Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 24, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


The Grand Solar Minimum
+ Reply to Thread
Page 76 of 132 FirstFirst ... 26 66 74 75 76 77 78 86 126 ... LastLast
Results 3,001 to 3,040 of 5244
  1. #3001
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    out & about
    Posts
    686
    From Melodi's post: "I think Jared Diamond still got one overarching thing right in his book Collapse -

    and that is the idea that in general being an elite in a real Collapse situation just means buying yourself enough time to be the last person to starve to death unless the general population rises up and kills you off in a rage before then."

    This is probably the truth and our worst nightmares about how the coming GSM will play out. Having an extra few months food stored and a garden may buy us some time....

    Store as much as possible during the next two years may be the course of wisdom. Now while food is relatively cheap and abundant is the time to invest in long term provisions and safely store them away. And pray.


    WWG1WGA

    If you don't know about the Grand Solar Minimum, you should learn about it NOW! Go check out the Grand Solar Minimum thread in the Earth Changes part of TB2K, it may be the most important upcoming event you learn about this year... or this decade.

  2. #3002
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,282
    New ADAPT 2030 podcast out this morning:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RzyeZbqly4

    Global Warming = All Time Record Cold (788)

    Run time is 14:21

  3. #3003
    Thanks for posting this link, TxGal. I just listened t o this and will be listening again this morning. I just emailed my brother to check it out and am now going to call me sister to share the information, since she doesn't have a computer.
    -----
    It's raining like crazy here and has been pretty much constant rain since early yesterday. It's coming down hard enough that I'm waiting to go out and check the gauge.

  4. #3004
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,282
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Thanks for posting this link, TxGal. I just listened t o this and will be listening again this morning. I just emailed my brother to check it out and am now going to call me sister to share the information, since she doesn't have a computer.
    -----
    It's raining like crazy here and has been pretty much constant rain since early yesterday. It's coming down hard enough that I'm waiting to go out and check the gauge.
    You're welcome. I think the one yesterday was the 'bigger' one, that was pretty ominous.

    We've been in fog and drizzle for several days, downright chilly, but it should be over today. They swear we're going to warm up and see the sun, but weather guys said that last week, too! This is just getting old....

  5. #3005
    I think by "bigger one" you mean the one about big volcanoes making the cooling bad enough to prevent actual summer from one to three years?

    When I listen to things like that and then sit and think it through for a while, I tend to get out my shopping list and add to it.

    I think instead of worrying so much that my chicken pen won't be repaired in time to find some new chickens, I will just buy a couple more rabbit cages so I can set up to raise my own chicks in my greenhouse with a heat lamp. Two of the 30"x30" cages wired together should hold a dozen chicks until they are feathered enough to put outdoors. That could be in May this year and that gives me lots more time to find help and get that pen repaired.

    Now back to the shopping/do list. I need to ask the feed store when they can order chicks for me, hopefully next month. Also if they have their potatoes and onions in yet. And I need to call Lowe's and ask when they will be getting in their bedding plants and berry plants.

    Ugh! I hate making these calls, listening to aggravating music while on hold, and then talking to people who don't know what they're talking about or just tell you what you want to hear.

  6. #3006
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    yankee baptist land
    Posts
    17,384
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5c4XPVPJwBY
    Why "Global Warming Failed " and why Climate Change is Real
    i strongly recommend that everyone find some time to watch this.
    36:43 minutes
    ” Watch ye therefore and pray always that ye may be accounted worthy to escape all these things that shall come to pass and to stand before the Son of Man”
    Luke 21:36

    COLLAPSE NOW: avoid the rush

  7. #3007
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    I think by "bigger one" you mean the one about big volcanoes making the cooling bad enough to prevent actual summer from one to three years?

    When I listen to things like that and then sit and think it through for a while, I tend to get out my shopping list and add to it.

    I think instead of worrying so much that my chicken pen won't be repaired in time to find some new chickens, I will just buy a couple more rabbit cages so I can set up to raise my own chicks in my greenhouse with a heat lamp. Two of the 30"x30" cages wired together should hold a dozen chicks until they are feathered enough to put outdoors. That could be in May this year and that gives me lots more time to find help and get that pen repaired.

    Now back to the shopping/do list. I need to ask the feed store when they can order chicks for me, hopefully next month. Also if they have their potatoes and onions in yet. And I need to call Lowe's and ask when they will be getting in their bedding plants and berry plants.

    Ugh! I hate making these calls, listening to aggravating music while on hold, and then talking to people who don't know what they're talking about or just tell you what you want to hear.
    Martinhouse, do you have any poultry fancier neighbors? Personally, I hate raising chicks, while cute...PITA! My neighbor has an incubator, and mail orders odd stuff, and also goes to shows. He always has extras, and tends to get rid of them just before they will start laying. He gets to enjoy his hobby, and I'll pay him around $10 for a nice bird that is just about to start her laying career. Win, Win.

  8. #3008
    It is and misty here and very still. I burned the dead plants from last year's garden and will turn the ashes back into the soil. I am doing everything possible to give the next garden I plant all the chances to produce a harvest. Right now, the seedlings are inside under fluorescent lights and growing along. I will set them out when it gets warmer.

    It is too wet to bother with the dehydrator, so I am canning instead. Rain is forecast here today, but right now, it's just fine Irish weather.

    Martinhouse, I always raise my chicks in a Rabbit cage and have had no complaints. They stay safe, easily monitored, and warm.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  9. #3009
    Thanks Jed!


    Kathy.
    Chasing rainbows across an empty sky
    The sun is fading before our very eyes
    See the darkness as it creeps up from behind
    We can no longer say we’re blind.

  10. #3010
    Seeker22, I've decided to use the two new cages I have that are still in their cartons. I won't attach them door-to-door this time, though. Changing the food and water will be easier if I can use the doors. I'm thinking maybe the new cages could be used upside down and I could leave the actual tops off so the chicks were walking on the tarp only and not the wire at all.

    As soon as I get some sunny days when the greenhouse is warm. I will start working on the set-up. Moving plants and their shelf, some water buckets and some rolling planters. If the folding table and tarp and the cages are all ready, plus the heat lamp but for running the big cord out to it, then I can get the chicks as soon as my order can be taken. I plan to get six Buff Orpington hens and a rooster and six Barred Rock hens and a rooster. These two breeds make gorgeous crosses and if the roosters don't get along, they will have to take turns living with the ladies. I'll just have to hope I'll get at least one or two of the hens wanting to go broody a year from now, since by then I may not be able to find bantams. Hmm. Maybe I should order about three bantams and a rooster, too. They could go in a separate cage which I could put on my old card table, Hmm.

    Oops, just remembered...I think the larger bantams are straight run only, so I may need to order six or eight of them to be sure I get at least three hens. Set-up will be difficult, too, as I don't dare use other than the one circuit I have for the heat lamp. If the bantams chicks weren't so tiny, I'd just put them all together. Sigh. Well, I'll figure it out.
    Last edited by Martinhouse; 02-11-2019 at 01:13 PM.

