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The Grand Solar Minimum
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  1. #5401
    I agree and I'm ever so glad you are posting all the stuff I would be posting if I knew how. (Plus a lot that you find that I probably wouldn't even find!)

    Just finished getting all those pears peeled, chopped up and in the freezer. Now I'll do a dozen big apples that will be added to the pears, then I'll be all finished with this tedious, messy job. Next I'll tackle the ten pounds of carrots in the fridge, if they are still any good. Carrots used to keep forever, but nowadays they've all been infected with something that seems to start rotting them as soon as they're pulled.

    Slowly, slowly, I'm getting things done. And almost constantly thinking about what I might need to add to that shopping list, while I'm getting things done.

  2. #5402
    [I swore not to post here anymore but this is too important not to spread widely. A lot of formating details were lost copying and pasting over to TB2000, but that's to be expected.

    https://thegrandsolarminimum.freefor...&scrollTo=1723

    if you want to see the original. von Koehler]

    [iceagefarmer caused a huge firestorm when he pointed out that corn has a specific, required minimum number of growing degree days to maturity (GDD) AND that the current solar minima is already dropping below those values. But the figure that the ice age farmer used UNDERSTATED THE MINIMUM REQUIREMENT BY ABOUT 20% meaning that the actual situation is even worse. So, instead of a projected crop loss caused by a 12.8% drop in GDD, the actual production loss figure is probably going to be much higher.

    Prior to WWII, most grain-growing was done by family farms using draft horse growing traditional open-pollinated varieties, yielding about 35 bushels per acre.

    Post-war, a series of major innovations occurred: draft horses were replaced by fossil-fueled machinery, freeing up more acreage for grain growing. Machinery became capable of handling larger and larger farms, with more crop specialization and resulting in increased production.

    A major advance was the widespread adoption of the first hybridized corn varieties, which was led us to today with super-specialized GMO corn yielding about 160 bushels per acre. Modern agri-business attempts to control every variable in the corn plant cycle. Monsanto has even developed "Round-Up" corn germplasm which will tolerate their cancer-causing herbicide. But they can't manipulate the amount of GDD the Sun produces! Going back to more weather-resistant corn varieties, like "Planted Mountain", means yields will plummet.
    von Koehler]

    partial quote:

    www.iceagefarmer.com/

    The Heat is Gone: US Growing Degree Days Plummet

    by Ice Age Farmer | Sep 3, 2019 |

    Most coverage of the difficulties plaguing the 2019 US season has revolved around the consequences of our “wettest year ever.” Rightly so, as the flooding across the nation continues to affect a substantial (and often fatal) blow to farmers’ operations. The flooding has been widely covered in most media, to the exclusion of another important factor: temperatures are much colder this year than the previous.

    While the media is less vocal about this aspect, it is no secret. The University of Minnesota shared a graphic demonstrating that this has been the coldest and wettest season since 1920.

    Cold temperatures pose problems for an already late crop to reach maturation. As Pro Farmer’s DTN Senior Ag Meteorologist mentions:

    "The extent of delayed planting of the 2019 U.S. corn crop appears to be coalescing around the idea that, in general, the U.S. corn crop is around three weeks late. With that in mind, the temperature trend takes on extra urgency for the crop."

    http://www.dtnpf.com/agriculture/web...g-degree-day-2

    And, at this point, temperatures are not cooperating on the side of growing degree day accumulation. Most of this June 10-14 week has average temperatures across the central U.S. forecast at from 4 to 12 degrees Fahrenheit below normal. And this cool pattern stays in effect for the entire remainder of the month of June.

    There is still time, but the growing degree day count will be a big detail for the rest of this season. After all, a lot of the prime time has, literally, floated away.

    Let’s take a closer look at this “growing degree day count,” as it may offer insight.

    Growing Degree Days

    Growing Degree Days are a measure of heat accumulation used to predict crop maturity. In the absence of extreme conditions such as unseasonal drought or disease, plants grow in a cumulative stepwise manner which is strongly influenced by the ambient temperature. In other words, GDD values provide a best-case outlook as to plants’ pace to maturity.

    If your GDD drops below certain thresholds, certain crops can no longer be grown.

    GDD is calculated as the sum of daily temperature averages in excess of a given threshold, often 10C/50F (maize), but this can be different for certain crops.

    Down 43%!?

    Tim Agnew of Big Nugget Farm wrote to me, noting that GDD in his neck of the woods has plummeted 43% from 2018. Several sites make this data available, including Syngenta’s GreenCast.

    www.greencastonline.com/growing-degree-days/home

    Checking a few more locations, I found that each had experienced a significant drop in GDD. Stunned, I went about collecting the data for every US ZIP code.

