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The Grand Solar Minimum
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  1. #1801
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Green County, Kentucky
    Posts
    9,889
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    I'm not sure if the hulless seeds are higher in oil (once you remove the weight of the hulls from the regular ones?)

    Probably the best compromise would be planting Baby Bear pumpkins. They are a PvP open pollinated variety which is "semi-hulless'... the seeds make excellent roasted snacks, but don't have the germination problems the Kakai hulless do. And they produce MANY small (pie pumpkin size) fruits which are good eating quality. Mine average 10 pumpkins per vine!

    On the germination problems, I've discovered that you can get nearly 100% germination simply by presprouting the seeds in damp paper towels in a warm spot. At about 7 days, it's very obvious which seeds are viable and strong. Transplant them, water in well, and barring rabbits or woodchucks, you're almost guaranteed a healthy plant.

    I do this with all my vines now... it gives me a bit of a head start, and saves a TON of seeds. Instead of planting 4-5 seeds in a hill and then snipping off all but the one or two strongest, you only plant the strongest pre-sprouted seed.

    Summerthyme
    That sounds good. Do you suppose Fedco's Naked Bear is basically the same thing as Baby Bear?

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  2. #1802
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,713
    Quote Originally Posted by Freeholder View Post
    That sounds good. Do you suppose Fedco's Naked Bear is basically the same thing as Baby Bear?

    Kathleen
    Johnnys Seeds in Maine and High Mowing in VT are a couple other places to look if you want northern seed.

    We got the Fedco seed catalog yesterday and my daughter is already planning her rabbit garden.

  3. #1803
    Quote Originally Posted by Freeholder View Post
    That sounds good. Do you suppose Fedco's Naked Bear is basically the same thing as Baby Bear?

    Kathleen
    Nope... it's fully hulless.. and unfortunately, a hybrid.

    It wouldn't surprise me if Baby Bear is one of it's parents.

    Summerthyme

  4. #1804
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Green County, Kentucky
    Posts
    9,889
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    Nope... it's fully hulless.. and unfortunately, a hybrid.

    It wouldn't surprise me if Baby Bear is one of it's parents.

    Summerthyme
    I may try it anyway, and see what happens. I'm making a seed order from Fedco, and possibly a small order from one other seed house; don't want to order from too many different places. Trying to make a true-breeding pumpkin out of a hybrid can be my breeding experiment for this year (I know it's been done with other plants, so it is possible).

    I used to order from Johnny's, but Fedco had more of what I wanted so I switched a few years ago. Haven't heard of High Mowing -- I'll check that one out.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  5. #1805
    Power Outage Knocks Out Pipelines in Canada

    Tuesday, December 04, 2018, 6:56 PM ET
    Wall Street Journal
    By Vipal Monga

    TORONTO -- A power outage in Western Canada knocked out major pipelines that transport oil to the U.S. on Tuesday, the latest setback for Canada's bottle-necked crude exports.

    Power problems in the province of Saskatchewan on Tuesday were affecting operations at parts of Enbridge Inc.'s mainline system, which can carry 2.6 million barrels of oil a day. The company said that the outages were a result of extreme weather and that it didn't know when operations would resume. It said there was no safety risk from the outages.

    The outages also affected TransCanada Corp., which operates the Keystone pipeline, which has capacity to carry 590,000 barrels, industry sources said. A TransCanada spokesman was unable to immediately confirm the company's pipeline system was affected.

    The problems caused the discount between the Canadian oil benchmark, Western Canadian Select, and the U.S. benchmark, West Texas Intermediate, to widen to $24.50 a barrel Tuesday afternoon from a $23 discount on Monday, said Dylan White, market analyst for Genscape Inc.

    "Right now the big question is, when will they get the pipelines back up, " he said.

    Canadian oil has been trading at a cheaper price than U.S. crude because some of it is landlocked in the country due to a shortage of pipeline capacity, and producers have few options to get it to market. The situation caused the gap between U.S. and Canadian oil to widen to more than $50 a barrel in October.

    That prompted the oil-rich province of Alberta on Sunday to announce steps to curtail production by nearly 9%, or 325,000 barrels a day, for much of next year, in a bid to lift depressed prices.

    Alberta's move provided an immediate lift to Canadian crude prices, narrowing the discount by $5 a barrel Monday, but Tuesday's outages may temporarily make them worse.

    "This is just the latest episode in a long laundry list of setbacks for a market that simply hasn't been able to catch a break," said Michael Tran, global energy analyst for RBC Capital Markets.

    Write to Vipal Monga at vipal.monga@wsj.com

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/power-o...ada-1543966878

  6. #1806
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  7. #1807
    [Melodi, snow for Dublin?]



    https://i2.wp.com/electroverse.net/w...40%2C473&ssl=1

    Extreme Weather GSM



    EUROPE’S SHOCKING 10 DAY SNOW FORECAST

    DECEMBER 4, 2018

    Latest GFS runs show heavy snow falling across the majority of Europe from Tues Dec 04 through Fri Dec 14. From East to West, North to South — the continent looks set to get buried.

    UK snowfall is forecast to start Tuesday evening, with the north and south receiving an almost equal share by Dec 14.

    GFS TOTAL SNOWFALL (DEC 04 – DEC 14)

    Heavy, early December snow is also predicted for all of Eastern and Northern Europe including Scandinavia, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, as well as two-thirds of Spain and Italy…

    …in fact, the majority of European countries can expect snow this coming ten days, with the Alps and Belarus, in particular, set for monster totals.

    The deep arctic trough will bring the mercury tumbling between 6C to 14C below average for vast swathes of the continent.

    While Europe braces for its third arctic blast of the season, North America continues to get buried under record-breaking accumulations:

    GFS TOTAL SNOWFALL (DEC 04 – DEC 14)



    History is repeating.

    The cold times are returning.

    Prepare.

    Grand Solar Minimum
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  8. #1808
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  9. #1809
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    1,977
    We're forecasted for 5" of rain on Friday, could be more. If the temps dipped enough, we'd be in for a world of hurt...for now, flooding is likely.

  10. #1810
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,713
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    What is this a graph of. THe type is so small I cant read it.

