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The Grand Solar Minimum
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  1. #4361
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    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out this morning:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFh77FJ1KSo

    Soaklahoma, Kangaroos Freeze in Australia & US Corn Assessment (837)

    Run time is 6:11

    Published on Jun 7, 2019

    Fist crop assessment coming June 09, survey experts will give emergence report and health of US crop even though they will only use the 45% that has emerged as the picture for all of US corn. Australia record snow and kangaroos are in distress because of cold as Al Gore visits to train Australians on Climate Change. Massive bomb cyclone hits France, emerging crops will be hit with 100mph winds. So much above normal rain 274% the state of Oklahoma is now named Soaklahoma.


  2. #4362
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    Isn't it a little late for this?:

    https://www.iceagenow.info/freeze-wa...ths-of-oregon/

    Freeze warning for large swaths of Oregon

    June 7, 2019 by Robert

    URGENT WEATHER MESSAGE… Includes valley locations…A Freeze Warning means sub-freezing temperatures are imminent or highly likely. These conditions will kill crops and other sensitive vegetation.

    National Weather Service Medford OR Fri Jun 7 2019

    FREEZE WARNING UNTIL 8 AM SATURDAY… FROST ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 8 AM PDT SATURDAY…

    * Freeze Warning Low Temperatures: 25 to 32 degrees.

    * Frost Advisory Low Temperatures: 33 to 36 degrees.

    Widespread frost and freezing conditions are expected again tonight into Saturday morning.

    * Locations in the Freeze Warning include:
    Most valley locations in northern Klamath and Lake Counties. Northeast Siskiyou and Northwest Modoc Counties-Modoc County-Klamath Basin-Northern and Eastern Klamath County and Western Lake County-Central and Eastern Lake County-

    This includes Chiloquin, Chemult, Sprague River, Bly, Silver Lake, Beatty, Dorris, Newell, Macdoel, Tulelake, Alturas, Canby, Altamont, Klamath Falls, Crescent, Gilchrist, Lakeview, and Valley Falls

    * Locations in the Frost Advisory include:
    Most valley locations in southern Klamath and Lake Counties as well as in Modoc County. This includes Klamath Falls, Lakeview, Alturas, and Summer Lake.

    * Impacts…Sensitive vegetation could be damaged or killed by frost or sub-freezing weather.

    * View the hazard area in detail at
    https://www.wrh.noaa.gov/mfr/HAZARD

    PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

    A Freeze Warning means sub-freezing temperatures are imminent or highly likely. These conditions will kill crops and other sensitive vegetation.

    A Frost Advisory means that widespread frost is expected. Sensitive outdoor plants may be killed if left uncovered.

    Thanks to David Christian for this info

  3. #4363
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    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out this morning:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFh77FJ1KSo

    Soaklahoma, Kangaroos Freeze in Australia & US Corn Assessment (837)

    Run time is 6:11

    Published on Jun 7, 2019

    Fist crop assessment coming June 09, survey experts will give emergence report and health of US crop even though they will only use the 45% that has emerged as the picture for all of US corn. Australia record snow and kangaroos are in distress because of cold as Al Gore visits to train Australians on Climate Change. Massive bomb cyclone hits France, emerging crops will be hit with 100mph winds. So much above normal rain 274% the state of Oklahoma is now named Soaklahoma.


    tell us more about the kangaroos freezing in Australia please!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  4. #4364
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    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    Isn't it a little late for this?:
    Depends on the elevation where t hee freeze is occurring, if it's at or near sea level then YES it's a wee bit late! Up in the mountains anything goes.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  5. #4365
    Podcast is very disturbing, as always lately. Thanks for the link.

    My computer is acting up and I may have to take it in Monday AM. Don't know why it's even working right now, but if I disappear from this thread for a few days, that is the reason.

  6. #4366
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Podcast is very disturbing, as always lately. Thanks for the link.

    My computer is acting up and I may have to take it in Monday AM. Don't know why it's even working right now, but if I disappear from this thread for a few days, that is the reason.
    You're welcome! I usually post them before I watch them, I'll do that later.