  11. #3011
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Seeker22, I've decided to use the two new cages I have that are still in their cartons. I won't attach them door-to-door this time, though. Changing the food and water will be easier if I can use the doors. I'm thinking maybe the new cages could be used upside down and I could leave the actual tops off so the chicks were walking on the tarp only and not the wire at all.

    As soon as I get some sunny days where the greenhouse is warm. I will start working on the set-up. Moving plants and their shelf, some water buckets and some rolling planters. If the folding table and tarp and the cages is all ready, plus the heat lamp but for running the big cord out to it, then I can get the chicks as soon as my order can be taken. I plan to get six Buff Orpington hens and a rooster and six Barred Rock hens and a rooster. These two breeds make gorgeous crosses and if the roosters don't get along, they will have to take turns living with the ladies. I'll just have to hope I'll get at least one or two of the hens wanting to go broody a year from now, since by then I may not be able to find bantams. Hmm. Maybe I should order about three bantams and a rooster, too. They could go in a separate cage which I could put on my old card table, Hmm.
    I put an old towel in the bottom of the cage for added warmth and to put something between those little feet and the cage wire. Paper towel on top of that catch the poop and keep food where they can still get it. A regular terrycloth towel has little loops they get their claws stuck in, and a slick surface would give them splay leg. Paper towels seem to be the happy medium. Keep putting new ones in daily to keep things clean.

    I get them started early on the water bottles the rabbits use. Only a few days with a water bowl and then it's the rabbit water bottle on the side of the cage which is cleaner and drier underfoot. They will know how to drink out of both which is handy.

    When they are bigger, I put hay in the cage, again to keep them off the wire. If birds are left too long in the cage their toes will begin to malform. You should have the coop completed by the time that would start to be a problem.

    The only time I raised Bantams with my other chickens, the Bantams were mean and pecked the other birds mercilessly. Bantams need their own space.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  12. #3012
    Seeker22, when I put my bantams in with the other birds, it was just a few older hens and there was no rooster. Only one of the bantam roosters was mean and only to me. But after I saved him from being tangled in shreds from a tarp, he followed me around like a little puppy.

    I wouldn't put the new banty chicks with the new regular chicks. The banties are just too tiny, some barely the size of my thumb, and they get trampled or piled on too easily.
    Last edited by Martinhouse; 02-11-2019 at 03:31 PM.

  13. #3013
    To all who are raising livestock, be they cows, sheep, goats, chickens, rabbits, or even fish. What desperate people won’t relieve you of when they’re starving, the government will ‘For the greater good.’

    The same thing goes for visible preps, be they food, cash, or gold etc. It’s happened before (many times) and it’ll happen again.

    Bury your preps and keep a *very* low profile if you wish to survive. You can grow your own food indoors (using non-hybrid or heritage seeds) after the two-legged mauraders are dead and the government (wherever you live) thinks you are too.

    The ‘elite’ in our time will be happily ensconced in well-stocked underground cities. (We’ve known about this for decades!) Apparently, after 2022, nothing growing (in terms of crops) above ground will survive. Even now, in parts of Europe and the Eastern Block, farmers are slaughtering their livestock en mass because there’s no food to feed them.

    People living above ground won’t be able to venture outside for long periods, and not at all without protective gear. It’s not just about earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, drought, lightning storms, raging forest fires, ice, snow, and volcanic ash, nor even the frigid temps and high winds. Because of the severely weakened magnetosphere, cosmic rays (various kinds of solar radiation) will be lethal to animal life, including humans.

    Under ground (unless in a flood plane) is the safest place to be, but even then, the best estimates for human survival when this Grand Solar Minimum abates (in 2053) hover around 5%, or 1 in 20 of us. Put another way, a maximum of 400,000 of us will still be alive - globally, the number of people in underground cities notwithstanding.

    The last Grand Solar Minimum only claimed 25% of the global population (1 in 4 people), but the Earth’s population was less than 1 billion; they were largely self reliant and agrarian (natural preppers); few were living in densely populated areas; they were not reliant upon technology; ‘hiding out’ was easy; the Earth was not polluted; they did not have a drastically weakened magnetosphere (so no excessive cosmic rays); they were highly skilled in natural healing and wild crafting, and there was enough distance between them so that natural disasters didn’t claim nearly as many lives as they do today.

    Today, the majority (80%) of the global population lives in abject poverty, with barely the means to survive the day. Most of the rest of us live like sardines in humongous conurbations, and most are reliant on either a nuclear-powered grid for warmth (and cooling) and light etc., and upon grocery stores for food, and pharmacies for life-sustaining medications.

    http://www.globalissues.org/article/...acts-and-stats

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/merrill...-benefits/amp/

    Roughly 72% (of the 20%), including pensioners, is reliant on governmental support for survival, and no more than 3% of us are prepped to survive for a year or longer, so it isn’t difficult to imagine only 5% of us surviving this particular Grand Solar Minimum.

    Check out the work(s) of Valentina Zharkova. YouTube has some good videos. Her research papers are rather long and heavy reading, but they too are available online.

    Sláinte!


    Kathy.
    Last edited by TrueNorthNomads; 02-11-2019 at 02:51 PM. Reason: Link insertion.
    Chasing rainbows across an empty sky
    The sun is fading before our very eyes
    See the darkness as it creeps up from behind
    We can no longer say we’re blind.

  14. #3014
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    3,013
    Quote Originally Posted by TrueNorthNomads View Post
    To all who are raising livestock, be they cows, sheep, goats, chickens, rabbits, or even fish. What desperate people won’t relieve you of when they’re starving, the government will ‘For the greater good.’

    The same thing goes for visible preps, be they food, cash, or gold etc. It’s happened before (many times) and it’ll happen again.

    Bury your preps and keep a *very* low profile if you wish to survive. You can grow your own food indoors (using non-hybrid or heritage seeds) after the two-legged mauraders are dead and the government (wherever you live) thinks you are too.

    The ‘elite’ in our time will be happily ensconced in well-stocked underground cities. (We’ve known about this for decades!) Apparently, after 2022, nothing growing (in terms of crops) above ground will survive. Even now, in parts of Europe and the Eastern Block, farmers are slaughtering their livestock en mass because there’s no food to feed them.

    People living above ground won’t be able to venture outside for long periods, and not at all without protective gear. It’s not just about earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, drought, lightning storms, raging forest fires, ice, snow, and volcanic ash, nor even the frigid temps and high winds. Because of the severely weakened magnetosphere, cosmic rays (various kinds of solar radiation) will be lethal to animal life, including humans.