  11. #1811
    They are predicting snow for the hills and parts of Northern Ireland, actual snow (except for flurries) is pretty rare in Dublin; it is almost always caused by the Easter Moving (Siberian Express/Beast from the East) rather than the more usual Atlantic based winds and stormy weather that we are currently having.

    Now WE may get snow in the Midlands, but again probably not a lot except on the hilltops (I won't call them mountains); but we are only likely to see real "sticks on the ground snow" if the temperatures go down a lot further than predicted and/or the rain is cold enough (and from up high enough) to fall as serious snow.

    At least we are now in the time of year - December through February/March where some snow isn't that unusual; we can have several years in a row with no snow at all, followed by a couple of snow in's like last year.

    But nearly every time I can remember seriously getting snowed in and/or Dublin looking like Denver Colorado during a blizzard it has been East Moving winds - that might change if things got cold enough but Atlantic Air is usually "warmer" for a given degree of warm (like 35 degrees) rather than the 27 or 28 you really need here for heavy snowfall.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  12. #1812


    https://i1.wp.com/electroverse.net/w...68%2C461&ssl=1

    Cosmic rays continue to increase as Sun goes quiet.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  13. #1813
    https://weather.com/storms/winter/ne...s-appalachians

    Nationwide "winter" storm warning.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  14. #1814
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  15. #1815
    http://www.visir.is/g/2018181209563/...-aldarfjordung

    The glaciers of Iceland did not deteriorate for the first time in a quarter of a century

    Kristján Már Unnarsson writes 4 December 2018



    Looking to Svínafellsjökull, one of the glaciers of Örćfajökull, the southernmost part of Vatnajökull.

    STATION 2 / ARNAR HALLDÓRSSON.

    The largest glaciers in the country remained in place and even expanded in the last twelve months, from autumn to autumn, according to the latest measurements. This is the first time in a century that the Icelandic glaciers do not deteriorate. A glacial specialist considers this a natural deviation from global warming that can be seen by colder waters south of the country. This was stated in Stöđvar 2

    's news. The performance of the Icelandic glaciers is a strong indicator of climate developments in Iceland. Glacier researchers at the University of Iceland Earth Sciences Institute went on an annual survey on Vatnajökull and Langjökull and now the results of these two largest glacier areas are available.



    Finnur Pálsson is a project manager for glacier research at the Geology Institute of the University of Iceland.

    STAGE 2 / SIGURJÓN ÓLASON

    "They stand pretty much this year, which is unusual over the last 25 years. They have been deteriorating, both Vatnajökull and Langjökull, especially Langjökull, "says Finnur Pálsson, project manager of glacier research at the Geological Institute of the University of Iceland.

    Thus, Langjökull had usually diluted about one and a half meters a year in the past twenty years, according to Finn.

    "But in the last few years he has been close to zero, that is, he has neither expanded nor diminished. And that applies to this year, both for Vatnajökull and Langjökull. "

    An annual survey of Hofsjökull, which the Icelandic Meteorological Experts presented for ten days, shows that he has improved slightly between years, and limited measurements on the surface of Mýrdalsjökull show that he also expanded. There really became a significant addition.



    From Hofsjökli.

    INDICATOR / VILHELM.

    Finnur says these figures have no reason to doubt global warming, which is a normal deviation.

    "One reason may be that it's a bit colder sea south of the country," says Finnur.

    A question as to whether this is an indication that Iceland is sailing into the cold spoon, he refers to meteorologists.

    "However, it is a fact that it has been rather colder last few years. Summer in summer was very unusual, maybe not necessarily because of cold, but because it was so heavy for the majority of the summer, especially here in the west of the country. "



    From Langjökull.

    STATION 2 / EGILL AĐALSTEINSSON.

    Interestingly, the warm summer of the eastern part of Iceland was clearly visible on Vatnajökull. Thus, deterioration was measured east of Vatnajökull but further westward.

    And called summer west of Norway was seen on Langjökull.

    "I think there was more snowfall in August on the upper part of Langjökull, which is very unusual," says the project manager of the glacier research at the University.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  16. #1816
    [Australia is a major grain exporter to the world. von Koehler]

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/20...-crop/10579036

    ABARES downgrades predicted winter crop after damaging frosts, driest September on record

    By Jess Davis

    Posted Monday at 13:17



    A wheat crop in western Victoria.

    ABARES predicts Australia's winter crop will be 20 per cent below the 20-year average. (ABC News, file photo)

    Australia's winter crop looks worse than initially predicted after the driest September on record and significant frost damage.

    With harvests underway across most of the country, the latest forecast by the Australian government commodity forecaster ABARES puts crop production 20 per cent below the 20-year-average and the lowest since Australia's last drought in 2008-09.

    The report, released this morning, has predicted a crop of 29.3 million tonnes, nearly 4 million tonnes less than the September forecast.

    #Drought Statement: Australia's driest September on record increases rainfall deficiencies. More at: https://t.co/qGzwLvUWcN pic.twitter.com/cmFcTtsbF2

    — Bureau of Meteorology, Australia (@BOM_au) October 3, 2018

    Just two seasons ago, farmers across Australia's grain growing regions were preparing to reap a record-breaking 59 million tonne harvest.

    ABARES senior economist Peter Collins said crops deteriorated after Australia recorded its driest September on record, a critical month for crops because spring rains could provide major boosts to yields.

    "Since September we've downgraded the forecast in just about every state except WA — in NSW there's been a downgrade of 19 per cent, Victoria 31 per cent and Queensland 12 per cent and South Australia 21 per cent," Mr Collins said.

    "That's been because early in spring a lot of crops needed rain, that rain didn't come and it remained dry in some areas in October or it came too late."

    Frost damage hurts farmers

    The danger of frosts is also at its highest in September and significant frost events damaged crops in NSW, Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia.

    High fodder prices and reduced crop prospects resulted in many farmers, who planted crops for grain production, opting to cut them early for hay.

    Harvesting of winter crops like wheat, barley and canola is nearly finished in Queensland and underway in New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia.

    The lowest crop Australia has recorded in the last 20 years was about 17 million tonnes in 2002-03 and 2006-07 seasons.

