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The Grand Solar Minimum
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  1. #4161
    I don't believe I've ever listened to Greg Hunter before. This was interesting, especially the field behind him. Thanks for posting it.
    ----
    The sky just opened up here and it's raining quite heavily. I may have to disconnect soon. I sure hope the power does not go out!

    I can smell the rain even though my house is all closed up. Wonder what that might mean? First time this has ever happened to me.

  2. #4162
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    I don't believe I've ever listened to Greg Hunter before. This was interesting, especially the field behind him. Thanks for posting it.
    ----
    The sky just opened up here and it's raining quite heavily. I may have to disconnect soon. I sure hope the power does not go out!

    I can smell the rain even though my house is all closed up. Wonder what that might mean? First time this has ever happened to me.
    I've been watching radar, your state is just getting hammered. So far most has skirted around us, but I'm not letting down my guard at all. You be safe!

    We used to call that smell ozone, the thunderstorm smell, and it was so strong you'd smell it everywhere. Then a science major where we worked pre-retirement went into a long explanation of how it's actually rainfall interacting with bacteria on the ground or something like that. I still call it ozone. :-)

  3. #4163
    I didn't think of ozone because there was no lightning at all. To me it just smells like rain. Maybe the smell that says "Spring is here!" is from bacteria, though. To me it's just been wet dirt smell that means winter is over and it's time to watch for robins. Been that way for me since I was a little kid in Minnesota...smells of spring way before anything is actually growing.

    There is a smell one gets driving past a lake that is just that and from no other water. Not fishy, not muddy, just a "lake-y" smell.

    Maybe there should be different words for different kinds of water, just like, who is it, Eskimoes? that have many words for the different kinds of snow?

    The rain has stopped here now and I won't know how much we got because I forgot to empty my gauge from our last rain. I'll call and ask my sister in a little while but she may not feel like putting her boots on and going out to look.

    Sounds like the rain is starting back up again. Ugh!

    Actually, what we got in the last hour or so was LOTS!

  4. #4164
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    Maine
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    We are finally dry enough to plant. Our flax, barley and oats are going in tomorrow as well as the mangels and sugar beets. Onions and potatoes this week. My wife did say "I thought we weren't having a garden this year" but it is mostly experiments so I told her it doesn't count.

  5. #4165
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    I don't believe I've ever listened to Greg Hunter before. This was interesting, especially the field behind him. Thanks for posting it.
    ----
    The sky just opened up here and it's raining quite heavily. I may have to disconnect soon. I sure hope the power does not go out!

    I can smell the rain even though my house is all closed up. Wonder what that might mean? First time this has ever happened to me.

    Hunter usually has good interviews (a few bloopers, too). I haven't listened recently, so don't know if he is familiar with the Eddy Min, but he does come from a farming area, and reports throughout the season on crops.

    The smell of rain is different where ever I've lived. Here in NM, you can smell the creosote in the plants when it rains.

  6. #4166
    The smell of the rain has been the same wherever I've lived. It is the smell that sometimes come that tells me it's raining somewhere nearby and it will like arrive soon since if the smell is arriving, it means that the air will be moving things in the same direction.

    I've lived in Minneapolis, NW Wisconsin lake country, Denver, and Charlotte, as well as here in Arkansas, and the smell of rain in the air has been the same wherever I am.

  7. #4167
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    Below is an article on France's crop problems. Because of all the exporting and importing, we are all ultimately affected by crop problems around the world. They seem to be having planting delays as is the US.


    https://electroverse.net/french-sowi...ther-persists/


    French Sowing Slows Further as Cold Weather Persists

    May 17, 2019 Cap Allon


    Corn sowing in France slowed again this week, losing its lead to last year, after persistent cold weather continues to hamper the central European nation’s planting efforts.

    France was battered by a brutal cold front during the second half of April and first half of May — the key planting window — with the mercury hitting all-time lows and effectively slamming the brakes on sowing efforts.

    France is the third largest corn exporter in the world, meaning a delayed or poor harvest will have a pronounced impact on global markets.

