Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 24, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


The Grand Solar Minimum
+ Reply to Thread
Page 16 of 34 FirstFirst ... 6 14 15 16 17 18 26 ... LastLast
Results 601 to 640 of 1358
  1. #601
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    out & about
    Posts
    603
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    But on a wider point, if your friends are not willing to accept these results then probably nothing short of an advancing glacier will do either.

    By the time it's obvious to everyone, it's too late to prep.

    von Koehler
    Yes, I agree that there's going to be a lot of people who will be hurting and then they think about us who warned them to prep... "I know let's go to rolenrock's house, they'll have food..." Part of my wanting them to prep is to take the pressure off MY supplies when things go bad. I've seen some good material on posted charts that ought to make anyone sit up and take notice and that I can relate as real. On the Total Solar Irradiance levels I think they can be address as "some experts say..." and it gets it out there for them to investigate. Only when someone learns something for themselves do they accept it as fact - we can only point people to what's really going on for their study. Only rarely do we tell someone about something and they just take our word for it. I am studying as fast as I can, coming to this late, so I can tell others because this upcoming winter and the agricultural fallout of our erratic weather patterns ought to be making apparent that something is definitely going on with the weather.


    WWG1WGA

    “Hope has two beautiful daughters; their names are Anger and Courage. Anger at the way things are, and Courage to see that they do not remain as they are.”
    St. Augustine of Hippo

  2. #602
    We just had a shower here! It was enough to totally wet down the sidewalks and ground, but not enough to wet the walks under the large trees. There was not a single cloud in the sky!

    I saw this once before a very long time ago, but there were clouds at the sides of the sky but just not anywhere overhead. This clear sky shower is new to me and I an 74 years old. No rainbow then or this time.

    Is this what is called a sun shower? Does it even belong on this thread or is it fairly common?

  3. #603
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Green County, Kentucky
    Posts
    9,730
    Quote Originally Posted by Pinecone View Post
    It's not just the cold and rain, but plant diseases that will change as the temperature cools and weather gets more extreme. I've had to go to container gardening and its got new problems that I'm learning to deal with now. When I had my greenhouse it had unique problems, too. Those who think they can just throw up a greenhouse for food production could be in for a steep learning curve at the worst possible time.
    Greenhouses can be very useful tools, but if anyone is going to depend on them for a prolonged period of time, they will need to keep on hand the materials to repair it. Glass ones will need panes replaced from time to time; plastic covers have to be replaced every two to four years usually, depending on the quality of the plastic used. Fiberglass can last up to ten or twenty years, but by then it will be yellowed enough that the plants inside won't be growing very well. I don't know if there is any greenhouse cover, other than glass, that will last a lifetime.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  4. #604
    We have had heavy rain every day for 2 weeks. Rain is common here (S. La.) but we’ve had more heavy and consistent rain in the last few years than I can remember. Also, the light looks different, looks like autumn light (September/October). I noticed that about a week ago. It’s like the angle of the sun is fall like. Also, this is the first year that I have seen (in the 25 years that I’ve lived here) that we had an actual winter (multiple significant snow falls and an extended period of sub freezing days) and an actual cool, non-humid, spring.

    ETA ... von kohler, thank you for your posts
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  5. #605
    As for greenhouses, heavy snow is not your friend if it's a hoop house. A few years ago we had a freak snowstorm, and lots of greenhouses north of us collapsed under the weight of the snow. I had one at the time, but kept knocking the snow off it. It survived. Too many didn't. Many looked to be of metal pole construction.

  6. #606
    Quote Originally Posted by BenIan View Post
    We have had heavy rain every day for 2 weeks. Rain is common here (S. La.) but we’ve had more heavy and consistent rain in the last few years than I can remember. Also, the light looks different, looks like autumn light (September/October). I noticed that about a week ago. It’s like the angle of the sun is fall like. Also, this is the first year that I have seen (in the 25 years that I’ve lived here) that we had an actual winter (multiple significant snow falls and an extended period of sub freezing days) and an actual cool, non-humid, spring.

    ETA ... von koehler, thank you for your posts
    I really value getting reports from people dealing with growing, whether farmers or gardeners or actual weather conditions.

    Here in Northern Illinois mid-summer is typically the warmest period with about 10 to 15 days of 90 degree F. heat.

