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The Grand Solar Minimum
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  1. #3681
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    Well, that went well....sigh.....

  2. #3682
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    More of the impacts of the Midwest flooding coming out:

    https://www.agweb.com/article/heres-...from-flooding/

    Here’s What to Watch in the Markets from Flooding

    March 22, 2019 03:29 PM

    While devastating flooding takes place in the Midwest it has a ripple effect on the market. Full losses in livestock and grain are not yet known—and could take even a year to uncover—but there are key factors to watch in the market even now.

    1. Ethanol: “Pay attention to what’s taking place with ethanol capacity,” says Angie Setzer, vice president of grain for Citizens LLC in Michigan. “A good percent of production is offline or damaged in the short-term and because of that we did see ethanol futures jump mid-week and help margins for plants not effected.”

    2. Logistics: “They can’t ship grain if rail is damaged,” Setzer says. “There are significant logistic disruptions and how that plays out is yet to be seen and it could affect basis. The Mississippi River is expected to see major flooding and it’s a significant grain mover—what does that mean for export ability.”

    3. Destroyed stored grain: “The million-dollar question is how much grain storage is impacted and what does that mean,” she says. “You can’t blend off flooded grain. Nebraska stored grain in bags at record levels, how much of that has been lost? Nebraska is estimating $440 million in crop losses.”

    While the weather might not have a big effect on the markets yet, it likely will.

    “It’s definitely going to come into play, for one, I’ve been saying since November there is no way we’ll get to 94 million corn acres because of fall field work,” Setzer says. “We needed a warm, dry spring to get caught up and we didn’t get it—we had the exact opposite.”

  3. #3683
    Yeah. Too bad, really. It's almost depressing, isn't it?

    Lots of things seem to be going not so well lately.

    Maybe it's a general condition. Some sort of GSM vibes maybe?

    Got my big shopping done this morning and will have to do the small-town part of it on Monday when the bank is open. When I drove through there this morning I saw that the guy has put out eight more of the 30-gallon white barrels. I had to force myself to realize that I do NOT need more barrels! Rather, I need to buy more good soil for the last ones I got. And I still don't know when any of them are going to be cut in half. I may have to start working on them on my own, one at a time, just to reassure myself.

    There was one cryptogram book left at Walmart so I grabbed it and now I have something new to waste a few days on, now that there's rain in the forecast again.
    -----
    Will be very interesting to see how badly this flooding has affected everything, once we find out how the market is going to react.

  4. #3684
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    More issues that will affect grain prices and availability:

    https://www.thegazette.com/subject/n...rmers-20190323

    Swollen Mississippi adds headaches for grain farmers

    'This isn't going to be cured by the end of March'



    Minneapolis Star Tribune



    High water and strong currents on the lower Mississippi River are squeezing barge traffic and driving up the cost of agricultural shipping.

    As the snow melts in the Upper Midwest and flows into the waterway, barge traffic has been expected to slow even more, further limiting the movement of grain south and fertilizer north.

    “High water is slowing transit, it’s limiting tow sizes, speeds are reduced. It creates some safety risks,” said John Griffith, senior vice president of global grain at Minnesota-based CHS Inc.

    “When everything’s slower and everything’s more dangerous, it consumes more resources, and frankly we haven’t gotten to the real spring thaw that’s going to come and pump a bunch more water into the Mississippi River basin.”

    A towboat moving six barges crashed into a shipyard 60 miles upriver from New Orleans two weeks ago, and the U.S. Coast Guard closed the Mississippi River to all traffic near Baton Rouge for several hours on March 14 after a towboat sank in the swollen river.

    No one was injured.

    Barge companies, which usually can tow 40 barges at a time on the southern stretch of the Mississippi River, have reduced tow sizes to 25 to 30 barges.

    Also, the Coast Guard was allowing only southbound barge traffic during daylight hours this past week at Memphis, Tenn.; Vicksburg, Miss.; and Baton Rouge.

    This may persist for the rest of March, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s weekly Grain Transportation Report, released late last week.

    Earlier this month, grain movement by barge was down 58 percent compared with the same week in 2018, and the “less than ideal conditions” have driven up freight rates by more than 50 percent over the past three weeks, according to the report.

    Sediment and headaches

    Though the Upper Mississippi still was closed for the winter as far south as Dubuque as of midweek, the higher cost of shipping is driving down local grain prices for farmers.

    “When it becomes more and more difficult to move grain out your back door, grain handlers are less and less willing to accept grain through their front door,” said Mike Steenhoek, executive director of the Soy Transportation Coalition.