    Severe frosts have been widespread these last four-or-so-weeks, from the lowlands to Brittany to South Ouest, with farmers regularly lighting frost-fires in an attempt to protect fragile crops.

    On May 6, the nation averaged its coldest May morning since 1979, at 2.5C (36.5F).

    After a brief reprieve this weekend, a fresh bout of frigid air is forecast to plunge into central Europe next week, likely persisting through the remainder of May.

    The cold times are returning.

    Our star is shutting down (relatively).

    Prepare.

  8. #4168
    TxGal, it will be interesting to see just how cold it will get this coming week in Europe. I wonder if people over there are as oblivious to the GSM as most are here on this side of the Atlantic? And I wonder if there are people like us over there who are online reading about the rains and flooding in the Americas and wondering the same things about us?

  9. #4169
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    Martinhouse, I have a hunch that's exactly what is going on over there. Maybe we all have a heightened sense of awareness or a stronger survival instinct. I don't know. But it's really amazing that will all the unusual weather for the last few years, it would seem more people would sense that something isn't right and they'd best be starting to take care of themselves.

  10. #4170
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    I suspect we'll see more articles like this. Personally, I don't pay attention to the price fluctuation of commodities, what I focus on are planting problems with crops.

    https://newsok.com/article/5631776/c...nting-new-crop


    Corn prices rise as farmers fall behind in planting new crop


    Published: Sun, May 19, 2019 5:00 AM


    Here is this week’s edition of Futures File, our weekly commodities wrap-up:

    Corn pops over soggy fields

    Corn prices popped this week as markets grew increasingly concerned about severe planting delays across the Corn Belt. Nationwide, only 30% of the crop had been planted as of last week, compared to a recent average near 60%.

    Waterlogged fields are preventing farmers from being able to get machinery into their fields, and they are expected to fall farther behind as more rain is in the forecast. For many farmers who are behind schedule, federal crop insurance may be their best option, as late-planted crops can suffer from lower yields or be at higher risk of frost damage in the fall.

    Either way, grain watchers are expecting a smaller corn crop, which helped prices explode over 10% this week, with July corn trading for $3.84 per bushel on Friday.

    Another option for farmers who can’t plant corn during May is to switch fields to plant soybeans, which typically can be planted another two weeks later than corn. This last-minute swap which could lead to increasing soybean production this year. Fears of more beans and less corn along with the ongoing trade disputes with China have crushed soybean prices, which traded Monday below $8.00 per bushel for the first time in a decade.

  11. #4171
    It kind of irritates me that everywhere I read about how the market for soybeans is down, it is blamed solely on the so-called trade war and not the possibility that China doesn't need more soybeans now at any price because they've culled out such a huge portion of their hogs.

    Another thing that irritates me is all the countries with failed crops saying they can no longer export and will have to import instead. With failures happening all over the globe, just who the devil are they going to import from? Seems like no one is mentioning that! And I don't believe that the few places that aren't having failures will be anywhere near able to pick up all the slack. How could they possibly fill the needs of former exporters and additionally supply to the former recipients of those former exports?

  12. #4172
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    And another:

    https://agfax.com/2019/05/15/mississ...s-into-summer/

    Mississippi Corn: After Delays, Planting Plunges into Summer

    May 15, 2019
    By Linda Breazeale, Mississippi State University

    Corn producers rushed to finish planting — or replanting — as much as sunny weather has allowed so far in May.

    Erick Larson, grains specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said spring rains complicated conditions, keeping planters out of fields during much of April and contributing to many more establishment issues than normal.

    “Corn planted in late March and early April suffered as heavy and persistent rains hit the first weekend in April,” Larson said. “The cool soil temperatures slowed emergence and made the young crop even more vulnerable.”

    Larson said corn seedlings are vulnerable to prolonged saturated conditions that limit aerobic activity. A long duration of anaerobic conditions will be harder on plants than the total amount of rainfall.

