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The Grand Solar Minimum
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  1. #1161


    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DpFAABzU8AMTQxs.jpg

    A great example of a "looping" jet stream; cold on one side and hot on the other.



    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DpBHCoQUcAAOgnI.jpg

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  2. #1162
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  3. #1163
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  4. #1164
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,606
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    For a more realistic view of what we may be facing, i highly recommend 2 of Laura Ingallls Wilders books.... Farmer Boy, which is the story of her husband Almanzo's boyhood years in Malone NY, which is in the far northern corner up by the St.
    Lawrence river. Almanzo's father had more stock than he could fit into his barns, so he outwintered yearling cattle in an enclosed barnyard. Despite the protection from the wind this afforded, he had to go out almost every winter night withna stock whip, around midnight, and chase them around for 20 minutes or so to get their blood pumping, lest they freeze to death in their sleep. Thermometers went down to minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit, and sometimes the mercury froze in the bulb when temperatures dropped even lower!

    The other book is The Long Winter, and I find it fascinating that the Indians warned that every 20 years, there would be a very hard winter, but every third cycle (IIRC) the winter would be exceptionally hard. It sounds like they were observing the effects of the sunspot cycle!

    Summerthyme
    My daughter just cleaned her room and found her Little House series again. I just reread Long Winter. It is about the winter of 1880 which is fairly well documented in a number of sources. One of my big takeaways is that even in that time the people were already relying on the train for many of their supplies. Coal and flour were brought in. When the trains couldn't run the people some people started to starve and the Ingalls burned hay to keep warm. What wheat they were able to get they ground in their coffee grinder and it was a constant job. Another thing was tedium of daily existence basically locked in the tiny kitchen of their house surrounded by the constant storm and wind. My other takeaway is thank god we have modern construction. I think of what even an 1" thick rigid foam board would have done for that house and their comfort.

  5. #1165
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Green County, Kentucky
    Posts
    9,664
    Quote Originally Posted by mecoastie View Post
    My daughter just cleaned her room and found her Little House series again. I just reread Long Winter. It is about the winter of 1880 which is fairly well documented in a number of sources. One of my big takeaways is that even in that time the people were already relying on the train for many of their supplies. Coal and flour were brought in. When the trains couldn't run the people some people started to starve and the Ingalls burned hay to keep warm. What wheat they were able to get they ground in their coffee grinder and it was a constant job. Another thing was tedium of daily existence basically locked in the tiny kitchen of their house surrounded by the constant storm and wind. My other takeaway is thank god we have modern construction. I think of what even an 1" thick rigid foam board would have done for that house and their comfort.
    I re-read that a few years ago (daughter and I spent several months living in an old 5th wheel with no internet, so I read books to her to entertain us both). My thought was that they would have been better off in a soddy -- at least they would have been warmer.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  6. #1166
    https://krtv.com/weather/2018/10/09/...vel-difficult/

    Mountain snow will make travel difficult
    Brandon Michaels
    3:20 pm
    October 9, 2018



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jp0-...ature=youtu.be

    1:25 minutes

    We’ve already seen some accumulating snow on Tuesday, with much more left to fall.

    Snow is expected to continue through the night.

    Snow showers below 5,000 feet are possible, but the bulk of the snow will fall on and along the Rocky Mountain Front, with additional accumulations of up to 8″ possible near Rogers Pass.

    The mountain snow will make for locally difficult commutes, especially Wednesday morning.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  7. #1167
    https://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2018/...ther-advisory/

    Snow Hitting Northwestern Minnesota Overnight
    October 9, 2018

    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – Winter is still a good two months away, but parts of Minnesota will get their first significant snow Tuesday night through Thursday morning.

    The National Weather Service has issued a Winter Weather Advisory for several counties in northwestern Minnesota Tuesday night that will last until Thursday morning. Some parts of northwestern Minnesota could see more than six inches of snow by Thursday morning, and strong winds.