    So far there has been only one 90 degree F. day; the cooler temperatures have been pleasant. The farmer's plantings were delayed about two weeks, but the corn appears to be near normal in size. Of course, the farmers won't know what the yield was until after its harvested.

    von Koehler
    Last edited by von Koehler; 07-12-2018 at 05:00 PM.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  7. #607
    von Koehler, it's good to hear how things are where you live, too. I'm from the Twin Cities (Bloomington) and what you are seeing helps give me a rough idea of how major grain crops might be doing.

    I just read the thread on Main about longhorn ticks. I had a lot of ticks this spring and early summer. They've eased back for now, but if I make it through this coming winter, I do think I'll look into getting a bunch of guineas. When I used to have them, I had no ticks and very, very few chiggers. Wish I could get fertile guinea eggs and put them under one of my good broody hens...this might help keep them roosting in a pen I could close at night so I don't lose them all within the first two years.

    My yard has not been mowed this year and it's awful. Wish guineas would graze like geese do! I really do not want to free range chickens any more now that I have open gardens, but they sure do help keep things cropped down. And guineas keep potato bugs eaten up before there's any damage and that will be super important if we're trying to grow our own food.

  8. #608
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    von Koehler, it's good to hear how things are where you live, too. I'm from the Twin Cities (Bloomington) and what you are seeing helps give me a rough idea of how major grain crops might be doing.

    I just read the thread on Main about longhorn ticks. I had a lot of ticks this spring and early summer. They've eased back for now, but if I make it through this coming winter, I do think I'll look into getting a bunch of guineas. When I used to have them, I had no ticks and very, very few chiggers. Wish I could get fertile guinea eggs and put them under one of my good broody hens...this might help keep them roosting in a pen I could close at night so I don't lose them all within the first two years.

    My yard has not been mowed this year and it's awful. Wish guineas would graze like geese do! I really do not want to free range chickens any more now that I have open gardens, but they sure do help keep things cropped down. And guineas keep potato bugs eaten up before there's any damage and that will be super important if we're trying to grow our own food.
    Thinking about it, the main change in the weather here was that the growing season had been lengthening. In 1985, the last frost was usually on 15th May and the first frost was around October 7 to 15. Since then [which was a Solar Maximum] the growing season added about 6-7 weeks in the Spring and at least a week in the Fall.

    It will be interesting to see if we have an early Fall frost.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  9. #609
    [The reason why this is being posted is not to definitely say this particular volcano is going to be "the big one" but rather as an example of what an Earth affecting volcano would look like. There are many, many volcanoes world-wide which are starting to become active again as the Sun's solar winds diminish and are no longer brushing aside cosmic rays. A volcano ejecting enough dust and gases into the upper atmosphere is what caused the 1816 "Year Without A Summer" before. I tried to clean up the formatting of this article and provide valid links, and it took about a hour to do. It isn't a question of whether or not such an eruption will occur; rather its only a matter of when and where.

    von Koehler]






    Eruptions intensify, off scale seismicity at Anak Krakatau, Indonesia

    http://www.facebook.com/VolcanoDisco...5870255378335/

    Explosive activity at Anak Krakatau in Indonesia continues and its seismicity is reportedly going off the scale today, July 12, 2018.

    "Krakatau is going crazy ... 100 times explosion a day. Very loud and could be heard until Carita, 42 km (26 miles) away," Volcano Discovery's Indonesian volcano expedition leader said July 12.



    PVMBG reported there were four were four ash-producing events at Anak Krakatau on July 4 and 5, each lasting between 30 and 41 seconds. While inclement weather conditions prevented an estimation of the ash-plume height from the event at 05:22 local time on July 4, ash plumes from events at 14:09, 14:25, and 16:51 on July 5 rose 300 - 500 m above the crater rim and drifted N and NW.



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hN6...ature=youtu.be

    1:15 minutes

    At this time, the Alert Level remains at 2 (on a scale of 1-4). Residents and visitors were warned not to approach the volcano within 1 km (0.62 miles) of the crater.

    Geological summary

    The renowned volcano Krakatau (frequently misstated as Krakatoa) lies in the Sunda Strait between Java and Sumatra. The collapse of the ancestral Krakatau edifice, perhaps in 416 CE, formed a 7-km-wide (4.3 miles) caldera.