    “When rains persist over a four-day period, aeration problems are likely, particularly on heavy soils, flat-planted fields and deep-planted corn seed,” he said. “These adverse conditions caused seedling mortality or stunted seedling development, leading to growth disparity.”

    Larson said research has shown that replanting partial stands or weak spots is counterproductive.

    “Corn emergence uniformity is important to high productivity,” he said. “Corn plants that emerge later than others are less productive and lag in growth throughout the season. That creates disproportionate competition between plants for resources, which reduces yield potential.”

    Similar rules apply to replanting.

    “It is absolutely imperative to destroy the remaining live corn plants with either tillage or herbicides before you replant an unacceptable stand,” Larson said.

    Lowndes County grower Tony Dantzler said he has weighed the decisions about replanting corn carefully. Out of about 1,400 acres, he has replanted all but 120.

    “It has helped to have the options researched and available through the Extension Service to help make decisions this year,” Dantzler said. “I’ve never had this much replanting in more than 22 years of farming.”

    Dantzler said the good news was that time allowed for the replanting.

    “Corn still seems more profitable than soybeans, and that is why we are taking a chance with later plantings,” he said.

    Larson said corn may face an uphill battle, but if weather conditions will cooperate, fields still have the potential for favorable yields.

    “For many of the corn growers, the recent four-day rain event (preceding Mother’s Day) should not be as detrimental on the late plantings as the rains earlier in the spring,” Larson said. “Warmer temperatures helped the seed germinate and emerge quicker. In general, recent plantings have successfully emerged, unless exposed to prolonged flooding.”

    While 92% of the corn is planted, the majority — 66% — is in fair, poor or very poor condition, according to the Mississippi Crop Progress and Condition report released May 13.

  13. #4173
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    Just posting a few more articles, but there are plenty out there. I may have to rethink my pantry and stock up on more grains:

    https://www.hpj.com/crops/cool-wet-w...0c7128970.html

    Cool, wet weather delays wheat harvest, row crop planting (Texas)

    May 14, 2019 - Updated May 14, 2019

    Cool, wet weather affected most of the eastern and central areas of the state during the week ending May 12, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Southern Plains Regional Field Office, Texas. Precipitation in East Texas, the Blacklands, the Cross Timbers, the Upper Coast, South Central Texas and the Coastal Bend ranged between 1 and 6 inches, with isolated areas in the Upper Coast and South East Texas getting upwards of 15 inches. Rainfall in the rest of the state ranged from trace amounts to 3 inches, with isolated areas in the Northern High Plains and the Edwards Plateau getting upwards of 5 inches. There were 4.1 days suitable for fieldwork.

    Wheat producers were assessing wind and hail damage in the Northern High Plains. Rust was found in wheat in the Low Plains. Wet conditions caused lodging problems in small grains in the Blacklands. Wheat harvest in the Coastal Bend and South Texas was delayed due to rainfall.

    Rainfalls delayed row crops planting in the Plains and the Blacklands. In areas of the Blacklands, corn and sorghum turned yellow due to excess moisture. Flood water covered corn, sorghum and cotton in some areas in South East Texas. Cotton in parts of the Coastal Bend was showing moisture stress. Precipitation stalled rice planting in the Upper Coast.

  14. #4174
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    There is also a video with this article, please visit the webpage:

    https://www.kcrg.com/content/news/We...509917341.html

    Wet weather leads to crop planting delays for Iowa farmers

    By Jordee Kalk |

    Posted: Tue 6:34 PM, May 14, 2019 |

    Updated: Tue 9:32 PM, May 14, 2019

    LINN COUNTY, Iowa (KCRG) Farmers in Linn County haven't been out in the fields as much as they've liked, and in some cases are drastically behind schedule.

    Brian Lensch planted some corn three weeks ago. But the spikes, or the first above-ground signs of growth, are a different color than usual: yellow instead of bright green. And that's due to unusual spring conditions.

    "It's yellow. It'll come out of it I'm sure but we need some warm temperatures to get things moving along,” Lensch said.