    “The delivery locations will offer farmers less for their soybeans.”

    The deluge of water hitting the southern Mississippi also has been carrying with it huge amounts of sediment, Steenhoek said — so even though the water is high, the depth of the river is shallower in places, which further restricts how much grain can move down river.

    “Normally you have about a 45-foot depth, but now we’re at 41 feet because of all this sediment,” Steenhoek said of the lower Mississippi. “Every foot amounts to about 71,000 bushels of soybeans.”

    Griffith, the CHS executive, said he was in New Orleans this past week and saw water from the Mississippi rushing into Lake Pontchartrain through the gates designed to release excess water.

    “This isn’t going to be cured by the end of March. I think we’ve got a crest estimated for early April,” Griffith said. “We’ve got another month of these conditions to navigate, no pun intended.”

    The backup is a headache for farmers because many planned to sell grain before they start preparing their fields and planting.

    Grain handlers lowering the price they offer to farmers is only one potential problem.

    “Worse yet, they may even go no bid because they’re plugged up,” Griffith said. “We’ve been struggling to sell grain to China and you add some of these frustrations on top of it, you know, it’s just a challenging time in the industry.”

    While the Ohio River reopened for traffic on Monday, several locks there had been closed after the river between Cincinnati and Evansville, Ind., reached its highest level since 1997.

    On March 15, the Coast Guard closed a portion of the Missouri River from just south of Omaha to St. Joseph, Mo., because of high water and dangerous currents. The Coast Guard also requested shippers create “as minimal wake as possible” between St. Joseph and Kansas City to minimize levee damage.

    A real crunch’

    Spring conditions on the Mississippi River tend to always be complicated for shipping, but this spring is worse than normal, said Al Kluis, a commodity broker in Wayzata, Minn.

    “I think it’s extreme this year,” he said.

    Some grain is starting to be routed to the Pacific Northwest by rail or to ports near Houston, Kluis said.

    After they’re unloaded in New Orleans, barges full of grain are typically filled with fertilizer in the spring for the trip back north to the Midwest.

    Fertilizer shipping likely will be restricted by river conditions, too.

    “There’s already potential for a real crunch in fertilizer prices and delivery this spring because there wasn’t much fall field work done and there wasn’t much fertilizer put on,” Kluis said.

    Record and near-record February snowfall in Wisconsin and Minnesota, which is just now thawing, should keep river levels high, and another thing farmers will have to deal with this spring is severely damaged gravel roads, said Steenhoek of the Soy Transportation Council.

    “With the rain and the melt, gravel roads don’t co-exist well,” he said. “It’s just the fact that you need to replace it.”

  5. #3685
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Yeah. Too bad, really. It's almost depressing, isn't it?

    Lots of things seem to be going not so well lately.

    Maybe it's a general condition. Some sort of GSM vibes maybe?

    Got my big shopping done this morning and will have to do the small-town part of it on Monday when the bank is open. When I drove through there this morning I saw that the guy has put out eight more of the 30-gallon white barrels. I had to force myself to realize that I do NOT need more barrels! Rather, I need to buy more good soil for the last ones I got. And I still don't know when any of them are going to be cut in half. I may have to start working on them on my own, one at a time, just to reassure myself.

    There was one cryptogram book left at Walmart so I grabbed it and now I have something new to waste a few days on, now that there's rain in the forecast again.
    -----
    Will be very interesting to see how badly this flooding has affected everything, once we find out how the market is going to react.

    Yes, it really is. Kinda sad and a bit depressing, indeed. FYI, my PM seems a little wonky since last night, I have no idea why....likely it's on my end.

    Funny you mention barrels, we have 4 rain barrels that we're going to cut in half for planting, and those are really hard material. We've had such heavy rain of late, that they can mess with drainage and just plain get in the way. Big old cattle troughs do just fine if we need them.

    But we're needing to get soil, too, for the barrels and our raised beds. Lots.

    I think we're just beginning to see what is going to happen with grain products. What's lost is lost, but I don't think they'll be able to plant this season in many places in the Midwest. Our farmer down the highway that lost all his cotton and sorghum this past year has not been able to get in to work his acreage. I don't think he's alone. By now we should be seeing crop growth well under way...but nothing.

    ETA: I think we're helping with another's search for relevant articles. And I think I'm going to have to make use of the ignore feature or I'll get an ulcer...that'll make two (on ignore, not ulcers!).

