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The Grand Solar Minimum
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  1. #4201
    Thanks, PW. I had thought I'd just use a little in my rice and my mashed potatoes, and maybe stir some into my mayo, but I will take a look at the story/recipe.

  2. #4202
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    2,926
    I'm posting a link to a post by Doomer Doug on another thread. Grocery prices are jumping...I hoped it would take a bit longer.

    The post is #101

    http://www.timebomb2000.com/vb/showt...27#post7291727

  3. #4203
    I'm so far behind on this thread. Sorry to hear about your bunnies and chickens, Martinhouse. I miss mine terribly to this day. I hope the new owners will make sure you get some eggs and clean up like promised. Maybe you'll make friends with some wild birds.

    Summerthyme, the neighbors who had Angus started to make sausage from the cattle they butchered. They had different seasonings and I guess sold it in pans, not links. They sent some over now again when they tried out different spice combinations and wanted feedback. The cattle I fed for them for a couple months were breeding stock, but they had a business with someone with a stockyard. I think they were trying to find a new market as well.

    Thanks for the updates everyone. The weather in my part of the PNW has been nice actually. Nicer than we normally get anyway. Lots of people are putting in hazelnuts instead of grass fields, which is nice to see. Not much in row crops near us so I have nothing to report. Naturallysweet would be able to give you an idea of how things are going here. She's north of me and she used to grow tomatoes among other things.

  4. #4204
    Pinecone, thank you for commiserating about my little animals. The new owners live too far from me to get eggs from. They should be here after school is out to help with moving and mixing the soil in my outdoor containers.

    As for the cleanup, the guy that has been clearing my yard and mowing for me showed up today with a helper, a nice polite little guy from a troubled family and they did some more clearing where the privet is trying to take over. Then I told them EXACTLY how to do it and they moved the chick cage out of my greenhouse for me and took it way down the drive and emptied it out. It is now sitting in the back yard where either some rain or my garden hose can blast it clean. I will be able to blast the dust out of the greenhouse soon, too, and then things will be back to beautiful, blessed normal in there.

  5. #4205
    TxGal, I read Doomer Doug's shopping post to my sister and she is now going to do the shopping she's just kept putting off. She remembers Doug from when he used to be a guest on a certain person's 6 PM shortwave/live streaming program so she was quite inclined to take it seriously.

    Actually I'm taking it seriously, too. I've tended to sit back a bit because I didn't need to stock up on feed and more garden container items, but I need to stop that and pay attention again. If I'm able to fall asleep any time before midnight tonight, I will be up before sunrise to go to town for more shopping and to top of the gas tank of the truck.

  6. #4206
    I didn't read DD's post, but I am doubling my container garden. Off to the store for more dirt! Thanks to all the information you all have been so kind to provide.

  7. #4207
    I did not click on the link there, but this morning I saw an article title on a "certain" website which reminded me that not only food may/will be costlier and less available in coming days because of our changing growing conditions, but seeds as well.

    Out comes the old shopping list again. My feed store still has their cans of bulk seeds out. I may just take the time to get a small envelope of each type of seeds I might not have enough of already.

    And I've mentioned this before but I'll say it again, always have a few pounds of potatoes on hand, just in case when spring comes they might not be plentiful in garden supply centers or wherever you buy planting potatoes. I keep at least five and usually ten pounds of a good brand of red potato in my fridge at all times and I make sure the ones I buy have healthy looking little buds of sprouts on them, rather than little cried up nubs that means they might have been treated with sprout inhibitor. I've planted grocery store red potatoes before and if they are healthy to start with, they grow just fine. Don't know about other types, as I don't have time or space to waste on fancy lower-yield colored ones.

    One time I bought a five pound bag of a small red potatoes that were perfectly round, all the same size, and had no sprouts started from their eyes. I planted them and not a single one grew.