    95% of US ZIP codes experienced a colder growing season in 2019 than in 2018.

    On average, a US ZIP code received 87.2% of the heat accumulation as in 2019 — a 12.8% drop!

    Try Yourself

    Click here iceagefarmer.com/gdd/ to check your ZIP code and see how you are affected. (I put in a nearby zip code and got: GDD has decreased in Zion, IL to 78.73% of previous value (-21.27% drop) in 60099. This comparison GDD link might be a useful tool when considering a possible relocation site. von Koehler)

    This data actually helps to quantify our shifting growing zones:

    Corn

    Corn requires ~ 2000 GDD to reach maturity.

    There are 5,277 US ZIP codes that exceeded 2000 GDD in 2018 and have fallen beneath in 2019. These areas can no longer grow corn (it may look great, but it won’t reach maturity before the first frost).

    unquote.

    BUT, from a different post by an agronomist:

    agfax.com/2019/09/06/illinois-how-will-corn-and-soybeans-will-yield-in-a-disjointed-year/

    Illinois: How Will Corn, Soybeans Yield In A Disjointed Year?

    September 6, 2019

    By Emerson Nafziger, Extension Agronomist, University of Illinois

    Temperatures this season have tracked very close to normal: from May 1 through September 1, the statewide GDD accumulation was about 2,580, 15 GDDs above normal. This total ranges from about 2,300 in northern Illinois to 2,500 in central Illinois, and to more than 2,700 GDD in the southern part of Illinois.

    Had the crop been planted at the normal time, some fields in southern Illinois would be starting to dry down by now, and those in central Illinois would be getting close to black layer. But corn planted on June 1 instead of May 1 in northern and central Illinois lost about 350 and 450 GDDs, respectively, and so accumulated only about 1,950 and 2,050 GDDs by September 1.

    Corn planted on June 15 lost an additional 250 GDDs or so, and so accumulated only about 1,700 and 1,800 GDDs by September 1 in northern and central Illinois, respectively.

    If we assume for simplicity that hybrids normally grown in northern and central Illinois require 2,550 and 2,700 GDDs from planting to maturity, corn planted on June 1 would need to accumulate roughly 600 and 650 GDDs, respectively, from early September through maturity.

    Normal GDD accumulations in September in northern and central Illinois are about 450 and 500, respectively, and accumulating the number of GDDs needed to reach maturity would, with normal temperatures, take until about October 20 in northern Illinois and about October 15 in central Illinois.

    September temperatures have been above normal in four of the last five years, but we can’t count on that in 2019. Corn planted after June 10 requires more GDD to mature than it is likely to get before the average date of the first frost, which is around October 20.

    Lack Of GDDs? Then What?

    What if the corn doesn’t get enough GDDs to mature fully? According to the Iowa State University publication Corn Growth and Development (PMR 1009), dry matter accumulation slows considerably near the end of the grainfilling period. It takes 380 GDDs to accumulate the last 10% of kernel dry weight, and 205 GDDs to accumulate the last 3% of dry weight.

    So, having the corn stop filling with 200 GDD yet to go should not cost a lot of yield. That depends somewhat on how grainfill ends, though. A hard freeze (28 degrees or less) stops grainfill and starch formation in the kernels quickly, while slow deterioration of the leaf area before grainfill ends allows more sugar to move into the kernels and be converted to starch to add dry weight.

    Kernels that don’t fill completely tend to have a constricted base where they attach to the cob, and that can mean lower test weight. If frost stops the conversion of sugars to starch, kernels remain unfilled to the tip and also accumulate sugar there, which can slow field drying and can make kernels discolor more easily during heated-air drying.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  3. #5403
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    SW IA
    Posts
    116
    thank you von Koehler, for posting that...my part of iowa has been sunless for so long, I had a terrible garden this yr..again today, no sun, for cryin' out loud, if I wanted gloomy days, I would move to Seattle..its startin' to get to me.

  4. #5404
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    East Central Texas
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    3,464
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    I agree and I'm ever so glad you are posting all the stuff I would be posting if I knew how. (Plus a lot that you find that I probably wouldn't even find!)

    Just finished getting all those pears peeled, chopped up and in the freezer. Now I'll do a dozen big apples that will be added to the pears, then I'll be all finished with this tedious, messy job. Next I'll tackle the ten pounds of carrots in the fridge, if they are still any good. Carrots used to keep forever, but nowadays they've all been infected with something that seems to start rotting them as soon as they're pulled.