    Oh yuck....I was having trouble with mine last week....for several hours I had what seemed like the black screen of death. I have no idea what happened, but thankfully it came out of it. We have an old laptop on Windows 7, but I'm very comfortable with it. I dread the day I need to get another one. Hope it goes well for you.

    Forgot to add - we have several dry days starting today, which would normally be great for getting stuff done outside, but the temps are going into the mid-90s and the heat index upwards of 110. It's already scorching out there. We have frozen water bottles in all the chickens water fonts.

  7. #4367
    For some reason it has just started working again. I have Windows 7, too, because I hate changing familiar things.

    Robert Felix is posting some good things again, isn't he? He must be fairly well settled into his new place already. Is it too nosy to wonder what part of Texas he's moved to?

  8. #4368
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    For some reason it has just started working again. I have Windows 7, too, because I hate changing familiar things.

    Robert Felix is posting some good things again, isn't he? He must be fairly well settled into his new place already. Is it too nosy to wonder what part of Texas he's moved to?
    I thought he said he was moving to the Hill country region, but I'd have to double check that. Here's a link to the Wiki page for the Hill country, it's a big area!:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_Hill_Country

  9. #4369
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    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM4_bv320v8

    June Snow Grand Canyon, France Bombogenesis & More Lost Crops Ontario (838)

    Run time is 6:35

    Published on Jun 8, 2019

    We were told by Al Gore that snow would be a thing of the past and our children would never know what snow is, well there was snow from May 30-June 06 in the Grand Canyon. A peak at Ontario crop losses and delayed planting and a bombogenesis slams the french corn growing region. #grandsolarminimum #corn #bombcyclonefrance #noplant19




  10. #4370
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    Found this on Sott.net this morning, it's from 31 May 19 but I don't believe it's been posted yet (pics and links at the website):

    https://www.sott.net/article/414420-...-in-The-Making

    A Global Food Disaster is in The Making

    F. William Engdahl
    New Eastern Outlook
    Fri, 31 May 2019 00:00 UTC

    No, this is not at all an endorsement of the apocalyptic scenarios of AOC or that famous young Swedish climate expert, Greta. It is, however, a look at unusual weather disasters in several key growing regions from the USA to Australia, the Philippines and beyond that could dramatically affect food availability and prices in the coming year. That in turn could have major political implications depending on how the rest of the growing season develops.

    USA Midwest Waterlogged

    According to the latest May 20 report of the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) of the US Department of Agriculture, corn and soybean crops are well behind the planting growth levels normal this time of the planting season. They report that only 49% of all planned corn acreage in the US has been planted compared with 78% at this time a year ago. Of that only 19% has yet emerged from the ground compared to 47% in May 2018. In terms of soybeans, barely 19% of crops have yet been planted compared with 53% a year before. Rice acreage planted is down to 73% compared to 92% a year ago in the six US rice-growing states. Of course, should weather dramatically improve the final harvest numbers could improve. It is simply too early to predict.

    Comment: Crop catastrophe hits US Midwest: Latest USDA report outlines nightmare food production scenario

    The USA is by a wide margin the world largest soybean producer with 34 percent of the world's soybean production and 42% of world exports prior to the China trade battles. The US is also the world largest corn or maize producer, almost double China, the number two. A serious harvest failure in these two crops could significantly affect world food prices, leaving aside the unfortunate fact that almost all US soybeans and corn are GMO crops. They are mainly used in animal feed.

    A major factor in the disruption of the US Midwest growing season is the fact that the past 12 months have seen the greatest precipitation levels since the US Government began keeping statistics in 1895, according to the US NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. Record snowfall followed by abnormally heavy rains are the reason.

    Noteworthy is the fact that a strong Pacific El Niņo was in play during 2015-16 and a new El Niņo has been confirmed this past winter, somewhat earlier than normal. Precisely how that affected the current weather is not yet clear. El Niņo is the periodic warming of the equatorial eastern and central Pacific Ocean.

