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The Grand Solar Minimum
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  1. #761
    So far, nearly all the attention has been on the TSI [Total Solar Irradiance] number, which has been dropping.

    However, I am starting to wonder if there is yet another variable at play: a shift in the Sunlight's wavelength frequency?

    Consider this grow light as an example:

    [damn unable to copy and paste image!]

    There are three different colored LEDs designed to encourage different stages of plant growth. The sunlight might be sufficient to promote green growth but lacking the critical wavelengths needed to ripen and set fruiting stages.

    So far I have not come across any scientific studies concerning this proposed wavelength shift, so it's in the layman's "wild assed guess" category.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  2. #762
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    SE Georgia
    Posts
    3,120
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    So far, nearly all the attention has been on the TSI [Total Solar Irradiance] number, which has been dropping.

    However, I am starting to wonder if there is yet another variable at play: a shift in the Sunlight's wavelength frequency?

    Consider this grow light as an example:

    [damn unable to copy and paste image!]

    There are three different colored LEDs designed to encourage different stages of plant growth. The sunlight might be sufficient to promote green growth but lacking the critical wavelengths needed to ripen and set fruiting stages.

    So far I have not come across any scientific studies concerning this proposed wavelength shift, so it's in the layman's "wild assed guess" category.

    von Koehler
    You may be right. This is how most things are figured out. Common sense and WAGs

  3. #763
    Don't remember where I read this but it was said that the sun is different now and looks white instead of the yellowish it used to look like. And the UV in sunlight that was UV1 and UV2 is now UV3 and is much worse for our skin. I think it may account for the difference in how I've seen most plants growing the last few years, too. I'm seeing that leafy greens might be the most successful crops for a while. For example, the dandelions I picked this last spring and early summer mostly had leaves at least a foot long and three inches wide at their widest point and my plaintain, just the old junky stuff at the edge of my driveway grew leaves the size of my hand, three to four times the size they usually are. If this is a permanent feature of GSM growing patterns, at least we can keep ourselves fairly well nourished, if we just study what plants we can eat. I am planning to set out an enormous amount of kale and broccoli plants in my greenhouse this fall. If they grow there as well as they did last year, I will have enough to dehydrate to last me several years, and they are about the only green leafy food I can eat.

  4. #764
    Based on what I have read about previous Solar Minimums, when typically a sizable proportion of a country would die off, I am formulating a working hypothesis. That's a fancy word for a "wild assed guess."

    That a Winter is coming is not an unexpected event; undoubtedly some would die from exposure to the cold but that is NOT the main cause of mortality.

    It appears that most of the deaths [which varied greatly from about a quarter to a half of the population] were from starvation. Simply, there just wasn't enough food from the affected annual harvest. The lower classes were especially hard hit, as they couldn't afford higher food costs.

    The second main cause was disease epidemics, which makes sense when you consider starving people have drastically weakened immune systems. They are the ideal hosts for infections.

    That civilizations collapse during a solar minimum is no surprise when the people are starving.

    Growing food is the key to survival.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  5. #765
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Don't remember where I read this but it was said that the sun is different now and looks white instead of the yellowish it used to look like. And the UV in sunlight that was UV1 and UV2 is now UV3 and is much worse for our skin. I think it may account for the difference in how I've seen most plants growing the last few years, too. I'm seeing that leafy greens might be the most successful crops for a while. For example, the dandelions I picked this last spring and early summer mostly had leaves at least a foot long and three inches wide at their widest point and my plaintain, just the old junky stuff at the edge of my driveway grew leaves the size of my hand, three to four times the size they usually are. If this is a permanent feature of GSM growing patterns, at least we can keep ourselves fairly well nourished, if we just study what plants we can eat. I am planning to set out an enormous amount of kale and broccoli plants in my greenhouse this fall. If they grow there as well as they did last year, I will have enough to dehydrate to last me several years, and they are about the only green leafy food I can eat.
    You might be onto something here; consider that the plants you mention kale and broccoli are eaten in their green leafy stages. Not like a fruiting plant like a tomato.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  6. #766
    Another sign that I think is something caused by the changed sun...this is the third summer that I've had to rake up leaves from the big sweet gum tree behind my house. It was nice when I found I hadn't saved enough in bags from last year to mulch my potatoes this year, but it really has been a huge mess to have them falling almost from the time the tree has been fully leafed out.

    Other trees have been losing leaves all summer, too and it's like they all think it's autumn for most of the summer.

    About the broccoli, I dehydrate the leaves just like I do the kale. I can't wear dentures so I give any heads to my sister. Except for a certain cancer-fighting nutrient, the leaves are just as nutritious as the heads. I found for myself and then later read somewhere that dehydrated cabbage does not store well, so I don't do that any more.