    But despite this year's drought, Mr Collins said crop production across Australia would be 69 per cent higher than that.

    "By historical standards there have been others that have been even lower, there have been other years when there's been drought right across the country," he said.

    "This year the worst of the drought has been in the eastern states and Western Australia is still having a reasonable year."

    WA is expected to account for more than 50 per cent of the national crop with an increase in its production of 11 per cent on last year.

    The report said the quality of crops harvested so far had varied widely among different crops and different regions, but the overall quality won't be known until more was harvested.

    Overall, ABARES has forecasted some significant drops in nationwide grain production this harvest:

    Wheat production by 20 per cent to 17 million tonnes
    Barley production by 18 per cent to 7.3 million tonnes
    Canola production by 39 per cent to 2.2 million tonnes
    Chickpea production by 39 per cent to 330,000 tonnes
    Oat production by 21 per cent to 888,000 tonnes
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  17. #1817
    Hey Google, where is my car please? Extreme snow storm in Akureyri, Iceland buries cars and streets under more than 1 meter of snow in less than 24 hours

    By Strange Sounds - Dec 3, 20180

    Extreme weather is reported all over the world with catastrophic events increasing every years. But this is just incredible! Akureyri, the second largest city in Iceland, was engulfed by an alpine-style snow storm, which dropped more than 105 cm of snow in less than 24 hours! And some say we are not in a little ice age…



    iceland snow record, Akureyri iceland snow record picture, car buried in snow in iceland, iceland record snow storm, record snow storm drops 105 centimeters of snow over Akureyri



    A snow storm engulfed the second largest city of Iceland with more than 1 meter of snow in 24 hours.



    iceland snow record, Akureyri iceland snow record picture, car buried in snow in iceland, iceland record snow storm, record snow storm drops 105 centimeters of snow over Akureyri



    http://strangesounds.org/wp-content/...rd-768x432.jpg

    Huge amount of snow covers cars in a parking in Akureiri, Iceland.

    Cars completely buried in snow after storm engulfs Akureyri in Iceland. via VK

    After hours of snow shovelling, cars were finally freed.

    Here a video of this extreme weather event:



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CuCu...ature=youtu.be

    1:08 minutes

    After the storm, the city of Akureyri was transformed into a Christmas wonderland:



    After the record snow, the city in Iceland looked like a Christmas wonderland. via VK
    iceland snow record, Akureyri iceland snow record picture, car buried in snow in iceland, iceland record snow storm, record snow storm drops 105 centimeters of snow over Akureyri



    But quite a difficult path to walk through!

    The Akureyri police has posted pictures and notices on social networks, inviting residents to use their cars only when necessary, and to pay attention when driving to school or to work, as many roads are difficult to pass and many have been closed to traffic due to the record amount of snow.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  18. #1818
    https://nationalpost.com/opinion/eur...ed-and-starved

    Europe's Little Ice Age: 'All things which grew above the ground died and starved'
    One in a series of book excerpts from finalists for McGill University's US$75,000 Cundill History Prize



    1575 Winter Landscape with Snowfall near Antwerp by Lucas van Valckenborch.Städel Museum

    November 8, 2018

    On arrival in North America, Europeans’ hopes were dashed by the harsh winters — not because they were unprepared for the ice and snow, but because they were all too familiar with the deprivations of a cold climate. As Sam White writes in A Cold Welcome, colonists had left a continent roiled by what is now known as the Little Ice Age.

    By Sam White

    During late 1606 and early 1607, while the first Englishmen sailed to Jamestown, the weather in Europe turned eerily warm and dry. In parts of Germany, the flowers bloomed in February. Coming after decades of cold, wet seasons, it seemed to some that this year there was “no winter” at all.

    That suddenly changed in late 1607, when the continent plunged back into some of the worst cold in generations. The winter of 1607-1608 has gone down in history as one of Europe’s “great winters,” bringing Arctic cold, snow, and ice. In the Netherlands, the freeze began in late December and continued with few interruptions into late March. Horses and sleighs travelled over the Zuiderzee from Haarlingen to Enkhuizen, and the extraordinary sight would inspire some of the most famous winter landscape paintings of the era. Even Spanish diplomats travelled by sleigh over the ice to broker their truce with Dutch rebels in early 1608. By late winter the rivers were solid and the ground lay under sheets of ice. Birds froze to death; livestock and wild animals starved; fruit trees perished of frost. “In short,” Dirk Velius observed from Hoorn, “it was a winter whose like was unheard of in human memory.”

    It was a winter whose like was unheard of in human memory

    His sentiment was echoed all across Europe. In Ireland, wrote one chronicler, “in the winter of this year was a great frost, which began a little before Christmas, and continued till about Midlent. This frost increased with such fervency of cold that all things which grew above the ground died and starved with cold; many beasts, both wild and tame, died and starved with hunger, and so did great numbers of wild fowls. The rivers for the most part throughout all Ireland were so covered over that the people might go to and fro upon the ice as upon dry land.” In Germany, heavy rain and flooding in early winter soon gave way to ice: the Rhine froze all the way up to Cologne, and the Main iced up all the way past Frankfurt. “Not only the vineyards but even the trees in warm valleys froze,” noted one contemporary. From Prague, the Venetian ambassador reported snow, ice, and “the greatest, most extraordinary cold.” In France, the Loire River froze, and ice floes choked the Rhone. The Seine iced over for nearly two months, so carriages could pass across. Communion wine froze in the churches of Paris and had to be thawed out for mass. Hundreds perished from cold and hunger in the streets of French towns and cities. “The cold was so extreme and the freeze so great and bitter, that nothing seemed like it in the memory of man,” wrote the diarist Pierre de l’Estoile.

    The cold was so extreme and the freeze so great and bitter, that nothing seemed like it in the memory of man

    diarist Pierre de l’Estoile

    Even the Mediterranean did not escape. Spain faced bitter cold, frozen rivers, and snowfall as late as May 1608. Northern Italy suffered one of its coldest winters of the Little Ice Age. In Florence, continual rains during December turned to snow and ice throughout January and February; in Milan the ice and snow were supposedly so bad that people could barely go outdoors. In Rome, heavy rains brought frequent flooding of the Tiber. Lakes and rivers froze in Greece. In Anatolia, still ravaged by the Celali rebellion, extreme cold and drought induced widespread famine and reportedly cannibalism.