    Connected with solar activity, not manmade factors, it can shift global weather patterns over a period of months, bringing the possibility of more warm, cold, wet or dry weather in parts of the world. They occur in cycles every several years, usually every two to seven years, and it is notable that there is a confirmed, if relatively weak El Nino which is expected to reach peak this month of May. The NOAA in April estimated that the current El Niņo conditions are likely to continue through the Northern Hemisphere for spring 2019 (~80% chance) and summer (~60% chance).

    Comment: See also: Global freezing: 15-year ice age predicted to hit in only 4 years as sun prepares to 'hibernate'

    Australia and Philippines Severe Drought

    While the Midwest USA farm-belt is waterlogged, other regions of the globe suffer drought, most notably, Australia, a major grain producer. For the first time since 2007 Australia is being forced to import wheat, mainly from Canada. Last year drought caused a 20% crop harvest reduction. The Government has issued a bulk import permit to deal with the situation. Current wheat harvest estimates are for only 16 million metric tons, half of what it was two seasons ago. Australia is in recent years the number five world wheat export nation.

    Adding to the shortfall of grains, The Philippines is experiencing a major drought since February 2018, which is devastating the current rice crop. Although the country is not one of the world top rice producers - India, Thailand, Vietnam and Pakistan comprise a total of some 70% all rice export - it has significant political impact on the troubled country.

    Another country being hit by severe drought is North Korea. There rainfall so far this year is lowest since 1982. State media reports that a "severe drought has been lingering in all parts" of the country. The average precipitation since January is only 42.3% of the average annual precipitation of 5 inches. This comes as the country experiences significant food shortages. While data is likely politicized, effect of international sanctions do not help.

    While these significant shortfalls are still not grounds for declaring global emergency, notably they take place at the same time the Peoples' Republic of China is in the midst of the worst infestation of deadly African Swine Fever across the entire China pig population. USDA estimates that as many as 200 million pigs must be slaughtered this year if the contagion is to be at all contained. China is the world's largest pig producer by far with some 700 million. As if this were not bad enough, the country is being hit by a plague of Fall Armyworms which could devastate crops such as corn or soybeans across China.

    This all does not take into account the various warzones around the world from Yemen to Syria to the Congo where agriculture production has been devastated as a casualty of war.

    Russia as New Grain Power?

    These current crop difficulties or possible major harvest shortfalls could be a major advantage to Russia, the country which, since imposition of US and EU sanctions in 2014, has emerged in the past three years to become the world's largest wheat exporter, far surpassing both Canada and the United States. This current 2019/2020 harvest year, Russia is estimated to export a record 49.4 million tons of wheat, some 10% above a year ago. Last year Russia accounted for 21% of total world wheat exports compared with around 14% for the USA and about the same for Canada.

    Western sanctions on Russia have had the interesting effect of forcing the government to take measures to become self-sufficient in food production. The Government banned GMO plantings or imports in 2016, and enjoys some of the most productive black earth soils on the planet. At least in the short term, Russia stands well suited to step in to address the various harvest shortfalls in the world grain markets.

    While it is unlikely that it will be asked to sell grain to the US, were that to happen, it would be a major historic irony. During the Soviet harvest failures of the early 1970's it was Secretary of State Henry Kissinger who orchestrated, with the complicity of Cargill and the grain cartel, sale of tons of grain to the USSR at enormously inflated prices in what came to be called the Great Grain Robbery, sending grain prices in the Chicago commodity exchanges to 125 year highs. Combined with the 1973-74 OPEC 400% oil price shock, one in which the sneaky diplomacy of the same Kissinger played a central role, food and oil were responsible for the great inflation of the 1970's, not the wage demands of American or European workers as we were told.

  11. #4371
    Thanks, TxGal...a good article. It would have been better if the author had not felt it necessary to sneak in a couple of small political digs. I've learned to spot those pretty well, probably because lately everyone seems to be doing it.

    The mention of rice reminded me of the recent posts here about rice planting being way behind right on my doorstep here in Arkansas. I've gotten more rice because of it and now I think I need to make a stop at our Ace Hardware for more two-quart canning jars. I eat a lot of split peas, cooked plain and pureed, and the resulting soup is more balanced and a little tastier to eat with rice in it.