    The snow will continue throughout much of Wednesday before clearing out by early Thursday morning. The areas likely to get the most snow range from Bemidji and to the northwest, into North Dakota.

    The southern half of the state has gotten drenched by consistent rainfall the last several days. The Twin Cities will get steady, if not heavy rain, overnight. A Flood Watch is in effect for southeastern Minnesota Tuesday night, where several inches of rain have already fallen.

    Thursday will be windy and cold across much of the state before our first freeze Friday night.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  8. #1168
    https://electroverse.net/thank-you-u...lobal-warming/

    Extreme Weather GSM



    THANK YOU UN AND IPCC — SAVE US FROM ALL THIS GLOBAL WARMING!
    OCTOBER 9, 2018 CAP ALLON

    US & Canada temperatures are set to plunge as much as 16C below average as we head into mid-October.

    The Grand Solar Minimum is tightening its grip:



    UN 1989: “entire nations could be wiped off the earth by rising sea levels if global warming is not reversed by the year 2000“.

    How many ‘tipping point’ deadlines have to come and go before populations wake up?



    The raw satellite data shows global average temperatures are continuing to decline.

    We should be below baseline by Christmas.

    Early season snow is building.

    The GSM is upon us.

    Prepare.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  9. #1169
    https://electroverse.net/alberta-sno...-the-forecast/



    ALBERTA: SNOWFALL BREAKS CENTURY OLD RECORD — MORE “HEAVY SNOW” IN THE FORECAST

    OCTOBER 9, 2018

    Between midnight Oct 1 through midnight Oct 2, the Calgary International Airport reported a snow total of 38cm. Meteorologist for Environment Canada Brian Proctor said they haven’t seen a barrage of snow like that in October for well over 100 years.

    “The previous record for October for any one day was 29.7cm set way back on Oct 4, 1914,” said Proctor.

    Last Tuesday’s total, “really blew away the old record by nearly 10cm.”


    Proctor adds that it wasn’t only the Foothills region that got covered.

    “Some of the other really significant amounts were Bragg Creek which got 60cm, Canmore got anywhere from 40-50cm, out in the Kananaskis region they reported upwards of 60cm on the town-site, Coalman got 35-40cm and Exshaw reported 45-50cm.”

    The forecast anticipates further heavy snowfall early this week as arctic air continues to hold well south.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  10. #1170
    Quote Originally Posted by mecoastie View Post
    My daughter just cleaned her room and found her Little House series again. I just reread Long Winter. It is about the winter of 1880 which is fairly well documented in a number of sources. One of my big takeaways is that even in that time the people were already relying on the train for many of their supplies. Coal and flour were brought in. When the trains couldn't run the people some people started to starve and the Ingalls burned hay to keep warm. What wheat they were able to get they ground in their coffee grinder and it was a constant job. Another thing was tedium of daily existence basically locked in the tiny kitchen of their house surrounded by the constant storm and wind. My other takeaway is thank god we have modern construction. I think of what even an 1" thick rigid foam board would have done for that house and their comfort.
    Personally, I am planning to relocate.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  11. #1171
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    Personally, I am planning to relocate.

    von Koehler
    How far north are you now?

    Summerthyme

  12. #1172
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    How far north are you now?

    Summerthyme
    I am living within the area which was covered by a mile thick of ice in the last Wisconsin glacier.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  13. #1173
    I used to live in the glacier area, too, but over in the Twin Cities. I moved to Arkansas in 1977 and never regretted it even though work was hard to find.

    Now I'm more glad than ever to have made that move.

  14. #1174
    New evidence suggests Stone Age hunters from Europe discovered America

    David Keys
    Tuesday 28 February 2012

    The Independent US

    New evidence suggests Stone Age hunters from Europe discovered America

    New archaeological evidence suggests that America was first discovered by Stone Age people from Europe – 10,000 years before the Siberian-originating ancestors of the American Indians set foot in the New World.