    Slowly, slowly, I'm getting things done. And almost constantly thinking about what I might need to add to that shopping list, while I'm getting things done.
    Sometimes I get lucky in the article hunt, sometimes not so much :-)

    Good for you getting all that done! I know how much work that is. It's a good feeling getting stuff on your list done, we're finally making progress also.

    We just moved the last new storage rack into our storage room. Because of the heat we decided to order the last one from Costco, and not to go pick it up after all....that means I haven't been to the LDS Home Storage Center yet. I want to go again, but I'm waiting to see what's on sale for Sep/Oct. Now that the final rack is in, and I move everything around again on the shelves (ugh), we'll see how much more room we have for purchases. I can feel my shopping list trying to grow.

    The old racks are going down to our shed, and given the article I'm pretty sure we'll be getting in our feed early, and in larger quantities. At least we can get set for a year without degradation of nutrients. Hay is plentiful this year, we're pretty sure we've seen fields with their 4th cutting - almost unheard of here. Prices are running more normal for rounds, haven't priced squares yet because we haven't needed any this summer. We're in a drought now, but we still have grass in the lower areas so we're holding on. Our rain chances start to pick up this week, and the heat should come down some. We've been running 100+ pretty much for weeks now.

    And just after I was saying our tomatoes and green peppers were done for, I spotted about half a dozen peppers on one plant. Maybe there is still hope for the fall garden. We finally got all of our raised beds put together and set up, now we're just adding old hay, compost, soil and cow leavings...it'll be good come spring gardening. I'm really glad we did that this year, I don't know if we'd have had the energy or stamina to get that done in future years.

    Barred rock chicks (6 pullets) are doing well, my plan next spring is to add 6 more (at least). We may well buy one of those prefab chicken houses and add a kennel rather than trying to integrate them with the rest of the flock and having to add more living space onto our current housing (we're getting old for that, too). We're looking at a pricey house, but the double wall format is what we have on our chicken shed and it keeps them warm in frigid weather - https://www.mypetchicken.com/catalog...ens-p1269.aspx

    Now, back to organizing the storage racks.

  5. #5405
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    43,570
    Just wanted to let y'all know that I've added a chat side to the monthly planting guide in the Gardening subforum. Feel free to talk about gardening there, right now we're discussing fall plantings.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  6. #5406
    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    Sometimes I get lucky in the article hunt, sometimes not so much :-)

    Good for you getting all that done! I know how much work that is. It's a good feeling getting stuff on your list done, we're finally making progress also.

    We just moved the last new storage rack into our storage room. Because of the heat we decided to order the last one from Costco, and not to go pick it up after all....that means I haven't been to the LDS Home Storage Center yet. I want to go again, but I'm waiting to see what's on sale for Sep/Oct. Now that the final rack is in, and I move everything around again on the shelves (ugh), we'll see how much more room we have for purchases. I can feel my shopping list trying to grow.

    The old racks are going down to our shed, and given the article I'm pretty sure we'll be getting in our feed early, and in larger quantities. At least we can get set for a year without degradation of nutrients. Hay is plentiful this year, we're pretty sure we've seen fields with their 4th cutting - almost unheard of here. Prices are running more normal for rounds, haven't priced squares yet because we haven't needed any this summer. We're in a drought now, but we still have grass in the lower areas so we're holding on. Our rain chances start to pick up this week, and the heat should come down some. We've been running 100+ pretty much for weeks now.

    And just after I was saying our tomatoes and green peppers were done for, I spotted about half a dozen peppers on one plant. Maybe there is still hope for the fall garden. We finally got all of our raised beds put together and set up, now we're just adding old hay, compost, soil and cow leavings...it'll be good come spring gardening. I'm really glad we did that this year, I don't know if we'd have had the energy or stamina to get that done in future years.

    Barred rock chicks (6 pullets) are doing well, my plan next spring is to add 6 more (at least). We may well buy one of those prefab chicken houses and add a kennel rather than trying to integrate them with the rest of the flock and having to add more living space onto our current housing (we're getting old for that, too). We're looking at a pricey house, but the double wall format is what we have on our chicken shed and it keeps them warm in frigid weather - https://www.mypetchicken.com/catalog...ens-p1269.aspx

    Now, back to organizing the storage racks.
    I was looking pretty interested in that chicken coop until I read "light weight". Ruh Roh. Winds at 60mph are not uncommon out here. I think the GSM will take them higher still. Pretty coop, though.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  7. #5407
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Paradise, New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,270
    New Ice Age Farmer video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=woneE1CV6WA

    Point of No Return: No Veggies to Can -- (or "China Eats Kenya's Donkeys")

    Run time 11:09

    “Don’t pick a fight, but if you find yourself in one, I suggest you make damn sure you win.” - John Wayne

  8. #5408
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,464
    Thanks, alpha!