  12. #4372
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Thanks, TxGal...a good article. It would have been better if the author had not felt it necessary to sneak in a couple of small political digs. I've learned to spot those pretty well, probably because lately everyone seems to be doing it.

    The mention of rice reminded me of the recent posts here about rice planting being way behind right on my doorstep here in Arkansas. I've gotten more rice because of it and now I think I need to make a stop at our Ace Hardware for more two-quart canning jars. I eat a lot of split peas, cooked plain and pureed, and the resulting soup is more balanced and a little tastier to eat with rice in it.
    Welcome! I really dislike the political angles they try to sneak it, too. Rice is a big concern of mine, too. It's versatile, easy to digest, and just rounds out a meal nicely. We had been making homemade dog food for our dog for years, and always kept a good size amount on hand; we'd buy the 50lb bags of jasmine rice at Costco. Now we don't use it as much and I'm doing exactly what you're doing, but using 1 quart jars instead. I have all our beans and legumes in 1 qt jars also. The jars are pretty darn handy for sticking in out of the way places, too. It makes getting in a good supply as easy as possible.

  13. #4373
    There's no big box stores close enough for me to drive my elderly truck to, but WM has 20# bags of rice for a good price, and I can't really lift more than 20# anyway. These 20# bags were over $12 at one time, but at present they are, I think, $8.53. I'm expecting that to go way up by or before the end of summer.

    Any time I've bought canning jars, I've always bought several extra boxes of lids along with the case of jars. I like using the canning jars for storage because when the contents are consumed, there is a perfectly good, usable canning jar. At one time I took the lids out of their little boxes and stored them in the big gallon sized glass pickle jars. (I need to find the card on which I wrote down
    Summerthyme's instructions for "refreshing" unused but old canning lids. I have no idea where I've put it!) I always put a piece of thick plastic (like from a rice bag!) to act as a sort of gasket on the rim of the pickle jars that have what I call the "bubble lid" rather than a good threaded lid. I think that pantry moths and those tiny narrow bugs can get into the bubble lids.

    I like the 2-quart canning jars for storing my finely flaked dehydrated greens, too, even though I wouldn't ever can anything in that size jar. I wish Dollar General had Golden Harvest jars in the wide-mouth size, but I've never seen any. Maybe there's no such thing.
    ------
    Now that I think of it, I believe I'll use the Golden Harvest quarts for my latest rice purchase. The quart jars will be more versatile in the long term. And it will save me a trip to the far end of town.

  14. #4374
    I just looked at the ten-day forecast and we are supposed to have five days of highs in the 70s and lows in the 50s. This is totally wrong for Arkansas approaching the middle of June!

    I wonder if any competent, honest meteorologist are making any long-term forecasts for the next three months or so? Like maybe someone with real experience and instincts instead of a technician who knows how to create computer models? If it's going to stay cooler, maybe I could still plant some beets and carrots and even cabbage. Oh, how I wish I'd been able to get the rest of my outdoor containers reworked with the better soil!

  15. #4375
    I just checked the Adapt 2030 Youtube page and David has just posted one of his little short podcasts.

    It runs 11:07.

    I keep hoping he'll post the next longer one, which will be # 206.

    TxGal, maybe you can post this new one here when you find time? Thanks.

  16. #4376
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    I just checked the Adapt 2030 Youtube page and David has just posted one of his little short podcasts.

    It runs 11:07.

    I keep hoping he'll post the next longer one, which will be # 206.

    TxGal, maybe you can post this new one here when you find time? Thanks.
    Hi Martinhouse, I'm back with the living I think. We had a heat index of 110 yesterday, and darned if I didn't spend too much time outside and get heat exhaustion. Not fun, and I'll have to be careful for a few weeks, but 65 and excessive heat don't mix!

    I'll go pull that in now.