  6. #3686
    Guys... if you havent, PLEASE look at some links for Earthboxes, and plans to adapt your own containers! Once you understand the very simple concept, you can convert (with a bit of redneck engineering) almost any container.

    They have a large water reservoir (you drill a hole to drain off extra so the plant roots are never drowning, even if you have the container outside in heavy rain. They take HALF the soil they would otherwise. Mine usually need their water reservoirs topped off once a week in our hottest weather.

    Another tip... if you don't want to change a deep pot into an Earthbox type container, fill the bottom 1/3 to 1/2 with tose styrofoam packing peanuts. Provides good drainage and makes the whole pot much lighter in weight, pkus saves money on potting soil. Just make sure you don't have the biodegradable "peanuts" made from cornstarch! If you aren't sure, get one wet... if it dissolves, it's not styrofoam.

    And one more... because our lives during the growing season are busy and hectic, I've always struggled with keeping potted plants alive in the heat of summer. However, between Earthboxes and discovering "water holder" polymer crystals, it's become much easier.

    https://www.amazon.com/Medium-absorb...gateway&sr=8-5

    These crystals (you may be able to find a better price per pound if you look, but a little goes a long way) absorb a huge amount of water, and then slowly release it into the soil. It's the best wsy I've found to keep an even moisture level even in hot, dry and windy weather.

    Summerthyme

  7. #3687
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    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    Guys... if you havent, PLEASE look at some links for Earthboxes, and plans to adapt your own containers! Once you understand the very simple concept, you can convert (with a bit of redneck engineering) almost any container.

    They have a large water reservoir (you drill a hole to drain off extra so thecplant roots are never drowning, even if you have the container outside in heavy rain. They take HALF the soil they would otherwise. Mine usually need their water reservoirs topped off once a week in our hottest weather.

    Another tip... if you don't want to change a deep pot into an Earthbox type container, fill the b9tt9m 1/3 to 1/2 with tgose styrofoam packing peanuts. Provides good drainage and makes the whole pot much lighter in weight, pkus savescmoney on potting soil. Just make sure you don't have the biodegradable "peanuts" made from cornstarch! If you aren't sure, get one wet... if it dissolves, it's not styrofoam.

    And one more... because our lives during the growing season are busy and hectic, I've always struggled with keeping potted plants alive in the heat of summer. However, between Earthboxes and discovering "water holder" polymer crystals, it's become much easier.

    https://www.amazon.com/Medium-absorb...gateway&sr=8-5

    These crystals (you may be able to find a better price per pound if you look, but a little goes a long way) absorb a huge amount of water, and then slowly release it into the soil. It's the best wsy I've found to keep an even moisture level even in hit, dry and windy weather.

    Summerthyme
    Thanks, Summerthyme! Excellent info and darn near perfect timing for us :-)

  8. #3688
    Well, I'm not going to use this forum's ignore function but I'm going to be exercising my own personal Don't Give a S---" function. Not that I contribute to anyone else's searches, but I certainly do care about your efforts.

    At this stage of things, I don't really need any more charts and graphs. But I do like to know the latest on weather, crops and the related markets, so there's still a lot of good info here. I wish I could actually contribute, but I have no agricultural experience of any kind and so have no clue what I'd even look for.

    Therefore, multiple thanks to any and all who post all the GSM related articles here, as well as their own personal doings.

    Also, I do realize that many here are busy with outdoor spring activities chores and may not be posting nearly as much for a while.

  9. #3689
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Well, I'm not going to use this forum's ignore function but I'm going to be exercising my own personal Don't Give a S---" function. Not that I contribute to anyone else's searches, but I certainly do care about your efforts.

    At this stage of things, I don't really need any more charts and graphs. But I do like to know the latest on weather, crops and the related markets, so there's still a lot of good info here. I wish I could actually contribute, but I have no agricultural experience of any kind and so have no clue what I'd even look for.

    Therefore, multiple thanks to any and all who post all the GSM related articles here, as well as their own personal doings.

    Also, I do realize that many here are busy with outdoor spring activities chores and may not be posting nearly as much for a while.
    You are a very strong person! I know people can certainly tell the date and time articles are posted on any site, and it becomes obvious quickly. We have a smart group of people on the forum, and they will notice what is going on.

    Internet research has been something I've generally done well over the years, it was useful for work and I enjoy it....kind of finding a needle in a haystack kind of thing. Must be the family LE background, it's just a deep investigation but for news. It's out there, the trick is to find it. Love a mystery!