    Adapt 2030 also has a new podcast out this morning:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0EgrgKAe90

    (MIAC #228) What Will be Forgotten or Rewritten During Unstable Times 2020-2030

    Run time is 24:13

    DuByne creator of the ADAPT 2030 channel on YouTube discusses energetic changes on Earth as the Sun moves into its 400-year cycle affecting crop production, the economy and everyone on our planet. This is an energetic timeline for what you can expect from now to 2023.

    •Perception of the narrative is more valuable than the monetary equivalent
    •Cliff dwellings globally
    •Where were there millions of Dolmens planet wide?
    •Solar Magnetic fields causing a Grand Solar Minimum
    •Solar Cycle 25 Earth goes into Global Cooling
    •Using smart contracts for future food and supply chain payments
    •Building global awareness for cryptocurrency to start the conversion process
    •How much global data was lost in the last 100 years
    •Look for Kambalni eruption
    •Moving plant species to new hardiness zones to continue global agriculture
    •Persistent worldwide cold brings breadbasket concerns

  9. #5409
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,464
    Quote Originally Posted by Seeker22 View Post
    I was looking pretty interested in that chicken coop until I read "light weight". Ruh Roh. Winds at 60mph are not uncommon out here. I think the GSM will take them higher still. Pretty coop, though.
    Thanks, Seeker22! There is a video showing the entire coop being put together, I'll rewatch that to be sure it's safe here. We've had winds in excess of 70mph that did a bit of lift on one side of our standing seam metal roof, and this year we were in the path of I think about half a dozen tornadoes (the storm systems that hit Franklin and Marquez). We even had the pleasure of seeing exactly what 'rotation' detected in severe storms means....we looked outside and watched the clouds literally moving in a counter-clockwise circle over our land...truly frightening, it seemed like our house was in a flushing toilet. I'm pretty sure I have a bit of ptsd from those storms.

    We have a similar looking shed behind our house that we put together. I think it's a Rubbermaid (not sure), but it has a similar locking system. However, it also came with seriously big bolts/screws and molybolts to tie it all together. We periodically tighten those, but have never had any problems with wind.
    Last edited by TxGal; 09-10-2019 at 09:27 AM.

  10. #5410
    When I go to these podcasts I always put them on pause and read the comments first and then check the row of next offerings at the right of the page. I just did this on Adapt 2030 and the top offering was a NEW adapt 2030 #886, with a picture I didn't recognize. I barely saw it, blinked and it was gone. But the number stuck in my mind so I checked the Adapt 2030 site and that last short podcast about the poorly formed corn ears was # 884. So I was NOT imagining things! It was there and then disappeared. We'll have to see if it shows up again soon. Maybe he numbered it wrong and took it down so he could mark it #885?????

    Kinda eerie, but I REALLY DID SEE IT! Wish I could remember what it said!

  11. #5411
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,464
    Martinhouse, I'll go check that one out and see what happens.

    Honestly, that Ice Age Farmer podcast out this morning is another one of those REALLY important podcasts.

  12. #5412
    I agree that this morning's IAF podcast was super important. It had me adding things to my shopping list when it had barely started. And I put back a couple of things that I had crossed off.

    I've pretty much decided that growing our own food could be no more successful than the crops we've been hearing about for the last couple of years. So I am back into stocking up. I will still be prepared to garden in one form or another, but if there are going to be surprise late frosts and freezes, early frosts and freezes, mid-summer frosts and freezes, we will not be harvesting anything at all. I really think the sun is what damaged my plants this summer and ruined what I was hoping to be a nice batch of potatoes. Same happened with my tomatoes and the late spring kale and broccoli I tried to grow.

    So I'll be buying more canned goods, but moreso I'll be getting things I can store dry or dehydrate myself and then store. Even though the sun might be damaging the garden plants, nothing's going to grow at all if it's cloudy all the time, let alone too chilly. I'm absolutely NOT going to let myself depend a single bit on being able to grow anything for myself.

