Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 24, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


The Grand Solar Minimum
+ Reply to Thread
Page 130 of 132 FirstFirst ... 30 80 120 128 129 130 131 132 LastLast
Results 5,161 to 5,200 of 5256
  1. #5161
    TxGal, Ice Age Farmer just posted two new podcasts. Each one runs a little over 6 minutes.

    Just ready to listen to them now.

  2. #5162
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    Ice Age Farmer has two new podcasts out - thanks to Martinhouse!:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Crd489JmsOw

    Alberta: Flooding Disaster & Hail Destroys Taber Corn

    Run time is 6:13

    Alberta, Canada is feeling the Galactic Cosmic Rays in this Solar Minimum. After late frosts last year, producers were hoping for a better season this year -- instead, massive rains destroyed crops, prompting declaration of an emergency. THEN, a hailstorm in South Alberta destroyed vast majority of Taber corn from the Corn Capital of Alberta. Start growing your own food today.


    -------------------------------------------------------

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7q_G_lXqG0Q

    New UN Report: Food Supply Threatened by Global Warming

    Run time is 6:08

    As predicted, now that crop losses and canned food shortages have entered public consciousness, the new UN IPCC's report (and media propaganda) dictates that Global Warming is decimating food production, and food scarcity looms. This is to mask the natural cycles and Grand Solar Minimum, in order to take total control of the food supply and, transitively, humanity.

    START GROWING TODAY!

  3. #5163
    One thing I don't understand is how can these guys tell us how awful the conditions are for growing food, and then they tell us to grow food. What makes them think it's going to grow for us much better than it is for anyone else?

    I've been seeing changes in how my garden grows for the last few years and it seems to be getting worse. I won't give up entirely, but I'm definitely storing away a lot more than I'd originally intended. I'm not talking a massive warehouse worth of food...I don't eat much, possibly only a third or fourth of what a normal person would eat, and I probably won't be around a lot longer, but I am making sure I've got things I'm able to eat in case I can't grow anything at all for up to maybe a year or two.

  4. #5164
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    One thing I don't understand is how can these guys tell us how awful the conditions are for growing food, and then they tell us to grow food. What makes them think it's going to grow for us much better than it is for anyone else?

    I've been seeing changes in how my garden grows for the last few years and it seems to be getting worse. I won't give up entirely, but I'm definitely storing away a lot more than I'd originally intended. I'm not talking a massive warehouse worth of food...I don't eat much, possibly only a third or fourth of what a normal person would eat, and I probably won't be around a lot longer, but I am making sure I've got things I'm able to eat in case I can't grow anything at all for up to maybe a year or two.
    I guess maybe they think we'll get something in our gardens to keep us going...I guess. Our garden was terrible this year, so I'm not optimistic. I'm a light eater, too, and I can get 3 or 4 meals off a can of green beans. I figure that if I have way more food set aside than I'll ever need, someone down the line will get use out of it...likely family, of course.

  5. #5165
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    yankee baptist land
    Posts
    17,387
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    One thing I don't understand is how can these guys tell us how awful the conditions are for growing food, and then they tell us to grow food. What makes them think it's going to grow for us much better than it is for anyone else?

    I've been seeing changes in how my garden grows for the last few years and it seems to be getting worse. I won't give up entirely, but I'm definitely storing away a lot more than I'd originally intended. I'm not talking a massive warehouse worth of food...I don't eat much, possibly only a third or fourth of what a normal person would eat, and I probably won't be around a lot longer, but I am making sure I've got things I'm able to eat in case I can't grow anything at all for up to maybe a year or two.
    I believe that we all can definitely benefit by building and using greenhouses, and once built, start incorporating a hydroponic set-up, lights, auxiliary heat, and maybe insulating night time curtains as well. Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
    ” Watch ye therefore and pray always that ye may be accounted worthy to escape all these things that shall come to pass and to stand before the Son of Man”
    Luke 21:36

    COLLAPSE NOW: avoid the rush

  6. #5166
    Well, since will is about all I have left, and not any money or strength to speak of, I guess my way will have to be mostly the proverbial beans and rice. Figuratively speaking.

    I really don't mind. For me, eating has always been about 5% pleasure and 95% necessity. I wouldn't have lasted the last twenty-plus years without being able to wear dentures, if food was a big deal to me.

  7. #5167
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    193
    You're welcome, TxGal. The mention of an early winter quickly caught my interest as my brother is already experiencing his change of season asthma problems so there may be something to it.