  17. #4377
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    Thank you, Martinhouse! Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hG8CrS69EY

    Trial of the Century Classifying a Grand Solar Minimum (840)

    Run time is 11:07

    Published on Jun 10, 2019

    New litigation in Australia will require companies to create risk assessments for climate change and how companies are going to respond to the changing climate. This will give a chance to risk assess the Grand Solar Minimum or CO2, both will be acceptable as the wording is not clear on what risk for the planet or companies operating. The new laws are targeting company officers and governments themselves, at least it can be an A or B choice.


  18. #4378
    TxGal, thanks. I thought it was fairly interesting.

    Felix is finally back to posting normally and has put up some good things. Not that they necessarily should be on this thread, just that they are quite varied and interesting. For those who don't know, his site is iceagenow.info

    Sorry the heat got to you. Take care of yourself!!!!!

  19. #4379
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    Sep 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    TxGal, thanks. I thought it was fairly interesting.

    Felix is finally back to posting normally and has put up some good things. Not that they necessarily should be on this thread, just that they are quite varied and interesting. For those who don't know, his site is iceagenow.info

    Sorry the heat got to you. Take care of yourself!!!!!
    I'm trying to catch up, thanks! I'll check Felix out.

    I will, I should have learned this by now. I've done it a few times and either last summer or the one before I wound up in the ER getting rehydrated. I stayed in most of the day and have been pushing a variety of fluids and eating lightly...very lightly. This time I think I caught it in time :-)

  20. #4380
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    Jul 2006
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    Maine
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    Spoke with my uncle who lives around Saratoga NY. He was making hay like mad in these last few beautiful days but all the farmers are a month behind planting their crops. Here in So ME guy I work withs family runs a good size hay operation and they got about 3/4s of what they normally get for a first cutting because of fields still too wet to run equipment in.

  21. #4381
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    http://strangesounds.org/2019/06/usa...ops-video.html

    (Note: Videos/pics at the link)

    Some Ohio farmers won’t plant crops at all

    By Strange Sounds - Jun 11, 2019

    The constant rains this spring are leaving some Ohio farmers wondering whether they’ll be able to plant any crops this year.

    Just one-third of Ohio’s corn crop had been planted as of a week ago. In normal years, farmers in the state would have nearly all of their corn fields planted.

    Soybean planting also is way behind because of the wet weather.

    U.S. Department of Agriculture statistics show that only Indiana is farther off the pace than Ohio when it comes to the delays in planting.

    The Ohio Farm Bureau Federation tells The Blade newspaper that farmers in the northwestern part of the state have been hit the hardest.

    The farm bureau says it’s the worst planting season since it started tracking planting progress in the 1970s.

  22. #4382
    It's not raining here right now, but the forecast shows several days of rain coming by next week. Again.

    And it was 54 degrees when I got up this morning! I moved here in Jun of 1977. I don't remember June being this chilly overnight since I moved here, Arkansas, 42 years ago. And if this is a GSM trend, in another year or two, I'll have to worry all summer about my garden freezing. That is, if it hasn't already rotted from the constant rain we get with one system after another moving across the country.

    For now, the potatoes I planted recently are now a foot high, thick and dark green. These are the grocery store potatoes I stored in a crisper drawer since last fall and they sprouted this spring, and with no rotten ones at all. Even with all the rain we've had in the last month, they are doing fine in the outdoor containers.

  23. #4383
    I have tried to follow the Ag reports for Indiana.

    The last planting date is usually about June 10. As of the end of last week, about 1/3 of the fields had not been planted.

    Research from Purdue has found that in the past few years, late planted beans have a better germination rate but yield less.

    DD's father-in-law in south central Indiana, has still not been able to plant some of the fields.
    that which one man receives without working for, another man must work for without receiving." -- Kenneth W. Sollitt

  24. #4384
    We had bad thunderstorms here night before last. Woke up to no Internet and this morn still have none am posting on cell. It is cool enough here (South Texas) that I need a sweater in the morning. Is raining now and will be all day.