    Right now I'm crock-potting the second of three batches of carrots to be pureed and canned and I've added another ten pounds of carrots to my shopping list. Am wondering if I could dehydrate carrots that are already cooked? They would last longer than even home-canned and I could rehydrate as small a quantity as I needed instead of opening an eight ounce jar when I only want four ounces of carrots?

    I'm afraid I'm going to be a busy person for the next month or so, if not longer.

    And I'm about to give up on this modem of mine. It wouldn't connect again this morning, fourth morning in a row, now,and it took over an hour on the chat thingy to get it fixed and at the end I was finally told that I might need a new modem. GRRRR!
    Last edited by Martinhouse; 09-10-2019 at 02:27 PM.

  13. #5413
    There's a new Ice Age Farmer podcast up just now. Runs 13:08

    Looks like another good one!

  14. #5414
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
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    Ice Age Farmer has a new podcast out this morning:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkNNFh_WjwM

    UK Coldest in 30 Yrs - Aus. Grains Demise - “Chicken Causes Cancer” - Lab-Grown Cheese

    Run time is 13:08

    NSW/QLD grain yields have been predicted at 40-50% of 10-year averages — and GrainCorp is trying to get OUT of the grains business. The Beast from the East returns! UK forecasts coldest winter in 30 years. “Alt-shrimp” and lab-grown cheese introduced as the war on real food continues, attempting to make you wholly dependent on the technocracy’s nasty lab-grown food. And propaganda rags have run away with a "Chickens Cause Cancer" headline, based on a correlation. Christian breaks it down.

  15. #5415
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,464
    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out this morning:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8bcAm6DTog

    More Government Preparedness Warnings & Deep Snow in Europe (886)

    Run time is 5:44

    UK government using BBC Morning to cover three separate segments on getting a grab bag ready and keeping it handy, which puts this along with the US, Switzerland and Sweden to tell its citizens to get ready for emergencies. Deep summer snow for Italy, France and Switzerland of 1-3 feet and massive hails blanket beaches in Italy. Huge hail stones Algeria along with a grain loading port strike.

  16. #5416
    TxGal, this latest podcast #886 is the one that I saw briefly and it then disappeared from the right-hand column on the youtube page. Now that I see it, I recognize the first part of the title, too, that says More Govt Preparedness Warnings.

    Also when I went to this link I checked the stuff at the right side and saw an Adapt 2030 #883 offered and I'm watching it now. It is Part 1 of an interview with North West Liberty News with a guy in Montana. It's 28 some minutes...I'm ten minutes into it and I don't think it was up before now. So far, they are talking about China/Hong Kong, and about depressing the economy so people can't afford to migrate when they can no longer get food where they are and I think I'll finish listening to it before I catch the short one you just linked for us this morning.

  17. #5417
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    East Central Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    TxGal, this latest podcast #886 is the one that I saw briefly and it then disappeared from the right-hand column on the youtube page. Now that I see it, I recognize the first part of the title, too, that says More Govt Preparedness Warnings.

    Also when I went to this link I checked the stuff at the right side and saw an Adapt 2030 #883 offered and I'm watching it now. It is Part 1 of an interview with North West Liberty News with a guy in Montana. It's 28 some minutes...I'm ten minutes into it and I don't think it was up before now. So far, they are talking about China/Hong Kong, and about depressing the economy so people can't afford to migrate when they can no longer get food where they are and I think I'll finish listening to it before I catch the short one you just linked for us this morning.
    Sometimes his main postings seem to get a little mixed up, or I just missed it :-)

    Trying to find it now.....

  18. #5418
    TxGal, I just watched this morning's podcast #886. Short but interesting.

    The longer one I found, #883, was definitely new to me. It was out on Sept. 5th, so I checked back a page here and we did not have this one. I don't think it was posted on his webpage where you could get a link to it. It was a a pretty good one and would be good to have here if you can even find it anywhere.

  19. #5419
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    Sep 2012
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    East Central Texas
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    Found it, looks good:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1luk5APTCI

    Sun Cycles, Food Shortages and the Swift Contraction of Civilization PT 1 (883)

    Run time is 28:21

    When we see political moves across the planet in areas that were once fertile breadbaskets two to four millennia ago, that are now coming back online to become new major food grow regions, isn't it peculiar that where there are major conflicts that a new agricultural zone is emerging? Its about food, not oil resources anymore.

    James White of NorthWestLibertyNews.com and David DuByne creator of the ADAPT 2030 channel on YouTube discuss societal changes as our Earth shifts to a cooler climate and the Eddy Grand Solar Minimum intensifies. A repeating 400-year cycle in our Sun which will affect crop production, the economy and everyone on our planet. This is a timeline for what you can expect from now to 2023 and how to protect your families and yourself through the changes.