  8. #5168
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out this morning:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BqgEVx_fcT8

    Food Price Rises Cant Be Hidden Any Longer (870)

    Run time is 5:50

    TESCO raised prices on 1000 food items, apples in Europe down 20% yield from last year, pears 14%. Nicaragua bean prices up 20% and scallop population down, water too fresh from record floods across the USA Mississippi basin areas.

  9. #5169
    I watched this early this morning before I left for town. I plan to watch/listen again as soon as I finish bringing in the rest of my shopping bags.

  10. #5170
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    Let us know if you saw any shortages in the grocery store (if you went to one), or noticed price increases. I still need to get 100 lbs of rice into qt canning jars, we're moving much slower in this darn heat. After watching his podcast, I thought maybe getting more lentils and beans would be a good idea. I know the prices have already gone up, some months ago when I bought some most were just under $1/1 lb. bag. I don't think any of them are anymore. We rarely eat them, although I do like refried beans in the can, nice and mushy, but they're a good addition to soups for extra protein and last almost indefinitely.

    Finally got some of that Painted Mountain/Desert corn planted yesterday (can't recall the name at the moment), and want to get more in. Cukes have started to pop up, we'll see if the fall garden amounts to anything. I still have this really strong urge to expand our chicken population...which means more housing/runs. DH is kind of rolling his eyes at me when I'm not looking, I think! I'm trying to force myself to wait until spring, hoping something in the economy/climate doesn't go bust in the meantime. I never get tired of eggs from the home flock, and we supply family members, too. Really odd, I have that nagging feeling in the back of my mind all the time now...get more chickens, get more chicken food....

  11. #5171
    TxGal, the chicken thing eats at my mind all the time, too, now but I'm at a standstill on it if I can't find anyone to fix the pen for me.

    With all the problems I'm facing with whiteflies now, it's tempting to turn the greenhouse into a chickenshelter/run. But it does get far too hot in there in the summer and they would destroy everything in there. Plus, where would I hang my laundry? (: Plus, I like to open the doors into the living room on sunny winter days, and before long that would become rather odorous. (My house is bad enough as it is, I sure don't need it to smell like chicken poop!)

    I only bought carrots and baby food turkey, peas, and carrots, and a big bag of cat food at WM this morning. But I did peek down a couple other aisles and I noticed that at first glance, the packaged potato aisle looked full, but looking closer, I saw that the boxes were only two deep. It's only been about a week and a half since I was there last, so I didn't notice any price increases. Oh, I do remember checking the canned vegetables and there were no Del Monte whole kernel corn or French cut green beans.

    If I had felt better, I would have strolled up and down the aisles, but this was not one of my better mornings. I would have postponed my shopping yet again if it weren't for the fact that our schools start tomorrow and after today I might still feel like doo, and have the irritation of school traffic added to the trip.

  12. #5172
    I was in the grocery store this weekend and the fresh produce was almost nonexistent. Lots of holes on the shelves.

  13. #5173
    TxGal, there's a pretty good article by Michael Snyder over on shtfplan.com. If you think it belongs here on this thread, that is. I intend to go back to it later when there's been more time for some comments to be posted.

    It's about farmers and how this present year's bad conditions could be the final blow when they are already deeply in debt. Nothing we don't already know about, but he puts some numbers to some of it.

  14. #5174
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    Thanks, Martinhouse! Here's the article she was referencing above:

    https://www.shtfplan.com/emergency-p...on-us_08132019

    The Average U.S. Farm Is $1,300,000 In Debt, And Now The Worst Farming Crisis In Modern History Is Upon Us

    Michael Snyder
    August 13th, 2019
    The End Of The American Dream
    Comments (8) Read by 208 people

    This article was originally published by Michael Snyder at The End of the American Dream.

    We haven’t seen anything like this since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Leading up to this year, farm incomes had been trending lower for most of the past decade, and meanwhile, farm debt levels have been absolutely exploding.

    So U.S. farmers were desperate for a really good year, but instead, 2019 has been a total disaster. As I have been carefully documenting, due to endless rain and catastrophic flooding millions of acres of prime farmland didn’t get planted at all this year, and the yields on tens of millions of other acres are expected to be way, way below normal. As a result, we are facing the worst farming crisis in modern American history, and this comes at a time when U.S. farms are drowning in more debt than ever before. In fact, the latest numbers that we have shown that the average U.S. farm is 1.3 million dollars in debt…

    Debt-to-asset ratios are seeing the same squeeze, with more farms moving into a ratio exceeding 80%. Barrett notes each year since 2009 has seen an increase in the average amount of total debt among farmers, and 2017 was no exception. Average debt rose 10% to $1.3 million. The biggest increase was in long-term debt, such as land.