  7. #767
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Panhandle
    Posts
    711
    "Forgotten civilzation" the role of solar outbursts in our past and future,.

    by Robert m. Scoch, PhD.

    Very interesting book......

    Thank you all for this thread, my gut has been telling me time is ticking faster,,,and there are a whole lot of people who are gonna be hurting.

    Likely, all of us.

    Keep up the great work.

  8. #768
    https://www.nature.com/articles/ngeo2875

    Article | Published: 23 January 2017

    Climate response to the Samalas volcanic eruption in 1257 revealed by proxy records
    Sébastien Guillet, Christophe Corona, Markus Stoffel, Myriam Khodri, Franck Lavigne, Pablo Ortega, Nicolas Eckert, Pascal Dkengne Sielenou, Valérie Daux, Olga V. Churakova (Sidorova), Nicole Davi, Jean-Louis Edouard, Yong Zhang, Brian H. Luckman, Vladimir S. Myglan, Joël Guiot, Martin Beniston, Valérie Masson-Delmotte & Clive Oppenheimer
    Nature Geoscience volume 10, pages 123–128 (2017) | Download Citation

    Abstract
    The eruption of Samalas in Indonesia in 1257 ranks among the largest sulfur-rich eruptions of the Common Era with sulfur deposition in ice cores reaching twice the volume of the Tambora eruption in 1815. Sedimentological analyses of deposits confirm the exceptional size of the event, which had both an eruption magnitude and a volcanic explosivity index of 7. During the Samalas eruption, more than 40 km3 of dense magma was expelled and the eruption column is estimated to have reached altitudes of 43 km. However, the climatic response to the Samalas event is debated since climate model simulations generally predict a stronger and more prolonged surface air cooling of Northern Hemisphere summers than inferred from tree-ring-based temperature reconstructions. Here, we draw on historical archives, ice-core data and tree-ring records to reconstruct the spatial and temporal climate response to the Samalas eruption. We find that 1258 and 1259 experienced some of the coldest Northern Hemisphere summers of the past millennium. However, cooling across the Northern Hemisphere was spatially heterogeneous. Western Europe, Siberia and Japan experienced strong cooling, coinciding with warmer-than-average conditions over Alaska and northern Canada. We suggest that in North America, volcanic radiative forcing was modulated by a positive phase of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation. Contemporary records attest to severe famines in England and Japan, but these began prior to the eruption. We conclude that the Samalas eruption aggravated existing crises, but did not trigger the famines.

    Article | Published: 23 January 2017

    Climate response to the Samalas volcanic eruption in 1257 revealed by proxy records
    Sébastien Guillet, Christophe Corona, Markus Stoffel, Myriam Khodri, Franck Lavigne, Pablo Ortega, Nicolas Eckert, Pascal Dkengne Sielenou, Valérie Daux, Olga V. Churakova (Sidorova), Nicole Davi, Jean-Louis Edouard, Yong Zhang, Brian H. Luckman, Vladimir S. Myglan, Joël Guiot, Martin Beniston, Valérie Masson-Delmotte & Clive Oppenheimer
    Nature Geoscience volume 10, pages 123–128 (2017) | Download Citation

    Abstract
    The eruption of Samalas in Indonesia in 1257 ranks among the largest sulfur-rich eruptions of the Common Era with sulfur deposition in ice cores reaching twice the volume of the Tambora eruption in 1815. Sedimentological analyses of deposits confirm the exceptional size of the event, which had both an eruption magnitude and a volcanic explosivity index of 7. During the Samalas eruption, more than 40 km3 of dense magma was expelled and the eruption column is estimated to have reached altitudes of 43 km. However, the climatic response to the Samalas event is debated since climate model simulations generally predict a stronger and more prolonged surface air cooling of Northern Hemisphere summers than inferred from tree-ring-based temperature reconstructions. Here, we draw on historical archives, ice-core data and tree-ring records to reconstruct the spatial and temporal climate response to the Samalas eruption. We find that 1258 and 1259 experienced some of the coldest Northern Hemisphere summers of the past millennium. However, cooling across the Northern Hemisphere was spatially heterogeneous. Western Europe, Siberia and Japan experienced strong cooling, coinciding with warmer-than-average conditions over Alaska and northern Canada. We suggest that in North America, volcanic radiative forcing was modulated by a positive phase of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation. Contemporary records attest to severe famines in England and Japan, but these began prior to the eruption. We conclude that the Samalas eruption aggravated existing crises, but did not trigger the famines.

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    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  9. #769
    Just wanted to show what a scientific study looks like.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  10. #770
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  11. #771
    https://electroverse.net/excessive-h...s-in-new-york/



    EXCESSIVE HEAT AND RAIN AFFECTS CROP SEASONS IN NEW YORK
    AUGUST 9, 2018 CAP

    Waves of torrential rain and withering heat this summer have made growing and harvesting food more unpredictable for farmers in New York.