    The wet season is also causing other challenges for Lensch Farms. Farmers have only planted about a third of their fields, but usually they’re done planting at this time of year.

    "It could have a potential to have yield loss,” Lensch said.

    Lensch said this is a regional issue.

    On Monday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture released its latest report for the percent of fields planted with corn crops: 48 percent of Iowa farms are planted now compared to a five year average of 76 percent. In Minnesota, 21 percent are planted now, compared to 65 percent average. And Illinois has some startling numbers, with only 11 percent planted, compared to 82 percent average.

    Farmers say it'll take some changing conditions to get on track.

    Lensch also cites global markets as a potential concern. He watches the numbers closely each day, and hopes the numbers change to reflect growing conditions. Lensch said it's concerning, especially given the growing price of corn in recent years.

    "The corn market is not worth what is putting it in the ground, but you always have an opportunity to get it sold. That's why you're a good farmer you got to keep your pencil sharpened and know your numbers,” Lensch said.

  15. #4175
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    This article is a bit technical on crop planting, but it does show what the farmers are up against and it will likely translate into issues at the grocery store (price or availability, or both):

    https://agfax.com/2019/05/16/rice-ra...ng-agfax-rice/


    AgFax

    Rice: Mid-South/Texas


    Owen Taylor, Editor


    Here is this week’s issue of AgFax Rice, sponsored by the Southern rice team of Corteva Agriscience.

    OVERVIEW

    Rain continues to create problems. Yet again, planting has ground to a halt in much of the Midsouth and areas in southeastern Texas. With the last round of heavy rains, fields went under water in parts of southwest Louisiana.

    The earliest fields in the Midsouth are moving towards flood, although that remains a minor part of the expected crop.

    Green rings are turning up on more south Louisiana rice.

    CROP REPORTS

    Tyler Hydrick, Hydrick’s Crop Consulting, Inc., Jonesboro, Arkansas:

    “We’re all over the board with rice – from some that hasn’t been planted yet to early fields that we’ll start moving to flood next week. In fact, I almost put one field to flood today (5/14) but decided to hold off until next week to let the herbicides do a bit more work.

    “One grower said he’ll plant rice up to June 5. He’ll stay with rice partly because soybean prices are so weak. But he’s in the Cache River valley and a lot of those growers have had a tough go, and at least some of that land for rice hasn’t been worked yet.

    “Those growers still have rice stubble in the fields where they’ll plant beans. The rain has been doubly hard on them. Every time it rains, the water accumulates under that residue and it stays wet longer. Those guys really need an extended dry spell.”

    Hank Jones, C&J Ag Consulting, Pioneer, Louisiana:

    “Rice is at a standstill. The rain, which started late last week and went into the weekend, dumped 3 to 6 inches across this area, so we’re trying to get water off fields.

    “A good north wind is blowing today (5/13), with plenty of sunshine, so things are at least moving back to normal. I imagine we’ll get herbicides and fertilizer out this week where we can and start moving to a flood on our earliest fields.

    “You tend to think of rice crops as having a uniform age, more or less, but this crop is in all stages – one field is at fourth leaf, the next one has a single leaf, some hasn’t emerged, some hasn’t been planted. We usually have a crop well on its way in mid-May, but this one is only 60% to 70% planted. Some rivers are rising again and backing out in spots.”

    Lance Honeycutt, Sanders, Inc., Jonesboro, Arkansas:

    “I’m guessing that 65% to 70% of my growers’ rice has been planted. Spotty showers fell last night (5/15), from 3 tenths to an inch, and everyone was just on the verge of getting back in the field. Some people, in fact, can work today but others were caught again by enough rain to hold them back until Sunday.

    “Those guys, in particular, are really scratching their heads about what to do. Some are leaning towards prevented planting and others think they’ll plant more rice because soybeans won’t pencil out. One unknown is how or whether the new tariff relief funding will be applied to rice. If it’s mainly for soybeans, some people could shift ground to beans. But, again, that’s a huge unknown.