  8. #4208
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    2,926
    Have been working outside all morning, fence clearing and a bit of gardening. Getting hot, came in for lunch and probably a nap. Article on fruit problems, I did not bring over the pictures of cherries:

    https://www.sott.net/article/413588-...ated-by-storms

    California cherry crop devastated by storms

    Dennis Rettke
    Fresh Plaza
    Tue, 21 May 2019 08:57 UTC


    California cherries hammered by unseasonable storms

    Cherry growers in California are counting the cost as storms over the past week destroyed a significant amount of the current cherry crop. While official estimates are still several days or even weeks away, the general feeling is that a few million boxes worth of cherries have been lost, with the worst affected being early season varieties and also a large portion of the Bing crop. There is some hope that some of the later season cherries can still be salvaged.

    "The cherry crop has been devastated, especially the early season varieties," said Tom Valenzuela of Sunriver Sales. "There is a chance some of the later season cherries can be salvaged, but we won't see those until mid-June at the earliest. Tree fruit in general was hit hard, not just from the heavy rain, but also the hail. This was on the back of an already wet winter and spring which could also have an impact on future crops such as grapes."

    Terrible blow to cherry growers

    For cherry growers, it's terrible news as some growers will simply have to walk away from their fields. Joe Cataldo of J&M Farms in Lodi took to social media to announce the loss of his cherry crop. "When it rains it pours," he said. "We just witnessed one of the craziest storms ever seen this late into May. This was a true winter storm. The damage it caused has turned one of the best crops we have ever set, into garbage for the birds. Devastating is an understatement."

    Don Goforth of Family Tree Farms further south near Reedley, said the company has already begun their cherry harvest and were hit hard by hail and heavy rain. "These storms will have a considerable impact with the most obvious damage inflicted on the cherries," he observed. "We are about half way through our harvest but have been significantly affected. Some of our blocks are okay but others we are abandoning completely due to severe cracking. We will be busy surveying the damage over the next week but it will certainly turn into an interesting season with supplies expected to dramatically tighten up as we transition to the northern regions."

    He added that Family Tree Farms also grows a large amount of other stone fruit including peaches and nectarines. These were also affected - especially by the hail - but to a lesser extent than cherries. "Our other stone fruit was also affected by hail and we are expecting to see some spotting resulting in a little bit of damage. However, it is not too severe and we are still quite hopeful of a good stone fruit crop."

    Meanwhile, there is also expected to be some impact to berry growers as several inches of rain fell in those regions. Some growers were able to pick ahead of the storm, however they are all currently assessing the fields and more will be known in the coming days. At the very least, harvest has been disrupted due to muddy conditions.

    Cherry market expected to tighten up considerably

    For the next few weeks, the market is likely to tighten up as cherry volumes diminish. One cherry supplier said he expects the California cherry deal to be shorter. "The rains have had a huge impact on cherry supplies," he noted. "The cherry deal is likely going to wrap up early."

    This also comes as shippers were aiming to fill orders for Memorial Day, which will now not be the blockbuster event many were hoping for. "The recent rain storms couldn't have come at a worse time for California cherries with the Memorial Day pull in full swing," said Ira Greenstein of Direct Source Marketing. "Last week the industry struggled to pack sufficient volumes to fulfill their holiday commitments. Weekend orders were pushed, prorated and canceled, leaving many retailers scrambling to get fruit on the shelves. Pricing on pre-committed program business ranges from $32-$45, while the spot market is trading from $45-$55 with only limited volumes available. We might not see shippers resume normal packing schedules until the middle of the week, leaving most of the industry unable to find fruit to cover heavy Memorial Day promotions."

    "A cherry crop that was originally estimated to be well over 10 million boxes may now drop well below 7 million," he continued. "Many growers may choose to not harvest fruit at all and go the route of filing for insurance money. Either way, this recent weather event has put the California cherry industry into a state of disarray and it will take the balance of the week to truly understand the long term affects for shipments in June."

    As if there hasn't been enough precipitation, one more storm front is expected to pass through the Central Valley today before finally clearing up. Temperatures are also expected to rise from tomorrow.

  9. #4209
    This situation seems to be never-ending. The stories just keep coming.

    Off topic except maybe in a small way because of the Green New Deal. Have you seen Robert's post about AOC this morning on his iceagenow.info? I thought it was pretty clever!