    A remarkable series of several dozen European-style stone tools, dating back between 19,000 and 26,000 years, have been discovered at six locations along the US east coast. Three of the sites are on the Delmarva Peninsular in Maryland, discovered by archaeologist Dr Darrin Lowery of the University of Delaware. One is in Pennsylvania and another in Virginia. A sixth was discovered by scallop-dredging fishermen on the seabed 60 miles from the Virginian coast on what, in prehistoric times, would have been dry land.

    The new discoveries are among the most important archaeological breakthroughs for several decades - and are set to add substantially to our understanding of humanity's spread around the globe.

    The similarity between other later east coast US and European Stone Age stone tool technologies has been noted before. But all the US European-style tools, unearthed before the discovery or dating of the recently found or dated US east coast sites, were from around 15,000 years ago - long after Stone Age Europeans (the Solutrean cultures of France and Iberia) had ceased making such artefacts. Most archaeologists had therefore rejected any possibility of a connection. But the newly-discovered and recently-dated early Maryland and other US east coast Stone Age tools are from between 26,000 and 19,000 years ago - and are therefore contemporary with the virtually identical western European material.

    What’s more, chemical analysis carried out last year on a European-style stone knife found in Virginia back in 1971 revealed that it was made of French-originating flint.

    Professor Dennis Stanford, of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC, and Professor Bruce Bradley of the University of Exeter, the two leading archaeologists who have analysed all the evidence, are proposing that Stone Age people from Western Europe migrated to North America at the height of the Ice Age by travelling (over the ice surface and/or by boat) along the edge of the frozen northern part of the Atlantic. They are presenting their detailed evidence in a new book - Across Atlantic Ice – published this month.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/w...a-7447152.html



    At the peak of the Ice Age, around three million square miles of the North Atlantic was covered in thick ice for all or part of the year.

    However, the seasonally shifting zone where the ice ended and the open ocean began would have been extremely rich in food resources – migrating seals, sea birds, fish and the now-extinct northern hemisphere penguin-like species, the great auk.

    Stanford and Bradley have long argued that Stone Age humans were quite capable of making the 1500 mile journey across the Atlantic ice - but till now there was comparatively little evidence to support their thinking.

    But the new Maryland, Virginia and other US east coast material, and the chemical tests on the Virginian flint knife, have begun to transform the situation. Now archaeologists are starting to investigate half a dozen new sites in Tennessee, Maryland and even Texas – and these locations are expected to produce more evidence.

    Another key argument for Stanford and Bradley’s proposal is the complete absence of any human activity in north-east Siberia and Alaska prior to around 15,500 years ago. If the Maryland and other east coast people of 26,000 to 19,000 years ago had come from Asia, not Europe, early material, dating from before 19,000 years ago, should have turned up in those two northern areas, but none have been found.

    Although Solutrean Europeans may well have been the first Americans, they had a major disadvantage compared to the Asian-originating Indians who entered the New World via the Bering Straits or along the Aleutian Islands chain after 15,500 years ago.

    Whereas the Solutreans had only had a 4500 year long ‘Ice Age’ window to carry out their migratory activity, the Asian-originating Indians had some 15,000 years to do it. What’s more, the latter two-thirds of that 15 millennia long period was climatologically much more favourable and substantially larger numbers of Asians were therefore able to migrate.

    As a result of these factors the Solutrean (European originating) Native Americans were either partly absorbed by the newcomers or were substantially obliterated by them either physically or through competition for resources.

    Some genetic markers for Stone Age western Europeans simply don’t exist in north- east Asia – but they do in tiny quantities among some north American Indian groups. Scientific tests on ancient DNA extracted from 8000 year old skeletons from Florida have revealed a high level of a key probable European-originating genetic marker. There are also a tiny number of isolated Native American groups whose languages appear not to be related in any way to Asian-originating American Indian peoples.

    But the greatest amount of evidence is likely to come from under the ocean – for most of the areas where the Solutreans would have stepped off the Ice onto dry land are now up to 100 miles out to sea.