    Farming in the 21st century has become an extraordinarily risky business, and countless U.S. farmers were already on the verge of going under even before we got to 2019.

    Now that this year has been such a complete and utter disaster, many farms will not be able to operate once we get to 2020.

    Minnesota farmers Liz and Bob Krocak were hoping for better days ahead as this year began, but things have been really tough and their debts have become overwhelming. During a recent meeting with their creditors, Liz was so distraught that she literally burst into tears…

    They had to face their creditors at a mediation. There was Del, the mechanic, whom they owe $28,000 and who now can’t help his son buy a home. There was Steve, the feed store guy, who is 64 and has delayed his retirement because of the Krocaks’ $311,000 bill.

    Liz recalled the mediator opening the meeting by saying, “This is going to be an emotional day. I can see everybody really likes this family.” Liz had burst into tears then – and she was crying again now, describing the scene seven months later.

    “We just hope there’s a farm left at the end of it,” she said.

    In total, the Krocaks just happens to be 1.3 million dollars in debt.

    At this point, there isn’t a prayer that all of that debt will ever be paid off. All they can really hope for is more patience from their creditors because without it the farm is going under.

    The Krocaks recently received a check for about 12,000 dollars from the federal government, and they are very grateful for the money, but the truth is that it isn’t even going to make a dent in their 1.3 million dollar debt.

    If the horrific weather and endless flooding wasn’t enough, about a week ago the Chinese government announced that they would be ending all “purchases of U.S. agricultural products”, and that was a devastating blow for farmers all over the nation.

    In particular, soybean farmers are going to see demand for their crops absolutely collapse. In recent years, China has purchased approximately 60 percent of all U.S. soybean exports.

    And even if a trade deal is eventually reached, it is unlikely that all of that demand is ever going to come back. Right now, the Chinese are spending enormous amounts of money “to build transportation infrastructure to ship soybeans grown in what used to be rain forests” in Brazil. They aren’t going to abandon all of that just because Trump suddenly changes his mind.

    And the truth is that it is extremely unlikely that Trump will change his mind and cave in to the Chinese.

    So for the foreseeable future, U.S. farmers are going to be facing weaker markets and lower prices, and that is going to be the final straw for many of them.

    Have you ever been at a point in your life where you have endured problem after problem and then one day a final crushing blow comes along that takes away the last shred of hope that you were holding on to? That is precisely what has happened to farmers like Bob Kuylen of North Dakota…

    “It’s really, really getting bad out here,” said Bob Kuylen, who’s farmed for 35 years in North Dakota.

    “Trump is ruining our markets. No one is buying our product no more, and we have no markets no more.”

    We keep hearing about “government bailouts”, but they aren’t going to be nearly big enough for most farmers. Kuylen has worked as hard as he possibly could, but he was not able to overcome the challenges he was facing, and now he is facing financial disaster. He would walk away, but he says he can’t because “I’ve invested everything I have in farming”…

    Kuylen, who farms roughly 1,500 acres of wheat and sunflowers, lost $70 per acre this year, despite growing good crops. Current government subsidies only cover about $15 per acre, he said.

    “There’s no incentive to keep farming, except that I’ve invested everything I have in farming, and it’s hard to walk away,” he said.

    It would be nice to think that all of these farmers will somehow bounce back next year, but that isn’t likely. It is very doubtful that there will be any sort of a trade agreement with China before the 2020 presidential election, and global weather patterns are not going to be getting any more stable. Sadly, it is entirely possible that next year could be even tougher for U.S. farmers than this year was.

    So please say a prayer for our farmers. They grow the food that we all eat on a daily basis, and their hard work is rarely recognized on a national basis. They are unsung heroes, and right now most of them are really, really hurting.

  15. #5175
    Thanks for posting the link. I couldn't get the site to refresh in order to get all of the comments, but it worked from your link.

  16. #5176
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Thanks for posting the link. I couldn't get the site to refresh in order to get all of the comments, but it worked from your link.
    You're welcome, funny how weird the internet can be.