    Remnants of this ancestral volcano are preserved in Verlaten and Lang Islands; subsequently Rakata, Danan and Perbuwatan volcanoes were formed, coalescing to create the pre-1883 Krakatau Island. Caldera collapse during the catastrophic 1883 eruption destroyed Danan and Perbuwatan volcanoes, and left only a remnant of Rakata volcano.

    This eruption, the 2nd largest in Indonesia during historical time, caused more than 36 000 fatalities, most as a result of devastating tsunamis that swept the adjacent coastlines of Sumatra and Java. Pyroclastic surges traveled 40 km (25 miles) across the Sunda Strait and reached the Sumatra coast.

    After a quiescence of less than a half century, the post-collapse cone of Anak Krakatau (Child of Krakatau) was constructed within the 1883 caldera at a point between the former cones of Danan and Perbuwatan. Anak Krakatau has been the site of frequent eruptions since 1927. (GVP)
    Last edited by von Koehler; 07-13-2018 at 02:27 PM.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  10. #610
    So, I have another item on my list of things to keep up with. Thanks for posting this.

    Since a really large eruption could dim our sunlight for a year or two, I'm reminded to mention something I discovered just this morning. I have a large compost bin in my back yard and while tossing some things in it, I saw five broccoli plants starting from the roots of of plants from the greenhouse that I tossed in there over a month ago. I wouldn't think a thing of this normally, but this bin is in total shade except for about an hour shortly after sun-up. Not distant shade...this bin is under a big gum tree, barely three feet from the bole of the tree. I plan to keep an eye on these plants and see how they do through the summer. Hard to believe they'd grow even in the shade now that it's hitting 90 or higher most days now.

    Maybe a good thing to know of a nutritious plant that might grow in dimmer light? I read that broccoli leaves are as nutritious ad the heads, they just don't' have that one cancer fighting ingredient the heads are said to contain.

  11. #611


    https://steemitimages.com/DQmP4suZcP....se_search.png

    A recreation of temperature changes during the Maunder Minimum. Looks like central USA turned colder while Alaska warmed up.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  12. #612
    [There so many scientific research papers coming out now its impossible to keep up with them. von Koehler]

    Explosive volcanic eruptions triggered by cosmic rays: Volcano as a bubble chamber

    Author

    ToshikazuEbisuzakiaHirokoMiyaharabRyuhoKataokaaTat suhikoSatocYasuhiroIshimined

    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gr.2010.11.004

    Abstract
    Volcanoes with silica-rich and highly viscous magma tend to produce violent explosive eruptions that result in disasters in local communities and that strongly affect the global environment. We examined the timing of 11 eruptive events that produced silica-rich magma from four volcanoes in Japan (Mt. Fuji, Mt. Usu, Myojin-sho, and Satsuma-Iwo-jima) over the past 306 years (from AD 1700 to AD 2005). Nine of the 11 events occurred during inactive phases of solar magnetic activity (solar minimum), which is well indexed by the group sunspot number. This strong association between eruption timing and the solar minimum is statistically significant to a confidence level of 96.7%. [96.7% correlation is proof enough for me. von Koehler] This relationship is not observed for eruptions from volcanoes with relatively silica-poor magma, such as Izu-Ohshima. It is well known that the cosmic-ray flux is negatively correlated with solar magnetic activity, as the strong magnetic field in the solar wind repels charged particles such as galactic cosmic rays that originate from outside of the solar system. The strong negative correlation observed between the timing of silica-rich eruptions and solar activity can be explained by variations in cosmic-ray flux arising from solar modulation. Because silica-rich magma has relatively high surface tension (~ 0.1 Nm−1), the homogeneous nucleation rate is so low that such magma exists in a highly supersaturated state without considerable exsolution, even when located relatively close to the surface, within the penetration range of cosmic-ray muons (1–10 GeV). These muons can contribute to nucleation in supersaturated magma, as documented by many authors studying a bubble chamber, via ionization loss. This radiation-induced nucleation can lead to the pre-eruptive exsolution of H2O in the silica-rich magma. We note the possibility that the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption was triggered by the same mechanism: an increase in cosmic-ray flux triggered by Typhoon Yunya, as a decrease in atmospheric pressure results in an increase in cosmic-ray flux. We also speculate that the snowball Earth event was triggered by successive large-scale volcanic eruptions triggered by increased cosmic-ray flux due to nearby supernova explosions.
    Last edited by von Koehler; 07-13-2018 at 01:28 PM.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  13. #613
    That's a great map! Guess the warm area in the north Atlantic didn't do much to keep the British Isles warm, though, did it? Usually anytime I read something about the US year without a summer, it also mentions how the Thames would freeze in the winter during that little ice age.