    The one underwater site that has been identified - thanks to the scallop dredgers – is set to be examined in greater detail this summer – either by extreme-depth divers or by remotely operated mini submarines equipped with cameras and grab arms.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  15. #1175
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    10,949

    Relevant; from www.xkcd.com

    Proud member Alt-Right group "Scientists For Trump". (Smart Americans know he's right.)
    A man should only take a wife whose Bible includes Genesis, Leviticus, Deuteronomy, Colossians, Malachi, Isaiah, Ephesians, Corinthians, Hebrews, Timothy, Titus, Proverbs, Mark, Peter & Revelation. Ecclesiastes 7:28 (NIV) tells him the odds.

  16. #1176
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    I am living within the area which was covered by a mile thick of ice in the last Wisconsin glacier.

    von Koehler
    & that is where? US? can you give a region at least?
    It's Doom O'clock somewhere...www.righteousgrunt.com
    www.strikehardgear.com

    Support a Vet. Made in USA tactical gear, Bible covers & more.
    Live Well, Live Blessed.

  17. #1177
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,606
    So are we now anticipating a new ice age?

  18. #1178
    Quote Originally Posted by mecoastie View Post
    So are we now anticipating a new ice age?
    I, personally, am not. Quite a big difference between a "little ice age", and actual millennia of mile deep glaciers extending into areas currently heavily built up and populated.

    I don't think we have any idea what the triggers for the most recent great Ice Age were, but i doubt that a quiet sun did it alk on its own...

    Summerthyme

  19. #1179
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Green County, Kentucky
    Posts
    9,664
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    I, personally, am not. Quite a big difference between a "little ice age", and actual millennia of mile deep glaciers extending into areas currently heavily built up and populated.

    I don't think we have any idea what the triggers for the most recent great Ice Age were, but i doubt that a quiet sun did it alk on its own...

    Summerthyme
    No, I really doubt that we are going to see the continents covered by ice sheets again -- that was in the aftermath of the Flood, which is a non-repeatable occurrence. Mini-ice-age, loooong cold snaps, sure. But not glaciers covering half of North America.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  20. #1180
    Quote Originally Posted by Freeholder View Post
    No, I really doubt that we are going to see the continents covered by ice sheets again -- that was in the aftermath of the Flood, which is a non-repeatable occurrence. Mini-ice-age, loooong cold snaps, sure. But not glaciers covering half of North America.

    Kathleen
    Actually, there have been repeated Ice Ages that have covered parts of North America and Northern Europe but the time between the full sheets moving down varies a lot.

    I'd be surprised at a full Ice Age right now myself - not impossible and the sheets can start moving (or rather be deposited if a recent theory is correct) in as little as five years (once the cold starts you get a feedback loop and a couple of "Years without Summers" where the snow doesn't melt so the glaciers don't actually have to move so much as morph into giant Ice Packs).

    But a Maunder/Dalton Minimum Little Ice Age sees more likely than not unless Sunna (Norse Sun) brings her spots back; which lately she seems to have been rather reluctant to do.

    From wiki:

    The Quaternary Glaciation / Quaternary Ice Age started about 2.58 million years ago at the beginning of the Quaternary Period when the spread of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere began. Since then, the world has seen cycles of glaciation with ice sheets advancing and retreating on 40,000- and 100,000-year time scales called glacial periods, glacials or glacial advances, and interglacial periods, interglacials or glacial retreats. The earth is currently in an interglacial, and the last glacial period ended about 10,000 years ago. All that remains of the continental ice sheets are the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets and smaller glaciers such as on Baffin Island.

    Ice ages can be further divided by location and time; for example, the names Riss (180,000–130,000 years bp) and Würm (70,000–10,000 years bp) refer specifically to glaciation in the Alpine region. The maximum extent of the ice is not maintained for the full interval. The scouring action of each glaciation tends to remove most of the evidence of prior ice sheets almost completely, except in regions where the later sheet does not achieve full coverage.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_age
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  21. #1181
    I have started my annual fundraiser for my forum, webwidediscussions.com and am waiting to see what support it receives.