  17. #5177
    I don't mind having to refresh shtfplan every time I check it. What is really irritating is how the new guy doing dailysheeple doesn't put the date on his pieces so I can tell if I've already checked them. I will probably stop going there altogether before long. The new page design isn't very good.

  18. #5178
    New Dubyne podcast just up at Adapt 2030 youtube

    MIAC #221 runs 30:04

  19. #5179
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out, thanks, Martinhouse!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-wJFFdFBv3o

    (MIAC #221) Flash Frozen Wolves, Underground Cities and Repeating Climate Cycles

    Run time is 30:03

    DuByne creator of the ADAPT 2030 channel on YouTube discusses energetic changes on Earth as the Sun moves into its 400-year cycle affecting crop production, the economy and everyone on our planet. This is an energetic timeline for what you can expect from now to 2023.

    •Volcanic eruptions causing a slight albedo cooling effect globally
    •When glaciers begin to grow in Colorado and the Sierra Nevada Mountains
    •Pleistocene wolf unearthed in perfect state after 18,000 years
    •Pleistocene cave bears unearthed in perfect condition after 18,000 years
    •5000-year-old city discovered in Turkey, Cappadocia Region 1.2 million square meters underground
    •Stability of civilization over the last 8000 years
    •Global Warming re-branded to climate change now climate extremes

  20. #5180
    Just finished listening to this last podcast. It's one that I wish he'd posted the entire show. The underground cities are fascinating but the whole concept certainly is disturbing.

    I can't shovel any more...I'd have to dig my underground shelter with a spoon and a pail and then a hammer and chisel. My property has little soil, I think I'm on a couple hundred feet of limestone here.

    There was a time I wanted to build a kiva-like shelter which was positioned to include my well. I never had the money for such a thing and I still don't and now I haven't the strength, either and I'm too old for it to matter.

    I wonder if it's been calculated yet how long these underground cities were occupied, how long it was necessary to stay underground? Months? Years? Decades?

  21. #5181
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    Martinhouse found a good article that probably should cause all of us to stop and think:

    https://www.iceagenow.info/no-more-soup/

    No more soup
    August 14, 2019 by Robert


    “Am I paranoid? Am I crazy? Something in the air is really bothering me.”
    – Centurion
    ___________
    No more soup
    Centurion

    The following is a true event. It began about 2 weeks ago, and it is a “man on the street” account of possible food shortages starting even now.

    I am a member of 3 “Big Box” Membership Stores: Sam’s, BJ’s, and Costco….One of them ran a “coupon” for a particular soup. It was $2.25 off each 4-pack…It is a soup my family and I love and eat all the time since it is really wholesome with no additives…No wheat, no soy, etc.

    So, I used one coupon but bought 2 “boxes”. While being a smart-ass at the check-out, I asked the person if I can by 2 boxes with one coupon? “NO”, was the answer…….So, I asked, “If I have a separate coupon for each 4-pack I can buy them?”….”Yes,” was the answer.

    Here is the point. I took a whole bunch of their “Coupon Book” home with me and cut our the coupons. 2 days later (to avoid the same clerk), I went back and bought 10 boxes, each with a coupon and it worked.

    BUT, I noticed pallet upon which these 4-pack rested was getting depleted. I look all around and could not see a back up (Yes, I know they can put the pallets anywhere in the building)….The next day I bought 10 more……….pallet getting empty.

    Yesterday, they had only 8 boxes left and they were placed at the END OF THE AISLE ,and where the “soup” used to be had extra Ravioli Cans….They never had 3 Stacks of anything…but they had no more soup……I have NEVER seen this before in any of the 3 chains…They never skip a beat…When something gets low, they have the new pallet down…NEVER has this happened…….

    For some reason, this company can not get any more of this common, well known, soup. The soup manufacturer has NOT gone out of business………was it just a run on this sale item?, or did others realize this was a great product to prep and store with?…..beats eating SPAM for 6 months…………..

    Is it beginning? And here is the problem. Every employee of these companies will learn about this a week BEFORE the stupid customer. The employees, family and friends of the employee will talk to each other and buy up everything withing hours…if this has begun………

    Am I paranoid? Am I crazy? Something in the air is really bothering me. ….I feel like a German Jew in Berlin in 1934.

    Something is wrong…………….

  22. #5182
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    Well, I know it isn't a Costco, because they don't do coupons that way. Sales are shown in their brochure and the items' display shows the sale price, or if an item is on clearance (discontinued), there is an asterisk on the item's display that indicates that will be the lowest price.