    “On the positive side, fields are staying clean where we’ve already planted rice. With the rain, residuals are working well and we’ve been able to spray between rains and keep control going. It’s a nice crop, what we have so far.

    “We’ll apply a light shot of fertilizer ahead of the rain forecasted for the weekend and then next week we’ll spray, apply more fertilizer and flood several fields. At the same time, of course, we’re still planting rice.

    “About 90% of my corn planting is done. A few guys want to plant some more and a little replanting is needed. Soybeans are a different story. Maybe 5% have been planted, and we sure won’t have any early beans.

    “The dicamba application cutoff is May 25 and a lot of guys bought into that system thinking they could spray dicamba once before that cutoff. That’s not going to happen this year. I don’t know to what extent they’ll stay with those varieties or shift to Liberty or 2,4-D technology. To complicate things more, very little bean ground is ready and pigweeds are 6 to 8 inches tall in places.”

    Amy Beth Dowdy, ABD Crop Consulting, Dexter, Missouri:

    “Traces of rain fell last night (5/15) in Pemiscot County but Dunklin County seemed to miss it. Only about half of my rice has been planted. Where growers will follow rice with rice, they’re dealing with the straw and those fields also are exceptionally wet. So, farmers can’t get in and try to dry up anything.

    “On top of that, they now have a lot of volunteer rice emerging from last year’s crop. At this point, we’ve got to pull together some burndown programs to clean it up. This will be tricky in places where an adjoining field already has rice up. Thankfully, winds have not been an issue but potential for that is in the back of everyone’s mind.

    “In places, volunteer rice is already at fourth to fifth leaf, so farmers will have to go with high rates of glyphosate – plus, aquatics are up and have reached a pretty substantial size. Farmers also will have to run something over that ground to take out the ruts.

    “Some growers keep changing their minds about what to plant. When bean prices fell early this week, two growers said they might add 200 acres of rice if the weather straightens out before June. In fact, they still hadn’t planted all the rice they intended. Then we got this unexpected rain and now they’ve said they’re not even sure they’ll plant all the rice they expected to have. It’s like riding a rollercoaster every day.

    “We’ve sprayed 4 fields where rice is barely tillering and looks a little yellow. I’ve recommended applying fertilizer and letting the rain flush it in, then dropping the boards and start taking those fields to a shallow flood with the expected rain. From there, we’ll add water as needed.

    “None of that will be at a permanent flood until late next week, but the plants should perk up once the fertilizer is in place. We’ll probably do the same with 4 more fields next week.”

    Tyler Fitzgerald, AgriLife Agricultural Agent, Jefferson County, Texas:

    “About 50% of our rice has been planted. By now (5/16), 90% of the crop would typically have been planted, and organic rice would have accounted for a big part of what was left.

    “That’s not the case this year and it’s due to all the rain that’s fallen here since last fall. It hasn’t stopped, either. Heavy rains fell last Thursday (5/9) and the county has pretty much been flooded since then. I don’t know of any ground that could be worked at the moment.

    “Water, though, is leaving the fields. If no more rain falls over the weekend, growers can maybe move into the field again on Monday or Tuesday and finish up. A small number of acres were planted in the last week of March and in the first week of April, and that may be getting close to flood, but it’s 1% of the crop at most.”

    Dustin Harrell, Louisiana Rice Extension Specialist, LSU Rice Research Station, Crowley:

    “We’re dealing with a few scenarios with rice this week in southwest Louisiana. With some fields, growers were able to apply fertilizer on dry ground and flood up those fields at a good time without any issues. That rice looks really nice.

    “On the other hand, a lot of growers have had excess water on many of their fields. Some tried to use the expected rain to get to flood a little earlier but part of that rice went under water for a short time. So, plants are stretched out and struggling. It looks kind of ugly but a lot of that rice simply needs nitrogen and good growing conditions.

    “Growers finally have taken the water off or have lowered it, so the rice has a chance to recover. In certain cases, growers will pull all the water off and then apply nitrogen on dry ground. Others are lowering the water and will spoon feed the N. We’ve had limited days with good growing conditions but that rice should turn around as the weather improves.

