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The Grand Solar Minimum
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  1. #3161
    You need to give yourself at least 15 minutes after sun exposure (an hour is better) before washing skin oils off with soap, if you want the benefit of the Vitamin D. We don't have chiggers here, but do you need to use soap to get rid of them? If you could just do a quick rinse to get rid of them, you could take your full "clean up" bath or shower later. Or at least only use soap on the body parts with chigger problems, if that's necessary.

    Summerthyme

  2. #3162
    Summerthyme, I probably get plenty of Vitamin D in the summer, provided the weather is warm enough to be somewhat uncovered, which for me is probably too warm for most others. In the winter there would be no problem with chiggers, of course. Plus I'm one of the lucky ones who only itch from a chigger bite for two days rather than for two weeks. And the "floor" of my bigger container garden is covered with old black truck tarps so there are no chiggers while tending that garden. (No weeds, either!)

    It's winter sun that I'll be watching for. I thought I'd see some in the last hour here, but it didn't happen. I do have my lawn chair in it's new place right by that door, though, and this afternoon I'll be gathering up something to work on while sitting in the sun. Maybe a little basket with some yarn and needles or a hook. If I could wear dentures, it might be a little basket of pecans to crack. If I were the girly type, I could polish my fingernails. (Yuck!) Oh! An idea just struck. It could be a little basket of socks that need darning!!!!!

    I wonder if I'd get any D at all from sun coming through thin clouds? We seem to be getting a lot of days now where it might get as warm as 60, but it stays cloudy. This might be good to know if it is cloudy all summer.

  3. #3163
    I just had another thought after rereading this morning's posts on this thread. Faroe mentioned that bulbs purchased for certain types of light tend to lose that ability as they get older. Did I understand that correctly?

    And if so, maybe we need to find out if this would also be true of those expensive new types of special grow lights being recommended these days for indoor gardening? If that's the case, I wouldn't want to be spending all that time and money on them. Better to set up from the start for more basic methods of growing our food, especially if one doesn't yet have all the long-lasting tools which are needed for doing things the old-fashioned way.

    Faroe, I'm really glad you brought up the matter of the "life span" of special types of bulbs.

  4. #3164
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    I just had another thought after rereading this morning's posts on this thread. Faroe mentioned that bulbs purchased for certain types of light tend to lose that ability as they get older. Did I understand that correctly?

    And if so, maybe we need to find out if this would also be true of those expensive new types of special grow lights being recommended these days for indoor gardening? If that's the case, I wouldn't want to be spending all that time and money on them. Better to set up from the start for more basic methods of growing our food, especially if one doesn't yet have all the long-lasting tools which are needed for doing things the old-fashioned way.

    Faroe, I'm really glad you brought up the matter of the "life span" of special types of bulbs.
    Correct, the lights do degrade in quality of spectrum over time, while remaining bright to our eyesight. We don't see all of the spectrum. This is less of a problem for plants. I am NOT an expert on lighting, and am rusty on what I have learned in the past. Also, the grow light industry has been changing fast with new developments over the last several years. IIRC, T-8 florescent were the standard, now, per memory, my newest and supposedly best are t-5 (? they are thinner, and require a specific fixture). I also have some LED's for the plants. (compact florescent coil bulbs are probably NOT The best for growing, but, again there might be new improvements on the market - nevertheless they have a bad reputation with reptile keepers, despite aggressive marketing.) My planted vivs have thrived for 3 (?) years under the same LED's (jungle Dawn brand), and these are efficient, but I like the horizontal span to the newer tubes better ("what's old is new again"?). LED's are very energy efficient as grow lights. Amazon sells inexpensive LED's for plant growing, and aquarists have recently adopted them in place of the older options (avoid the cheapest Chinese LED brands). An old style florescent can light the fish, but plants/corals at the bottom of a deeper tank can require more light than that - again, not an expert. I only raise goldfish and philodendron and floating plants in my indoor fish tank lighted with an old Jungle Dawn LED.

    Short answer: At this point in time, grow lights for your greens and seedlings don't have to be expensive to purchase or run. Numerous good options available. Until your lights visibly dim, or your plants start looking poor, what ever light you are running close above them should be ok for a long time.