  10. #4210
    My best friend lives in the foothills of the Sierras, east of Sacramento. A huge hailstorm devastated the fruit growers there. Pears, apples, grapes, etc. Friend grows good garden every year, grows all her vegetables pretty much (doesn't can), and gives away a lot. Her entire garden was killed. She's off today to buy starts and also plant more seeds.
    https://soundcloud.com/user-309670005
    Audio Bhagavad Gita downloadable

    This knowledge is the king of education, the most secret of all secrets. It is the purest knowledge, and because it gives direct perception of the self by realization, it is the perfection of religion. It is everlasting, and it is joyfully performed.

  11. #4211
    Be Well, thanks for sharing this. Every bit of information like this will help all of us in our ongoing plans and preps.

  12. #4212
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    631
    How to get your machines into a muddy field.

    Shadow

    Sorry, file is too large. It showed a tractor, with a log twice as long as the drive tire is tall, chained to the tire. It was limping thru the mud.

    Luddite here!
    "18 The wrath of God is being revealed from heaven against all the godlessness and wickedness of people, who suppress the truth by their wickedness… 21 For although they knew God, they neither glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts were darkened… 24 Therefore God gave them over in the sinful desires of their hearts…" Romans 1:18-32

  13. #4213
    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow View Post
    How to get your machines into a muddy field.

    Shadow

    Sorry, file is too large. It showed a tractor, with a log twice as long as the drive tire is tall, chained to the tire. It was limping thru the mud.

    Luddite here!
    Uggg.... I don't even like reading about it. BTDT, and it's never fun, and often very expensive.

    Plus, the damage being done to the fields and their future potential yields is astronomical. Compaction will hugely reduce yields for years to come.

    Summerthyme

  14. #4214
    Update 24 May 2019.

    None of the corn fields around me have been worked on in any way.

    No plowing, disking.

    No herbicide. No fertilizer.

    Absolutely nothing.

    It looks like last fall, except the old husks, are starting to rot.

    The soil is completely saturated with water.

    It's been raining nearly every other day for weeks.

    It would take weeks of dry, sunny days before anything could be done.

    But the weather forecast is for more of the same.

    Pasture grass is thriving; the horses are happy.

    Never have seen conditions so bad for so long.

    100% crop loss?

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  15. #4215
    VK, that's AWFUL!

    Every time I read another post like this or listen to another podcast with weather reports and planting reports, I add more things to my shopping list!

  16. #4216
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    432
    With our recent travels we have seen a lot of the late late plantings and non planting. We have seen enough and heard enough that we have decided on a early pay off of our new property rather than other things we were thinking to do. Necessities first. I believe this GSM will have a very negative effect on the economy within a couple years on for a couple decades or longer. I think VK posted some charts once that show cooling cycles corresponding with weak economic cycles.
    I think that using some assets we have now to pay off everything will be more beneficial than what the money will be worth in future hyperinflation times.
    My FIL, who retired about 15 years ago sees his pension payment buying about half of what it did initially.
    I am afraid that is about to become much worse.

  17. #4217
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    2,926
    On the "ALERT Midwest Flooding General Reports Thread Spring 2019," Cacheman has made a good post about crop problems due to flooding. Please see his post #66:

    http://www.timebomb2000.com/vb/showt...46#post7295146

  18. #4218
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    2,926
    Ice Age Farmer has a new podcast out this morning:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdAHf7vYDZc

    "The worst ever that we’ve seen” - Wettest Since 1895 - Grand Solar Minimum

    Run time is 16:52

    Published on May 25, 2019

    An inflection point has been reached with respect to the collapse of modern agriculture as we enter the Grand Solar Minimum and the climate changes -- and the system is responding by clamping down on truth. As the US experiences its worst planting on record, China is facing a one-two punch from African Swine Fever and Armyworm. Food prices are rising. Canada officially reports a 14-year high of arctic sea ice levels. Will ASF come to US, and inspire forced vaccines for livestock? Christian breaks it down.

    Start growing your own food today.