    “More reports are coming in about rice hitting green ring, so we want to make sure enough nitrogen goes out on those fields.

    “In northeast Louisiana, a lot of fields still have water on them from the last big rain and it’s moving off slowly. More rain is expected there this weekend, so I don’t know when or if those acres will finally be planted. The prevented planting date up there is May 25, I think, so it’s quickly approaching.

    “Some of those fields are close to rivers and bayous and tend to be clay soils, so it could take two weeks with no rain before anyone could start planting in those locations. With all that, we may end up with fewer rice acres this year in our northern parishes.”

    Bobby Golden, Mississippi Extension Rice and Soil Fertility Agronomist:

    “I received a photo last night (5/15) of the prettiest rice field I’ve seen this season. But another photo showed relift pumps in the adjoining field trying to move water off of it. That says a lot about how this season is going.

    “Planters are at least rolling again in some areas.

    “The big question now is whether to water-seed rice where fields are still covered over. The first question I’m asking is what was applied as a seed treatment and whether the label allows for water seeding or pre-soaking.

    “If you don’t germinate that seed before it’s flown on, you get a lot of movement. Beyond that, we’re not set up to soak seed. People are desperate, and I understand that.

    “We’ve also got fields where rice was planted and came up but then more rain fell and those plants sat under water for 7 or 8 days. Growers have been running relifts as hard as they can. But in certain fields, there was no place to pump the water.

    “On the positive side, a few fields are to the point that growers could put in levees before the next rain and probably go to flood within 10 days. That’s a fairly small portion of the crop, though.

    “This crop is really stretched out. Planting progress is still very slow in Tunica County and the north Delta. That’s been the same story for the last 3 weeks through a big part of the Delta. More people are waiting right now than doing anything.”

    Jarrod T. Hardke, Arkansas Extension Rice Specialist:

    “Growers can find limited places to plant in parts of the state but nothing on a wide basis. Rain has continued to delay most progress. The rain last week was supposed to finish on Saturday (5/11) but then some guys got 3 to 4 tenths on Sunday.

    “Areas north of Interstate 40 received yet more rain yesterday (5/15). It was somewhat spotty, but a half-inch fell in places. In spots, the total hit 2.5 inches. Plus, small hail dinged up rice in isolated locations.

    “If that rain hadn’t come on Sunday night, growers would have been in the field Tuesday afternoon. Where rain fell yesterday, those guys are sidelined again. Certain spots on the prairie missed the rain or most of it, so those farmers got a bit of a reprieve.

    “I’ve seen a little planting today and a few levees were being pulled. A limited amount of rice was planted in late March and early April, and some of that is being fertilized and is going to flood. Some growers are a little worried that their rice is too short to take to flood, even if it’s had enough DD50s. I would say go for it unless the rice is super short.

    “Press ahead if the rice has 4 to 5 leaves, with 1 or maybe 2 tillers and it’s 5 to 6 inches tall. You ought to be able to apply fertilizer and let the next rain help establish the flood. Yes, the water may be a little deep when you start flooding but the level drops quickly as water soaks into the soil. In the meantime, the roots will find the nitrogen and be ready to take off.

    “The worst thing you can do – considering this weather – is to wait until the rice is a little taller or looks a little better. With warm weather, rice that’s gone to flood will grow quickly. As things have been trending, it could be 2 weeks from now before that opportunity rolls around again.

    “The earliest rice has the highest yield potential, so you don’t want development to fall behind.

    “More calls are coming in about Roundup injury. We had a minimal amount of that in the last couple of years but more seems to be likely this season. People are in a hurry and the rain is complicating everything. But we’ve got to be mindful of this and not hurt ourselves or our neighbors. It’s taken too long to gain stands, so the last thing we need is to set back rice even further.

    “A little seedling disease is showing up. A lot of this is in rice planted 6 weeks ago and it took 3 weeks for seedlings to emerge. By then, the fungicidal seed treatments had played out. These pounding rains have been splashing soil on seedlings, which is a recipe for disease. Now that the weather has warmed up, it is obvious which plants were affected. They’ve died and are desiccating now.”