    While the historical charts are interesting, I think the bigger concerns have to be what is going on now and how we will all be affected by events we cannot control. All we can do is read, learn, and try to stay ahead of it as much as possible. Everyone's gardens and pantry work has to take priority, it would seem more and more we're going down that dark road.

  10. #3690
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    Thanks for the info on Earthboxes, Summerthyme! I think we've finally decided for sure (subject to hubby changing his mind again, lol) to let our garden space rest this year. We have a couple of long raised beds in a different area that we've been letting rest the past couple of years and we'll plant in them, but I was just thinking earlier this afternoon about doing more container gardening too.

    Oh, and thank you to all who post info here! I'm afraid I've been so busy with everyday life and circumstances here that, although I knew about the flooding, it didn't connect about how it would affect food production and pricing. You're opened my eyes!
    Visit my Etsy shop at www.etsy.com/shop/TheCrochetFarm

    If we aren't showing love, His love, then what are we doing calling ourselves Christians?

    Psalm 73: 25 Whom have I in heaven but you?
    And earth has nothing I desire besides you.
    26 My flesh and my heart may fail, but God is the strength of my heart
    and my portion forever.

  11. #3691
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    Another article on the devastating floods in the Midwest:

    https://www.mercurynews.com/2019/03/...away-by-flood/

    By The Washington Post |

    March 23, 2019 at 2:48 pm

    By Annie Gowen and Frances Stead Sellers | The Washington Post

    SIDNEY, Iowa — His farm is still cut off by floodwaters, so Iowa soybean farmer Pat Sheldon had to view the damage from the air. On a helicopter ride over what seemed like an endless stretch of water, he came to a place he recognized as his own land — and saw that one of the grain silos had burst open, spilling yellow soybeans into the dingy, toxic water.

    “It was like a punch in the gut,” Sheldon said.

    “You work hard planting, taking care of these beans and harvesting them. Then, to have that happen makes you almost physically ill,” he said. “But I haven’t had time to get mad — too many responsibilities and people that still need help.”

    Although the water has yet to recede enough for a true examination, Sheldon says more than $350,000 of his corn and soybeans are in jeopardy, and he worries he may lose the farm that’s been in his family for generations.

    Before the terrible “bomb cyclone” sent warm rain down on frozen ground, resulting in catastrophic flooding throughout the Midwest and displacing thousands, American farmers were already struggling after several seasons of low commodity prices and the continuing trade war with China. In towns along the overflowing Mississippi and Missouri rivers, farmers are seeing their crops — and their futures — swept away by floodwaters.

    In Nebraska, Gov. Pete Ricketts, R, has called the flooding “the most widespread destruction we have ever seen in our state’s history.” Iowa has more than 100,000 acres of farmland still underwater. Officials from both states say the damage estimates are more than $1 billion and counting.

    “It’s devastating for a lot of these folks, there’s no doubt about it,” said Jeff Jorgenson, a farmer and board member of the Iowa Soybean Association. “Essentially, it’s two years of negative; these farmers lost what was stored in the bins and won’t be able to plant next year’s crop. So it’s going to be really tough for a lot of people.”

    But, he added, “if we get the opportunity, we’ll go to work.”

    Some farmers had more soybeans in storage this year than normal, according to Frayne Olson, a crop economist and marketing specialist with North Dakota State University. The government estimates there are more than 3.7 billion bushels of soybeans still in storage — a record — partly because Chinese purchases of the grain have plummeted in recent months during the ongoing tariff war.

    Iowa farmers have about 528 bushels in storage, up 8 percent from the previous year, while Nebraska had 13 percent more grain stored, according to the U.S. Agriculture Department’s estimate.

    “A lot of farmers have not been selling, hoping for better prices and some kind of trade agreement,” Olson said.

    As floodwaters are receding across some parts of the Midwest, new threats loom.

    The Missouri River is continuing its destructive course south into Missouri where Gov. Mike Parson, R, declared a state of emergency, as governors have already done in Iowa, Wisconsin and hard-hit Nebraska.

    The river is expected to crest this weekend in Atchison, Kanas, and state officials urged residents of at-risk towns to evacuate.

    Threats are emerging from the north over the next week, where warm temperatures are causing snow to melt rapidly in the Dakotas and Minnesota, releasing vast quantities of water into streams and rivers, meaning some areas will have little chance to dry out before a new deluge arrives.

    In Sioux Falls, S.D., the Big Sioux River is expected to have two crests — one late Monday and another on Friday. The Mississippi will likely peak later in the week in St. Paul, Minn. Ten miles to the south, the city of Cottage Grove declared an emergency in anticipation of flooding from the river, which is expected to peak there on March 30.