    The most famous image of that winter remains the frost fair on the frozen Thames in London. In December 1607, ice began to pile up at the old London Bridge. The floes began to freeze together about a week before Christmas, and within three weeks the river turned solid from bank to bank. A few brave souls ventured out on the ice, and soon shops, food stalls, and impromptu parties appeared in the middle of the frozen river. “Many fantasticall experiments are dayly put in practise, as certain youths burnt a gallon of wine upon the ice and made all passengers partakers,” wrote one contemporary, “but the best is of an honest woman (they say) that had a great longing to have her husband get her with child upon the Thames.”

    A few brave souls ventured out on the ice, and soon shops, food stalls, and impromptu parties appeared

    Even in England the winter was not all fun and games. The year 1607 had already begun badly. In January, a tremendous flood of the River Severn had drowned thousands of people and cattle, an event that excited wonder and dread across the country and beyond. In April, long-standing grievances against rising food prices and the enclosure of common lands erupted in rural riots known as the Midland Revolt. Soldiers promptly crushed the ragtag army of “levellers” and “diggers” that June, but resentments lingered. Anger and despair over continuing high food prices are thought to have inspired Shakespeare’s descriptions of rebellious plebes in the opening act of Coriolanus.

    The crisis revealed King James I at his most petulant and insensitive. A series of royal proclamations castigated the rioters and denied any connection between the hunger and rebellion. He prohibited farmers from feeding peas to pigs, brewers from using more malt for beer, and even gentlemen from using starch in their lace collars, claiming these measures would spare enough food for the poor. Other proclamations targeted those hoarding and speculating on grain and the new wave of migrants coming to towns and cities in search of employment or relief. But these steps, and even grain imports from the Baltic, failed to hold back rising prices and hunger. The exceptional cold of early 1608 ruined the wheat crop. An Englishman recalled that as far south as Devon, “an extreme dearth of corn happened this year, by reason of extreme frosts (as the like were never seen), the winter going before, which caused much corn to fall away.”



    Details from a portrait of King James I by Dutch artist Daniel Mytens.

    Thomas Dekker penned a satirical almanac that mocked the miseries of the year:

    When Charitie blowes her nailes, and is ready to starve, yet not so much as a Watchman will lend her a flap of his freeze Gowne to keepe her warme: when tradesmen shut up shops, by reason their frozen hearted creditors goe about to nip them with beggerie: when the price of Sea-cole riseth, and the price of mens laboures falleth when everie Chimnye castes out smoak, but scarce any dore opens to cast so much as a marlbone to a Dog to gnaw: when beasts die for want of fodder in the field, and men are ready to famish for want of foods in the citie…

    Bubonic plague, which had flared up from time to time after the great outbreak of 1603, now made new inroads among the poor, hungry, and vagrants. “You have heard before of certaine plagues, and of a Famine that hangs over our heads in the cloudes,” Dekker added wryly. “Mis-fortunes are not borne alone, but like married fooles they come in couples.”

    Mis-fortunes are not borne alone, but like married fooles they come in couples

    Thomas Dekker

    Dekker’s epigram was just as fitting for England’s twin colonies in North America. It is often forgotten that Jamestown was only one half of the original Virginia Company venture. Its charter of April 1606 called for a pair of colonies: one to the south, with claims from present-day day North Carolina to New Jersey, and one to the north, with claims ranging from Delaware to Maine. The former — that is, the Jamestown colony — drew London investors hoping for Mediterranean commodities and lured by rumours of gold-bearing mountains and the Verrazzano Sea. The latter attracted West Country investors looking for a land and climate more like England’s, offering goods such as timber and fish, besides the perennial promise of precious metals.

    In ordinary times, and given Jamestown’s desperate plight, the northern colony might have been the more promising of the two. Poor planning, conflict with the indigenous Wabanaki, and the extraordinary winter of 1607–1608 brought it to an untimely end instead. Around the same time, the voyages of Henry Hudson would bring back new descriptions of extreme Arctic cold and diminish hopes of finding a passage to the Pacific through Canada or New England. These failures would have lasting consequences for English exploration and settlement in North America. For all that the Jamestown colonists suffered during their first winters, experiences farther north would make Virginia — once feared as too tropical for the English — look like the most viable option.

    Excerpted from A Cold Welcome: The Little Ice Age and Europe’s Encounter with North America by Sam White, published by Harvard University Press. Copyright © 2017 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College. Used by permission. All rights reserved.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  19. #1819
    Rich people and the royal class wear velvet and the poorer classes wore homespun. Lots of layers of velvet in the picture above was good to keep the royal self warm. It makes for pretty pictures, but it was more about staying warm in a big building made of stone.

    Velvet these days isn't even close to what the old stuff was. Weaving. as with everything else modern, has gone down in quality.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

  20. #1820
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    15,925
    Winter for the Northern Hemisphere starts on December 21st this year. We. Are. Still. In. Fall.



    Danger. We are in danger.
    Your levity is good, it relieves tension and the fear of death.

    The Frigid Times - http://www.frigidtimes.blogspot.com/
    Civil Defense Reborn - http://cdreborn.blogspot.com/
    Believe what you will, but the Russian nuclear threat is far from dead. It ain't even sick. - Brutus

  21. #1821
    Yeah.. its not at all unusual for us here in southwestern NY state to see snow... even significant snow.. at this time of year. But I don't remember EVER seeing it as widespread and as far south as those maps are showing...

    Summerthyme

  22. #1822
    Quote Originally Posted by mecoastie View Post
    What is this a graph of. THe type is so small I cant read it.
    It's an Elliott Wave interpretation of the stock market. Since my forum has closed down here is the only place left to post these charts.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  23. #1823
    https://www.sott.net/article/402021-...onable-weather

    Canadian potato shortage looms due to 'harvest from hell' after unseasonable weather

    Aleksandra Sagan
    CTV News
    Sat, 01 Dec 2018



    Bad weather brings potato shortage: farmers Manitoba farmers say dry conditions have led to a shortage of the starchy dinner staple, with thousands of acres of potato crops unharvested

    Farmers across Canada left thousands of acres of potato crops unharvested after a slew of bad weather created challenging conditions, setting the stage for a possible shortage of the starchy dinner table staple.