  20. #5420
    Glad you found it! Thanks! I thought it was really a good one.

  21. #5421
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    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Glad you found it! Thanks! I thought it was really a good one.
    You're welcome! I'm wondering if he already did part 2.....

  22. #5422
    I think he did. I do remember a podcast with this guy interviewing him and it could very well have been Part 2. If you already linked to it here, it possibly was before Sept. 5th.

  23. #5423
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    East Central Texas
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    Finally got the internet back, we got walloped again today with strong storms and - I'm not complaining - 2" of rain. Just catching up, Electroverse has some great articles out, heavy on the graphics. Here's one, please go to the link for the graphics/charts. And so winter begins:

    https://electroverse.net/late-summer...ns-on-the-way/

    Late-Summer Snow Falls in Northwest U.S. as the Jet Stream Shifts South — Even Colder Conditions on the Way

    September 11, 2019 - Cap Allon

    Cool air funneled into the Western U.S. this week resulting in up to 10 inches of snow falling on the mountains of Utah and Wyoming. While looking ahead to next week, meteorologists see a much more potent cold air-mass sweeping the Pacific coast and Intermountain West.

    This week’s cool air, which arrived in the Northwest on Monday, saw temperatures nosedive some 10C below the seasonal average. Snowflakes fell over the high country of the Tetons in northwestern Wyoming early Tuesday. And a decent dumping of the white stuff settled at Bald Mountain Pass, Utah: (graphics follow)

    Up to 10 inches of snow is expected to fall in the higher terrain of northern and western Wyoming Tuesday night into Wednesday, in what the NWS is calling the first “fall-like storm” of the season.

    Bighorn, Absaroka, Wind River and Teton mountains –including parts of Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks– are all expecting healthy accumulations of powder above 8,000 feet.

    With Thundersnow even possible in the Bighorn Mountains on Wednesday.

    While a southward kink in the jet stream is responsible for this week’s cool down, a major buckling is forecast for next week — the recent chill is expected to pale in comparison to next week’s proper burst of autumnal cold.

    “We expect snow to fall next week over the high country of the Cascades and perhaps the northern Sierra Nevada and northern Rockies,” said AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Brett Anderson.

    The upcoming pattern next week should deliver some of the first frosts and freezes of the season.

    The Changing Jet Stream

    Studying the jet stream has long been an indicator of the weather to come.

    And to study the jet stream, attention must turn to the sun.

    When solar activity is high, the band of meandering air flowing some 6 miles above our heads is tight, stable and follows somewhat of a straight path. But when solar activity is low, as it is now (with NASA forecasting this next solar cycle “will be the weakest of the past 200 years”), the jet stream loses strength and its band of fast-moving air becomes wavy which, in the NH, drags Arctic air south to much lower latitudes than normal: (graphics follow)

  24. #5424
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    Short article on harvest and planting, video at the link:

    https://ktiv.com/2019/09/09/planting...-near-harvest/

    SIOUX CENTER, Iowa (KTIV) – Farmers Cooperative Association crop advisers say planting delays due to flooding are causing concern over corn maturity as harvest season approaches.

    An early frost could pose a threat to corn crops.

    “When you pull a kernel out, and you break the end off. This end is actually going to be black, when it gets to full maturity, and that’s what they call ‘black layer,'” said Cody Van Drie, a Certified Crop Adviser with Farmers Cooperative Society.

    The flooding in March caused many farmers to have to delay the planting of their crops.

    Agriculture officials say due to late planting this year for corn, some of the corn crop may not reach full maturity.

    “Typically we like to see that black layer date, coming up here soon. Middle of September, late September. The way things have been going here the past season, we are actually close to actually two weeks behind normal,” said Van Drie.

    Van Drie says the main concern is that the crop reach full maturity before the first frost of the season.

  25. #5425
    TxGal, glad you got some rain and got your Internet back. Thanks for the links and articles.

    Question...Does Dubyne have an Adapt 2030 home site? I tried adapt2030.com and didn't get anything. I only have his youtube page bookmarked, and also the oilseedcrops.org page.

  26. #5426
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    East Central Texas
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    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out today:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uXYaPtFwAE0

    Wheat Scarcity Import-Export Shell Game Begins (887)

    Run time is 16:34

    Australia becomes a wheat importer looking to Canada for supply but Canadian wheat output slashed this year as well. Now other countries that used to rely on Australian exports need to find supply elsewhere. Australian government warning people to brace for huge food price rises, which we see unfold as an example of what the planet will experience in a massive economic contraction as food becomes super expensive and buying habits shift.