    Currently "guests" are permitted to read all posts, just like here at Timebomb2000.

    Until the dust settles, I putting my posting here on hold.

    I am also very active trading the recent market crash, so time is limited.

    von Koehler
    Last edited by von Koehler; 10-12-2018 at 12:26 PM.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  22. #1182
    I read the single post you just put up on your site. It was very good.

    If you don't post here for a while, I guess most of us will be busy acting on all this information. But I hope we can all still contribute now and then. The exchange of ideas is so helpful, and also knowing what conditions are like for members in different parts of the country and even of the world.

    Thanks for this thread and am looking forward to when you have time to come back to it...hope that won't be too long.

  23. #1183
    After thinking about this for a long time, I have decided to close down my forum webwidediscussions.

    So it makes little sense for me to continue this thread at TB2000.

    If you are not convinced by now then probably nothing short of a advancing glacier outside your window would do.

    Even then, denial runs strong.

    Good luck. It's time to prep.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  24. #1184
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    North Georgia
    Posts
    313
    We are going to miss you, but the reality is that we should have listened !

    Others with a similar message on YeeTub - Adapt2030 and SuspiciousObservers
    I have seen the same charts - and the truth is out there

    rick on the Road in the RV - Central Nevada today...

  25. #1185
    Thank you, van Koehler. You have been putting so much work into this and it's been much appreciated. Now it is up to us to act on the information as is appropriate for each of our individual situations. This winter is already winding up to be a doozy. Good luck with your relocation and preparations.

  26. #1186
    Please know that I listened when you sounded the alarm. My skillset is increased because you put work and time into these posts. You were strong enough to put the truth out there. Far too many people are craven and in the Glowbull Warming camp. I believe that you have saved many lives. Mine may be one of them.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

  27. #1187
    I hope you do change your mind and post here at least part of the time, I value your information - that long lecture by the Chinese scientist was amazing!
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  28. #1188
    Glad to see the post about the pecan crop, too. I had not seen that anywhere else. Hoping you can still post here if you close down your own site. I find that TB2K is a nice place for a sort of one-stop shopping when it comes to news, especially these special threads that are off the main page. This thread and one other here on TB have given me more knowledge and ideas than anywhere else I go on the web.

  29. #1189
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    out & about
    Posts
    593
    von Koehler, I hope you come back and post but take a break, you deserve one. You have done a lot here and on your website to wake people up and that can be, no it is, quite exhausting. Look at how much you've taught us! You've awoken a lot of people - you've planted a seed of knowledge in a lot more. Take a break and then come back and share, visit, comiserate about our experiences as we enter a deepening GSM. We are all going to need each other and this is a perfect place to share our questions, our successes and our journey.


    WWG1WGA

    “Hope has two beautiful daughters; their names are Anger and Courage. Anger at the way things are, and Courage to see that they do not remain as they are.”
    St. Augustine of Hippo

  30. #1190
    I'm hoping he comes back, too. But in the meantime, maybe the rest of us can share what we mean to do about the conditions this GSM is throwing at us.

    I'm really tired of all the rainy and just plain cloudy days. But I think that's pretty normal for a GSM so I've decided that one of the most important preps might be to stock up on TONS of vitamin D3 and/or cod liver oil. And as soon as it stops raining, I'm going to go out and pull all the young dandelion plants I can find out of the cracks in my sidewalks and where ever else I can find them. I'm hoping they will grow in my greenhouse this winter. They have seemed to be super-susceptible to powdery mildew in the greenhouse, so I'll see if I can find out what a good cheap remedy would be for that, and hopefully it will be something that stores well.

    I may even try bringing in a few other nutritious weeds from outdoors. Even if they won't grow all winter in the greenhouse, they will start growing again a lot earlier in the spring than they will outdoors, and nutrition-wise, that could be pretty important.

  31. #1191
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    15,605
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    After thinking about this for a long time, I have decided to close down my forum webwidediscussions.