    "It's unprecedented. Never, never before have I seen this in my time," said Kevin MacIsaac, general manager of the United Potato Growers of Canada (UPGC), an organization that provides industry information to help farmers make production and marketing decisions. He's been with the organization for seven years and, before that, grew potatoes in Prince Edward Island, where he still lives.

    In typical years, one area of the country may suffer from a bad harvest, while others do OK, he said, but this year, the problems span almost all the way across the country.

    Farmers abandoned about 16,000 acres of potato crop, according to the group's most recent estimate, which did not include figures for Saskatchewan, Ontario or Nova Scotia, but indicated they also suffered some losses. B.C. is the only province that did not mention abandoned crops in UPGC's report.

    The group expects to have more precise figures soon, MacIsaac said, but is working with the best information it has now.

    P.E.I., the country's largest potato producer, suffered the most.

    Farmers left about 6,800 acres unharvested. In a typical year, some 500 to 1,000 acres may be abandoned, said Greg Donald, general manager of the Prince Edward Island Potato Board, which represents the province's nearly 170 growers.

    The weather this year in the province was relentless.

    First came a lacklustre growing season, with a late spring and hot, dry summer, said Donald, which was followed by an early frost in September that killed any future growth potential.



    The weather in PEI this fall was rain, rain and more rain. Growers didn't have enough days of decent weather to dig potatoes out of the ground.
    Then came copious amounts of rain, which delayed the end of harvest beyond the usual Halloween target date, and farmers pushed into November.

    In early November, it rained one day and the ground froze solid the next, he said, meaning farmers could no longer dig for potatoes.

    "Many have described it as the harvest from hell," he said.

    Unusual weather caused other provinces to suffer similar setbacks.

    In Manitoba, some 5,200 acres remain unharvested, according to UPGC. While the province's prospects for a good yield were strong going into harvest, rainfall followed by a cold spell resulted in thousands of abandoned acres, said MacIsaac.

    Most farmers will have some type of insurance to cover a portion of their costs associated with the lost income, but it won't cover the profit they would have made, he said.

    The thousands of unharvested acres could mean a shortage of processing potatoes (those used to make products like french fries and hash browns) and table potatoes (those sold whole in grocery stores), both men said.

    "It's going to be a real, you know, challenge," said Donald, adding there's not going to be enough local supply for the markets the province typically serves.

    Compounding the problem is a similar situation in parts of the U.S., as well as parts of Europe where a dry season hurt yields, making for a more global shortfall.

    While some growing areas in North America may have a shortage, others will have a surplus that can balance that out, said Terence Hochstein, executive director of the Potato Growers of Alberta.

    His province abandoned about 1,000 acres, he said, which is more than he'd like, but pretty typical. It was able to send some potatoes to P.E.I. and Alberta to help, he said.

    "Overall, I think the crop is going to be tight, but I think the industry will be alright."

    Still, consumers could ultimately see price hikes on potato products due to basic supply and demand principles.

    When there's less of a product, it's going to be reflected in the price, Donald said, adding even the potatoes that have been harvested are not quite safe yet.

    Potatoes are mostly water and harvesting them in wet conditions adds the risk of bringing extra moisture into storage, making them more difficult to dry and keep, he said.

    "So that's still a big concern as well.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  24. #1824
    https://www.ctvnews.ca/business/pota...ther-1.4200643

    Potato shortage looms due to 'harvest from hell' after unseasonable weather
    Bad weather brings potato shortage: farmers

    Manitoba farmers say dry conditions have led to a shortage of the starchy dinner staple, with thousands of acres of potato crops unharvested

    Is a global potato shortage looming?

    The United Potato Growers of Canada estimates farmers abandoned 16,000 acres of potato crops this year.

    Aleksandra Sagan, The Canadian Press

    Published Saturday, December 1, 2018

    Farmers across Canada left thousands of acres of potato crops unharvested after a slew of bad weather created challenging conditions, setting the stage for a possible shortage of the starchy dinner table staple.

    "It's unprecedented. Never, never before have I seen this in my time," said Kevin MacIsaac, general manager of the United Potato Growers of Canada (UPGC), an organization that provides industry information to help farmers make production and marketing decisions. He's been with the organization for seven years and, before that, grew potatoes in Prince Edward Island, where he still lives.

    In typical years, one area of the country may suffer from a bad harvest, while others do OK, he said, but this year, the problems span almost all the way across the country.

    Farmers abandoned about 16,000 acres of potato crop, according to the group's most recent estimate, which did not include figures for Saskatchewan, Ontario or Nova Scotia, but indicated they also suffered some losses. B.C. is the only province that did not mention abandoned crops in UPGC's report.

    The group expects to have more precise figures soon, MacIsaac said, but is working with the best information it has now.

    P.E.I., the country's largest potato producer, suffered the most.

    Farmers left about 6,800 acres unharvested. In a typical year, some 500 to 1,000 acres may be abandoned, said Greg Donald, general manager of the Prince Edward Island Potato Board, which represents the province's nearly 170 growers.

    The weather this year in the province was relentless.

    First came a lacklustre growing season, with a late spring and hot, dry summer, said Donald, which was followed by an early frost in September that killed any future growth potential.

    Then came copious amounts of rain, which delayed the end of harvest beyond the usual Halloween target date, and farmers pushed into November.

    In early November, it rained one day and the ground froze solid the next, he said, meaning farmers could no longer dig for potatoes.

    "Many have described it as the harvest from hell," he said.

    Unusual weather caused other provinces to suffer similar setbacks.

    In Manitoba, some 5,200 acres remain unharvested, according to UPGC. While the province's prospects for a good yield were strong going into harvest, rainfall followed by a cold spell resulted in thousands of abandoned acres, said MacIsaac.