    Under ground (unless in a flood plane) is the safest place to be, but even then, the best estimates for human survival when this Grand Solar Minimum abates (in 2053) hover around 5%, or 1 in 20 of us. Put another way, a maximum of 400,000 of us will still be alive - globally, the number of people in underground cities notwithstanding.

    The last Grand Solar Minimum only claimed 25% of the global population (1 in 4 people), but the Earth’s population was less than 1 billion; they were largely self reliant and agrarian (natural preppers); few were living in densely populated areas; they were not reliant upon technology; ‘hiding out’ was easy; the Earth was not polluted; they did not have a drastically weakened magnetosphere (so no excessive cosmic rays); they were highly skilled in natural healing and wild crafting, and there was enough distance between them so that natural disasters didn’t claim nearly as many lives as they do today.

    Today, the majority (80%) of the global population lives in abject poverty, with barely the means to survive the day. Most of the rest of us live like sardines in humongous conurbations, and most are reliant on either a nuclear-powered grid for warmth (and cooling) and light etc., and upon grocery stores for food, and pharmacies for life-sustaining medications.

    http://www.globalissues.org/article/...acts-and-stats

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/merrill...-benefits/amp/

    Roughly 72% (of the 20%), including pensioners, is reliant on governmental support for survival, and no more than 3% of us are prepped to survive for a year or longer, so it isn’t difficult to imagine only 5% of us surviving this particular Grand Solar Minimum.

    Check out the work(s) of Valentina Zharkova. YouTube has some good videos. Her research papers are rather long and heavy reading, but they too are available online.

    Sláinte!


    Kathy.
    Where are you getting that nothing growing above ground will survive? People grew crops in all the other minimums. There are old growth forests that are hundreds of years old that survived many minimums.

  15. #3015
    Interesting to me that you should bring this up right now, because I've been thinking recently that I might do well to bring my few critters inside for a while. The magnetic field being down as you describe would be nearly an ELE.

    I've also wondered about covered walkways as an alternative, since they are not that far from the house.

    The biggest problem I see with dealing with this would be someone rural like me having to go outdoors to draw water, as here in the south there are very few basements and those few wouldn't be that likely to have the well accessible from inside.

    This would have to be very temporary, and I've read things that indicate the field could be down or nearly down for a matter of years, not days or weeks.

    So in that case, when it's time to go, it's time to go. Any survivors of that scenario would have to have been well set up in caves at the very least or underground at best. And if that happens, then I guess there will just be another cycle of the elites breeding their slaves back up to useful numbers when they move back above ground. I 'd rather not worry about something I won't be around to see.

  16. #3016
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    yankee baptist land
    Posts
    17,384
    Quote Originally Posted by TrueNorthNomads View Post
    To all who are raising livestock, be they cows, sheep, goats, chickens, rabbits, or even fish. What desperate people won’t relieve you of when they’re starving, the government will ‘For the greater good.’

    The same thing goes for visible preps, be they food, cash, or gold etc. It’s happened before (many times) and it’ll happen again.

    Bury your preps and keep a *very* low profile if you wish to survive. You can grow your own food indoors (using non-hybrid or heritage seeds) after the two-legged mauraders are dead and the government (wherever you live) thinks you are too.

    The ‘elite’ in our time will be happily ensconced in well-stocked underground cities. (We’ve known about this for decades!) Apparently, after 2022, nothing growing (in terms of crops) above ground will survive. Even now, in parts of Europe and the Eastern Block, farmers are slaughtering their livestock en mass because there’s no food to feed them.

    People living above ground won’t be able to venture outside for long periods, and not at all without protective gear. It’s not just about earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, drought, lightning storms, raging forest fires, ice, snow, and volcanic ash, nor even the frigid temps and high winds. Because of the severely weakened magnetosphere, cosmic rays (various kinds of solar radiation) will be lethal to animal life, including humans.

    Under ground (unless in a flood plane) is the safest place to be, but even then, the best estimates for human survival when this Grand Solar Minimum abates (in 2053) hover around 5%, or 1 in 20 of us. Put another way, a maximum of 400,000 of us will still be alive - globally, the number of people in underground cities notwithstanding.

    The last Grand Solar Minimum only claimed 25% of the global population (1 in 4 people), but the Earth’s population was less than 1 billion; they were largely self reliant and agrarian (natural preppers); few were living in densely populated areas; they were not reliant upon technology; ‘hiding out’ was easy; the Earth was not polluted; they did not have a drastically weakened magnetosphere (so no excessive cosmic rays); they were highly skilled in natural healing and wild crafting, and there was enough distance between them so that natural disasters didn’t claim nearly as many lives as they do today.

    Today, the majority (80%) of the global population lives in abject poverty, with barely the means to survive the day. Most of the rest of us live like sardines in humongous conurbations, and most are reliant on either a nuclear-powered grid for warmth (and cooling) and light etc., and upon grocery stores for food, and pharmacies for life-sustaining medications.

    http://www.globalissues.org/article/...acts-and-stats

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/merrill...-benefits/amp/

    Roughly 72% (of the 20%), including pensioners, is reliant on governmental support for survival, and no more than 3% of us are prepped to survive for a year or longer, so it isn’t difficult to imagine only 5% of us surviving this particular Grand Solar Minimum.

    Check out the work(s) of Valentina Zharkova. YouTube has some good videos. Her research papers are rather long and heavy reading, but they too are available online.

    Sláinte!


    Kathy.
    Thanks for the info and the links. That first one about world poverty statistics was positively ghastly!

    It does seem entirely likely that very few of this generation will still be living in the next 20 years. Or less. Certainly, becoming rural and food independent as possible would be the smart choice of all one’s options. And about that 20 years, I am thinking that the time for dramatic changes to kick in will probably less than two years away. Too many want to be chief, too many cooks in the kitchen, too many waiting in line hoping to make it to the cafeteria before the food runs out.
    ” Watch ye therefore and pray always that ye may be accounted worthy to escape all these things that shall come to pass and to stand before the Son of Man”
    Luke 21:36

    COLLAPSE NOW: avoid the rush

  17. #3017
    Quote Originally Posted by jed turtle View Post
    Thanks for the info and the links. That first one about world poverty statistics was positively ghastly!

    It does seem entirely likely that very few of this generation will still be living in the next 20 years. Or less. Certainly, becoming rural and food independent as possible would be the smart choice of all one’s options. And about that 20 years, I am thinking that the time for dramatic changes to kick in will probably less than two years away. Too many want to be chief, too many cooks in the kitchen, too many waiting in line hoping to make it to the cafeteria before the food runs out.
    Don't forget clean water. Once the taps aren't running reliably, E.coli is bound to be in whatever most urbanites gather for drinking water. Like San Francisco, piles of poop will be everywhere if the toilets won't flush. People with cholera/typhus/disentary don't travel far, not on foot, anyway. Affected cities could turn into mostly dead people in a matter of weeks.

