the list with an asterisk (*).

    The following crops will grow with as little as three to six hours of sun per day, or constant dappled shade. While size or yields may be affected in some instances, taste will be just as good.

    Lettuce
    Arugula
    Spinach
    Broccoli *
    Green onions
    Cabbage *
    Parsley
    Sorrel
    Garlic
    Mint
    Collards
    Endive
    Cress
    Cauliflower *
    Peas *
    Currants
    Pak Choy
    Beets *
    Kohlrabi *
    Brussels Sprouts
    Mustard greens
    Thyme
    Coriander
    Tarragon
    Radishes
    Cardamom
    Potatoes *
    Rhubarb *
    Swiss Chard
    Kale
    Turnips *
    Carrots *
    Sweet potatoes and yams *
    Gooseberries
    Cilantro
    Dill
    Lemon Balm
    Strawberries *
    Beans *
    Blackberries and raspberries *
    "Let your food be your medicine, and your medicine be your food." Hippocrates

    Who is Q?

  15. #15
    I used to have a huge seed collection, but they are now several year's old. Gardening in NM turned out (for me) turned out to be much more difficult than gardening in IA. Going to try to do a better job of that this summer.

    Maybe I'll have fresh stuff to swap next year.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    12,655
    I can't imagine gardening in the desert Faroe. I went to Southern California years ago and was asked to help someone with starting a garden where they lived. I said sure until I saw the soil. I told them I was very sorry but I didn't think anything would sprout in that soil. It was sandy dirt and dry as a bone. Not a great spot for a garden. Dang..
    "Let your food be your medicine, and your medicine be your food." Hippocrates

    Who is Q?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.