  5. #3165
    Faroe, thanks for posting so much about lighting. All helpful for making decisions!

  6. #3166
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Faroe, thanks for posting so much about lighting. All helpful for making decisions!
    You are welcome.
    I miss all that. I still maintain my vivs, but am not planning/building new ones. The coming hardships make me reluctant to take on any more animal commitments. I cut off all contact with the avian, fish, and snake forums that I used to post on. I no longer even read, and that goes for all the other fascinating websites devoted to aquariums, assorted amphibians, bugs, lizards, etc. It's an amazing world out there.

  7. #3167
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    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out today:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sCpuljOgses

    (MIAC #180) Reasons Why China Will Collapse During the Eddy Grand Solar Minimum

    Run time is 24:44

  8. #3168
    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    Zero Hedge has posted what seems to be a relevant and very important article. I believe it's saying that NASA has blocked info that actually states we could be heading into an ice age.

    Please note that my old computer, slow satellite connection, and lack of skill will mess up any attempt at my bringing in the entire article with pictures and video. von Koehler always came to my rescue and was so efficiently able to do that. Please access the link to see the entire article.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-...ll-nasa-hiding

    Climate Change Religion And Related Cover-Ups: What The Hell Is NASA Hiding?

    Here is one piece of that article:

    "The above image is difficult to read as presented, but I enlarged the image many times to make the transcript below.

    The words are all legible. Here is a partial transcript starting with the opening paragraph, with all pertinent views from both sides captured fully. Emphasis is mine.


    The Sun is the primary forcing of the Earth's climate system. ... In short, the Sun drives almost every aspect of our world's climate system and makes possible life as we know it.

    Earth's orbit around and orientation toward the Sun change over spans of many thousands of years. In turn, these changing "orbital mechanics" force climate to change because they change where and how much sunlight reaches Earth. (Please see for more details). [Mish Comment: Unfortunately we can't.]

    Thus, changing Earth's exposure forces climate to change. According to scientists' models of Earth's orbit and orientation towards the sun indicate that our world should just be beginning to enter a new period of cooling - perhaps the next ice age.The above image is difficult to read as presented, but I enlarged the image many times to make the transcript below.

    The words are all legible. Here is a partial transcript starting with the opening paragraph, with all pertinent views from both sides captured fully. Emphasis is mine.


    The Sun is the primary forcing of the Earth's climate system. ... In short, the Sun drives almost every aspect of our world's climate system and makes possible life as we know it.

    Earth's orbit around and orientation toward the Sun change over spans of many thousands of years. In turn, these changing "orbital mechanics" force climate to change because they change where and how much sunlight reaches Earth. (Please see for more details). [Mish Comment: Unfortunately we can't.]

    Thus, changing Earth's exposure forces climate to change. According to scientists' models of Earth's orbit and orientation towards the sun indicate that our world should just be beginning to enter a new period of cooling - perhaps the next ice age."







    There is a reason they are called Never A Straight Answer. I see nothing has changed. Let the death and destruction be on their heads then- their choice. Turds.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

  9. #3169
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    It's misting out and dark, dreary, and cold today, so I've spent some time researching Texas and the Ice Age just to see how much information was out there about how the state faired during the last big freeze. Actually, it was pretty darn interesting. The Gulf of Mexico was half the size it is now.

    If you plan on staying where you are during the GSM (or worse), it might be worthwhile to research your state's history during the last minimum and Ice Age.

  10. #3170
    TxGal, that's interesting! I'm assuming, if the Gulf of Mexico was so much smaller, that you are talking about a fully glaciated ice age, not just a grand solar minimum.

    It's chilly and dark here, too, although thankfully there's no mist or drizzle. And my house just won't warm up without any sun for days and days. I really do need to start working on the warmer clothing that I've made provisions for, yarn, fabrics, etc.

    Sometimes I wish those podcasts lasted three or four hours. Now THAT would REALLY give me something to listen to while I got a good amount of knitting done!

    I'd go back a couple of years or more and listen to lots of McCanney archives, but I got so tired of him spending so much of his hour bellyaching about how everyone stole his work, that I just stopped listening.