    “This weather has been just horrid to deal with,” said Craig DeVoe of DeVoe’s Rainbow Orchards in Halfmoon. “You don’t know when a curveball is going to get thrown at you.”

    A cold and snowy April put growers behind in their planting schedules, which is why some crops may not be ready now, said Steve Reiners, chair of the horticulture section at Cornell University.

    Hot temperatures in July put stress on plants, affected the pollen of fruits and vegetables and caused some products to be cracked or misshapen, he added.

    “We’re seeing more extremes all the time in our weather,” Reiners said. “We don’t have an average year anymore.”

    In Brunswick, Ed Engel should be harvesting his tomatoes by now. But they’re not ripe, and blight has ravaged many of the plants.

    It used to be that Ed could fill dozens of baskets with tomatoes quickly, but now it takes several hours to fill 12.

    His sweet corn has been affected too, and while he’d ordinarily be cutting cabbage this time of year, that’s not ready either.

    “It’s just a strange year,” said Ed. “Nothing’s right.”
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  12. #772
    Here is a link explaining some causes for bean plants which look healthy but which set few pods:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edi...ms-no-pods.htm

    I'm guessing THIS is the explanation for most people this year:

    High temperatures – When the temperatures go too high (normally above 85 F./29 C.), bean flowers will fall off. The high heat makes it difficult for the bean plant to keep itself alive and it will drop its blossoms.
    If so, for those with this problem, keeping the plants healthy should let them produce a good crop... later, when it cools down a bit.

    Despite our heat and humidity, the two rows of snap beans are producing very well. We're getting some blue mold/rot on the wet end of one row, but I've seen it worse. We picked the green beans to can today, but decided to wait on the yellow bean row for 2-3 more days, as they are still "baby beans". Delicious, but they can up better if they're a bit bigger.

    Summerthyme

  13. #773


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-4cP6eA0ek

    10:08 minutes

    Melodi?

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  14. #774
    This Red Gardens guy did a good job with his short-but-sweet explanation of what the growing season's been like in his part of Ireland this summer.

  15. #775
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    So far, nearly all the attention has been on the TSI [Total Solar Irradiance] number, which has been dropping.

    However, I am starting to wonder if there is yet another variable at play: a shift in the Sunlight's wavelength frequency?

    Consider this grow light as an example:

    [damn unable to copy and paste image!]

    There are three different colored LEDs designed to encourage different stages of plant growth. The sunlight might be sufficient to promote green growth but lacking the critical wavelengths needed to ripen and set fruiting stages.

    So far I have not come across any scientific studies concerning this proposed wavelength shift, so it's in the layman's "wild assed guess" category.

    von Koehler
    So I have a question for you all. Will longer days in the north be an advantage over the shorter summer days in the south?

  16. #776
    I don't think anyone has addressed that yet. Any advantage might be overwhelmed by colder temperatures versus being further south.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  17. #777
    I'm from Minnesota and one 4th of July, 45 to 50 years ago, I saw snow flurries at the family lake home in north western Wisconsin. If temps go overall colder, I'm afraid it could be a lot more than just a few snow flurries, maybe more like a killing frost or even a substantial freeze, right in the middle of the growing season.

    In a full-blown Grand Solar Minimum, I wouldn't want to depend on a long enough growing season if I lived in the northern tier of states in this country. Maybe even the tier right below those states as well.

    This year we've had a short but warm summer here in Arkansas, but there have been two spells where the temps have been lots cooler for a few days and nights. If this happened when temps were lots cooler all around, it would take just one overnight low at or below 32 degrees to destroy the year's entire garden. Excepting maybe some root crops and hardy greens.

    An extra hour or two of sunlight wouldn't make a lot of difference if it's too chilly for optimum growth.

    My opinion only, of course, but this is the sort of thing I'm trying to prepare for.

  18. #778
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Green County, Kentucky
    Posts
    9,889
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    I'm from Minnesota and one 4th of July, 45 to 50 years ago, I saw snow flurries at the family lake home in north western Wisconsin. If temps go overall colder, I'm afraid it could be a lot more than just a few snow flurries, maybe more like a killing frost or even a substantial freeze, right in the middle of the growing season.

    In a full-blown Grand Solar Minimum, I wouldn't want to depend on a long enough growing season if I lived in the northern tier of states in this country. Maybe even the tier right below those states as well.

    This year we've had a short but warm summer here in Arkansas, but there have been two spells where the temps have been lots cooler for a few days and nights. If this happened when temps were lots cooler all around, it would take just one overnight low at or below 32 degrees to destroy the year's entire garden. Excepting maybe some root crops and hardy greens.