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration warned people to prepare for a prolonged disaster.

    “The stage is set for record flooding now through May,” said Mary C. Erickson, deputy director of NOAA’s National Weather Service. Edward Clark, director of NOAA’s National Water Center called it “potentially an unprecedented flood season.”

    There are some 40,000 soybean farmers in Iowa. In the past several years, 1 in 3 rows of soybeans have been sent to China, meaning farmers were heavily impacted after China virtually stopped buying American soybeans last year, according to the Iowa Soybean Association.

    But some of the farmers who gathered Thursday at the Silver Spur Bar and Grill in Iowa’s Fremont County — a population of about 7,400 — didn’t want to talk about tariffs, saying they felt their plight was being used to fuel political debate on cable news shows and by Washington.

    “We like what the president’s doing,” Sheldon said. “As the farmer sees it, we’ve had times a lot worse for grain prices as we’ve got right now. We know China’s been screwing us for years, not only on farm products but on technology. We know we can duck our heads and pull our boots on and get through this, and, in the long run, the whole country is going to be better off.”

    The farmers said they were more concerned with the way the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was handling the management of the river. They said they received little warning from the Corps before levees breached and their land was flooded, and many did not have time to move their grain to safety.

    “Our story is that we’re devastated. We’re faced with losing a whole year’s income, maybe two,” said Brian Johnson, 57. “We’ve got a problem with the way the river is being managed. How are we going to recover? How can we keep our land and continue to farm?”

    The Army Corps of Engineers has long been criticized for a plan to control the Missouri River that farmers say prioritizes wildlife protection over flood control. A federal claims court judge ruled last year that Corps policies contributed to some flooding. After touring flood damage in Missouri last week, Parson said it was time to “re-evaluate” the Corps’ management of the Missouri River.

    A spokesman for the Corps’ office in Omaha did not return calls for comment.

    “We’ve had no real communication from the Corps of Engineers since this started,” said Mike Crecelius, the emergency management coordinator for Fremont County.

    He estimates that there have been 14 breaches in their levees alone, causing $147 million in damage — more than a $100 million from farm crops and equipment.

    “It’s been one big nightmare,” he said.

    Sellers reported from Washington.

  12. #3692
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    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out today, it should be interesting:

    How Much Food Prices Will Rise After Midwest USA Floods (804)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQyH1FM9Yy8

    Run time is 15:25

    Synopsis: "The biggest floods to hit the USA Midwest crop growing belts since 1993 and 1927, this appears to be the largest event ever recorded in that area of North America in the last 150 years. Since the trade war with China, more 6.7 billion bushels in storage of the 17 billion bushels total has been lost due to flooding and contamination. Going by 1993 price rises after the flood a jump of 30% at the minimum is forecast. Global grain production down 7% over the last two years and poor conditions in the fields will make refilling the silos difficult at best."

  13. #3693
    Thanks for posting this podcast. This one dealt with corn, wheat and soy.

    I think it's time for me to stock up on chicken feed while I still can, even though I don't have chickens yet. I plan to order the chicks tomorrow when I go to my small nearby town.

    I wish he'd do another podcast that would deal with the same information for things like peas, beans and rice.

  14. #3694
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Thanks for posting this podcast. This one dealt with corn, wheat and soy.

    I think it's time for me to stock up on chicken feed while I still can, even though I don't have chickens yet. I plan to order the chicks tomorrow when I go to my small nearby town.

    I wish he'd do another podcast that would deal with the same information for things like peas, beans and rice.
    You're welcome! I haven't listened to it yet, we went out to do shopping mid-morning and visiting family, and we just got home.

    We're thinking a lot alike again :-) I'd like to get in as much chicken feed as we can. Cracked corn down here is running about $10/50 lb bag and scratch and whole oats are about $13, but chick feed and layer feed is way, way up depending on the brand. $18/50 lb bag is about average. I don't guess it's going down anytime soon.

    I'm grateful the grass is coming in now, so we'll be weaning the cattle off cubes soon and they're beginning to ignore hay, which means the grass is good. Now, if we can just avoid drought or flooding, it will be a good year. Last year we had both, so I'm guessing it'll be the same again.