  11. #3171
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    Yes, that went back to the glacial period, when the upper half central and northern US was a glacier. Interesting, that there were forests in what is now the Gulf; Florida also had that, and there are what scientists say are drag marks off the coast of Florida that were from the glaciers moving south. I guess all is not lost for Texas if it gets really bad.

    I thought I heard David DuByne say that Australia would not be exporting wheat this year in that last podcast. I'll have to go back and re-listen.

    von Koehler, if you're checking in periodically, please come back :-)

  12. #3172
    Yes, I think he did say that about Australian wheat. This, if nothing else, should tell us it's is really here, if we still had any doubts.

    I also heard or read somewhere in the last couple of days that Russia is actively debating whether or not they will be exporting any wheat from the coming harvest.

    I am absolutely going to find a way to plant enough wheat to give greens to the rabbits through the winter and into spring and then let enough head out so I can replant every year. This wouldn't be the only thing I'd be giving them, but it's easy to grow and I bet I'd be able to cut some all winter from a couple containers of it in the greenhouse. I wonder if the spouting seeds from the health food store are the winter wheat? I really can not buy a whole 50# sack of wheat just to plant a handful for the chickens and rabbits!

    Did you know that the sorghum seeds in wild bird seed mix will grow dandy plants with nice big heads full of seeds? I wonder what other seeds in that stuff would give me useful plants?
    -----
    A few more of my cut kale tops are starting to root. I doubt they will make full-sized plants, so I may start planting them in some smaller flower pots, one to a pot. I do like having them year round for the rabbits. The garden centers here still have nothing in them here. I really do need to call the feed store and ask about potatoes and onions and if they've set out their cold-weather seeds yet.

    Ditto to von Koehler.

    Just called the feed store. They have their seed potatoes and onions and have set out all their cold weather seeds left from last year, which I have no problem with. They expect the Bonnie Plants truck early this coming week. Yayyy!
    Last edited by Martinhouse; Yesterday at 06:24 PM.

  13. #3173
    Yes, I heard about the Russian consideration of cancelling wheat exports. Not sure what happens in the commodities mkt when futures contracts are not delivered on. Do the contract holders just get bought out? I also heard 500,000 beef cattle were killed in AU flooding. (Rex, of Leak project - not sure, he can be a bit sensationalist.) The biggest news to me, was Chinese pork...they are killing ALL the pigs due to fatal disease??? - again IIRC Rex, so am looking for independent verification.

    Enough for now - broken main key board. The mug of coffee that spilled all over everything this morning probably is to blame. Maybe the key board will dry out. This lap top one is impossible!

  14. #3174
    Vitamin D3 is what’s needed for those who don’t or can’t spend an hour outside in the sunlight daily.

    Single pane glass isn’t much of an impediment, but once you get into double or triple paned glass, and especially tinted glass, the amount of D3 that reaches you is woefully insufficient. The increasing cloud cover is going to necessitate a higher dose than one would normally need. D3 is best absorbed when taken with a sublingual B12 supplement, which is also necessary on a daily basis now.

    Of course, the cosmic rays now striking the Earth, due to the weakened (almost nonexistent) magnetosphere, need to be dealt with in a more aggressive manner. We can’t escape them altogether, but hats, gloves, long sleeves, and either long skirts, dresses, or blue jeans will be the ‘New Normal’ from now on, as will a good pair of sunglasses with the highest UV protection available.

    Hope this helps.

    Sláinte!


    Kathy.
    Chasing rainbows across an empty sky
    The sun is fading before our very eyes
    See the darkness as it creeps up from behind
    We can no longer say we’re blind.

  15. #3175
    My sister and I have always covered up against the sun. Our mom was a redhead and while neither of us is, we have that awful freckled red-head skin, me worse than my sister.

    My farmer tan, which is really not very tan, starts at my wrists because I hate wearing gloves. My sister wears gloves all the time when she works outside, and sunglasses because she has the beginnings of glaucoma. And we have both learned that one can get sunburned right through a thin T-shirt.

    If China starts pushing its people to eat chicken instead of pork, I wonder what that will do the price of it here in the U.S.? Especially if places like Tyson decide more money is to be made selling it to China than to us?