  18. #3018
    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    Don't forget clean water. Once the taps aren't running reliably, E.coli is bound to be in whatever most urbanites gather for drinking water. Like San Francisco, piles of poop will be everywhere if the toilets won't flush. People with cholera/typhus/disentary don't travel far, not on foot, anyway. Affected cities could turn into mostly dead people in a matter of weeks.
    And most of these people have no idea what to do with bleach or pool shock. There is not enough of that in the u-verse for what is headed straight at them like a train.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  19. #3019

    9

    Evening all!

    I think I heard about ‘nothing growing above ground’ on Adapt 2030, but it may have been on Ice Age Farmer’s YouTube channel, I don’t recall. I follow at least half a dozen people who seem to know what they’re talking about. I’m sorry I can’t be more precise, but I was referring to *crops* only, not other, more hardy flora.

    This is the reason (and time) to learn to grow fresh food indoors. I’m learning to do it in our RV and trailer using solar-powered grow lights (for as long as solar still works) and hydroponics. It’s easy to grow sprouts (barley grass, mung beans, and alfalfa etc), but I’m going to tackle lettuce, spinach, and peppers next week. We *all* need to become adept at growing fresh produce indoors, as we need the micronutrients they provide.

    It’s true that most of us here won’t be alive in 2053 (I’ll be 97, but my family tends to live a long time. I have a few physical challenges though, so I’ll consider it a miracle if I do)!

    I was hoping to live through my golden years following the sun with my beloved, so it’s kind of a bummer to have to battle ferocious and drastic climate-related events for the rest of our lives, and travel will be out of the question.

    Still, looking at the global stats, it’s difficult to be anything other than grateful for the life I’ve already been blessed with. I’ve been allowed to do, see, and have so much in my 63 years, and I’m most grateful for the gift of my family, and the knowledge that our Heavenly Father knows what He is doing. I can live and die with that.

    The hardest part of our present reality is the thought of the horrifying losses, the billions who won’t make it, especially the young.... When I first heard about our little Ice Age, I thought of my children and grandchildren and cried for a week. Now I just pray for everybody’s children.

    Normally, I can turn any situation into one in which I feel privileged to serve/help all those that I can, and find joy in doing so, but I have to admit to feeling helpless in this scenario. I can love people ‘til I bleed and it won’t change a thing. I still want to wake up in the morning, and I still want to hang around (God Willing), but I cannot imagine how any of us are going to enjoy what’s left of our lives knowing how many others are suffering and dying.

    I’ll shut up now.


    Kathy.
    Chasing rainbows across an empty sky
    The sun is fading before our very eyes
    See the darkness as it creeps up from behind
    We can no longer say we’re blind.

  20. #3020
    Quote Originally Posted by jed turtle View Post
    Thanks for the info and the links. That first one about world poverty statistics was positively ghastly!

    It does seem entirely likely that very few of this generation will still be living in the next 20 years. Or less. Certainly, becoming rural and food independent as possible would be the smart choice of all one’s options. And about that 20 years, I am thinking that the time for dramatic changes to kick in will probably be less than two years away.. Too many want to be chief, too many cooks in the kitchen, too many waiting in line hoping to make it to the cafeteria before the food runs out.

    Jed, I have a pic of a graph on my phone that shows what changes to expect, and when, but I don’t see any way to post iPhone photos on here.

    Basically, the chart shows that weather events in 2019 will be *twice* as numerous and intense as what we saw in 2018, which impacted our crop yields drastically, but we still had crop reserves. Still, food prices are expected to triple by the end of this year.

    Weather events in 2020 will be *twice* as numerous and intense as what we’ll experience in 2019, and we won’t have any crop reserves. Food prices at the end of 2020 are expected to be 5-10 times what they are now, with many foods not being available at all.

    Weather events in 2021 will be *twice* as numerous and intense as what we’ll experience in 2020, and we won’t have any crop reserves. Food prices at the end of 2021 are expected to be twice what they were at the end of 2020, with few foods being available at all, including grains.

    Weather events in 2022 will be *twice* as numerous and intense as what we’ll experience in 2021, and few crops are expected to grow, so outside of the few productive regions, which will primarily be in Central Africa, parts of New Zealand, Brazil, and Equador. No food will be available elsewhere at any price.

    Weather events in 2023 will be twice as numerous and intense as what we’ll experience in 2022. The few crops that grow will grow primarily in the same regions as they did in 2022, and no food will be available elsewhere at any price.

    Weather events in 2024 will be twice as numerous and intense as what we’ll experience in 2023, and they’ll remain that severe until 2030, at which time they’ll begin to stabilize, but it will take 23 years for them to return to 2019 conditions. Food production is not expected to measurably improve prior to that time.

    By the end of 2024, circa 5% of the 2019 global population will still be alive, those in underground cities notwithstanding.

    Older people will die, of course, but babies will replace them, so the overall survival rate is expected to remain the same.

    Sounds like a day at the beach, eh?

    Don’t shoot the messenger!

    Sláinte!


    Kathy.
    Last edited by TrueNorthNomads; 02-12-2019 at 12:53 AM. Reason: The color thingy wouldn’t work!
    Chasing rainbows across an empty sky
    The sun is fading before our very eyes
    See the darkness as it creeps up from behind
    We can no longer say we’re blind.

  21. #3021

    4

    Oh, great! A ‘full-blown’ Ice Age?

    Have a listen to the Ice Age Farmer! (Run time 16:56.)

    https://youtu.be/Ei6x4zkQLXE


    Kathy.
    Last edited by TrueNorthNomads; 02-12-2019 at 07:43 AM.
    Chasing rainbows across an empty sky
    The sun is fading before our very eyes
    See the darkness as it creeps up from behind
    We can no longer say we’re blind.

  22. #3022
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    out & about
    Posts
    686
    Quote Originally Posted by TrueNorthNomads View Post
    Jed, I have a pic of a graph on my phone that shows what changes to expect, and when, but I don’t see any way to post iPhone photos on here.

    Basically, the chart shows that weather events in 2019 will be *twice* as numerous and intense as what we saw in 2018, which impacted our crop yields drastically, but we still had crop reserves. Still, food prices are expected to triple by the end of this year.

    Weather events in 2020 will be *twice* as numerous and intense as what we’ll experience in 2019, and we won’t have any crop reserves. Food prices at the end of 2020 are expected to be 5-10 times what they are now, with many foods not being available at all.

    Weather events in 2021 will be *twice* as numerous and intense as what we’ll experience in 2020, and we won’t have any crop reserves. Food prices at the end of 2021 are expected to be twice what they were at the end of 2020, with few foods being available at all, including grains.

    Weather events in 2022 will be *twice* as numerous and intense as what we’ll experience in 2021, and few crops are expected to grow, so outside of the few productive regions, which will primarily be in Central Africa, parts of New Zealand, Brazil, and Equador. No food will be available elsewhere at any price.