    I haven't been to a Sam's in several years, we stopped our membership, I can't recall if they do coupons. I haven't been to a BJ's in probably 30 yrs, so have no idea how they do things.

  23. #5183
    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    Well, I know it isn't a Costco, because they don't do coupons that way. Sales are shown in their brochure and the items' display shows the sale price, or if an item is on clearance (discontinued), there is an asterisk on the item's display that indicates that will be the lowest price.

    I haven't been to a Sam's in several years, we stopped our membership, I can't recall if they do coupons. I haven't been to a BJ's in probably 30 yrs, so have no idea how they do things.
    Sam's does not, but BJ's does.

    If the price ends in a 1 it is a discounted price at Sam's.
    Been reading for years, just now starting to talk.

  24. #5184
    Anything that's on sale here is pretty much always gone 2 hours into the sale... Big time couponers here. Between them, the SAHMs, and the folks on SS, all the items on special are always cleared out in a hurry. The store usually won't re-stock, but they will give you a rain check for the sale price.
    The new store manager at Aldi is clueless, most of the regular customers have switched to shopping on Wed or Thurs, because every Friday, the store is pretty much wiped out. All my numerous complaints about them constantly being out of stock have done is get the donuts I like returned to their inventory. They had completely quit carrying them.

  25. #5185
    Ice Age Farmer has just posted a 14 minute youtube podcast. It looks like it['s going to be a good one. iceagefarmer.com

    TxGal, I hope you find this post tonight!!!
    -----
    Well, heck! My computer won't accept this podcast. Guess I'll have to wait for the link here. Grrr!

    It says something about seed shortages. EEEK!

  26. #5186
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Ice Age Farmer has just posted a 14 minute youtube podcast. It looks like it['s going to be a good one. iceagefarmer.com

    TxGal, I hope you find this post tonight!!!
    -----
    Well, heck! My computer won't accept this podcast. Guess I'll have to wait for the link here. Grrr!

    It says something about seed shortages. EEEK!

    Thanks for the heads up, we're in and out watering fruit trees trying to keep them alive:

    Ice Age Farmer has a new podcast out:

    Looks like it premieres in about 30 mts!


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cj53z1ATBOo

    Sept Frost vs USDA - SEED Shortages - China Warns of Cooling Cycles


    Run time is 13:59.

    Analysts warn of a mid-/late September frost threatening late corn crop. Seed shortages loom as 5x the record prevent plant acres need cover crop. A new study out of China warns of cooling cycles with catastrophic consequences. And the USDA's new report signals they will stave off crisis as long as possible -- at the expense of farmers. AN ATTACK ON FARMERS IS AN ATTACK ON OUR FOOD SUPPLY. Christian breaks it all down.

    Modern agriculture is unable to cope with the perfect cosmic storm of changes -- START GROWING YOUR OWN FOOD TODAY!


    Last edited by TxGal; 08-14-2019 at 08:55 PM.

  27. #5187
    Another good, informative podcast. Just like David Dubyne on Adapt 2030, this guy is starting to sound pretty urgent.

  28. #5188
    Another short podcast from Adapt 2030 this morning. it is 6:51 minutes.

    He is once again talking very quickly and emphatically. Subject is mainly China, which has gone public with saying that there is now going to be a long period of cooling climate.

  29. #5189
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    As Martinhouse said, Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wM1yXjQBz1M

    China's Scientists Publicly Say We Are Headed Into Global Cooling (871)

    Run time is 6:50

    Chinese scientists now confirm that our world is entering a "Global Cooling" phase, which explains why the economy, and tension in the air seem to be ramping up. China and USA are the two largest corn producers on the planet and are both struggling with record low planting this year. The Grand Solar Minimum is now being drip fed to the public. Who is paying attention to China's string of pearls?

  30. #5190
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    Charts/graphs/pics at link:

    https://electroverse.net/chinese-sci...lobal-cooling/

    Chinese Scientists warn of imminent Global Cooling

    August 14, 2019 - Cap Allon

    Climate change is real, the climate changes — this fact is never disputed. A new study, led by prominent Chinese scientists, has found that winters in northern China have been warming for the past 6,000 years –unrelated to human activity– but now the prospect of a sudden and severe bout of global cooling is on the horizon and poses a serious danger.