    Most farmers will have some type of insurance to cover a portion of their costs associated with the lost income, but it won't cover the profit they would have made, he said.

    The thousands of unharvested acres could mean a shortage of processing potatoes (those used to make products like french fries and hash browns) and table potatoes (those sold whole in grocery stores), both men said.

    "It's going to be a real, you know, challenge," said Donald, adding there's not going to be enough local supply for the markets the province typically serves.

    Compounding the problem is a similar situation in parts of the U.S., as well as parts of Europe where a dry season hurt yields, making for a more global shortfall.

    While some growing areas in North America may have a shortage, others will have a surplus that can balance that out, said Terence Hochstein, executive director of the Potato Growers of Alberta.

    His province abandoned about 1,000 acres, he said, which is more than he'd like, but pretty typical. It was able to send some potatoes to P.E.I. and Alberta to help, he said.

    "Overall, I think the crop is going to be tight, but I think the industry will be alright."

    Still, consumers could ultimately see price hikes on potato products due to basic supply and demand principles.

    When there's less of a product, it's going to be reflected in the price, Donald said, adding even the potatoes that have been harvested are not quite safe yet.

    Potatoes are mostly water and harvesting them in wet conditions adds the risk of bringing extra moisture into storage, making them more difficult to dry and keep, he said.

    "So that's still a big concern as well."
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  25. #1825
    In early November, it rained one day and the ground froze solid the next, he said, meaning farmers could no longer dig for potatoes.
    Now THAT is uncommon enough to add to the photos of entire parking lots of cars buried under 3 feet of snow (was that Iceland?) and realize that maybe it WAS possible for Woolly Mammoths to freeze with green forage still in their mouths!

    Our potato crop wasn't the best we've ever had, but we did end up with probably 300# more than our normal need for table use plus adequate seed gor next Spring. We did have someone who wanted to buy a few bushels...but while we could definitely use the money, i couldn't bring myself to sell the "extras". I believe I'll be putting 50# of mashed potates and 25# of french fries in the freezer in the spring... just in case we have problems with growing a crop next year.

    While i have plenty of alternatives stashed in the preps (noodles, rice, pearl barley, etc), potatoes are a staple crop for us. If we'd only get a small crop for some reason, I'd need to keep them all for seed for the next year.

    Summerthyme

  26. #1826
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    Now THAT is uncommon enough to add to the photos of entire parking lots of cars buried under 3 feet of snow (was that Iceland?) and realize that maybe it WAS possible for Wooly Mammoths to freeze with green forage still in their mouths!

    Our potato crop wasn't the best we've ever had, but we did end up with probably 300# more than our normal need for table use plus adequate seed gor next Spring. We did have someone who wanted to buy a few bushels...but while we could definitely use the money, i couldn't bring myself to sell the "extras". I believe I'll be putting 50# of mashed potates and 25# of french fries in the freezer in the spring... just in case we have problems with growing a crop next year.

    While i have plenty of alternatives stashed in the preps (noodles, rice, pearl barley, etc), potatoes are a staple crop for us. If we'd only get a small crop for some reason, I'd need to keep them all for seed for the next year.

    Summerthyme
    You are wise to hold on to any surplus. My earlier prediction that this Winter 2018/2019 will be twice as bad as last year is coming true. It some point the public will realize that Global Warming is a lie.

    Yes the snow on cars was in Iceland.

    Wonder if pigs could dig up the frozen potatoes and turn them into bacon?

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  27. #1827
    That's a great question about pigs and frozen potatoes. Hope someone can answer it!

  28. #1828
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Green County, Kentucky
    Posts
    9,889
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    You are wise to hold on to any surplus. My earlier prediction that this Winter 2018/2019 will be twice as bad as last year is coming true. It some point the public will realize that Global Warming is a lie.

    Yes the snow on cars was in Iceland.

    Wonder if pigs could dig up the frozen potatoes and turn them into bacon?

    von Koehler
    Potatoes need to be cooked before they can be used as livestock feed, as far as I know. But if they can be dug still frozen and cooked immediately, they might be salvaged on a small scale.

    Kathleen

    We learned, when we lived in Alaska, that if potatoes freeze, KEEP THEM FROZEN. As long as they STAY frozen, you can still use them, as long as you can cook them before they start to thaw.
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  29. #1829
    I don't know if they'd be able to root in frozen ground... and as Kathleen points out, once frozen potatoes thaw, they are *done*. I'll have to ask my son, who raises pastured hogs, how they handle frozen soil... I suspect the composition of the soil (sandy or clayey) would make a big difference.

    Pigs can eat raw potatoes, but they get more out of them, nutritionally, if they are cooked. Plus, cooking deactivates the solanine toxin, so if there are any green potatoes in the batch, cooking them will keep the pigs from being poisoned.

    Summerthyme

  30. #1830


    https://www.tropicaltidbits.com/anal...ow_seus_41.png

    Al Gore "white rain" forecast for the SE.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  31. #1831
    http://www.floridahistorynetwork.com...t-freezes.html

    Florida's Worst Freezes

    Do you think the winter of 2013-14 was cold by Florida standards?

    Be glad you didn't have to suffer through these icy blasts
    of yesteryear.



    Central Florida citrus grove after the 1894 freeze. Photo: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory

    By Denny Bowden

    Volusia History - Retracing Florida's Past

    My wife and I rush to unpack storage bins of old blankets and afghans in our garage each time a frost threatens to ruin our hibiscus bushes, and for my young orange trees I drape a covering over them and wrap cloths muffler-like around their vulnerable slender trunks. Here in Volusia we rightly panic when frigid weather comes uninvited, and I particularly remember one winter about 35 years ago when I was a teacher at Spruce Creek High School. The weather forecast predicted a freeze with a low temperature of about 20 degrees, and district school officials knew that if water pipes froze, there would be more than 2,000 students (enough to be a small city) with no usable restroom facilities. With this possibility, officials cancelled school a “snow day” without snow.

    Orange growers continued to do battle with Volusia’s winters, but the onslaught of 1886 was one of the worst our county has had.