  19. #4219
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    2,926
    Quote Originally Posted by ktrapper View Post
    With our recent travels we have seen a lot of the late late plantings and non planting. We have seen enough and heard enough that we have decided on a early pay off of our new property rather than other things we were thinking to do. Necessities first. I believe this GSM will have a very negative effect on the economy within a couple years on for a couple decades or longer. I think VK posted some charts once that show cooling cycles corresponding with weak economic cycles.
    I think that using some assets we have now to pay off everything will be more beneficial than what the money will be worth in future hyperinflation times.
    My FIL, who retired about 15 years ago sees his pension payment buying about half of what it did initially.
    I am afraid that is about to become much worse.
    Thanks for this post, ktrapper, it's very telling and I believe you are right about your reasons for paying off your place - the peace of mind you will have is priceless. We paid for our land outright, and were working and cash-flowing the construction of our small retirement home not long before our retirement. Having the homestead paid for is simply huge.

    Similar to your FIL, DH and I often have a conversation about our now deceased parents - how would they do if there were still alive and retired now...the answer is likely not well at all. My parents were always frugal having grown up in the depression era. And even though they had a small military pension and a decent Gov pension, I know they would have struggled with inflation and pensions not keeping up at all. The one thing I think they should have done differently in retrospect is that when they sold their small home in the late 70s/early 80s and banked the proceeds in CDs - they rented a condo instead of either buying one or a smaller one-level home. I know their pension would never have kept up with inflation and rising rental costs.

    At least here we just have utilities, insurance, and taxes (and now that I'm 65 we get a senior exemption along with our homestead exemption). While keeping up with the acreage takes us more time now and it's harder physically, we are truly blessed. We have stocked ponds, fruit and nut trees, chickens, ducks, cattle, and an ever-growing raised bed garden. If the truly bad times hit, and I am increasingly concerned that they will indeed, at least we'll be able to feed ourselves and our adult kids, and help the neighbors, too.

  20. #4220
    Well there is plenty of sugar cane growing here. That’s what is grown nearly year round by about 90% of the farmers in my area. It’s all looking good. We are looking at a stretch of about a week in the 90s with no rain after having a ton of rain over the last few months.
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  21. #4221
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    2,926
    Quote Originally Posted by BenIan View Post
    Well there is plenty of sugar cane growing here. That’s what is grown nearly year round by about 90% of the farmers in my area. It’s all looking good. We are looking at a stretch of about a week in the 90s with no rain after having a ton of rain over the last few months.
    It's good to know at least something seems to be growing without too much difficulty!

  22. #4222
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    2,926
    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out today:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2vgVrYMyCU

    Water Capture for Gardens, Biogas & 5G Shielding (830)

    Run time is 18:58

    Published on May 25, 2019

    Alosha Lynov is the visionary inventor and master builder of geometrically inspiring, functionally self-sustaining Eco Tech living habitats for the last 12 years. Alosha founded (Bio Veda Academy) which specializes in practical training around Water Self Sufficiency and Living Bio Shelter Habitats. Online training combines six international workshops in an urban permaculture training ground:

    • Natural Law
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    Biotecture training centers as seeds that sprout communities.
    Sign up to our free Eco Community & Natural Building seminar below and learn how to create resilient and thriving Intentional Communities. What does it take?

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  23. #4223
    I have been stuck in meat world for awhile. I can tell you one thing that is still growing fine- snakes. And the bugs are carrying off my Collard greens. Everything else looks good.

    This is a strange Spring. We will have a few days of hot and sunny and then go back to cool and cloudy. That is NOT South Texas weather, folks. Usually, we have high wind starting late February early March. By May it is usually calm. The wind is dry enough that it just sucks the moisture out of everything. I can deep-water in the morning and by Eventide, things are dry again.

    I get #50 bags of Carrots for the Rabbits. Last month's were 3" diameter. Big woody things. This month's were maybe 1" diameter with many (many) that were less. What's up with that? These are coming out of Mexico.

    Prices are indeed going up. Package sizes are going down. They think we don't notice. Heh. Crooks.

    Ah yes, paying off the old homestead. The Cabin is paid for and we will pay off the property in full this month. Peace of mind for when the hard times hit.