    There were three kinds of bugs eating my garden alive. I sprayed and then it rained. No bugs this morning. This is a good day for canning and knitting.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  25. #4385
    Since Dennis has open registration, maybe Mr. Felix would like to sign up?
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  26. #4386
    That would be neat, if Robert Felix were a member here! I imagine, though, that now, right after the big move he's made, that he'll be awfully busy for a while. I'm surprised he's already back to posting as much as he is.

    I stopped to get a few peaches from the peach lady when I went to my small town this morning. I asked about my "children" and she said they are all doing well. The bantams are still growing, so they are good-sized, as I'd hoped. And her grandchildren have already bred the rabbits and have named them and they hold them and pet them and spoil them rotten. She said it's easy to tell they had been "loved on" a lot before. I'm glad they didn't lose that tameness while I had them.

    When I asked her if I could get breeding pairs or sets from offspring if things get really bad, she said absolutely. So if things do get bad, economically, I will have a fresh start of chickens and rabbits, if I'm able to care for them and there is a way to get them to me.

    I feel lots better about having to give my little critters away, now that I've talked to the lady about them.

  27. #4387
    On the main forum there is a thread about an article from Zerohead concerning the growing problem with the virus of African Swine Virus (Pig Ebola) set to destroy most of the global swine herds.

    I recall that the historical info from the last Grand Solar Minimum, during the earlier years of the cycle, there was also a virus that began in the Alps and spread across most of Europe. This virus killed off most of the domestic and wild herds. (see post # 1647)

    The parallel is striking and concerning.
    that which one man receives without working for, another man must work for without receiving." -- Kenneth W. Sollitt

  28. #4388
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    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out; by the title it looks like a good one:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aE45O5CJ-VU

    Infrastructure Already Can't Cope With Grand Solar Minimum Intensification (841)

    Run time is 10:24

    Published on Jun 11, 2019

    Long before we get to the most intense effects of the Grand Solar Minimum around 2028, our modern infrastructure is already having a difficult time coping. Denver International Airport brought to a standstill from a Summer, "Winter Storm", highways and bridges washed away in biggest floods ever across America, farm machinery unable to cope with muddy fields disappearing into quicksand grow zones and these are events in May/June 2019. Where do we go from here to prepare our societies for the coming changes. Plus a look at gargoyles in metal detectors at Denver International Airport.


  29. #4389
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    That would be neat, if Robert Felix were a member here! I imagine, though, that now, right after the big move he's made, that he'll be awfully busy for a while. I'm surprised he's already back to posting as much as he is.

    I stopped to get a few peaches from the peach lady when I went to my small town this morning. I asked about my "children" and she said they are all doing well. The bantams are still growing, so they are good-sized, as I'd hoped. And her grandchildren have already bred the rabbits and have named them and they hold them and pet them and spoil them rotten. She said it's easy to tell they had been "loved on" a lot before. I'm glad they didn't lose that tameness while I had them.

    When I asked her if I could get breeding pairs or sets from offspring if things get really bad, she said absolutely. So if things do get bad, economically, I will have a fresh start of chickens and rabbits, if I'm able to care for them and there is a way to get them to me.

    I feel lots better about having to give my little critters away, now that I've talked to the lady about them.
    Martinhouse, I'm so happy that your chickens and rabbits are in a loving home and doing so well! It sounds like you found them the perfect home with kind, loving people. And the fact that they'll restart you in hens and bunnies if things really go south is wonderful and a perfect solution. Kind of like an insurance policy.

    We woke up this morning to the upper 50s, and it feels great, but I know the tomato plants aren't too happy about it. They're growing, just not as fast or as full of fruit as they should be. I think we have about 12 small tomatoes total on 4 plants. The volunteer tomato plant that I hoped was a Cherokee Purple appears to be a Juliet, and is setting fruit nicely, so I'm not complaining.

    Martinhouse, with your potatoes in containers do you add dirt as they grow taller, or are they already at max coverage for the container space you have? We're working the hay method as a test, but they've grown so fast covering them back with hay would be a bit of a mess. Some have started flowering, which I thought meant the end of potato production.