    Weather events in 2023 will be twice as numerous and intense as what we’ll experience in 2022. The few crops that grow will grow primarily in the same regions as they did in 2022, and no food will be available elsewhere at any price.

    Weather events in 2024 will be twice as numerous and intense as what we’ll experience in 2023, and they’ll remain that severe until 2030, at which time they’ll begin to stabilize, but it will take 23 years for them to return to 2019 conditions. Food production is not expected to measurably improve prior to that time.

    By the end of 2024, circa 5% of the 2019 global population will still be alive, those in underground cities notwithstanding.

    Older people will die, of course, but babies will replace them, so the overall survival rate is expected to remain the same.

    Sounds like a day at the beach, eh?

    Don’t shoot the messenger!

    Sláinte!


    Kathy.
    Kathy, I would love to find the graphic as it might be a way to visually show what is coming to us. When I tell people about the GSM and food shortages they sort of glaze over since no one can remember a time when the stores weren't fully stocked with more variety and in quantities than they can eat in a decade. A quick graphic might help give them a clue. If you can't bring it into the thread then maybe could you link us to it on the web?

    I share your feelings about what is coming and especially to the children of the world. And IT is coming, sooner than we can imagine.
    Last edited by rolenrock; 02-12-2019 at 05:49 AM. Reason: clarity


    WWG1WGA

    If you don't know about the Grand Solar Minimum, you should learn about it NOW! Go check out the Grand Solar Minimum thread in the Earth Changes part of TB2K, it may be the most important upcoming event you learn about this year... or this decade.

  23. #3023
    If a "full-blown Ice Age" occurs, and the "secret" of the geological record is they can take as little as 5 years to come into being (not always hundreds of years) then relocation will simply happen.

    People who survive the first snowfall that doesn't melt all Summer (one-way ice sheets seem to form) along with the quickly advancing glaciers will pick themselves up, and walk South (or North).

    They just will; "snowball earth" hasn't existed for millions and millions of years; there are always climates where humans can live and they will go there.

    Millions will die off, but it would probably take a combination of wars and other disasters to kill off the species; we've survived several ice ages before.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  24. #3024
    Quote Originally Posted by Melodi View Post
    If a "full-blown Ice Age" occurs, and the "secret" of the geological record is they can take as little as 5 years to come into being (not always hundreds of years) then relocation will simply happen.

    People who survive the first snowfall that doesn't melt all Summer (one-way ice sheets seem to form) along with the quickly advancing glaciers will pick themselves up, and walk South (or North).

    They just will; "snowball earth" hasn't existed for millions and millions of years; there are always climates where humans can live and they will go there.

    Millions will die off, but it would probably take a combination of wars and other disasters to kill off the species; we've survived several ice ages before.

    No, they won’t, Melodi. The few habitable regions of this planet are already populated, and they also happen to be the only areas in which crops will grow, shortly. As others R-E-A-L-I-Z-E (to make real) this, those regions will become war zones, as people not already in underground cities, battle for food and life itself.

    The ‘weakened’ magnetosphere will make travel impossible, even if what’s left of the governments permits travel, and your travelling companions will be hordes of desperate, starving people, who will consider cannibalism normal and necessary at that juncture, which is barely two years away.

    Bottom line: we’re not going anywhere, and those who try to, unless they go this year, will not reach their intended destination alive.


    Rolenrock:

    I’ve taken screenshots that interested me from dozens of YouTube presentations, and I have at least a couple of dozen still on my phone (the ones I don’t wish to discard). I cherry-picked my screenshots from scores of presentations, and I’ve been researching this (no longer ‘Mini’) Ice Age for months, so I don’t recall where each graph came from, or I’d have linked to it when I first posted the information. I’ve painted the best word picture that I can, and all the info from the graph is in the content of my post, sans the horrifying graphics of the presentations.

    You say that most people won’t listen to you, and I know that you’re right because we’ve been here before (when prepping for Y2K). Those who would have listened to you are either prepped already or are in the process of augmenting their supplies. The rest of the world was never *going* to listen, and there’s not enough food left for everyone to prep anyway. If you’re wise, prepped, and wish to survive, DO NOT TELL A SOUL what you’re doing. You cannot help them. This is our unpleasant reality.

    Pray for the children.


    Kathy.
    Chasing rainbows across an empty sky
    The sun is fading before our very eyes
    See the darkness as it creeps up from behind
    We can no longer say we’re blind.

  25. #3025
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    out & about
    Posts
    686
    Quote Originally Posted by TrueNorthNomads View Post
    Rolenrock:

    I’ve taken screenshots that interested me from dozens of YouTube presentations, and I have at least a couple of dozen still on my phone (the ones I don’t wish to discard). I cherry-picked my screenshots from scores of presentations, and I’ve been researching this (no longer ‘Mini’) Ice Age for months, so I don’t recall where each graph came from, or I’d have linked to it when I first posted the information. I’ve painted the best word picture that I can, and all the info from the graph is in the content of my post, sans the horrifying graphics of the presentations.

    You say that most people won’t listen to you, and I know that you’re right because we’ve been here before (when prepping for Y2K). Those who would have listened to you are either prepped already or are in the process of augmenting their supplies. The rest of the world was never *going* to listen, and there’s not enough food left for everyone to prep anyway. If you’re wise, prepped, and wish to survive, DO NOT TELL A SOUL what you’re doing. You cannot help them. This is our unpleasant reality.

    Pray for the children.


    Kathy.
    Thanks, Kathy. You are so right about quietly prepping. Loose-lipped peppers are going to be overrun and many will lose their lives as well as their supplies to people who never imagined they'd kill to eat. We can never underestimate the viciousness of a hungry human and especially one with children to feed. I fear what is coming, I really do.


    WWG1WGA

    If you don't know about the Grand Solar Minimum, you should learn about it NOW! Go check out the Grand Solar Minimum thread in the Earth Changes part of TB2K, it may be the most important upcoming event you learn about this year... or this decade.

  26. #3026
    Sounds like a pretty good description of Northern Europe during The Migration Age (what Historians call The Dark Ages).

    Yes, millions of people will die but the living will still be walking out; Ruwanda showed in modern times how if four million (or more) people are scared enough of what is behind them to risk ANYTHING; they will just pick up and start walking and not even an atomic bomb is likely to stop all of them (that was actually secretly discussed at the time).

    I wouldn't expect to survive such a migration if it was in the end stages (I'm 62 and my health isn't good) but my 26 year old hired man who is amazing with animals just might; I could see him getting to the very Southern tip of Ireland with a donkey and then signing on a fishing boat to jump ship in France.

    The glaciers during the Last Ice Age didn't even cover quite all of Ireland (the southern tip was mostly clear) and it certainly didn't cover all of France and Germany (that's why cave paintings are there and in Spain).