    An extra hour or two of sunlight wouldn't make a lot of difference if it's too chilly for optimum growth.

    My opinion only, of course, but this is the sort of thing I'm trying to prepare for.
    Also high elevations would be problematic. 4,500' elevation in the high desert leaves you vulnerable to frost in any month of the year even now -- if temps got overall colder, it might become nearly impossible to garden there at all, although there would probably still be enough grass for livestock. This wasn't *the* reason why we moved to Kentucky, but it was *one* of the reasons. I thought about moving even farther south, but 1. our location here is just within range for my oldest daughter, who lives in Ohio, to visit for the weekend once in a while, and 2. I'm handling summer heat here fairly well (we do not have AC), but I'm not sure I would want to have to deal with a summer that was hotter and more humid. Not to mention that here, we do not have fire ants and several other nuisances that are common farther south.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  19. #779
    Kathleen, my thinking has been that your above-mentioned nuisances might not be so common farther south during a Grand Solar Minimum.

    I moved south from Minnesota over 41 years ago. Nearly every winter since, I've claimed that I did not move far enough south. Some of the summers were terribly hot, especially the first ten years or so, but I get cold so easily that I love the heat, even with having no air-conditioning or fans. Having a slab floor, of course, does help keep my house cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter.

    If I were young and healthy, I'd consider designing a new home to incorporate what I've learned through the years, but at my age, nearly 75, it would be a pretty silly thing to attempt.

  20. #780
    https://www.agweb.com/article/some-m...BIdExYWXEwdiJ9

    Some Missouri Fields Revealing Single-Digit Yields Due to Drought

    AUGUST 10, 2018 09:57 AM

    USDA's latest Crop Progress Report showed 44 percent of the state’s corn crop is in “poor to very poor condition". Only a quarter of the crop is considered “good to excellent.”




    By Tyne Morgan
    US Farm Report

    Missouri farmers are coming to grips with the reality of farming with very little rain. Moisture has been absent most of the growing season, and suffering crops are signs of just how bad the dryness is hitting area fields.

    The latest U.S. Drought Monitor showed exceptional drought in the area for the first time this summer. Extreme conditions cover 19 percent of the state, and severe drought saw a double-digit jump this week hitting 43 percent of Missouri.

    For Daniel Carpenter, he’s seeing the impacts first-hand. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s latest Crop Progress Report showed 44 percent of the state’s corn crop is in “poor to very poor condition,” which was more than 10 points worse than the week prior. Only a quarter of the crop is considered “good to excellent.”

    “If you look at a lot of these ears on the outside, they are filled out quite well,” said Carpenter. “If you take a few steps into the field, we've got quite a bit of tip back though, and obviously a much lower quality size of ear.”

    He said the ears didn’t fill out due to high heat and lack of rain in late June and early August. The bushels are lacking in a year when prices are also posing pain.

    “This year we've just been missing all types of showers, said Todd Gibson, a farmer in Carroll County, Mo.

    Some fields in west central Missouri look better than others, and some areas saw only five inches of rain all season. Carpenter said fields like this are showing more promise than most.

    “Top end [yield], what we've been seeing in fields right around here, what we've been seeing is 120 to 140 bushels per acre,” said Carpenter.

    He said if his expectations hold true, that would be 100 bushels per acre less than last year, and a hint that the "better than expected" yield story may not be in the cards for Missouri farmers this year.

    He said area fields already being appraised by insurance adjusters and show just how deep the scars of the 2018 drought may be with some yields in the single digits.

    “There have been some fields appraised under 10 bushels per acre, or right at 10, some even down to zero - close to zero,” said Carpenter. “Rainfall was the biggest factor in that, and soil type obviously, too.”

    As analysts from outside Missouri trek through fields and assess the damage this year, it's eating away at their yields expectations.

    “We saw a lot of pollination issues, a lot of small ears, a couple of the fields that I looked at were 40 to 50 bushels less than what I was maybe expecting to see,” said Matt Bennett of Bennett Consulting.

    The headline for Missouri’s harvest this year may be the variability in fields.

    “This fall when we go in the combine, we're going to hit some patches that will be absolutely zero, and then hit some areas, that the roots were down and caught some of that subsoil,” said Gibson. “The yield monitor will be all over the board this year.”

    A aerial view shows the marks of this year's drought -and the variability of the crop- with pockets of the field toast from high heat and little rain.

    “If you get a drone or any sort of aerial vehicle, you can tell up to the line what soil type it is,” said Carpenter.

    As the corn dries up, it's a stark resemblance to the drought of 2012.