  30. #4390
    Thanks for the link, TxGal. This #841 definitely IS a good one! It's all pictures which really drive the message home for me because I do not have TV.
    -----
    It's awfully chilly in my house this week, even though there's been sun part of the time. I hate cold weather and am wondering if I'll ever have nice hot summer weather again? I'm noticing that lately, instead of what I was calling yo-yo or see-saw weather the last couple of years. now we are getting up to a week of warm weather and then a spell of colder weather, and then a spell of rainy weather. Three different things that I have to plan my outdoor work around. It makes gardening bad enough and I can't imagine how awful it must be for the farmers and ranchers who haven't given up yet.

    From what I'm seeing, I just don't see how we can grow what we'll need in our own personal gardens. Looks to me like what we grow will be just to supplement what we can store up by buying now before any more people catch on and before there are so many crop failures that there's not a lot to buy.

    It's getting scary, and I think it's barely started.

    Being chilly this week has reminded me that I need to get more fleece fabric. I've found that a double layer of fleece keeps me warm and adding my sweater-knit long johns when summer's over should get me well into colder weather. So there's lots more sewing and knitting to do before real winter gets here, and who knows if it will be early or late in any given year?

    Time to revise my shopping list once again and then I think I'll watch this podcast once again.

  31. #4391
    TxGal, I think when potatoes flower it is the START of the production, The end is when the plants start dying back and that's why you let then sort of wither away before you dig the potatoes.

    I don't hill my potatoes. And since I seem to have become very allergic to wheat straw, I keep back several leaf bags of leaves each fall and use those for "hilling". I've never seen the tubers grow out further up the stalks by hilling. For me hilling just keeps the plants upright so they keep growing and feeding the tubers at ground level and it keeps the sun from hitting the tubers and turning them green.

    Also, I've found that if I can grow potatoes just every other year, I don't seem to have a problem with potato beetles. I realize that could change at any time, but that's the pattern for me for a good many years now. If I do a lot of canning, I don't need to grow them every year. Of course I'm just one person and a whole family might not be able to do this. But then, a whole family would have enough little hands to keep those potato beetles and larvae picked off the plants to save the crop.
    -----
    Upper fifties here this morning, too, and it feels AWFUL to me!

    Have you watched the podcast yet? It was so cool to see a picture of our three favorite GSM "teachers" together in Denver! Felix looks so different now that he's older and has that graying beard!

  32. #4392
    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    Martinhouse, I'm so happy that your chickens and rabbits are in a loving home and doing so well! It sounds like you found them the perfect home with kind, loving people. And the fact that they'll restart you in hens and bunnies if things really go south is wonderful and a perfect solution. Kind of like an insurance policy.

    We woke up this morning to the upper 50s, and it feels great, but I know the tomato plants aren't too happy about it. They're growing, just not as fast or as full of fruit as they should be. I think we have about 12 small tomatoes total on 4 plants. The volunteer tomato plant that I hoped was a Cherokee Purple appears to be a Juliet, and is setting fruit nicely, so I'm not complaining.

    Martinhouse, with your potatoes in containers do you add dirt as they grow taller, or are they already at max coverage for the container space you have? We're working the hay method as a test, but they've grown so fast covering them back with hay would be a bit of a mess. Some have started flowering, which I thought meant the end of potato production.
    Pinch the flowers off and add hay or dirt. Keep growing. Don't fertilize or your growth is all on top and tiny spuds.

    That bad storm three nights ago killed the main transmitter and five sectors, one of which just had to be mine. They don't know when they will get it repaired. We live in a freaking banana republic!
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  33. #4393
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,464
    Oh, thanks for all that great info! I thought my potatoes were already done for, the weather has just been weird.

    We have I think another day of cooler night temps, but on the weekend we slide back into mid to upper 90s daytime temps and upper 70s for the night for about a week. Looks like rain for Sunday and Monday, though.

    I think I'll watch it during lunchtime. We're giving up trying to work in the morning, too hot. We just take care of the poultry for the day and switch to inside projects. Evening is now the best time for anything outside.