  14. #614
    Thanks for the map! That is a great help for planning.

  15. #615
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    out & about
    Posts
    603
    [QUOTE=von Koehler;6944111]

    https://steemitimages.com/DQmP4suZcP....se_search.png

    How do they know what the temperatures were in middle-America during the 1600, 1700 up through the late 1800s when they started keeping records. The chart looks good but can we trust it is accurate? When my family arrived in the Appalachians in the 1780s they struggled to survive; I can't find anything on their observations on the environment - they were too busy just living day to day and I expect most in these areas experienced the same. Unless I can see there were temperature records being kept accurately and faithfully then I can't totally rely on this chart. One thing I know they didn't keep temp statistics in the 1600s in the grain belts of the USA.


    WWG1WGA

    “Hope has two beautiful daughters; their names are Anger and Courage. Anger at the way things are, and Courage to see that they do not remain as they are.”
    St. Augustine of Hippo

  16. #616
    [QUOTE=rolenrock;6945365]
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post


    https://steemitimages.com/DQmP4suZcP....se_search.png

    How do they know what the temperatures were in middle-America during the 1600, 1700 up through the late 1800s when they started keeping records. The chart looks good but can we trust it is accurate? When my family arrived in the Appalachians in the 1780s they struggled to survive; I can't find anything on their observations on the environment - they were too busy just living day to day and I expect most in these areas experienced the same. Unless I can see there were temperature records being kept accurately and faithfully then I can't totally rely on this chart. One thing I know they didn't keep temp statistics in the 1600s in the grain belts of the USA.
    This graph was based on recreation studies based on proxy's; you are right in that no one was taking temperature measurements with accurate instruments. So notice that the graph colors are just large scale representations; not fine grain detailed values for specific locations.

    This is best recreation available but you have to realize its limitations. It completely unrealistic to expect temperature measurements for this era comparable to the current state-of-art observations. It's all we have to go on currently-it has have a wide range of uncertainty.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  17. #617
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    out & about
    Posts
    603
    I agree, it can go in our favor or conditions could be much worse than we think they were. It would be wonderful to find some records from native Americans from the late 1600s through the next hundred years or so. I know, I'm dreaming.

    Oh btw, I think today is our 104th day this year with no sunspots equaling all of 2017's sunspot free days so things don't look too good for our prospects.


    WWG1WGA

    “Hope has two beautiful daughters; their names are Anger and Courage. Anger at the way things are, and Courage to see that they do not remain as they are.”
    St. Augustine of Hippo

  18. #618
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Where its wet alot
    Posts
    6,456
    von Koehler I want to offer you my sincere thanks for your efforts....Unlike the "Deep State's" global warming we have real science in action here.
    JOHN 3:16 / John 8:32 And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you FREE.

  19. #619


    https://globalfreezingyourassoff.fil...c-delusion.jpg

    The difference between the Medieval Warming [which was warmer then today] and the Little Ice Age was "only" 1 and a half degrees Centigrade lower.

    Some studies are calling for a drop of 2 to 3 degrees C. during the Grand Solar Minimum.

    von Koehler
    Last edited by von Koehler; 07-15-2018 at 10:09 PM.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  20. #620
    Quote Originally Posted by rolenrock View Post
    I agree, it can go in our favor or conditions could be much worse than we think they were. It would be wonderful to find some records from native Americans from the late 1600s through the next hundred years or so. I know, I'm dreaming.

    Oh btw, I think today is our 104th day this year with no sunspots equaling all of 2017's sunspot free days so things don't look too good for our prospects.
    I was thinking about that graph; notice that it covered a one hundred year period. Undoubtedly, the boundaries must have shifted so areas alternated between hotter and colder temperatures.

    Still it's the best world wide chart we got; but there are actual written records for Europa which give a much more accurate history for that region.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  21. #621
    Quote Originally Posted by Freeholder View Post
    Greenhouses can be very useful tools, but if anyone is going to depend on them for a prolonged period of time, they will need to keep on hand the materials to repair it. Glass ones will need panes replaced from time to time; plastic covers have to be replaced every two to four years usually, depending on the quality of the plastic used. Fiberglass can last up to ten or twenty years, but by then it will be yellowed enough that the plants inside won't be growing very well. I don't know if there is any greenhouse cover, other than glass, that will last a lifetime.