    “We had similar conditions in 2012, but we had the price support to back that up, so we were still able to make something out of it,” he said. “This year with the price support we have being very minimal, low yield and low price doesn't equate to a whole lot.”

    It’s reality that's mixed with the hope of living to farm another year.

    “The thing is, there's going to be a yield, so we'll harvest it and make some decisions and plans and go again next year,” said Gibson.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  21. #781
    Something that occurred to me reading the above post about the drought and crop losses in Missouri...

    Good weather patterns, chemical fertilizers, new (and hence efficient, albeit temporarily) herbicides and pesticides, and innovations in machinery that lets farmers plant precisely and apply chemicals within a few ounces per acre, have all contributed to the incredible yields people take for granted. That "terrible" 120-140 bushel per acre yield was considered a very good crop a generation ago!

    But what really occurred to me, reading how they can see where particular soil types run, is how we've managed to compensate for immense damage we've done to most of our farm soil structure and life.

    Our small farm has a silt loam soil that is running around 7-8% organic matter. Virgin prairie soils are around 10%. Fields which have been used to grow corn (even rotated with other crops) often are as low as 1/2% organic matter.

    In a dry year, we often see yields on our place double what some of the big places get. In a wet year, we struggle, because we've never been able to afford to put in the drainage tile to drain the common, shall8w, "wet weather springs" that dot our land, but outside those areas, the high organic matter content acts like a sponge and allows oxygen to still permeate the soi... plants don't drown.

    Our soil is so "live", it's crazy. Hubby once overdid the amount of manure he spread on our 2 acre garden... he must have put 80 tons on that spring! I was pretty sure i was going to have to find another spot for a couple of years, to let the clumps of manure and large amount of straw break down into the soil.

    Ha! THREE WEEKS later, it was almost impossible to find any recognizable manure! We disked it into the top 6" of soil once, and the various soil microorganisms broke it down faster than I'd have ever believed possible. If similar amounts had been spread on nearby commercial fields (even with identical soil types), it would have taken a couple years to break down.

    I'm afraid crop losses and yield reductions are going to be even worse than "experts" might estimate if they "only" take into account temperatures and possibly some sunlight reduction.

    Summerthyme

  22. #782
    Indeed. The topsoil around where I live is mostly gone, farmers are using the subsoils as just a substrate for artificial fertilizers and herbicides. Organic matter is totally lacking.

    Weeds take years to recover on bare fields.

    Makes a person slowly realize just how dependent modern agribusiness is on industrial inputs.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  23. #783
    I have been giving some thought to the ancient idea that forests are interconnected and also all plants in general. Some old texts say plants (especially trees) communicate with each other.

    I ran across research that is being done on fungal networks in the soil whereby plants do exactly this- they communicate. Look up something called the Wood Wide Web. Plenty of research is out there. Research papers, articles, and video.

    No one that I can find is addressing what happens to the fungal network during a Little Ice Age- they're too busy looking at Climate Change and Global Warming.

    If this research is for real and not just more junk science, monoculture is not going to cut it. In order for plants to survive, they will need this fungal network, not only for communication, but to pass nutrients between each other. It would behoove us to learn which plants can survive freezing of this fungal network. These are the ones that will help us survive until warmer weather comes again. It's fascinating reading.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

  24. #784


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Qb2KrUgoso&t=19s

    How homesteaders cope with destructive winds and rain.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  25. #785
    There is a weekend meteorologist on one of the Little Rock stations that my sister likes to watch. Last night he said that models are showing that the summer-hot weather here is over and what we will have the rest of this month is September weather.

    We already knew that, didn't we?

    Wonder what we'll have in September?

    I hope this coming winter will be the one to convince people once and for all that things really are changing. And that perhaps they might consider doing something about it?

  26. #786
    Quote Originally Posted by Seeker22 View Post
    I have been giving some thought to the ancient idea that forests are interconnected and also all plants in general. Some old texts say plants (especially trees) communicate with each other.

    I ran across research that is being done on fungal networks in the soil whereby plants do exactly this- they communicate. Look up something called the Wood Wide Web. Plenty of research is out there. Research papers, articles, and video.

    No one that I can find is addressing what happens to the fungal network during a Little Ice Age- they're too busy looking at Climate Change and Global Warming.

    If this research is for real and not just more junk science, monoculture is not going to cut it. In order for plants to survive, they will need this fungal network, not only for communication, but to pass nutrients between each other. It would behoove us to learn which plants can survive freezing of this fungal network. These are the ones that will help us survive until warmer weather comes again. It's fascinating reading.
    If you haven't run into him yet, look up Paul Stamets. IIRC, that is the correct spelling. I have several of his books. He also has a good interview with that guy who used to do MMA fighting..can't remember his name..I'll try to find it.