    I agree that a real Ice Age could easily lead to the collapse of civilization as we know it and depopulate the planet by as much as 90 percent (same as the collapse in North America from European diseases in the 1500's) but I really think it would take the inclusion of modern weapons (along with bioweapons) to wipe out people entirely.

    The tropics are a pretty big place, and the Sahara has been a garden paradise before and could be again.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  27. #3027
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    yankee baptist land
    Posts
    17,384
    Thanks for the ice age farmer link, Kathy. While I am not sure how quickly it will change over from the current status quo, to dire apocalypse, I acknowledge that it could in fact happen literally overnight. As an example: here in Maine on January 2, 1998, we had a “once in a lifetime“ ice storm that crept in silently, overnight, with NO warning from the forecasters, and over the next two days, not only was the entire southern half of the state entirely without power, but most roads were utterly impassable, and without enormous, no, gigantic! Help from outside -other states utilities - ie power crews - it would have probably taken a year at least to clean up the mess and get back power. Tree branches were breaking and trees collapsing EVERYWHERE! Consider that most northern tier residents rely on electric power to run their deep well pumps for water and run their electric furnaces. Some roofs were collapsing also, but my brother, who is an engineer, said that the whole affected area of the state came within an Hour or so of the ice being so heavy that MOST of the roofs would have collapsed.

    So....
    How able is one to move. Health, age, economics, all figure into that. Plus: WHERE?

    And as this approaching global disaster includes a magnetic reversal aspect, there are distinct possibilities that the may involve a geophysical change (even if only temporary...) in the location of the poles as well.

    1. Fear is not of the Lord. Whatever decisions one makes, it should be after praying and seeking guidance from the Lord God Almighty.

    2. Since God created us to tend The Garden, everyone should realize that that was our original estate, and should consider re-locating to a place where they can grow their own food.

    3. Mankind was intended to live with a family, working in cooperation with others who share the same values including above all others, to love God and their fellow “mankind”.

    4. There are virtually no examples left of such “communities” left in America (in spite of the fact that nearly all of rural America prior to the 1900s were actually such communities), since the beginning of the age of motor cars and electric power, except for the few communties such as Amish, maybe Mennonite, and Hutterites. But they do still exist and can teach us not only the “old ways” but also the work ethic of hard labor, group planning and community work projects.

    5. Even without community, it is possible for one’s family (consider the story of Noah) to prepare for “the event”

    This leaves: how does one prepare.

    High on my list are:

    1. building greenhouses (I can build wooden arches and geodesic domes for about 1/6 of the cost of buying a prefab greenhouse). Consider snow loads as well as area needed. This will necessitate having TOOLS.
    2. Acquiring heirloom seeds appropriate for cold climate zones (just ordered from Heirloom Organics myself)
    3. Prepare to grow fish, chickens, and fur/wool-bearing animals for food, fertilizer, milk, and clothing.
    4. Solar panels, (including batteries-an entire subject unto itself), inverter, etc.
    5. Wood or charcoal gasifier to run a generator to backup the solar for when the sun doesn’t shine (check out driveonwood.com)
    6. Root cellar for food storage and emergency shelter if the winds blow your house away....
    7. Last but not least, WATER. Deep well, shallow well, fish pond, brook, whatever you can arrange, DO IT.
    And a ceramic-based filter to make it clean (I use Aquarain myself, but many seem happy with Berkey)

    There. Short list huh? Buck up, the more people you can enlist the more likely you will accomplish these goals.
    ” Watch ye therefore and pray always that ye may be accounted worthy to escape all these things that shall come to pass and to stand before the Son of Man”
    Luke 21:36

    COLLAPSE NOW: avoid the rush

  28. #3028
    Jed turtle, that's a pretty good list, but I don't think I care to invest in solar panels. It's already so cloudy around here that they'd hardly be worth the expense, especially the ones made to work even in low light conditions. And any wind collectors would likely be torn apart by some of the winds/storms that are already happening.

    I have a woodstove and a decent, if not spectacular, well that I can draw water from by hand, I can grow food, some in my greenhouse, and I can store food and I have rabbits and will soon be replacing the chickens I lost last fall. And I have ways to cook that will use minimal fuel. All this will all have to do for me.

  29. #3029
    Quote Originally Posted by rolenrock View Post
    Thanks, Kathy. You are so right about quietly prepping. Loose-lipped peppers are going to be overrun and many will lose their lives as well as their supplies to people who never imagined they'd kill to eat. We can never underestimate the viciousness of a hungry human and especially one with children to feed. I fear what is coming, I really do.
    Give it to God, rolenrock; it’s too big a problem for us to solve, but we can still pray for people and love them as much as we can.

    Blessings!


    Kathy.
    Chasing rainbows across an empty sky
    The sun is fading before our very eyes
    See the darkness as it creeps up from behind
    We can no longer say we’re blind.

  30. #3030
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,282
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Jed turtle, that's a pretty good list, but I don't think I care to invest in solar panels. It's already so cloudy around here that they'd hardly be worth the expense, especially the ones made to work even in low light conditions. And any wind collectors would likely be torn apart by some of the winds/storms that are already happening.

    I have a woodstove and a decent, if not spectacular, well that I can draw water from by hand, I can grow food, some in my greenhouse, and I can store food and I have rabbits and will soon be replacing the chickens I lost last fall. And I have ways to cook that will use minimal fuel. All this will all have to do for me.
    Martinhouse, I pretty much parallel your thinking. Even down here in Texas we are losing the sun's intensity and in the last few springs/winters/falls our rainy days have far outnumbered our sunny days. In the beginning I wanted a solar system; kinda glad now we didn't get one. We also have a woodstove, and it was a chore finding someone down here (a company) that would/could install it, but we've got it. That was one of the best decisions we've made, along with a standing seam metal roof. I would change the design of the house if we were doing it from the beginning, to a hip roof style rather than the roof on a classic ranch house...less concern about wind damage; the winds have dramatically intensified the last few years. Also, galvalume roofing allows for rain water collection more than shingle roofs (more toxic), and of course excellent water filtration is necessary. We are of the Berkey mindset.

    Seeds, without a doubt, berry plants/fruit trees if you're already on property. For those looking at livestock, if you're planning on sheep or goats and they'll be on the menu I would strongly suggest buying some lamb/mutton/cabrito and trying it first. I love lamb, always have, but I know of quite a few people who cannot stomach the taste or even be in the house while it's cooking. Some would say if they're starving they'd eat it. That's likely true, but if there is a viable alternative it would be good to consider that first. Food intolerances can make a person quite sick.

    Wouldn't a root cellar or basement be great! Can't have them here, the ground isn't good for either. Could do a tornado shelter, they run about $5000+ for the smallest. I'm not sure how well they'd function as a root cellar, though.