    So it makes little sense for me to continue this thread at TB2000.

    If you are not convinced by now then probably nothing short of a advancing glacier outside your window would do.

    Even then, denial runs strong.

    Good luck. It's time to prep.

    von Koehler
    What the hell? Why the drama, sir? Did you think we weren't listening? FWIW, I happen to agree with you that we are incredibly likely to enter a full-bore ice age, given then we seem to be statistically overdue and temperatures are undeniably dropping year after year on average. So why leave? Is someone on the backchannel giving you grief?

    Otherwise, I'd like you to keep up the good work.
    Your levity is good, it relieves tension and the fear of death.

    The Frigid Times - http://www.frigidtimes.blogspot.com/
    Civil Defense Reborn - http://cdreborn.blogspot.com/
    Believe what you will, but the Russian nuclear threat is far from dead. It ain't even sick. - Brutus

  32. #1192
    Try a baking soda solution spray for powdery mildew. It works on roses. Neem oil is even better, and stores well, but is expensive.

    I'm going to haul out my Aerogarden and plant some leaf lettuce and spinach for winter salads. Our greenhouse needs new panels, and thats going to have to wait for spring, but we're having such dark weather, I don't think even greens will do well.

    I sure hope this weather pattern isn't our new normal! We have thousands of dollars worth of second cutting hay sitting uncut in the fields. We just spent some time discussing rebuilding fences around many of the fields to permit the beef cattle to graze deep into the fall. But man, is this cold, damp and dark hard on the old injuries and motivation levels!

    Summerthyme

  33. #1193
    It is raining hard as I write this. The winter wind howls outside and the pups are wisely, asleep by me. Rain and more rain. I feel bad saying anything because of all the people who have had hurricanes. My flash flooded creek seems a little thing.

    I am looking at shoring up the foundation for the Cabin, due to all the mud out there. We still had warm days, until late last night. Cold weather is finally upon us.

    Since my gardening zone is so far south, I am going to take Martinhouse's advice about the dandelions/wild greens. I will put a low hoop house over a section and mulch with hay from the Rabbit cages. The bunny berries should be fertilizer enough. The Comfrey (Rabbit feed) will get its own hoop house. My only concern is the wind. Tacking the fabric down over the wire hoops is going to be problematic since the ground is sogged. Anything we can harvest to give us more Vitamin D is critical to survival in gloomy weather.

    I just bought more lamp oil, wicks, and spare burners for the lamps. I make deer fat (tallow) candles in glass jars that won't take the pressures of canning. Top those off with a lid and a ring and box them for hard times. Electric light is a luxury I may not always have. Prepping changes a bit with the GSM.

    Old bones (for people and pets) are really showing what the coming years are going to be like. Fish oil helps the joints, too.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

  34. #1194
    Summer, thanks for the suggesting of using baking soda.

    I've been hurting so bad with the ugly weather the last several weeks that I can barely move when I first wake up. This sudden wet cool-down has forced me to learn not to ever put off any needed preparations. I'm sitting here staying warm by being surrounded by big pots of hot water. I neglected to bag up my little heater at the beginning of summer and I have to set it outdoors to burn out the dust since my lungs can't handle that sort of thing any more. And it's been so rainy that I don't dare run anything electric setting out on the sidewalk, even in the greenhouse. I'll be fine this way until we have a couple of sunny days, but I sure need to keep up with things better from now on.

    Another procrastination I need to "repair" is to make my white-fly traps. Those things LOVE the kale and broccoli in the greenhouse and I don't need my winter greens to be all withered and speckled when I dehydrate them!

    My greenhouse needs new side panels but I only take down the ones on the east side in the summer, now that t doesn't seem to get as hot as it used to. This also I should have forced myself to do during the last sunny spell, even if I did feel like crap.

  35. #1195
    Oh, here's something to share:

    My broccoli seems to be growing like mad, and is a nice, dark green but the new growth on the kale is paler than the original growth and I'm thinking it's because there's been so much more cloudy weather than I'm used to having.