    The paper, which has been accepted for publication by the online Journal of Geophysical Research, found that winds from Arctic Siberia have been growing weaker for thousands of years, the conifer tree line has been retreating north, and there has been a steady rise in biodiversity in a general warming trend that continues today. And that’s another thing AGW alarmists fail to address — increasing temperatures ALWAYS result in increased biodiversity. Life loves warmth, and, furthermore, it loves carbon.

    This weakening of the Siberian wind, according to the researchers, appears to have nothing to do with the increase in greenhouse gases which began with the industrial revolution. Lead scientist Dr Wu Jing, from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, said the study had found no evidence of human influence on northern China’s warming winters.

    “Driving forces include the sun, the atmosphere, and its interaction with the ocean,” Wu explained. “We have detected no evidence of human influence. But that doesn’t mean we can just relax and do nothing.”

    Wu and her colleagues are worried that, as societies become further indoctrinated by the concept of global warming, people will develop a misplaced confidence in our ability to control the climate — which we cannot. Nature, they warned, will likely trick us and catch us totally unprepared — potentially causing chaos, panic, famine and even wars.

    There are already concerning signs, according to their paper.

    Wu and her colleagues have found that winter warming over the past 6,000 years has been anything but linear, with violent ups and downs occurring roughly every 500 years.

    After more than 13 years of dedicated research across volcanic lakes in the wilderness of the Greater Khingan Mountain Range in Inner Mongolia, the scientists collected and crunched climate data spanning as far back as 10,000 years.

    And their findings confirmed an earlier study by a separate team of Chinese scientists, published in 2014, which first detected the 500-year cyclical pattern of China’s summer monsoons and linked it to solar activity.

    The 2014 paper, which drew on 5,000 years’ worth of proxy data, suggested the current warm phase would end within the next several decades, ushering in a brutal 250-year cooling phase.

    Wu said her latest study not only helped to flesh-out the 500-year cycle, but also revealed a previously unknown mechanism behind the phenomenon, which suggested the impact of the sun on the Earth’s climate is much greater than previously thought:

    According to Wu, the variation in solar activity alone was not normally strong enough to induce the rapid changes in vegetation the research team observed within the sediment cores of the volcanic lakes. Instead, the scientists found the warming impact was amplified by a massive interaction between surface seawater and the atmosphere in the Pacific Ocean known as the ‘El Nino-Southern Oscillation’.

    As a result of the research findings, Wu said she was now much more worried about global cooling than global warming.

    “A sharp drop in temperature will benefit nobody,” she said.

    “The biggest problem is that we know it will come, but we don’t know exactly when.”

    The cold times are returning, in line with historically low solar activity — a growing number of scientists from all corners of the world are coming out with this warning.

    Even stuffy NASA agrees, in part at least, with their SC25 forecast revealing it will be “the weakest [solar cycle] of the past 200 years” (www.nasa.gov):

    People need to prepare for the cold, though unfortunately the message stuck on loop across the MSM is one of impending catastrophic warmth, which is illogical and misguided at best.

    “A sharp drop of temperature will benefit nobody.”

    And unfortunately we don’t have long.

  31. #5191
    Thanks for posting the link, TxGal, and thanks for the electroverse article. Wow! I suppose this article could be where our two usual podcast guys got their latest information from.
    -----
    I just dug up the potatoes I planted in my outdoor containers earlier this summer. I planted five pounds of very nice healthy potatoes with good sprouts starting on them. The plants looked great, got about a foot and a half to two feet high, and then started losing leaves. No sign of insects or actual disease that I could recognize. After the leaves fell off, the stalks just slowly died.

    Even though the resulting new potatoes have been in the ground for a few weeks because I haven't felt up to digging them up, they are perfectly healthy, just very small. If the plants hadn't died so soon, I would have probably gotten 25 to 30 ponds of potatoes. What I got was maybe enough to plant the same amount again next year plus an awful lot of marbles. The only benefit to all my efforts with these things is that my stash of planting potatoes will be a year fresher than if I hadn't planted at all.

    This has made me want to go to the grocery store and buy a few bags of red potatoes even if they are expensive right now. I already have a lot of potatoes I've canned over the last couple of years, but how much is too much when there might be a lot of hungry people pretty soon?