    We're all facing a lot of challenges going forward, no doubt. I think we're all beginning to realize that there is no perfect solution to any of this. I firmly believe a GSM/Little Ice Age is livable, but it won't be easy, especially for those way up north.

  31. #3031
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    yankee baptist land
    Posts
    17,384
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Jed turtle, that's a pretty good list, but I don't think I care to invest in solar panels. It's already so cloudy around here that they'd hardly be worth the expense, especially the ones made to work even in low light conditions. And any wind collectors would likely be torn apart by some of the winds/storms that are already happening.

    I have a woodstove and a decent, if not spectacular, well that I can draw water from by hand, I can grow food, some in my greenhouse, and I can store food and I have rabbits and will soon be replacing the chickens I lost last fall. And I have ways to cook that will use minimal fuel. All this will all have to do for me.
    Hi Martinhouse,
    I understand about the limitations of solar. Location is primary. Keep in mind that we live in Maine and are completely off grid and have been for 8-9 years.
    Perhaps you could investigate the various vertical-axis wind turbines which tend to survive longer, take advantage of shifting wind directions better.
    As we age, for many of us, having electricity available is like having an assistant available to help us as we grow weaker.
    Think hauling water from a well...
    Also, I suggest that you have at least a few 100 watt solar panels at the minimum to recharge flashlight (headlamp!) rechargeable batteries, power a radio, and run LED lamps in your home.
    Light at night is a huge convenience, and much safer than kerosene or candles.
    We doubled our panels a few years ago with grid-tie panels, although we are NOT grid-tied, and they are more efficient collecting power on cloudy days than the older panels.
    A propane or diesel generator would allow you to have power from a fuel type that doesn’t breakdown over long periods of time, but yes u have to ask how much you can buy ahead of time to store. That’s why I suggest everyone investigate wood or charcoal gasified generators. Unfortunately, most of those are still do-it-yourself projects.
    most of WW2 Europe and even Japan used such devices for transport fuel because they HAD to. New designs are much better than what were available back then. Again: check out driveonwood.com.
    My son had a large branch fall from a pine tree and punch a hole in one of his panels and it still produced power. Must have missed the wires connecting the cells.
    ” Watch ye therefore and pray always that ye may be accounted worthy to escape all these things that shall come to pass and to stand before the Son of Man”
    Luke 21:36

    COLLAPSE NOW: avoid the rush

  32. #3032
    Quote Originally Posted by Melodi View Post
    Sounds like a pretty good description of Northern Europe during The Migration Age (what Historians call The Dark Ages).

    Yes, millions of people will die but the living will still be walking out; Ruwanda showed in modern times how if four million (or more) people are scared enough of what is behind them to risk ANYTHING; they will just pick up and start walking and not even an atomic bomb is likely to stop all of them (that was actually secretly discussed at the time).

    I wouldn't expect to survive such a migration if it was in the end stages (I'm 62 and my health isn't good) but my 26 year old hired man who is amazing with animals just might; I could see him getting to the very Southern tip of Ireland with a donkey and then signing on a fishing boat to jump ship in France.

    The glaciers during the Last Ice Age didn't even cover quite all of Ireland (the southern tip was mostly clear) and it certainly didn't cover all of France and Germany (that's why cave paintings are there and in Spain).

    I agree that a real Ice Age could easily lead to the collapse of civilization as we know it and depopulate the planet by as much as 90 percent (same as the collapse in North America from European diseases in the 1500's) but I really think it would take the inclusion of modern weapons (along with bioweapons) to wipe out people entirely.

    The tropics are a pretty big place, and the Sahara has been a garden paradise before and could be again.

    I have no wish to argue with you, Melodi; I don’t argue with anyone. You don’t want to be anywhere near the Equator (unless you’re underground), conditions there won’t be conducive to survival.

    https://youtu.be/NwQSWG5HzpQ (Run time - 8:42.)


    What’s The Worst That Can Happen?

    https://youtu.be/4tEgkUTdkZA (Run time - 7:48.)

    This scientist (along with most others) no longer thinks that the present Ice Age will be anything less than an Ice Age Proper, but the weather patterns that he describes (above) will still hold true for the next 11 years.

    As a Christian and Bible believer, I do not believe that humans will cease to exist, but I can certainly see our numbers reduced to less than 1 billion (including those sheltering in the underground cities), which was roughly the global population in 1800.

    In 1645, at the beginning of the peak of the last *Mini* Ice Age (this one will be exponentially worse), the global population was a mere 477 million people, and by its end, in 1715, the population had dwindled by roughly 25%. Clearly, it doesn’t take long for us to regenerate. It only took circa 220 years for us to increase from almost 1 billion to almost 8 billion people.

    Just a word about mass migration, Melodi. At no time in prior history has the magnetosphere been nonexistent. Cosmic rays will quickly kill any attempted mass migration, but I believe you’re right about human nature: fear always defeats reason.

    Sláinte!


    Kathy.
    Chasing rainbows across an empty sky
    The sun is fading before our very eyes
    See the darkness as it creeps up from behind
    We can no longer say we’re blind.

  33. #3033
    Kathy... just remember, everything thry are saying about the magnetosphere, etc, is THEORY. Ive lived long enough to have observed that we never get at least 90% of the "disasters" that are predicted. I've been either blessed or cursed with a near-photographic memory, and when the propaganda changes, I notice.

    As far as the historical record shows, I don't think we've ever seen a massive die off of 90% of the world population from weather changes. Anything is possible, but some of these video presentations have a distinct "Chicken Little" feel to them.

    Summerthyme

  34. #3034
    Quote Originally Posted by jed turtle View Post
    Thanks for the ice age farmer link, Kathy. While I am not sure how quickly it will change over from the current status quo, to dire apocalypse, I acknowledge that it could in fact happen literally overnight. As an example: here in Maine on January 2, 1998, we had a “once in a lifetime“ ice storm that crept in silently, overnight, with NO warning from the forecasters, and over the next two days, not only was the entire southern half of the state entirely without power, but most roads were utterly impassable, and without enormous, no, gigantic! Help from outside -other states utilities - ie power crews - it would have probably taken a year at least to clean up the mess and get back power. Tree branches were breaking and trees collapsing EVERYWHERE! Consider that most northern tier residents rely on electric power to run their deep well pumps for water and run their electric furnaces. Some roofs were collapsing also, but my brother, who is an engineer, said that the whole affected area of the state came within an Hour or so of the ice being so heavy that MOST of the roofs would have collapsed.

    So....
    How able is one to move. Health, age, economics, all figure into that. Plus: WHERE?

    And as this approaching global disaster includes a magnetic reversal aspect, there are distinct possibilities that the may involve a geophysical change (even if only temporary...) in the location of the poles as well.

    1. Fear is not of the Lord. Whatever decisions one makes, it should be after praying and seeking guidance from the Lord God Almighty.