    My dad drilled into my head for decades to be Self Sufficient. Cash and Carry (no credit). Live within your means. My many skillsets are geared either toward defense or food growing/preserving. All that time learning was not wasted. Not one single second.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  24. #4224
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    2,926
    Quote Originally Posted by Seeker22 View Post
    I have been stuck in meat world for awhile. I can tell you one thing that is still growing fine- snakes. And the bugs are carrying off my Collard greens. Everything else looks good.

    This is a strange Spring. We will have a few days of hot and sunny and then go back to cool and cloudy. That is NOT South Texas weather, folks. Usually, we have high wind starting late February early March. By May it is usually calm. The wind is dry enough that it just sucks the moisture out of everything. I can deep-water in the morning and by Eventide, things are dry again.

    I get #50 bags of Carrots for the Rabbits. Last month's were 3" diameter. Big woody things. This month's were maybe 1" diameter with many (many) that were less. What's up with that? These are coming out of Mexico.

    Prices are indeed going up. Package sizes are going down. They think we don't notice. Heh. Crooks.

    Ah yes, paying off the old homestead. The Cabin is paid for and we will pay off the property in full this month. Peace of mind for when the hard times hit.

    My dad drilled into my head for decades to be Self Sufficient. Cash and Carry (no credit). Live within your means. My many skillsets are geared either toward defense or food growing/preserving. All that time learning was not wasted. Not one single second.
    Seeker, I was so sorry to read of the loss of your Dottie to a rattler. We haven't seen rattlers here yet, I know they and coral snakes are here, but we have our share of copperheads, cottonmouths, and huge rat snakes. We've popped a number of enormous rat snakes in our chicken house (we keep the door open during the day, they find a way in), most in the 6' range. Explained where our eggs go periodically. We have to work on clearing our pond shortly, and I know we'll be popping cottonmouths, too.

    Bugs, good grief! Our tomatoes are getting hammered first by what I think is a type of army worm, now the hornworms have appeared. All that rain, and now we're getting dry, too. I KNOW we'll have army worms soon in the pastures again. Last year was our first ever.

    We have also seen the produce this season is just way off normal, small and expensive avocadoes (I stopped buying them), pitiful greens, etc. We're heading off to HEB/Kroger later, can't wait to see what's available and at what cost....

    Great post you made here :-)

  25. #4225
    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    Seeker, I was so sorry to read of the loss of your Dottie to a rattler. We haven't seen rattlers here yet, I know they and coral snakes are here, but we have our share of copperheads, cottonmouths, and huge rat snakes. We've popped a number of enormous rat snakes in our chicken house (we keep the door open during the day, they find a way in), most in the 6' range. Explained where our eggs go periodically. We have to work on clearing our pond shortly, and I know we'll be popping cottonmouths, too.

    Bugs, good grief! Our tomatoes are getting hammered first by what I think is a type of army worm, now the hornworms have appeared. All that rain, and now we're getting dry, too. I KNOW we'll have army worms soon in the pastures again. Last year was our first ever.

    We have also seen the produce this season is just way off normal, small and expensive avocadoes (I stopped buying them), pitiful greens, etc. We're heading off to HEB/Kroger later, can't wait to see what's available and at what cost....

    Great post you made here :-)
    Thank you for your kind words and prayers. They have made the difference. I didn't reach out to anyone for the previous seven pups' passing. don't know how I did it.

    Dottie's urn should be ready at the vet the first of June. When I go to pick Her up, I'll go armed with my price list I've kept since 2014. All the things I buy at HEB or Walmart (spit) have brand, size, and price. I can go online to each store's site and check prices on most of it so I know who is cheaper. Note that on the list. Saves gas and time. I will be picking up more fireant killer, Sevin Dust, water hoses and sprayer attachments, plumbing parts for the well house (spares are mandatory out here), more canning salt, more lamp oil and kerosene. More, more, and yet always more. That's where the bank account is- sitting in preps. Oh h-well, I'd rather have it in tangibles than have someone steal the account in the middle of the night because some invader needed the money. My Dad prepared me for these days, but I convinced myself for years I'd never see them. I was wrong. I know for a fact you can hear me, Dad. Thank you! Love you too. Glad I listened.