    Kathleen
    Another potential hazard is hail damage. Hail storms are already becoming more frequent, with larger sized hailstones.

    This only going to get worse as we descend into The Grand Solar Minimum.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  22. #622
    I had damage to the top of my greenhouse from a cat and from windblown dead branches, so I got some of that very expensive clear mending tape for it. That tape came loose within a few weeks. So I got some clear Gorilla tape. It has lasted for a year and a half so far and only two pieces of many have even started to come loose.

  23. #623
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    I suspect that rainfall amounts will be relative, depending on area. I'm seriously worried that we will see ever more difficult weather for planting and harvest... even if we get plenty of good "grass growing" weather. We're in southwestern NY State... we gets tons of "Lake Effect" snow, but I've also observed "lake effect" thunderstorms and rain in the summer... "pop up showers" that appear out of nowhere, on days when the official "experts" at the Weather Bureau say our chance of rain is zero, or ten percent... that start over Lake Erie and then promptly ruin our haying day by dumping a quarter or half an inch over our farm. Very frustrating!

    Because the thing is, "rainy and cool" (think Ireland) can be really good for growing grasses, especially cool season species. One of the main reasons we switched to a rotational grazing system for our dairy (were one of the very first in the state to adopt the "radical" new system back in 1982) was because we often couldn't get into the fields at the optimum time to harvest high quality forage, but the cattle could ALWAYS get out there to graze. There were certainly times when we had to keep them from grazing the regrowth in hay fields to avoid them pugging it up with deep hoofprints, but we had adequate acres of permanent pastures with very deep sod that wasn't easily damaged even in deep mud times. The grasses (especially, although white clover is very persistent and rugged as well) would regrow from deep roots, even after it appeared they had completely destroyed the pastures)

    Unfortunately, if drought (in normally drier areas) IS one of the expected affects of a new cooling period, it's all too likely that large swaths of the American SouthWest may end up being almost useless for agriculture, and sadly, maybe even for ranching/grazing. Economics will affect a lot of decisions... while you may be able to cull numbers and lighten up on the grazing density (possibly having to go from something like 5 acres per cow/calf pair to 15 or even 30 acres per pair), it's simply not economically feasible. And lacking the ability to irrigate (either due to lack of actual aquifer reserves, or-again- economics, where the cost of irrigation equipment simply can't be pencilled out) means that local hay production may be eventually shut down, as well.

    Things like spreader dams on any fields with any sort of slope (just a ridge of soil that's pushed up with a blade, that helps catch runoff and spread it over a wider area, allowing it time to soak into the soil, rather than run down to a creek or whatever and leave the property), ponds at lowest points (again, to help hold whatever water falls on your land), and planting deep rooted plants that will survive periodic (but not years- long) droughts should be considered. Possibly even something as drastic (to a cattleman! And believe me, I sympathize!!) as switching to goats, which are natural browsers, rather than grazers, and which might be able to produce on brushy land (often, land which can't support grass grows up to native species of brush, and goats will often browse even thorny species remarkably well)

    Honestly, I'm glad we're getting older, although I suspect that my feelings of weariness and not wanting to have to try to figure out how to handle these new challenges is likely BECAUSE we're getting older... but honestly, the idea of living where we do and having an even longer winter and shorter warm seasons is NOT appealing! I'm sure it will be possible to adapt and even thrive... people are going to need food, no matter what, and unless the populations absolutely crash, food demands are going to continue to rise. But we'll personally be just concentrating on growing our own foods, along with producing quality beef and chicken for direct sale,and leave the deep thinking about how to adapt major food production in a changing climate to others.