    2. Since God created us to tend The Garden, everyone should realize that that was our original estate, and should consider re-locating to a place where they can grow their own food.

    3. Mankind was intended to live with a family, working in cooperation with others who share the same values including above all others, to love God and their fellow “mankind”.

    4. There are virtually no examples left of such “communities” left in America (in spite of the fact that nearly all of rural America prior to the 1900s were actually such communities), since the beginning of the age of motor cars and electric power, except for the few communties such as Amish, maybe Mennonite, and Hutterites. But they do still exist and can teach us not only the “old ways” but also the work ethic of hard labor, group planning and community work projects.

    5. Even without community, it is possible for one’s family (consider the story of Noah) to prepare for “the event”

    This leaves: how does one prepare.

    High on my list are:

    1. building greenhouses (I can build wooden arches and geodesic domes for about 1/6 of the
    cost of buying a prefab greenhouse). Consider snow loads as well as area needed. This will necessitate having TOOLS.
    2. Acquiring heirloom seeds appropriate for cold climate zones (just ordered from Heirloom Organics myself)
    3. Prepare to grow fish, chickens, and fur/wool-bearing animals for food, fertilizer, milk, and clothing.
    4. Solar panels, (including batteries-an entire subject unto itself), inverter, etc.
    5. Wood or charcoal gasifier to run a generator to backup the solar for when the sun doesn’t shine (check out driveonwood.com)
    6. Root cellar for food storage and emergency shelter if the winds blow your house away....
    7. Last but not least, WATER. Deep well, shallow well, fish pond, brook, whatever you can arrange, DO IT.
    And a ceramic-based filter to make it clean (I use Aquarain myself, but many seem happy with Berkey)

    There. Short list huh? Buck up, the more people you can enlist the more likely you will accomplish these goals.
    I *LOVE* your spiritual prep list, Jed, and I’m so looking forward to getting to know you better! Bless you!

    With respect, I believe that your physical list could use a little tweaking, but I must attend to my offline duties right now. In fact, I won’t have much (if any) Internet time until Thursday evening. I’m looking forward to reading all new posts on this thread then.

    Stay safe, and may God be with you!


    Kathy.
    Chasing rainbows across an empty sky
    The sun is fading before our very eyes
    See the darkness as it creeps up from behind
    We can no longer say we’re blind.

  35. #3035
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,282
    ADAPT 2030 has another podcast out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NhMr5XOI9I

    (MIAC #179) Jumps in Technology a Dimension of the Grand Solar Minimum

    Run time is 27:04

  36. #3036
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,282
    The Leak Project put out a podcast yesterday:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKt2lDuUvV4

    191 MPH Winds & Record Breaking Snow, Hawaii & Seattle, More on Way, GSM Updates

    Run time is 14:16

  37. #3037
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    Kathy... just remember, everything thry are saying about the magnetosphere, etc, is THEORY. Ive lived long enough to have observed that we never get at least 90% of the "disasters" that are predicted. I've been either blessed or cursed with a near-photographic memory, and when the propaganda changes, I notice.

    As far as the historical record shows, I don't think we've ever seen a massive die off of 90% of the world population from weather changes. Anything is possible, but some of these video presentations have a distinct "Chicken Little" feel to them.

    Summerthyme
    I agree that some hyperbole is inevitable in disaster scenarios, and one must exercise diligence and filter out the garbage. As for the condition of the magnetosphere, however, there’s nothing theoretical about it, I’m sorry to say. (BTW, I too was blessed/cursed with a photographic memory, so I know precisely what you mean.) I’ve been monitoring this situation for months - not to say that my understanding validates anything. I’m simply stating my point of view and beliefs about the subject.

    For example, I almost switched off a video when I saw the word ‘Nostradamus,’ but my spirit told me to give it a moment, so I did. One never knows where nuggets of truth are hiding. To me, it’s rather like finding pearls in oyster shells.

    In scenarios such as the one we’re in, I find that it’s best to prepare for the worst and then pray for further instructions. YMMV.

    Sláinte!


    Kathy.
    Chasing rainbows across an empty sky
    The sun is fading before our very eyes
    See the darkness as it creeps up from behind
    We can no longer say we’re blind.

  38. #3038
    Well most of my planning has been in terms of the worst of "Little Ice Age" which is when our house was built; of course it was also a high-status home (a Rectory) and even though the Church didn't pay its Pastors enough to be really wealthy; the house was still designed to have several servants, likely a gardener and originally had a lot more farmland with it.

    So there would have been at least a "girl from the village" coming in every day to make sure the turf/wood/coal fires were kept burning in the Winter to keep the 3 foot thick walls warm; a gardener/handyman who made sure the Ice House was keeping the meat chilled and the fruit trees covered during serious freezes.

    The families who lived would also likely have received gifts from the Plantation owners they ministered too; things like oranges grow in indoor "orangeries" (we have friends that rented a house with the remnants of one of these) sides of beef and imported goods like spices or even white flour.

    Keeping this place going during a real Little Ice Age will require at least that level of work with modifications if we can keep electricity going; along with other modern upgrades (hence the new stove and now the chimney repairs - hey after 200 years things do tend to break down).

    And I'm not trying to argue either, just suggesting that we know human beings have survived several full Ice Ages; things were not fun in fact it looks like people in Eastern Europe were already settling down, learning to weave clothing and make pottery 28,000 years ago when BOOM! The Ice came back and they were back to living in caves and creating wall paintings; agriculture has to wait another few thousand years (at least officially).

    I have to agree with Summertyme that a number of the "theories" are a little "out there" even for a full Ice Age; when living around the equator might make perfect sense - and last time people only needed to move as far South as France or even Southern Washington State to find areas that were livable.

    That doesn't mean they would support modern agriculture but areas closer to the equator probably would; heck Venezuela has some great cattle country on the inland plains and before the political and social change they were a largely agricultural country - they still were when I was there in the late 1970s.

    I mean no one knows exactly what will happen but I really think a lot depends on how fast things change; people can adjust to a "new normal" when things changes over a few years or decades - a few months, on the other hand, would probably lead to a major population collapse with 90 percent not impossible and almost certain in some places.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  39. #3039
    Uncle Nosty predicted a high probability of a horrific world-wide famine sometime around 21st century with "horrible destruction of people and animals," along with a "great drought" that would be so terrible people would think it was the end of the world.

    A better topic for the "woo" section of the forum perhaps but if that was what the podcast or documentary was talking about, well they may have a point.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  40. #3040
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    First Coast
    Posts
    1,199
    I'm thinking that we should, as North Americans, forget building the Wall for now and let all the Hispanic population migrate as far north as possible. Then, when their countries are no longer heavily populated with Spanish speakers, us Anglos migrate south. Then perhaps the Hispanics will then build the wall to block us from moving back north (you know they would). Hopefully this will happen before they have realized we've trapped them into an Ice Age.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.