    ETA: Joe Rogan. Here is a link, but I don't recall this specific interview - might have only seen a section, originally (no time right now), it is 2 plus hrs runtime.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPqWstVnRjQ

  27. #787
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    Based on what I have read about previous Solar Minimums, when typically a sizable proportion of a country would die off, I am formulating a working hypothesis. That's a fancy word for a "wild assed guess."

    That a Winter is coming is not an unexpected event; undoubtedly some would die from exposure to the cold but that is NOT the main cause of mortality.

    It appears that most of the deaths [which varied greatly from about a quarter to a half of the population] were from starvation. Simply, there just wasn't enough food from the affected annual harvest. The lower classes were especially hard hit, as they couldn't afford higher food costs.

    The second main cause was disease epidemics, which makes sense when you consider starving people have drastically weakened immune systems. They are the ideal hosts for infections.

    That civilizations collapse during a solar minimum is no surprise when the people are starving.

    Growing food is the key to survival.

    von Koehler
    I think this is why they have the underground bunkers full stocked and ready to go. They are going underground, collapse the economy and maybe set off an EMP up here. Give us a year and 90%, they estimate, will be dead. They get their depopulation event.

    I also think they are going to tap the best and brightest of all fields and take them and their families to safety. When the year or two is over they can come topside and civilization can thrive. The best doctors, engineers, best everything has come through safely. People can survive with just 10% of the population to feed because that amount of food CAN be grown. They are going to contact people and say, "bring your family and come with me if you want to live" - those who survive it on the top are going to be the best of humanity and will make good stock to fill in the rest of a new society's niche jobs.

    They've been building these bunkers since the 1980's. They know it is coming and no one wants to come out of an underground facility all safe and sound and realize they didn't save the cancer doctors, the engineers, the carpenters, the dentists.... I bet they have a huge list of skill sets, knowledge bases and scientific minds they want to safeguard when the fighting over the last crumbs of available food are happening.

  28. #788
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by rolenrock View Post
    I think this is why they have the underground bunkers full stocked and ready to go. They are going underground, collapse the economy and maybe set off an EMP up here. Give us a year and 90%, they estimate, will be dead. They get their depopulation event.

    I also think they are going to tap the best and brightest of all fields and take them and their families to safety. When the year or two is over they can come topside and civilization can thrive. The best doctors, engineers, best everything has come through safely. People can survive with just 10% of the population to feed because that amount of food CAN be grown. They are going to contact people and say, "bring your family and come with me if you want to live" - those who survive it on the top are going to be the best of humanity and will make good stock to fill in the rest of a new society's niche jobs.

    They've been building these bunkers since the 1980's. They know it is coming and no one wants to come out of an underground facility all safe and sound and realize they didn't save the cancer doctors, the engineers, the carpenters, the dentists.... I bet they have a huge list of skill sets, knowledge bases and scientific minds they want to safeguard when the fighting over the last crumbs of available food are happening.

    In the 1970's they were saying a new ice age was upon us. Then they shut it up and soon Al Gore started his global warming stuff. But, they say they started the black-budget underground bunkers in the early 1980's. It's been "global warming this" and "global warming that" and nothing, nothing more about a solar minimum or earth's cooling. N.O.T.H.I.N.G. Yet, occasionally, like September 10, 2001, they happen to mention trillions have somehow disappeared. Where did those trillion$ go? I betcha they went into digging underground shelters for the coming extinction event solar minimum. The weather does not have to be what kills, starvation from economic collapse, plus an EMP or storms so violent crops don't get to harvest or trucks don't have fuel.... a violent disruption of society is what can kill 90% quite effectively. Fear of the weather will panic the herd....

  29. #789
    Quote Originally Posted by rolenrock View Post
    In the 1970's they were saying a new ice age was upon us. Then they shut it up and soon Al Gore started his global warming stuff. But, they say they started the black-budget underground bunkers in the early 1980's. It's been "global warming this" and "global warming that" and nothing, nothing more about a solar minimum or earth's cooling. N.O.T.H.I.N.G. Yet, occasionally, like September 10, 2001, they happen to mention trillions have somehow disappeared. Where did those trillion$ go? I betcha they went into digging underground shelters for the coming extinction event solar minimum. The weather does not have to be what kills, starvation from economic collapse, plus an EMP or storms so violent crops don't get to harvest or trucks don't have fuel.... a violent disruption of society is what can kill 90% quite effectively. Fear of the weather will panic the herd....
    Remember the phrase, "useless eaters?" The elite want us gone.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  30. #790
    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    If you haven't run into him yet, look up Paul Stamets. IIRC, that is the correct spelling. I have several of his books. He also has a good interview with that guy who used to do MMA fighting..can't remember his name..I'll try to find it.