    Quite honestly, after over 40 years of getting screwed by the government's pricing schemes, crooked co-operatives (also encouraged by the government) and rapacious middlemen, I'm about out of patience! Dairy farmers around here are going bankrupt... the smaller family farms have all vanished over the past 30 years, but we're now hearing about several of the big ones (who just keep getting bigger in an attempt to maximize efficiency) who are truly struggling financially. The milk price isn't a whole lot higher than it was in 1980... but on a recent, rare trip to the grocery store, I was absolutely stunned at retail dairy prices... when they are getting over $6 a pound for mozzarella cheese, when the farmer is getting $1.20 for the milk required to make that pound of cheese (and you skim the butterfat off first, and sell it as butter for almost $6 a pound!!), well, something has to change. There's a reason the average age of farmers in this country keeps rising, and is darned near older than the age where most can reasonably be expected to be able to handle the job... it's because younger people take a good, long look at the job, the risks, the rewards and the chances that even if they're the best at farming in their state, they STILL may lose money more years than they make it. And even those who love the life, the work and the challenges think long and hard about whether or why.

    It's going to take real hunger in this country- something that really hasn't been seen since the Great Depression years- before farmers are appreciated and paid proportionate to their worth again. Although they're more likely to be blamed than appreciated at that time, too!

    Summerthyme
    I am not a farmer or rancher so please excuse my ignorance but, I was wondering if there was a seasonal variation in pricing for hay? Is it financially possible to buy enough hay to support your herd? Or is it too expensive?

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  24. #624
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post


    https://steemitimages.com/DQmP4suZcP....se_search.png

    A recreation of temperature changes during the Maunder Minimum. Looks like central USA turned colder while Alaska warmed up.

    von Koehler


    The famous 1851 painting of Washington crossing the Delaware River is often considered today to be an exaggeration; but now I am wondering if the icy river might well be an accurate depiction.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  25. #625


    http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/images...historical.jpg

    For all the CO 2 global warming fans; here's the actual 800,000 year ice core study showing the cycle long before the event of the Industrial Revolution.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  26. #626
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    I am not a farmer or rancher so please excuse my ignorance but, I was wondering if there was a seasonal variation in pricing for hay? Is it financially possible to buy enough hay to support your herd? Or is it too expensive?

    von Koehler
    I'll get back to you in a few days. We're tent camping in 102 degrees in Virginia trying to get a dog bred! And I'm stuck with no Wi-Fi and very limited band width on my phone.

    Summerthyme

  27. #627


    https://scontent-ort2-1.xx.fbcdn.net...38&oe=5BEAF4E0

    It's not looking good...

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  28. #628
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Where its wet alot
    Posts
    6,456
    Phew, I live on a 6 acre plot, that is totally forested...so if worst comes to worst, I can chop down some trees and feed my wood stove. Plus I have a spare bedroom full of freeze dried foods.....but I expect to pass away before things get really cold.
    JOHN 3:16 / John 8:32 And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you FREE.

  29. #629
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  30. #630
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  31. #631
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,645
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    And harvest, store and protect.

  32. #632
    Looks like we made it Publius!

    THREE WEEKS WITHOUT SUNSPOTS: As July 17th comes to a close, the sun has been blank for 21 straight days--a remarkable 3 weeks without sunspots. To find an equal stretch of spotless suns in the historical record, you have to go back to July-August 2009 when the sun was emerging from a century-class solar minimum. We are now entering a new solar minimum, possibly as deep as the last one.


    Solar minimum is a normal part of the solar cycle. Every 11 years or so, sunspot production sputters. Dark cores that produce solar flares and CMEs vanish from the solar disk, leaving the sun blank for long stretches of time. These quiet spells have been coming with regularity since the sunspot cycle was discovered in 1859.

    However, not all solar minima are alike. The last one in 2008-2009 surprised observers with its depth and side-effects. Sunspot counts dropped to a 100-year low; the sun dimmed by 0.1%; Earth's upper atmosphere collapsed, allowing space junk to accumulate; and the pressure of the solar wind flagged while cosmic rays (normally repelled by solar wind) surged to Space Age highs. These events upended the orthodox picture of solar minimum as "uneventful."

    Nice graphic at link, but I can't figure out how to capture it.

    Space weather forecasters have long wondered, will the next solar minimum (2018-2020) be as deep as the previous one (2008-2009)? Twenty-one days without sunspots is not enough to answer that question. During the solar minimum of 2008-2009, the longest unbroken interval of spotlessness was ~52 days, adding to a total of 813 intermittent spotless days observed throughout the multi-year minimum. The corresponding totals now are only 21 days and 244 days, respectively. If this solar minimum is like the last one, we still have a long way to go.