  16. #3176
    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    Yes, I heard about the Russian consideration of cancelling wheat exports. Not sure what happens in the commodities mkt when futures contracts are not delivered on. Do the contract holders just get bought out? I also heard 500,000 beef cattle were killed in AU flooding. (Rex, of Leak project - not sure, he can be a bit sensationalist.) The biggest news to me, was Chinese pork...they are killing ALL the pigs due to fatal disease??? - again IIRC Rex, so am looking for independent verification.

    Enough for now - broken main key board. The mug of coffee that spilled all over everything this morning probably is to blame. Maybe the key board will dry out. This lap top one is impossible!
    Faroe, get to the office supply and buy a wireless keyboard by Logitech. Mine is old, but is model K360. You will need batteries to run it. I use rechargeable but carbons are fine. When you lift the lid on the box, you will see a little USB device to plug into one of the USB ports on the laptop. This communicates with the laptop and runs the keyboard.

    My laptop has a huge monitor but the keyboard is like typing on a board. No spring to the keys at all. I feel your pain. You may be able to test the wireless keyboards to see if they meet your expectations before you buy. They are not expensive. I think mine was under $20.00 good luck.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

  17. #3177
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    Did you know that the sorghum seeds in wild bird seed mix will grow dandy plants with nice big heads full of seeds? I wonder what other seeds in that stuff would give me useful plants

    Millet also grows pretty easily. I had a parakeet years back and some of his seed got into a few house plants. I let it go just to see what would happen, and he loved the fresh millet. Free and fresh is always good :-)

    Sure is starting to sound like prices of just about everything will be going up this year. Chicken is one of my favorite dishes. Guess it's a good thing I kept those young roos. The Banty hens are already getting broody, but I'm trying to hold them off until warmer weather. I guess raising some up would be good, even if half a clutch is roos that's great for soup and other dishes.

  18. #3178
    TxGal, I envy you your egg laying hens right now. I don't know when I'll be able to get chickens. Sol far I haven't found a good affordable way to fix my old pen to be raccoon proof.

    Thanks for the info about millet. I assume that's those tiny little round seeds? I'll bet the little black sunflowers would grow, too. My sister gave me some birdseed last fall and I separated it into baby food jars. I'll be able to have at least a trial container or patch of the various plants from them.

    Can't wait to go get my potatoes and bedding plants later this week!

    I like chicken okay, but only the white part. But I suppose I'll have to get over that with home-grown roosters as my supply. I'd have no problem treating my cat(s) with the dark meat and giblets.

  19. #3179
    Also, TxGal, I hope you do keep posting the links to those podcasts. With von Koehler gone, they might now be the biggest source of new information for us.

  20. #3180
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    TxGal, I envy you your egg laying hens right now. I don't know when I'll be able to get chickens. Sol far I haven't found a good affordable way to fix my old pen to be raccoon proof.

    Thanks for the info about millet. I assume that's those tiny little round seeds? I'll bet the little black sunflowers would grow, too. My sister gave me some birdseed last fall and I separated it into baby food jars. I'll be able to have at least a trial container or patch of the various plants from them.

    Can't wait to go get my potatoes and bedding plants later this week!

    I like chicken okay, but only the white part. But I suppose I'll have to get over that with home-grown roosters as my supply. I'd have no problem treating my cat(s) with the dark meat and giblets.
    It's funny, I went from worrying that the Bantams would never lay, to being inundated with eggs by Christmas! I'm so happy with the Bantams, most are pretty friendly and their eggs are wonderful. We're noticing a slight downtick now in egg production, could be the dreary weather, but I suspect we might have a snake visiting. It's happened before, I always carry a .38 now with snake shot, and hope we get it sooner rather than later.

    Yep, millet is the little seed. I would think the black sunflower seed would germinate, too. Never hurts to try!

    I still haven't gotten the potatoes in yet, it's been so soggy, but the onions are looking like they'll be fine. I'm so glad we're all getting into the early stages of growing season!

  21. #3181
    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    It's misting out and dark, dreary, and cold today, so I've spent some time researching Texas and the Ice Age just to see how much information was out there about how the state faired during the last big freeze. Actually, it was pretty darn interesting. The Gulf of Mexico was half the size it is now.