  16. #4176
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    It kind of irritates me that everywhere I read about how the market for soybeans is down, it is blamed solely on the so-called trade war and not the possibility that China doesn't need more soybeans now at any price because they've culled out such a huge portion of their hogs.

    Another thing that irritates me is all the countries with failed crops saying they can no longer export and will have to import instead. With failures happening all over the globe, just who the devil are they going to import from? Seems like no one is mentioning that! And I don't believe that the few places that aren't having failures will be anywhere near able to pick up all the slack. How could they possibly fill the needs of former exporters and additionally supply to the former recipients of those former exports?
    All of the above - I think you just pointed to all the elephants in the room! If/when the powers that be come forward and say we are facing serious crop issues as a planet, not just as a region, continent, or country, it just won't be pretty.

    Picking up (at least) a few extra bags of rice, beans, any grains/legumes, and some garden seeds here and there just seems like a good insurance policy. A lot of stocking up could be done at the cost of a few cups of Starbucks or a few trips to a fast food place. It's a lot healthier, too!

  17. #4177
    Even though I already have a lot, I also am thinking to pick up more split peas and rice. (And a little more pinto beans with my daughter in mind as I don't like them much myself but she hates peas!)

    I will hate it if I can't buy eggs any more, now that I don't have my own chickens, but as I just told my sister, I'll just have to get my protein from beans (or peas!) and rice and my vitamins and minerals from the greens I can grow in the greenhouse in the winter and whatever I can pick of wild things like dandelion, clover, and lambsquarter. This coming fall I'm thinking I will see if I can grow things like carrots and beets through the winter in my greenhouse.

  18. #4178
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Even though I already have a lot, I also am thinking to pick up more split peas and rice. (And a little more pinto beans with my daughter in mind as I don't like them much myself but she hates peas!)

    I will hate it if I can't buy eggs any more, now that I don't have my own chickens, but as I just told my sister, I'll just have to get my protein from beans (or peas!) and rice and my vitamins and minerals from the greens I can grow in the greenhouse in the winter and whatever I can pick of wild things like dandelion, clover, and lambsquarter. This coming fall I'm thinking I will see if I can grow things like carrots and beets through the winter in my greenhouse.
    I'd guess the wonderful family you helped out with your chickens and rabbits would likely gift you some eggs here and there. I'd think there must be a few locals in your area with eggs to sell at a good price or even trade maybe for some of your kale.

    We always have rice here, but I'm also buying split peas, lentils, and other beans and legumes. I don't eat them often, but they store well and are a valuable protein source. Also adding wheat and oatmeal along with macaroni and spaghetti bites that we get from the LDS store. I'm partial to angel hair pasts because it's so thin and can get soft quickly, and I get that from the grocery store.

  19. #4179
    TxGal, if things get really bad, I'll have to find other chickens or do without eggs. The family I'm giving things to lives 15 or 20 miles from me and the small town we both go through is about halfway between us. We'd have to meet there when we were both going to the big town, but I suspect that those like us won't be going much of any place if it gets that bad. If those little chickens make it and thrive, I'm sure she'd give me back a little rooster and maybe 6 hens for myself. And I only kept rabbits in order to breed pet food and I don't have pets any more, either.

    Sigh. It sure is lonely at my place these last few days. Wonder if I'll ever get used to it? I suspect not, after so many years of having little animals.

    If we lived closer, I know they'd give me eggs whenever I needed them. Since I gave them 200 new egg cartons, maybe that will inspire her to call me whenever she gets a good surplus!

    No one else on my whole road has chickens any more, and only one very elderly (like me!) man even gardens at all. Backyard gardening, canning and chickens is almost totally extinct in my little area. A regrettable situation, but I'm not the only one who is becoming able to do less and less as time passes. And I don't think there are even any people below upper middle age on my road any more. This section of my little State Road should be renamed Geezer Lane.

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