    Every time I watch the movie Lonesome Dove, I cry at the snake scene where they are moving the cattle across the river. Water snakes are no joke, either. Ya'll watch your tails out there.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  26. #4226
    Seeker22, when you get those garden hoses, get TONS of the good orange or black RUBBER hose washers. The plastic ones are so crappy! If you store the genuine rubber ones in a little Ziploc bag, then seal tightly in a glass jar, they will last a really long time without drying up. (Same with rubber pencil erasers, rubber bands, canner gaskets, etc...store in glass jars.)

  27. #4227
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Seeker22, when you get those garden hoses, get TONS of the good orange or black RUBBER hose washers. The plastic ones are so crappy! If you store the genuine rubber ones in a little Ziploc bag, then seal tightly in a glass jar, they will last a really long time without drying up. (Same with rubber pencil erasers, rubber bands, canner gaskets, etc...store in glass jars.)
    Thanks for the reminder. I'll definitely put some of the good rubber stuff in the basket. I need to order extra gaskets for the canner again. I work that poor thing like a rented mule.

    If Oxygen is the problem, would putting an O2 absorber in the glass jar help? I have a jar attachment for my Food Saver and can suck the air out of the jars for longterm storage. Nothing worse than needing some little thing and find that it's worthless and the money you spent was wasted.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  28. #4228
    I don't know if it's oxygen or not. I just know that rubber dries out when it gets old, even to the point of crumbling. Just thought of another thing to store in glass jars...spare nipples for both human and animal baby bottles. Oh! Another one jumped into my head. Ball point pens when you buy a whole pack of them. They always dry up if you don't use them up quickly. If they are in a glass jar, they stay good for a very long time. Another...faucet washers! Sewing machine belts and wheels!

    Rubber baby buggy bumpers!??? (: (:

  29. #4229
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    I don't know if it's oxygen or not. I just know that rubber dries out when it gets old, even to the point of crumbling. Just thought of another thing to store in glass jars...spare nipples for both human and animal baby bottles. Oh! Another one jumped into my head. Ball point pens when you buy a whole pack of them. They always dry up if you don't use them up quickly. If they are in a glass jar, they stay good for a very long time. Another...faucet washers! Sewing machine belts and wheels!

    Rubber baby buggy bumpers!??? (: (:
    Good suggestions. RUBBER baby buggy bumpers made me laugh out loud. You have no idea how I needed that. (((Martinhouse)))
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  30. #4230
    Delighted I could entertain! Sometimes we badly need to laugh, just to loosen the clamps of stress or depression a little.

  31. #4231
    I bought several blocks of paraffin several years ago. I figured if I ever needed to make a buried cache of foods, I could dip the cans and metal jar lids into the heated liquid paraffin to protect them from rust. Paraffin doesn't seem to ever degrade.

    Stormy here, and very windy. The yard is getting torn up, and I expect one of the greenhouses is probably toast. Feeling unusually blaze about it...I'll deal with the damage tomorrow.

  32. #4232
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    2,926
    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KAp_EZ6ytMs

    Rain and Water Everywhere Planet Wide (831)

    Run time is 5:55

    Increasing Galactic Cosmic Rays are leading to a visible change in the amount of record rain events across the planet. Australian outback, Oman, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Middle East, North Africa, USA grain Belts all with record ever recorded rainfall and this is a small selection of events unfolding in the last month. Crop prices up due to floods and hail globally.

  33. #4233
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    2,926
    Short post for now, we're desperately trying to catch up with outside work ahead of stormy weather in a few days. We're going pretty much sunrise to sundown now. Have had several more calves born (more than we thought!), have been able to cut in some pastures but we still have a lot of too-wet areas, saw hay being cut and baled for the first time this year, yay! It will be 'stemmy' but at least they could get their equipment in without bogging down.

    A 'shocker' from yesterday - we stopped in at the closest Kroger to us for some fresh items, and they had no - none at all - loose red potatoes. In the display where loose red potatoes usually are were sweet potatoes. The had only 3 small, commercially bagged bags of red potatoes. Have never seen that before at Kroger.