    If you plan on staying where you are during the GSM (or worse), it might be worthwhile to research your state's history during the last minimum and Ice Age.
    Would you consider posting some article titles and URLs you visited in your Texas research? Thank you!
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

  22. #3182
    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    It's funny, I went from worrying that the Bantams would never lay, to being inundated with eggs by Christmas! I'm so happy with the Bantams, most are pretty friendly and their eggs are wonderful. We're noticing a slight downtick now in egg production, could be the dreary weather, but I suspect we might have a snake visiting. It's happened before, I always carry a .38 now with snake shot, and hope we get it sooner rather than later.

    Yep, millet is the little seed. I would think the black sunflower seed would germinate, too. Never hurts to try!

    I still haven't gotten the potatoes in yet, it's been so soggy, but the onions are looking like they'll be fine. I'm so glad we're all getting into the early stages of growing season!
    I had Millet sprout last year and make seed heads, but they turned black and moldy. I read later you cut the heads and hang them upside down.

    If I find myself with too many eggs, I pickle mine. They are great as egg salad, just add salt and pepper and Miracle Whip. Also good in potato salad. Do not feed them to your dog unless you want a Hazmat situation.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

  23. #3183
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Also, TxGal, I hope you do keep posting the links to those podcasts. With von Koehler gone, they might now be the biggest source of new information for us.
    I'll at least pull in all the links I can find, but von Koehler really knew how to bring in the tough graphics. I check ADAPT 2030, Ice Age Farmer, and Ice Age Now several times a day.

    If it gets quiet I start searching for problems with crops in the US. Summerthyme's comments that she always focused on food and warmth really surprised me, because I have always been focused on that, too. I guess I'm getting nudges, also.

  24. #3184
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seeker22 View Post
    Would you consider posting some article titles and URLs you visited in your Texas research? Thank you!
    I didn't write them down, but I'll try to find them!

    Here ya go!:

    https://texasalmanac.com/topics/envi...eology-texas-0

    https://www.texasbeyondhistory.net/c...ges/intro.html

    Some of the reading is a bit dry; I'm sure there are other articles out there, too.

  25. #3185
    Five part YouTube series about 2024, published in 2016, but very informative. Contains lots of archival footage!

    https://youtu.be/L3NiSGFxdm8

    https://youtu.be/MKrA8u6a_Gw

    https://youtu.be/RXhVLP1Ld48

    https://youtu.be/6-eFNMJFe6Y

    https://youtu.be/VblusvRZ7wA

    Sláinte!


    Kathy.
    Last edited by TrueNorthNomads; Yesterday at 11:11 PM. Reason: To fix link.
    Chasing rainbows across an empty sky
    The sun is fading before our very eyes
    See the darkness as it creeps up from behind
    We can no longer say we’re blind.

  26. #3186
    Thank you, ladies. Not a problem- I can do "dry".
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

  27. #3187
    Another dark dreary day here. At least no rain or drizzle. Not even up to 40 degrees yet, if it's even going to get that warm today.

    I sure do miss the sun.

  28. #3188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Another dark dreary day here. At least no rain or drizzle. Not even up to 40 degrees yet, if it's even going to get that warm today.

    I sure do miss the sun.
    It poured down rain part of the night and this morning; isn't raining now but very cloudy. Cool outside, but probably in the fifties. I guess we'll just have to develop the mindset of being thankful, and rejoice when the sun does come out!

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  29. #3189
    Thankfully, although we have had quite a few really dark, dreary days, we've had plenty of sunny ones as well. But it's been an odd winter... 3rd year in a row we've watched multiple forecasted storms slide JUST south or north of us... the ones to the south are the big, actual "storms"... for whatever reason, we seem to get some sort of blocking high that keeps them JUST south of the Pennsylvania border (we're about 10 miles north).

    The ones to the north are "lake effect"... with the Great Lakes, until they freeze, they act as huge moisture reservoirs, and when cold air travels over them, the wind picks up the moisture and dumps it as "lake effect snow".. anywhere from 10 miles to 50 miles downwind. For Lake Erie, if the wind is straight due West, it dumps on Buffalo and the suburbs to the East. If it shifts a few degrees North (from the North/West), it can clobber us. We once had a completely unpredicted (they were calling for 4") FIVE FEET of snow dump overnight on our small town overnight.