    ETA: Joe Rogan. Here is a link, but I don't recall this specific interview - might have only seen a section, originally (no time right now), it is 2 plus hrs runtime.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPqWstVnRjQ
    Thanks, Faroe. Paul Stamets is amazing! I will be watching his vids and reading his books for a few months. Nobody replied to my post yesterday and I was hoping someone would. We don't have long to figure these things out.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

  31. #791
    Join Date
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    Yes, I think this is how they are going to do it. Or that is their plan. Good grief, this IS their plan, isn't it?


    WWG1WGA

    “Hope has two beautiful daughters; their names are Anger and Courage. Anger at the way things are, and Courage to see that they do not remain as they are.”
    St. Augustine of Hippo

  32. #792
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    Remember the phrase, "useless eaters?" The elite want us gone.

    von Koehler
    The problem is, I've never run into any of the "elite" who can clean their own toilets, much less plant, weed, harvest and store a crop, or milk a cow 2x a day and make butter and cheese. Most here know iit's nowhere near as easy as you might think, watching The Little House on the Prairie, and being a billionaire who thinks you're better than the peons you hire doesn't lend itself to working 15 hour days to learn.

    The thing is... they look down on farmers and plumbers and people who can maintain and repair stuff, believing that they do the jobs because of strong muscles, not being averse to getting dirty, and a very high boredom threshold. All of which is true... but they also (mostly) pay these people for their knowlege base and troubleshooting skills, and you dont get there overnight.

    Also... these days, those considered "the best" in various fields actually tend to be those who toe the party line and sell the corporations products. For several decades now, FFA "Star Farmer" award winners (high school kids) are those who were able to get the biggest loans and leverage themselves into debt, not those who found innovative ways to produce healthy food.

    Summerthyme

  33. #793


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xftDnvJoRqY

    14:14 minutes

    Krakatau volcano in continuous eruption, 5th August 2018 - 4K Resolution [just an example of the many volcanoes reawakening world wide.]

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  34. #794
    Join Date
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    Summerthyme, I know what you mean but these people have been gaming this since at least the 1980's. They have figured out what slots need to be filled, through the whole spectrum, and they are picking enough minds to account for those who die naturally while underground. They need the know how to survive, the best minds, the teachers, the scientists, farmers - especially farmers because they have to grow the food for a vastly depopulated earth but food HAS to be grown. There have to be doctors, nurses, lab technicians, pharmacists, dietitians, ear-nose-throat specialists, butchers and bakers, mid-wives, auto mechanics, engine designers, airplane pilots, aircraft mechanics.... They've had a long time and a huge budget to figure out the society they want to have when they come out of the ground and I bet it will favor a repressive regime with few at the top and the rest of the survivors are workers.

    ETA: Those of us on top that do survive will make good additions to those they've picked out to populate their new world - we'll make good laborers, skilled and unskilled workers to do all those necessary but tedious jobs that just have to be done but "not by them, cause they're special". The GA Guidestones tell the tale: They want about 500 million to populate the earth (to serve them) and this GSM is their depopulation event to make it happen.
    Last edited by rolenrock; 08-12-2018 at 04:45 PM. Reason: edited to add a thought

  35. #795
    http://www.breadandbutterscience.com...dness_Plan.pdf

    Solar “Grand Minima” Preparedness Plan i.e. Little Ice Age Preparedness.

    A 42 page .pdf with useful preps designed for a colder world.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  36. #796
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    Remember the phrase, "useless eaters?" The elite want us gone.

    von Koehler
    It is entirely mutual- I assure you.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

  37. #797
    Quote Originally Posted by rolenrock View Post
    Summerthyme, I know what you mean but these people have been gaming this since at least the 1980's. They have figured out what slots need to be filled, through the whole spectrum, and they are picking enough minds to account for those who die naturally while underground. They need the know how to survive, the best minds, the teachers, the scientists, farmers - especially farmers because they have to grow the food for a vastly depopulated earth but food HAS to be grown. There have to be doctors, nurses, lab technicians, pharmacists, dietitians, ear-nose-throat specialists, butchers and bakers, mid-wives, auto mechanics, engine designers, airplane pilots, aircraft mechanics.... They've had a long time and a huge budget to figure out the society they want to have when they come out of the ground and I bet it will favor a repressive regime with few at the top and the rest of the survivors are workers.