    Sigh

  32. #5192
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    TX & ID
    Posts
    1,723
    Speaking of an attack on our food supply, I learned on Fox Business News last night that Al Gore is one of the largest investors in that veggie burger company, Beyond Meat. Not only is he a top investor, but he's been using his crony connections to help shape the UN food policies to discourage raising beef cattle etc!
    “The consolidation of the states into one vast empire, sure to be aggressive abroad and despotic at home, will be the certain precursor of ruin which has overwhelmed all that preceded it.” – Robert E. Lee

  33. #5193
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    -----
    I just dug up the potatoes I planted in my outdoor containers earlier this summer. I planted five pounds of very nice healthy potatoes with good sprouts starting on them. The plants looked great, got about a foot and a half to two feet high, and then started losing leaves. No sign of insects or actual disease that I could recognize. After the leaves fell off, the stalks just slowly died.

    Sigh
    Martin,

    I had much the same thing happen with my spring planted beets and carrots. Just not a good year here for the Spring garden.
    that which one man receives without working for, another man must work for without receiving." -- Kenneth W. Sollitt

  34. #5194
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    Pics/vid at the website -

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-...ted-crops-year

    According To The Feds, 19 Million Acres Of Farmland Went Un-Planted With Crops This Year

    by Tyler Durden
    Thu, 08/15/2019 - 22:25

    Authored by Michael Snyder via The End of The American Dream blog


    If that headline sounds really bad to you, that is because the situation that we are facing is really bad.

    Over the past few months, I have written article after articleabout the unprecedented crisis that U.S. farmers are facing this year. In those articles, I have always said that “millions” of acres of farmland did not get planted this year, because I knew that we did not have a final number yet. Well, now we do, and it is extremely troubling. Of course there are some people out there that do not even believe that we are facing a crisis, and a few have even accused me of overstating the severity of the problems that U.S. farmers are currently dealing with. Sadly, things are not as bad as I thought – the truth is that they are even worse. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, crops were not planted on 19.4 million acres of U.S. farmland this year. The following comes directly from the official website of the USDA…

    Agricultural producers reported they were not able to plant crops on more than 19.4 million acres in 2019, according to a new report released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). This marks the most prevented plant acres reported since USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) began releasing the report in 2007 and 17.49 million acres more than reported at this time last year.

    So this is the largest number that the USDA has ever reported for a single year, and it is nearly 17.5 million acres greater than last year’s final tally of less than 2 million acres.

    If you have been following my articles on a regular basis, then you know exactly why this has happened. The middle of the nation was absolutely pummeled by endless rain and unprecedented flooding throughout the first half of 2019, and this new USDA report shows that the vast majority of the acres that were not planted come from that area of the country…

    Of those prevented plant acres, more than 73 percent were in 12 Midwestern states, where heavy rainfall and flooding this year has prevented many producers from planting mostly corn, soybeans and wheat.

    “Agricultural producers across the country are facing significant challenges and tough decisions on their farms and ranches,” USDA Under Secretary for Farm Production and Conservation Bill Northey said. “We know these are challenging times for farmers, and we have worked to improve flexibility of our programs to assist producers prevented from planting.”

    Of course the 19.4 million acres that were not planted are only part of the story.

    Most farmers were able to get seeds in the ground despite the challenging conditions, but in much of the country the crops are not in good shape.
    In fact, according to the latest crop progress report only 57 percent of the corn is considered to be in “good” or “excellent” shape.

    Unfortunately, the nation’s soybean crop is in even worse shape. At this point, only 54 percent of the soybeans are in “good” or “excellent” shape.
    In addition, only 8 percent of the U.S. spring wheat crop has been harvested so far. That is “sharply below the 30% five-year average”.

    So what does all of this mean?

    Well, it means that we have a real crisis on our hands. A lot less crops are being grown, and a substantial percentage of the crops that are being grown are not in good shape. Yields are going to be way down across the board, and that means that U.S. agricultural production is going to be way, way below initial expectations.

    In other words, we are going to grow a lot less food than usual.

    One bad year is not going to be the end of the world, but what if things don’t bounce back next year? As I keep telling my readers, our planet is becoming increasingly unstable in a whole bunch of different ways, and global weather patterns have been shifting dramatically. Many experts are issuing very ominous warnings about what is ahead as weather patterns continue to shift, and some believe that what we have witnessed so far is just the very beginning of this crisis.

    Almost every day, there are new headlines about extreme weather and records being broken. For example, one community in Colorado just got pummeled by hail the size of softballs…

    Monster hail fell from the sky and hammered areas of the central United States on Tuesday, shattering a state record. Earlier on Tuesday before the storms developed, AccuWeather Extreme Meteorologist Reed Timmer warned that Colorado’s state hail record could be in jeopardy given the intensity of the storms that he saw developing.