    The 1835 Freeze

    Volusia’s worst freeze on record happened on February 8, 1835 – the day of freezing rivers that has never been matched again. For example, near what later became Jacksonville, the St. Johns River froze 50 feet or more out from the shore as the temperature descended to a mere 8 degrees above zero. Inland, at Ft. King (near what is now Ocala) it was 11 degrees – such a frigid cold front that from South Carolina through Georgia and into much of Florida fruit trees were “destroyed, roots and all” as far south as the 28th parallel, which today would include Tampa on the west coast and Palm Bay (40 miles south of Cape Canaveral) on the east coast.

    The Freeze of 1766

    Seventy-five years earlier the “Father of American Botany” John Bartram and his son William came through Volusia, making a botanical and scientific tour of Florida in a dugout canoe just three years after England had obtained Florida from Spain. Of course, the Florida territory was a new British colony, and the Bartrams paddled along the western border of what is today Volusia County, and the father recorded in his diary on January 2, 1766, “The ground was froze [sic] an inch thick on the banks [of the St. Johns River]; this was the fatal night that destroyed the lime, citron, and banana trees in Augustine.”

    The Volusia region was sparsely populated in 1766 with few Native Americans and only a handful of Europeans. By 1835, Volusia had many plantations growing sugar cane, but there are no records of specific temperatures here during the freeze of 1835. This bitter cold was during The Second Seminole Indian War, and before the end of the war all of Volusia’s plantations had been burned and European settlers had fled.

    There was no commercial citrus industry as yet in the territory of Florida, and it would be another 10 years before Florida would become a state. Records show that the earliest orange grove along the east coast was Dummit Grove, just south of today’s Volusia County, but because of the disastrous 1835 freeze, orange growers would locate in warmer southern areas, including Hillsborough, Manatee, and Polk counties.

    In 1857, another major freeze hit Volusia, but we still had few residents. In fact, three years earlier when Volusia County was officially formed from part of Mosquito County, our new county had only 25 families who farmed small acreages of cotton, corn, and vegetables, not oranges.

    After the Civil War, in 1866 in Oak Hill, J. D. Mitchell established what is considered to be Volusia’s first citrus grove, however Barney Dillard told Volusia’s agricultural agent T. R. Townsend that in 1866 when his family came to Volusia County (when he was only six), there were already small two- to four-acre orange groves along the St. Johns River at Lake George (near Pierson). The St. Johns River facilitated shipping the fruit for marketing outside the area, so agricultural production was showing promise, especially oranges.

    Seven years later, though, in 1873 Volusia experienced another severe freeze and then three more in 1876, 1879, and 1880. One of the freezes of the 1870s killed the Holly Hill-area orange grove of William Ross and Samuel Wimple, which stood along the Halifax River in what later became Holly Hill.

    The 1886 Freeze

    Orange growers continued to do battle with Volusia’s winters, but the onslaught of 1886 was one of the worst our county has had, and the destruction of orange trees once again swept as far south as the 28th parallel from Tampa to south of Cape Canaveral. As historian T. E. Fitzgerald reports, this freeze “killed many of the younger [orange trees] and many of the older ones to the ground."

    Dr. John Milton Hawks, the founder of what later became Edgewater (south of New Smyrna Beach), wrote about this freeze: “On Saturday and Sunday, the 10th and 11 of January (1886) there was a strong wind from the Northwest – the wind that always brings our hardest frosts. On Sunday morning at Mosquito Inlet the mercury stood at 22, the lowest on record in that region.

    The crop of oranges remaining on the trees was frozen; some so solid that no juice flowed when they were cut open. Pieces of ice taken from a tub lay on the ground all day without melting. Fish of all kinds in the river were so chilled that they were left on the shores and sandbars as the tide went out, and died there, and cartloads of them lined the shores.”

    Unofficially, the temperature dropped to 18 degrees. The freeze was so severe that, according to Volusia historian Pleasant Donald Gold, “The cold came so suddenly that clouds of vapor arose from the river on account of the great difference in the temperature of the air and water. Large turtles became so numb with the cold that they floated on the surface of the water, and fish killed by the cold were washed ashore in such large numbers that they had to be buried by the inhabitants. All the leaves and fruit fell from the orange trees, the bark split and they were killed to the roots."

    Volusia growers of that day were resilient, and they threw their shoulders into the work necessary to bring back the orange industry in the county, digging up dead trees and replanting, so that by 1893-94 they had surpassed Volusia’s greatest production records to that date.

    These freezes of 1894-95 were so destructive that they caused Astor (just across the St. Johns River from Volusia) to be abandoned as nearly a ghost town (“Astor”).
    The 1894-95 Freeze

    Then on December 27, 1894, icy air once again blasted Volusia, and for the next two days the entire Florida mainland was frozen–so cold that even Key West experienced frost, and it dropped to 20 degrees as far south as Titusville, killing young trees “to the ground” and also seriously damaging mature orange trees. Volusia historian T. E. Fitzgerald reports that in Volusia it was as low as 16 degrees (fully 10 degrees colder than the temperature that will kill mature trees). He describes it as a “blighting cold”, yet as bad as it was, historian P. D. Gold notes that it was not so bad as the 1886 freeze because although the orange trees had lost all their fruit and nearly all their leaves, the trees had not died, so there was still hope.

    Although it was winter, after this disastrous freeze the days had begun to warm, and the orange trees then were sprouting tender green new growth from the limbs left barren of fruit that littered the ground all around the struggling trees. Then only five weeks later on February 7, 1895, the temperature began a “sudden drop,” and the warm afternoons gave way to colder and colder air being swept down the state into Volusia, lowering the temperature into the 30s and then into the 20s, a dangerous temperature that can kill an orange tree if the freeze lasts several hours.

    Mercilessly, the freeze grew colder, and in DeLand it was recorded at a low of 17 degrees, and in New Smyrna it hit 16 degrees, spelling doom to Volusia’s orange groves. Historian P. D. Gold reports, “The sap in the fruit trees froze, splitting them open and again they were killed to the roots."

    The freeze continued through the next day, and the next, and the next, so that on Feb. 10, Volusia had suffered the most devastating freeze on record for orange groves and property.