    And the temps have been very variable. We've seen nearly 20 below zero a couple nights, but we're seeing more daytime temps in the 40's than are normal. Along with the much-more-frequent than normal graupel falls, we've had several freezing rain events.

    I'll be watching the plants closely this Spring... I've always planted more by what Nature tells me is happening *that season* than the calendar. So far, I'm not seeing any signs of a very early Spring, but the willows are beginning to color up a bit. No sign of the Snowdrops yet, much less the early Crocuses..

    Summerthyme

  30. #3190
    We seem to be having an early Spring but I know from experience that can change - at this point day time is in the low 50's (sometimes with a sharp wind so windchill in the low 40's) and night can be anything from close to freezing to the same 50 degrees depending on cloud cover.

    But I know from experience we may have another round or two of seriously bad/cold weather before April, but if this trend continues I think we may be in for one of those wet "Irish Springs."

    Impossible to predict at this point and the weather people don't know either.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  31. #3191
    The next couple of days in Whistler are forecast as beautifully sunny, and today is too, with highs in the mid 30’s, but while the starry night skies are clear, the lows are frigid from sunset to sunup, and with the wind chill factor they’ll feel about -30°F. Good taxi weather!

    More snow (and storms) later this week though, unending and scheduled to come down by the ton all through March. Oh, well, at least the skiers will be happy!

    I’m fairly concerned about how (at our age) we’re going to manage to shovel multiple feet of snow as it grows incrementally more abundant from now through 2024, and then it’s supposed to remain overwhelming until 2030 when, if the new ‘best guesses’ are right, we’ll plunge into a 4-500-year-long Ice Age Proper.

    We’re not expecting the grid to be operational in 2024, and solar and wind turbines won’t work either, so unless one is hooked up to geothermal power (like Iceland, if its volcanoes behave), most of our recent technological advances will be useless, including communication devices and everything else digital. If I’m spared, even though we’re off grid, I’ll miss electricity more than I’ll miss summer, and that’s saying something!

    Another concern that will affect everyone here, which I haven’t seen addressed yet, is the reality of living perpetually under dark grey skies. In the Yukon, Alaska, and anywhere north of 60°, clinical depression is rampant after five (let alone the usual seven) months’ of darkness (sunless skies), and people become lethargic and sleepy in even daylight hours, and moods range from grumpy, or despondent, to overly emotional. There is a disproportionate number of suicides in these climes and no amount of D3 changes that fact. Most people drink alcohol to get themselves through the winter, and violent crime increases substantially. And that’s the reality of a seven-month-long winter. I shudder when I think about perpetual winter conditions. It’s something to be aware of. Prozac won’t be available, no medication will.

    Sláinte!

    Kathy.
    Last edited by TrueNorthNomads; Today at 07:50 PM.
    Chasing rainbows across an empty sky
    The sun is fading before our very eyes
    See the darkness as it creeps up from behind
    We can no longer say we’re blind.

  32. #3192
    We’ve been cloudy & gray for what seems like weeks here in S. La. Sideways mist started at about 5pm. It’s supposed to rain every day this week.
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  33. #3193
    Quote Originally Posted by BenIan View Post
    We’ve been cloudy & gray for what seems like weeks here in S. La. Sideways mist started at about 5pm. It’s supposed to rain every day this week.
    And the skies haven’t even darkened yet....
    Chasing rainbows across an empty sky
    The sun is fading before our very eyes
    See the darkness as it creeps up from behind
    We can no longer say we’re blind.

  34. #3194
    twelve inches of snow to shovel out from under today..yikes, took me three hrs. plus my husband snow blowed all the sidewalks. crazy Sunday!

  35. #3195
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    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out today:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-i14OyPkXg

    (MIAC #181) What Cars, Trains and Trucks Will Run After a Massive CME w/ Lee Wheelbarger

    Run time is 37:16

  36. #3196
    Thanks, TxGal. Just listened to it and will probably listen again tomorrow morning.

    I haven't put together my thoughts on this one yet. I can't spend all my waking hours on doomer planning, so tonight I'm devoting my time to Richard Jury and Melrose Plant.

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