  34. #4394
    It's been 63 the past couple of mornings. High today 72. Not S. Tx. weather. Feels good on the skin but on deeper level feels Wrong.
    Last edited by Seeker22; 06-12-2019 at 12:16 PM.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  35. #4395
    Thanks for the info on the potato flowers, Seeker22. I learn something important here every day. Hopefully you'll get power back quickly. Maybe while they're at it, they'll fix some of the underlying problems. (Yes, I also believe in the Easter Bunny. )

  36. #4396
    I've never seen a need to pinch off potato blossoms... for sure, the commercial places don't do it! Some varieties only produce very sparse blossoms, others will be covered with them. They *do* signal the start of production... once I see blossoms opening on my plants, I know that in 7-10 dsys, I'll be able to start stealing new potatoes.

    Hilling is vital because the tubers form *above* the seed piece, and if there isn't enough soil (or very thick mulch) tubers may push up into the sunlight, which turns them green and poisonous. We have a short season, and find that two hill8ngs is plenty...the first one as soon as the plants are up enough for us to be able to follow the row, an a second one 3 weeks or so later, but not after they start to bloom.

    The method whereby you keep hilling and hilling, creating a tall, covered stem with a smallish green plant on top, *theoretically* gives more tubers, but I've never seen it. I think part of the problem is that the more green tops you have, the bigger/more tubers will form, as they are the "food engine" of the plant. If you keep covering leaves with multiple hillings, you are reducing the plant's ability to perform photosynthesis. I suspect that method might work better near the equator, where you don't have the daylength changes that signal plants to hurry and complete the lifecycle before winter.

    Summerthyme

  37. #4397
    I didn't know that about pinching the flowers off of the potato plants. I did know they should not be over fertilized into growing all foliage, but that is true of many plants.

    My sister just told me that she talked to my brother this morning. He is pretty concerned about what we're hearing in these podcasts and they were discussing freeze-dried foods. They have gone together on getting a good deal of it in the past and so he went online while they were talking and she said the prices were way up. HUGELY way up! The only thing she would want would be the dehydrated scrambled eggs. She said they are really good, whereas the powdered eggs are totally nasty. Anyway, they got the scrambled eggs before on sale for somewhere between $20 and $30 for a #10 can and now they are $50 per can!

    So anyone who wants to stock up further, do it NOW!!!!!

    I am going to see about getting that small chicken pen repaired within the next month or so, even if I have to figure out a way to do it myself.
    -----
    Summerthyme, I agree about the potatoes growing just above the seed piece and have never understood how people say they grow all along the stem above. The potatoes I grow sure don't do that! I only hill enough to keep the sun off the potatoes and except for maybe a few handfuls of dirt now and then, it's always been with straw or leaves. I don't use hay because it has too many weed seeds.

  38. #4398
    Pinch off potato flowers on some plants and leave flowers on the rest- experiment. Pinching off flowers makes the tubers larger because there is no longer competition for nutrients between flowers and tubers. Water well and fertilize.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  39. #4399
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,464
    You all are amazing, thank you so much! When we grew potatoes in the ground we didn't think much about it, just did the usual hills and almost forgot about them. We harvested potatoes so it went fine on it's own. Doing something different when the weather is just really off is making me overthink, I guess.

    "Feels good on the skin but on deeper level feels Wrong."

    Seeker22, I couldn't have said it better.

    The last round of storms we got a few days ago had cloud formations we couldn't describe and just looked like they didn't belong here...maybe not on the planet. Just really weird.

    I just checked Mountain House's website, gosh the prices ARE up a lot. They can be had at Emergency Essentials, and a lot of other places. Usually even Costco has them online, but not a great variety. The 40-year shelf life is a real draw, even for the pouches. Sometimes we'll pick up a pouch or two at WalMart (ick), or a sporting goods store.

  40. #4400
    Was cold and rainy. We got some heat back yesterday, but not before I lost a Favorelle chick to the chill. It's the first week of June, and they are well-feathered, just small. Well, I should have thought about the temps, but I didn't. The next night they came in, and stayed warm.

    I found a local source for Cotournix eggs, and the neighbor lent me an incubator. That

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