    Turtles and fish died, and even bees died, as Gold notes, “Many of the bees in the colonies around Hawks Park [Edgewater] starved from lack of food from the orange blossoms."

    These freezes of 1894-95 were so destructive that they caused Astor (just across the St. Johns River from Volusia) to be abandoned as nearly a ghost town (“Astor”).

    By 1894 there had been 11,580 groves in Volusia County, but because of the freeze 1,600 of them were financially ruined and were gone by 1900. The impact on Volusia was disastrous.

    The 1894-95 freeze forced many orange growers to move to the very sparsely populated southern counties in Florida, forever changing the citrus industry. Florida’s citrus production had been five million boxes per year, but it took two decades of recovery before that production level was achieved again (Florida Memory Blog).

    In 1898 the temperature plummeted 60 degrees from 78 to 18 degrees, and the following year a four-day freeze between February 13 and February 16 again killed off many groves in Volusia. The temperature the next year in an 1899 freeze slid to 16 at New Smyrna (Fitzgerald 185). Over the next 17 years, though, no major freeze hit Volusia, and although the temperature plummeted 46 degrees from 82 to 36 during the third week of March in 1916, “little damage was done.” Overall, five major freezes destroyed Volusia’s orange groves between 1800 and the 1930s.

    The Major Freezes after 1960

    When my family moved to Volusia in 1960, Volusia was officially a leader among Florida’s orange industry, and during my years here I have experienced the freezes of 1962, 1983, and 1985 which were very costly to our county, but the grove-killing freeze in December 1989 changed Volusia, possibly forever, because it killed off so many mature trees in our county that Volusia is now no longer recognized as one of the major producers of oranges in Florida.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  32. #1832
    This big article on orange crops is fascinating and a good way to show us what sudden cold spells can do to a crop.

    Makes me think that growing "tall" things in the garden might be a bad choice once the GSM really sets in. Lower types of plants might be covered to hopefully preserve at least part of a year's food in a family's garden, if not in field crops.

  33. #1833
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    This big article on orange crops is fascinating and a good way to show us what sudden cold spells can do to a crop.

    Makes me think that growing "tall" things in the garden might be a bad choice once the GSM really sets in. Lower types of plants might be covered to hopefully preserve at least part of a year's food in a family's garden, if not in field crops.
    Oranges used to be as far north as the south Georgia coast. Now mostly they are south of Lake Okeechobee. On a map it's devastating to the idea of GW.

  34. #1834
    Perhaps dwarf fruit trees which can be grown inside greenhouses?

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  35. #1835
    My greenhouse isn't high enough even for dwarf trees. That's why I'm thinking about cane berries. It's not really high enough for those either, but maybe they wouldn't grow as huge as they used to, when the weather gets lots colder and the growing season is shorter. But I do have a well drained place to plant them where I could attach covers if there were a sudden dip in temperature.

    Not sure what kind of weather forecasts there might be during a GSM. If none at all, I'd consider covering things every night if I had to, but I sure wouldn't enjoy it!

  36. #1836
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,713
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    My greenhouse isn't high enough even for dwarf trees. That's why I'm thinking about cane berries. It's not really high enough for those either, but maybe they wouldn't grow as huge as they used to, when the weather gets lots colder and the growing season is shorter. But I do have a well drained place to plant them where I could attach covers if there were a sudden dip in temperature.

    Not sure what kind of weather forecasts there might be during a GSM. If none at all, I'd consider covering things every night if I had to, but I sure wouldn't enjoy it!
    I wouldn't bother with them in a greenhouse. There are a number of cane fruits that are hardy to Zone 3 from Fedco and I imagine a number of other nurseries. Also may want to look at blueberries. We are replacing our kiwis with blueberries this spring. Apples are very hardy as well.

  37. #1837
    I already have four nice young blueberry bushes. Can't grow apples here because there is so much red cedar. My Orient pears are resistant to the red cedar gall, but have stopped bearing. Could be lack of honeybees, but I'm going to try Kiefer pears if I can find them this coming spring. A neighbor has those so I know they can do well here.

  38. #1838
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    39,076
    Quote Originally Posted by Seeker22 View Post
    Rich people and the royal class wear velvet and the poorer classes wore homespun. Lots of layers of velvet in the picture above was good to keep the royal self warm. It makes for pretty pictures, but it was more about staying warm in a big building made of stone.

    Velvet these days isn't even close to what the old stuff was. Weaving. as with everything else modern, has gone down in quality.

    If you want quality you'll have to weave the fabric yourself, and spin the fibers into yarn/thread for your handwoven cloth. Seriously! This is why I hung onto my looms, spinning wheel, drop spindles, knitting, crochet, and tatting equipment, in addition to my sewing machines, etc.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  39. #1839
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    39,076
    www.solarham.net

    A rare sight during the descent into solar minimum, a new sunspot. Region 2729, a member of weakening Solar Cycle 24, formed fairly quickly in the southwest quadrant and is currently producing very minor B-Class solar flares. Although noteworthy solar flares are not expected, the sunspot should be monitored during the next 24 hours. Image below by SDO/HMI.



    December 4, 2018 @ 01:45 UTC
    Another Chance for Storming
    The current coronal hole stream failed to generate a geomagnetic storm and only produced slightly enhanced activity at higher latitudes. A larger coronal hole (#54) will come into play this weekend (Dec 8 and 9) and should be the source of a high speed solar wind stream. Another chance for minor (G1) storming possible.
    It should be noted that a weak coronal mass ejection (CME) observed on November 30th is predicted to pass Earth on December 5th and contribute to further enhancements. I personally don't think this will materialize, but perhaps I will be wrong. More updates will be added whenever necessary.

    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  40. #1840
    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    If you want quality you'll have to weave the fabric yourself, and spin the fibers into yarn/thread for your handwoven cloth. Seriously! This is why I hung onto my looms, spinning wheel, drop spindles, knitting, crochet, and tatting equipment, in addition to my sewing machines, etc.
    You are so right! I never pass up tools. I so wish the women on this board were within driving distance, but I am having to use Yootoob as my teacher. Slow, but I am determined. These tools and skills will be worth a kingdom one day.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

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