    How does this affect us on Earth? Contrary to popular belief, auroras do not vanish during solar minimum. Instead, they retreat to polar regions and may change color. Arctic sky watchers can still count on good displays this autumn and winter as streams of solar wind buffet Earth's magnetic field. The biggest change brought by solar minimum may be cosmic rays. High energy particles from deep space penetrate the inner solar system with greater ease during periods of low solar activity. NASA spacecraft and space weather balloons are already detecting an increase in radiation. Cosmic rays alter the flow of electricity through Earth's atmosphere, trigger lightning, potentially alter cloud cover, and dose commercial air travelers with extra "rads on a plane."

    At the moment there are no nascent sunspots on the solar disk, so the spotless days counter is likely to keep ticking. Stay tuned for more blank suns and … welcome to solar minimum.

  33. #633
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  34. #634


    http://spaceweather.com/images2018/1...u17njp8tb8qh20

    This is what a "quiet" Sun looks like.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  35. #635
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    35,762
    Quote Originally Posted by Pinecone View Post
    Looks like we made it Publius!

    THREE WEEKS WITHOUT SUNSPOTS: As July 17th comes to a close, the sun has been blank for 21 straight days--a remarkable 3 weeks without sunspots. To find an equal stretch of spotless suns in the historical record, you have to go back to July-August 2009 when the sun was emerging from a century-class solar minimum. We are now entering a new solar minimum, possibly as deep as the last one.


    Solar minimum is a normal part of the solar cycle. Every 11 years or so, sunspot production sputters. Dark cores that produce solar flares and CMEs vanish from the solar disk, leaving the sun blank for long stretches of time. These quiet spells have been coming with regularity since the sunspot cycle was discovered in 1859.

    However, not all solar minima are alike. The last one in 2008-2009 surprised observers with its depth and side-effects. Sunspot counts dropped to a 100-year low; the sun dimmed by 0.1%; Earth's upper atmosphere collapsed, allowing space junk to accumulate; and the pressure of the solar wind flagged while cosmic rays (normally repelled by solar wind) surged to Space Age highs. These events upended the orthodox picture of solar minimum as "uneventful."

    Nice graphic at link, but I can't figure out how to capture it.

    Space weather forecasters have long wondered, will the next solar minimum (2018-2020) be as deep as the previous one (2008-2009)? Twenty-one days without sunspots is not enough to answer that question. During the solar minimum of 2008-2009, the longest unbroken interval of spotlessness was ~52 days, adding to a total of 813 intermittent spotless days observed throughout the multi-year minimum. The corresponding totals now are only 21 days and 244 days, respectively. If this solar minimum is like the last one, we still have a long way to go.

    How does this affect us on Earth? Contrary to popular belief, auroras do not vanish during solar minimum. Instead, they retreat to polar regions and may change color. Arctic sky watchers can still count on good displays this autumn and winter as streams of solar wind buffet Earth's magnetic field. The biggest change brought by solar minimum may be cosmic rays. High energy particles from deep space penetrate the inner solar system with greater ease during periods of low solar activity. NASA spacecraft and space weather balloons are already detecting an increase in radiation. Cosmic rays alter the flow of electricity through Earth's atmosphere, trigger lightning, potentially alter cloud cover, and dose commercial air travelers with extra "rads on a plane."

    At the moment there are no nascent sunspots on the solar disk, so the spotless days counter is likely to keep ticking. Stay tuned for more blank suns and … welcome to solar minimum.


    I'm keeping track and not counting the chickens before their hatched and as of right now I have to wait until tomorrow morning to see if we made a full three weeks.

  36. #636


    http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/plots/mea...meanT_2018.png

    This is the latest chart from the Danish Meteorological Institute for Greenland. The red line shows the current year; the green line shows a long term average. The straight horizontal line shows where the 32 degree F. temperature is.

    The "Summer" temperature is actually below average and only about one degree above F. freezing.