  27. #5427
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
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    Electroverse has a new article out this morning. Their articles have a large number of charts/graphics/videos that I can't bring over - please go to the link:

    https://electroverse.net/many-all-ti...n-sept-9-2019/

    Many All-Time Daily Low Temperature Records Busted Across the U.S. on Sept 9, 2019

    September 12, 2019 Cap Allon

    A kink in the jet stream has led to frigid Arctic air funneling anomalously far south into the Midwest/Western U.S. this week.

    According to data from warm-mongers NOAA, a total of 18 all-time daily Lowest Maximum Temperatures were busted on September 9th alone (see link)

    Again, these are all-time daily low-max temperatures being broken, some at weather stations which have been around for well-over 100 years.

    The stations at both Litchfield, MN and Ellsworth, WI, for example, have been keeping records since 1908.

    And furthermore, even with all that UHI effect, the first 9 days of September have seen a total of 164 All-Time Daily Low Temperature Records either tied of busted across the United States. (see link)

    While a southward kink in the jet stream is responsible for this week’s cool down, a major buckling is forecast for next week — the recent chill is expected to pale in comparison to next week’s proper burst of autumnal cold which should deliver some of the first frosts and freezes of the season, as well as many more new all-time low temperature records.

    The cold times are returning, in line with historically low solar activity.

    Even NASA agrees, in part at least, with their recent SC25 forecast revealing this next solar cycle will be “the weakest of the past 200 years” (for more on that, see the link at the bottom of the page).

    Prepare.

  28. #5428
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    TxGal, glad you got some rain and got your Internet back. Thanks for the links and articles.

    Question...Does Dubyne have an Adapt 2030 home site? I tried adapt2030.com and didn't get anything. I only have his youtube page bookmarked, and also the oilseedcrops.org page.
    Good question, I don't think so. All I can find are those two sites, and a Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/Miniiceage/. We don't do Facebook, so I can only explore a limited amount there.

  29. #5429
    TxGal, this morning's podcast makes me want to get another 50# sack of winter wheat at the feed store. Not to eat, of course, but just for planting and possibly even sharing in the near future.

    Good to hear him finally express the question of how countries with shortages in their harvests can expect to import when the other countries are also have major harvest shortages.

    I'm also thinking I might want to start getting lots of hominy. It dehydrates and rehydrates beautifully and would be a good digestible form of a grain to add to my chili bean soup.

  30. #5430
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    TxGal, this morning's podcast makes me want to get another 50# sack of winter wheat at the feed store. Not to eat, of course, but just for planting and possibly even sharing in the near future.

    Good to hear him finally express the question of how countries with shortages in their harvests can expect to import when the other countries are also have major harvest shortages.

    I'm also thinking I might want to start getting lots of hominy. It dehydrates and rehydrates beautifully and would be a good digestible form of a grain to add to my chili bean soup.
    We don't eat many grains; the best part about them is that you can sprout them to get greens indoors any time! If we still had chickens I'd sprout grains for them also to increase the nutritional value.

  31. #5431
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    TxGal, this morning's podcast makes me want to get another 50# sack of winter wheat at the feed store. Not to eat, of course, but just for planting and possibly even sharing in the near future.

    Good to hear him finally express the question of how countries with shortages in their harvests can expect to import when the other countries are also have major harvest shortages.

    I'm also thinking I might want to start getting lots of hominy. It dehydrates and rehydrates beautifully and would be a good digestible form of a grain to add to my chili bean soup.
    I'm almost done listening to it now, and I'm with you. Wheat is just invaluable, either for people or livestock (chickens), and stored properly lasts virtually forever. Wheat is high on my worry list; I know I've said this before, but if we have some form of a bread product and a pot of soup that will keep a body going for a good while. Good, basic food, filling and nutritious.

    While I listen I usually read the comments below. There are some really good ones from down under.

  32. #5432
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    East Central Texas
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    Martinhouse, did you feel an earthquake this morning? I'm seeing reports of a 3.7 in Northern Arkansas (New Madrid, oh dear) near Gassville, AR.

    I've only been in one that I've felt, and oddly that was in San Antonio...weird, rolling/wave motion while at work. Everyone felt it, we had a few folks from CA working there who knew instantly what it was. I was watching my the water in my glass move about. I could do without that, along with tornadoes, snow storms, etc. Hope you're okay!

  33. #5433
    I generally read the comments before I listen. It helps me pay better attention to what he's saying.