    Seeker, that's good to know about fish oil and joints. Guess I'll stick to my cod liver oil, even though it's so much more expensive than the D3. The bunny hay mulch is a good idea, but I use leaves in their cages in ultra cold weather. They love eating the good parts and shredding the rest and it sifts down to mix with the droppings under the cages. Where, roughly are you located? I'm in north central Arkansas and some winters lots of things stay green year round here. Last year we had only one spell of single digit winter nights and my strawberries and comfrey in the greenhouse didn't even die back and their growth started super early in the spring, like late February maybe.

    So sharing here has already taught me two or three things. Thanks and thanks in advance for anything else that anyone has to suggest!

  36. #1196
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Oh, here's something to share:

    My broccoli seems to be growing like mad, and is a nice, dark green but the new growth on the kale is paler than the original growth and I'm thinking it's because there's been so much more cloudy weather than I'm used to having.

    Seeker, that's good to know about fish oil and joints. Guess I'll stick to my cod liver oil, even though it's so much more expensive than the D3. The bunny hay mulch is a good idea, but I use leaves in their cages in ultra cold weather. They love eating the good parts and shredding the rest and it sifts down to mix with the droppings under the cages. Where, roughly are you located? I'm in north central Arkansas and some winters lots of things stay green year round here. Last year we had only one spell of single digit winter nights and my strawberries and comfrey in the greenhouse didn't even die back and their growth started super early in the spring, like late February maybe.

    So sharing here has already taught me two or three things. Thanks and thanks in advance for anything else that anyone has to suggest!
    I am out on the 'scarp- The Edwards Escarpment in South Texas. The wind blows like a Banshee in the Fall and Winter. Anything not held down snugly is gone. Storms out here (especially in the Spring) are bad. With the GSM, they are set to be much worse. Sigh.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

  37. #1197
    For all those old farts like me who need to still work, I take Terry Naturally Curamin Extra Strength Pain Relief. It is made from Tumeric. Not cheap, but this works for moderate to severe pain. I won't clutter up the post with my feelings for Jeff Bezos, but Amazon is cheaper. Capsules are harder to find there than the local health food store.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

  38. #1198
    Seeker, when I had trouble with wind tearing loose the plastic I had on my arched cattle panel greenhouses, I got a bunch of those auger things used for tethering a dog out in the yard and criss-crossed bailing twine over the tops of the greenhouse in every direction I possibly could. The augers were only two dollars each at Dollar General at the time. They worked great! I stopped making those greenhouses when the plastic changed so that instead of lasting three entire winters with care, it would crumble and fall apart in less than one winter.

  39. #1199
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    351
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Seeker, when I had trouble with wind tearing loose the plastic I had on my arched cattle panel greenhouses, I got a bunch of those auger things used for tethering a dog out in the yard and criss-crossed bailing twine over the tops of the greenhouse in every direction I possibly could. The augers were only two dollars each at Dollar General at the time. They worked great! I stopped making those greenhouses when the plastic changed so that instead of lasting three entire winters with care, it would crumble and fall apart in less than one winter.
    Second hand volley ball netting, the netting that goes around trampolines, old gill net fish netting, even remnants of netted temporary construction fences works really well for this also.

  40. #1200
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Seeker, when I had trouble with wind tearing loose the plastic I had on my arched cattle panel greenhouses, I got a bunch of those auger things used for tethering a dog out in the yard and criss-crossed bailing twine over the tops of the greenhouse in every direction I possibly could. The augers were only two dollars each at Dollar General at the time. They worked great! I stopped making those greenhouses when the plastic changed so that instead of lasting three entire winters with care, it would crumble and fall apart in less than one winter.
    I haven't shaken loose the money to try the thicker Greenhouse plastic sheeting. Johnny's sells it and some other greenhouse suppliers. I am afraid of spending a lot more and have it still fall apart. More research needed and no time to do it for now.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

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