  34. #4234
    Thanks for the link. This guy talked faster in this podcast than I've heard him do up until now. could have been ten minutes rather than almost six. What he shows really is horrible and makes me put back on my shopping list a few things I'd crossed off.

    Yesterday I finally hosed out my greenhouse to clear it of chick dust and then watered everything really well. Then I fixed the broken axle clamp on my wagon, then I did absolutely nothing for the rest of the day. Am intending to make up for it today. I was hoping to wake early enough to go to town this morning, but now I'm glad I've seen this podcast before I go shopping.

  35. #4235
    TxGak, thanks for letting us know about the Kroger red potatoes! Glad I bought ten pounds of them when I did! I usually keep sweet potatoes around for planting just like I do red potatoes, but I've been thinking that things like okra, peanuts and sweet potatoes might not grow very well here where I live. A few hot weeks in June and July will not be enough for those particular plants, and that's the weather I've had here the last two summers and it looks like it'll be that way again this year, only with more rain.

    I wonder if we'll have our third August in a row of over 11" of rain? Before 2017, it's barely rained at all in August since I moved here in '77.

  36. #4236
    Observations from Costco run...

    1. 16oz bottle of vanilla extract priced at $30.00

    2. Fruit was of very poor quality..we ended up returning blackberries and grapes they were so bad

    3. Noticeably smaller packaging on some products
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  37. #4237
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
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    2,926
    Quote Originally Posted by BenIan View Post
    Observations from Costco run...

    1. 16oz bottle of vanilla extract priced at $30.00

    2. Fruit was of very poor quality..we ended up returning blackberries and grapes they were so bad

    3. Noticeably smaller packaging on some products
    Oh heck, thanks for posting this! We're going to try to squeeze in a Costco trip this week in between working outside and the storms coming in. Just found out we're in a marginal risk area for severe storms Wed-Thurs. Again.

  38. #4238
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    2,926
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    TxGak, thanks for letting us know about the Kroger red potatoes! Glad I bought ten pounds of them when I did! I usually keep sweet potatoes around for planting just like I do red potatoes, but I've been thinking that things like okra, peanuts and sweet potatoes might not grow very well here where I live. A few hot weeks in June and July will not be enough for those particular plants, and that's the weather I've had here the last two summers and it looks like it'll be that way again this year, only with more rain.

    I wonder if we'll have our third August in a row of over 11" of rain? Before 2017, it's barely rained at all in August since I moved here in '77.
    You're welcome! I wish I'd paid more attention to HEB's produce, we went there first. Come to think of it, I don't recall seeing ANY loose boiling potatoes at Kroger, just the sweet potatoes. Usually they'll have red potatoes and Yukon Gold, I didn't see them, either. I'm pretty sure they had bakers, though.

    That's a good question and a good thing to track. The last few years our weather has been different, and we're just beginning to see new patterns developing, I think.

  39. #4239
    Yes, BenIan, thanks from me, too. Now I know I'm going to set my alarm and get up early enough to go to town tomorrow. My shopping list just keeps growing!
    Last edited by Martinhouse; 05-27-2019 at 11:08 AM.

  40. #4240
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    2,926
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Thanks for the link. This guy talked faster in this podcast than I've heard him do up until now. could have been ten minutes rather than almost six. What he shows really is horrible and makes me put back on my shopping list a few things I'd crossed off.

    Yesterday I finally hosed out my greenhouse to clear it of chick dust and then watered everything really well. Then I fixed the broken axle clamp on my wagon, then I did absolutely nothing for the rest of the day. Am intending to make up for it today. I was hoping to wake early enough to go to town this morning, but now I'm glad I've seen this podcast before I go shopping.
    I'm going to try to watch the video in a few minutes, it's worrying me. We were working outside early, came in for a late breakfast, and DH is about to go out cutting pastures again.

    I'm glad you're getting caught up at your place. You should take time to rest and enjoy the beauty of all the nature you have. We're finding shopping takes a lot out of us (we have at least a two hr round trip to get to a decent sized grocery store). Resting after shopping is good, too!

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