    His prediction came to fruition on Tuesday afternoon when a hailstone with a maximum diameter of 4.83″ fell in Bethune, Colorado, on Tuesday afternoon. The record was confirmed on Wednesday evening by the Colorado Climate Center and the National Weather Service office in Goodland, Kansas.
    For some of my readers, this freakish incident is going to set off major alarm bells.

    We are regularly seeing things happen that we have never seen before. In other words, the seemingly impossible is happening so frequently that it has become mundane.

    Despite all of our advanced technology, we are still completely and utterly dependent on the weather. If the weather does not cooperate, farmers cannot grow our food, and we will not eat.

    Hopefully harvest season will go smoothly, but even if that happens, food supplies will be a lot tighter in the months ahead and that means that prices will continue to rise steadily.

    This is a crisis that is going to affect all of us. I wish that I could get everyone to understand this, but unfortunately there are still a lot of people out there that are not taking this seriously.

  35. #5195
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out this morning:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MpTsfNlX2RQ

    No Insurance & UK Food Rationing Odds (872)

    Run time is 5:30

    Odds on rationing of food in the UK by end of 2019 are 12/1 and strangely a week before 2019 began an article about re-standardizing the amount of calories on a quick and ready meal. Home insurance more difficult to come by as insurers are so strapped for cash after endless payouts, many are no longer insuring farms or homes. Are we crossing the galactic cross and are clues hidden in the cathedrals of Europe?

  36. #5196
    Thanks for the link to this latest podcast.

    Notice he's still talking loud and fast. I wonder why he's now putting out so many of these extra short podcasts?

    His new way of talking leaves me feeling almost panicked.

  37. #5197
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,288
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Thanks for the link to this latest podcast.

    Notice he's still talking loud and fast. I wonder why he's now putting out so many of these extra short podcasts?

    His new way of talking leaves me feeling almost panicked.
    Welcome! I'm not sure, but I've noticed it, too. Interesting....

  38. #5198
    I wonder how many people on TB2K think this is the "hottest summer ever"?

    From what I'm seeing, it is nowhere near hottest ever. When I first moved to Arkansas, we would expect days and days at a time where we would get three digit temps, anywhere from the middle of July until the end of August and occasionally even into September.

    Seems like everyone freaks now if the thermometer even hints it might get close to 100 degrees out. What in the world are they going to do if the power goes out and they don't have an icy cold house to hole up in?

    Would it help if the cursed Media would stop sensationalizing by using "heat index" and "wind chill" and "feels like" numbers, and actually give us real numbers about the temps, humidity and wind speed and direction? Could people nowadays even put those numbers together and figure out what they'd find when they stepped out the door?

  39. #5199
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    State of confusion
    Posts
    9,128
    “Are we crossing the galactic cross and are clues hidden in the cathedrals of Europe?”

    They were there, until the muzzies started burning them down.
    "...Cry 'Havoc' and let slip the cats of war..."
    It’s a real pisser when your belief system gets T-boned by reality.
    I’m not afraid of dying...I just don’t want to be there!
    ...sell your cloak, and buy a sword...Second Amendment 1.0

  40. #5200
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    S.W. Mich. near South Bend, IN
    Posts
    6,404
    Yesterday, at the farmers' market, I saw a couple of rows of half bushels of the most beautiful, big tomatoes I've ever seen. Since I can no longer garden, due to age limitations, I surprised myself and bought a half bushel of them, planning to can them. They looked close to being ripe, in a couple of days or so. No problem.

    Today, several tomatoes looked like they could be ripe, today, in fact, but did not feel quite soft enough,even though a couple even looked like they were starting to rot in a few places! ( They were perfect, when I removed them from the bushel basket, yesterday, and placed them on large pans for ripening, in the kitchen.)

    This afternoon, I decided to slice one that did look and feel rather ripe, intending to make a tomato sandwich with a slice, but when I ate the sandwich, that tomato had no flavor, whatsoever! Most of the slices had many large, firm white areas inside, too.

    I wonder if any of you folks have experienced that with your tomatoes. A neighbor brought me several from her garden and explained that this year, some of the insides of her ripe looking ones had white inside, too. New to her, too!

    I never had that happen, in all the many years I raised tomatoes. It must have something to do with the weather, although I can't see why. I have a hunch that I might not even be able to or want to can this half bushel of big, beautiful tomatoes, after all! Especially if they all have no flavor!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.