    Early Fall coming?

    http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/meant80n.uk.php



    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  37. #637
    [A meter is equal to 3.28084 feet.]

    http://www.climatedepot.com/2018/07/...limate-change/

    A project of CFACT Support Climate Depot

    ‘Lost Summer for Greenland’: ‘Record late snowpack—lingering into July’ – ‘A big shock’ – But the record cold & snow blamed on ‘climate change’
    'This year broke all records'

    By: Marc Morano - Climate Depot July 13, 2018 1:30 PM

    Greenland and Arctic record cold and snow are once again being blamed on “climate change,” according to an article in Scientific American. The July 13 article declares a “Lost Summer for Greenland” as “a record late snowpack—lingering into July” harms the shorebirds breeding season. Jeroen Reneerkens, an avian ecologist at the University of Groningen who has studied Greenland’s shorebirds since 2003, expressed bewilderment at the winter conditions in summer. “The tundra was 100 percent covered in snow, and it was a very deep layer,” he says, estimating an average depth of about one meter. “It was a big shock to see the place like that,” he added. (Related article: GLOBAL COOLING: GLOBAL TEMPS HAVE DROPPED BY 0.65C (1.2F DEGREE) SINCE 2016)

    The article reported: “This year broke all records,” Reneerkens says. “I know my literature about Arctic shorebirds very well and I have never come across something like this.” He is uncertain how this “disastrous” incident will affect the overall populations of these shorebird species. But “given the scale that this happening [on],” he says, “I do expect that this will have large consequences.” He estimates the record-late snowmelt impacted half of the global breeding area for sanderlings, red knots and ruddy turnstones.



    And it’s not just Greenland experiencing a year without a summer. According to Scientific American, “Researchers elsewhere in the Arctic are also reporting unusually late snowmelt this year, with repercussions for shorebirds.

    How does Scientific American account for the “lost summer for Greenland”? The article blames “climate change” for the record cold and snow. “Senner fears this nonbreeding year in eastern Greenland could herald an alarming trend. Climate models predict the Arctic atmosphere will hold more moisture as global temperatures rise, he notes. A wetter atmosphere means more snow in winter and spring, potentially causing late snowmelt to interfere with shorebird reproduction,” the article reported.

    Article excerpt:

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...ds-shorebirds/

    Scientific American: Late Snowpack Signals a Lost Summer for Greenland’s Shorebirds

    Sanderlings, red knots and ruddy turnstones failed to breed this year along the Arctic island’s east coast due to record snow cover

    By Daniel Ackerman on July 13, 2018

    Excerpts: Snowmelt usually allows shorebirds to begin nesting on eastern Greenland’s treeless tundra during the first half of June, says Jeroen Reneerkens, an avian ecologist at the University of Groningen who has studied these birds since 2003. However, when he arrived this year at Zackenberg Station on June 14 to survey sanderlings, a species of Arctic-breeding shorebird, he found they had nowhere to construct their nests. “The tundra was 100 percent covered in snow, and it was a very deep layer,” he says, estimating an average depth of about one meter. “It was a big shock to see the place like that,” he adds…

    Late Snowpack Signals a Lost Summer for Greenland's Shorebirds

    The region’s tundra was still 80 percent covered in snow as of July 10, according to observations provided by a staff member at Zackenberg…Climatic challenges like late snowmelt in their breeding grounds only compound the birds’ plight… “A nonbreeding year is pretty extreme.” Senner says the case is reminiscent of 1992, when shorebirds suffered poor reproductive success after Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines erupted the prior year. The tropical volcano belched atmosphere-cooling particles over the planet—including the far north, causing cold summer temperatures in the Arctic.

    Although shorebird breeding success fluctuates by 20 percent or more from one year to the next, a nonbreeding summer appears to be unprecedented. “This year broke all records,” Reneerkens says. “I know my literature about Arctic shorebirds very well and I have never come across something like this.” He is uncertain how this “disastrous” incident will affect the overall populations of these shorebird species. But “given the scale that this happening [on],” he says, “I do expect that this will have large consequences.” He estimates the record-late snowmelt impacted half of the global breeding area for sanderlings, red knots and ruddy turnstones.



    Researchers elsewhere in the Arctic are also reporting unusually late snowmelt this year, with repercussions for shorebirds. Richard Lanctot, a researcher for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, believes record late snowmelt inhibited nesting near Utqiavik (formerly Barrow) on the northern coast of Alaska.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  38. #638
    I love this 1950's sci-fi movie lobby poster style image:



    Thinking adopting this meme, lol.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  39. #639


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVumLIJJubE

    6:03 minutes

    Reports from real people on the climate changes-Louisiana farmer.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  40. #640
    Weather projection: hotter in far West and Texas while cooler in Central USA.



    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DiTaRsFW0AA9rc5.jpg

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.