    I've found that if I stay away from wheat, (and from dairy except for butter and hard cheese), my acid reflux is almost non-existent unless the scoliosis area of my back is in spasm. So I have a very small piece of bread once or twice a week and that doesn't seem to bother me. It was hard to do because toast and sandwiches were a big part of my diet, but I've managed and I think a lot of people would be better off without wheat.

    I like rice just fine in my soups and it is good enough for the grain needed to complete the protein in legumes, but I do like corn chips in the bean soups. But I think hominy would be more digestible so I plan to see if I can do something with it so I won't choke on it. I might even see what happens if I toss some into the blender.

  34. #5434
    TxGal, I think I'm too far south to have felt that quake this AM.

    I was in one quake when I was 19 years old. I was sleeping in my room in the YWCA in Denver and the bed swaying side to side woke me up in the wee hours. Being from Minnesota and being wakened from a sound sleep, I had no clue, and just went right back to sleep and totally forgot about it. It must have been many years later that I finally realized just what that experience had to have been.

  35. #5435
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    Sep 2012
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    Martinhouse, glad it didn't affect you!

    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out this morning:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9IqfXiyJZ9s

    (MIAC #229) To See and Recognize the Illusion w/Michael Lazaro

    Run time is 30:50

    Michael Lazaro from https://www.evolutionaryenergyarts.com David DuByne creator of the ADAPT 2030 channel on YouTube discusses energetic changes on Earth as the Sun moves into its 400-year cycle affecting crop production, the economy and everyone on our planet. This is an energetic timeline for what you can expect from now to 2023. Michael is known for his studies in Pranic Healing, Quantum Touch, Polarity Therapy and the Nag Hammadi and Dead Sea Scrolls. Evolutionary Energy Arts YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCd1B...

    •Using the Mind to Sustain the Body
    •Is there a multi-Verse
    •Indian Vedic texts and mythical beings
    •Guardians of Shamballa
    •Astral realms in the 4th dimension
    •Vibrational frequency changes on Earth causing a great consciousness awakening
    •Ancient Chinese sages
    •Nag Hammadi Scrolls
    •Can you manifest food out of thin air?

  36. #5436
    I think David DuByne just knocked on my door and handed me a little pamphlet!

  37. #5437
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Arkansas
    Posts
    597
    This is the first I'm hearing of the earthquake. I spoke with a friend that lives near there and she said she slept through it. Said that people that lived further from the quake than her had some minor stuff, but nothing for her.

    She also told me that "city" people are buying up all the land/housing there to get away from the big city crime. I hadn't realized that many people had found it.

    I went to a local big chain grocery store on Wednesday. It felt like I was in the twilight zone. Huge gaping holes on the shelves. They are down to about a 4 foot wide section of canned vegetable. Mostly store brand stuff and a reduced variety of products and brand names. I happened to notice they they only have the store brand and Hungry Jack brand of instant potatoes in the box and only 2 sizes of them. I looked for a shelf tag for another brand and there wasn't one. They did have a decent selection of a third brand of the flavored potatoes in the pouches. The entire dry potato section was only two feet wide on 4 shelves.

    I wandered around the store in a daze. Over on the cereal aisle, they are down to about 8 feet on just the one side. Big holes there too, as well as a major reduction in variety and brands. It was like that all over the store.

    That night I talked to a friend that had been to the local Walmart. She said it was the same there.

    Yesterday I spent some time with my 91 year old father-in-law. He had been grocery shopping on the Saturday before and said it was like that then. He commented that it really worried him. I asked him if it was like that during the war years. He said that he didn't know because they lived so far out in the country and that the only thing they got at the store was sugar and flour.

    If the grocery store shelves now are a reflection of last years crop, what will they look like next year?

  38. #5438
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    Sep 2012
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    Posts
    3,464
    Grand Solar Minimum News is livestreaming right now, and they're speaking with John Casey:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOiPS9y7GDs

  39. #5439
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    Sep 2012
    Location
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    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    Grand Solar Minimum News is livestreaming right now, and they're speaking with John Casey:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOiPS9y7GDs
    I missed the beginning, and I'll post the permanent link when it's up. THIS IS A HUGE INTERVIEW!!

  40. #5440
    Catskinner, I live in the same part of the country you do, although not right in the same part of our state.

    Your post just now has rather scared the crap out of me!

    TxGal, I clicked on your link to GSM news and my computer won't take it live. Hopefully I can try again in a couple of hours and it will be posted in a manner that I can listen to.

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