    ETA: Those of us on top that do survive will make good additions to those they've picked out to populate their new world - we'll make good laborers, skilled and unskilled workers to do all those necessary but tedious jobs that just have to be done but "not by them, cause they're special". The GA Guidestones tell the tale: They want about 500 million to populate the earth (to serve them) and this GSM is their depopulation event to make it happen.
    That's a mighty long list of people these people "need" to do all that work. I can manage with a few simple tools in a small cabin and I am almost entirely self sufficient. I am comfortable, clean, healthy, happy, spiritually fulfilled, at peace, and eat quite well. Where we diverge is my humility and willingness to do anything it takes to get things done and not shunt it off on somebody else because I think I am better than them. That attitude needs to be scoured from the earth. It would be my pleasure to contribute my part to geting it done. These "people" are not worthy of the air they waste. Life is 90% attitude. Theirs is very poor, indeed.
    No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson

    Mo is my One.

  38. #798


    If you look at the actual historical record, each previous collapse led to a new structuring of society.

    A Grand Reset follows a Grand Solar Minimum; note the periods of starvation.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  39. #799
    [What this study is about the effect of a fast solar stream would have on existing space satellites-not good-and recommendations to beef up shielding. While that would be helpful for future satellites it means that existing satellites are extremely vulnerable. von Koehler]

    https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley....9/2018SW001948

    Space Weather

    Research Article

    Realistic worst case for a severe space weather event driven by a fast solar wind stream

    Richard B. Horne Mark W. Phillips Sarah A Glauert Nigel P. Meredith Alex D. P. Hands Keith A. Ryden Wen Li

    First published: 10 August 2018 https://doi.org/10.1029/2018SW001948

    Please cite this article as doi: 10.1029/2018sw001948

    Abstract

    Satellite [electrical] charging is one of the most important risks for satellites on orbit. Satellite charging can lead to an electrostatic discharge (ESD) resulting in component damage, phantom commands, loss of service and in exceptional cases total satellite loss. Here we construct a realistic worst case for a fast solar wind stream event lasting 5 days or more and use a physical model to calculate the maximum electron flux greater than 2 MeV for geostationary orbit. We find that the flux tends towards a value of 106 cm−2 s−1 sr−1 after 5 days and remains high for another 5 days. The resulting flux is comparable to a 1 in 150 year event found from an independent statistical analysis of electron data. Approximately 2.5 mm of Al shielding would be required to reduce the internal charging current to below the NASA recommended guidelines, much more than is currently used. Thus we would expect many satellites to report ESD anomalies during such an event with a strong likelihood of service outage and total satellite loss. We conclude that satellites at geostationary orbit are more likely to be at risk from fast solar wind stream event than a Carrington type storm.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  40. #800
    [The Grand Solar Minimum is NOT limited to Winter storms; its effects are experienced all year long. Besides the weather, diminished solarwinds allow more cosmic rays to effect the Earth, leading to more earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.]

    https://watchers.news/2018/08/13/the...ugust-12-2018/

    [As predicted, hail storms are increasing in frequency, range, and severity.]

    Costly hailstorms are increasing in the United States, with the average year now accumulating $8 to $10 billion in hail damage, Bryan Wood of Capital Weather Gang reports.

    Additionally, hailstorms account for 70% of the insured loss from severe storms. In 2017 alone, there were two $2 billion hailstorms, one in Denver and the other in Minneapolis.

    [Meanwhile some regions are suffering severe droughts]


    Nearly 900 wildfires erupted in Texas this year, state on pace for worst wildfire year since 2011.

    While the fires raging in California have garnered national attention and help from fire departments across the country, Texas is on pace to see the highest number of wildfires in the state in seven years, according to Texas A&M Forest Service data.

    As of August 9, the Forest Service tallied 893 wildfires in Texas in 2018. That’s higher than the number of wildfires in each year from 2012 through 2017 - save 2013, which had 899 fires.

    [While other areas have torrential rains, leading to flooding]

    Flash flood sweeps away nearly a dozen cars in New Jersey.

    Heavy rain that swept through New Jersey on August 11, flooded roads and homes and sent cars from a Passaic County dealership floating into a bridge.

    The highest rainfall totals were reported in Bergen, Essex and Passaic counties, according to preliminary numbers. Caldwell topped the list with 124.9 mm (4.92 inches).

    [1906 was during the Centional Minimum]

    112-year-old record for lowest maximum high temperature broken in Texas
    An impressive 112-year-old record for the lowest maximum high temperature of 25.5 °C (78 °F) was set at Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, TX on August 11, 2018.

    The previous record was 26.1 °C (79 °F), set back in 1906.

    Wildfires in U.S. burned 22.6 million ha (5.58 million acres) so far in 2018
    As of August 11, the National Fire Information Center (NFIC) reported wildfires had burned more than 22.6 million (5.58 million) acres.

    This year’s fires have burned about 28% more area than the 10-year average for the year to date of 4.36 million acres.

    Six new large fires were reported Saturday, and the total number of fires now burning has risen to 103
    Last edited by von Koehler; 08-13-2018 at 01:32 PM.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

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