  15. #3695
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    Here's an interesting article out of China on grain futures as a result of the Midwest flooding. It's a slightly different take on what's happening with prices, and there is a bit of language issue, but the gist of it does seem to say prices are headed higher.

    http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/201..._137918623.htm

    U.S. corn futures higher amid data, flood concerns

    Source: Xinhua| 2019-03-24 03:26:43|Editor: Mu Xuequan

    CHICAGO, March 23 (Xinhua) -- Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) crop futures traded mixed in the trading week ending on March 22, with corn rising sharply over flood concerns and data.

    The most active corn for May delivery was up 5 cents, or 1.34 percent weekly, to settle at 3.7825 U.S. dollars per bushel. May wheat was up 3.75 cents, or 0.81 percent, to close at 4.66 dollars. March soybeans were down 5.5 cents, or 0.6 percent, to settle at 9.0375 dollar per bushel.

    Heavy rain and rapidly melting snow have caused flooding that impacted many areas in the U.S. Midwest, with the farming states of Nebraska and Iowa hitting hardest.

    On Thursday, U.S. President of Donald Trump declared that a major disaster exists in the State of Nebraska and ordered federal aid to supplement state, tribal, and local recovery efforts.

    CBOT corn rose more than 1 percent on the same day amid additional concerns that flooding could also delay corn planting.

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed on Friday sales by private exporters of 300,000 metric tons of corn for delivery to China during the 2018/19 marketing year, which began on Sept. 1.

    Traders anticipate that China will purchase more U.S. agricultural products, including corn, as part of a trade deal being negotiated by the two countries.

    As for CBOT wheat, an agreement with Brazil, along with possible damage from the flooding, boosted the grain notably this week.

    U.S. President Donald Trump and visiting Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro on Tuesday made a number of trade-related commitments. One of them is that Brazil will import every year 750,000 metric tons of U.S. wheat free of duty.

    The trade deal pushed up CBOT wheat futures as it will offer new export opportunity for U.S. wheat, as foreign wheat usually faces a 10-percent duty in Brazil unless it's grown in fellow Mercosur countries.

    Flooding also damaged some soft red wheat in the southern Midwest and Mississippi Delta, said market watchers, helped support CBOT wheat prices.

    CBOT soybeans saw a relatively quiet trading week and the market now awaits a report on prospective plantings and quarterly grain stocks on Friday.

    The market is positioned for record large soybean stocks and a decline in 2019 soybean planting intentions, according to the Chicago-based agricultural research firm AgResource.

  16. #3696
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    More on the Midwest flooding and effects going forward; please follow the link to see the graphics:

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-...me-apocalyptic

    200 Million People At Risk: National Weather Service Warns Worse To Come In Apocalyptic Midwest Floods

    by Tyler Durden

    Mon, 03/25/2019 - 10:54

    Authored by Michael Snyder via The End of The American Dream blog,

    The flooding that just struck the middle part of the country was the worst blow to U.S. farmers in decades, but now the National Weather Service is telling us that it was just “a preview of what we expect throughout the rest of the spring”.

    Can that possibly be true?

    After the immense devastation that we have already witnessed, how much worse can the flooding possibly get? Already we have seen thousands of homes and farms be completely destroyed, and we are being told that the total economic damage is in the billions of dollars. Sadly, the truth is that a lot worse is still yet to come. Thanks to a very snowy winter, a massive amount of snow is going to melt during the next several weeks, and that alone would produce tremendous flooding. But on top of all of that melting snow, forecasters are telling us that it will be a very rainy spring. In fact, the Weather Channel is warning that there will be “above-average precipitation across much of the Lower 48” over the next three months, and one meteorologist is forecasting that it is “not looking like we are going to see any dry stretches anytime soon”. And this is on top of all of the very heavy rainfall that has been falling in recent weeks. At this point, the Mississippi River basin has already gotten “three times as much rainfall as in a normal year”.

    Even without any additional flooding, U.S. food production would be way down this year. The recent flooding is going to keep thousands of farmers from planting crops on time, and thousands of others are not going to be able to use their fields at all.

    But when you factor in what is going to happen over the next three months, we are talking about an agricultural disaster of unprecedented magnitude in modern American history.

    At this moment, some areas in the Upper Midwest still have “more than 20 inches of snow” on the ground…

    In the eastern Dakotas and Minnesota, more than 20 inches of snow remains on the ground. The Missouri, Ohio, and Mississippi Rivers drain the central United States, but it takes several weeks for the water to travel downstream. In the meantime, emergency officials are warning local residents to make evacuation plans as well as purchase flood insurance in certain areas.

    All of that water has to go somewhere, and authorities are warning that 200 million people are at risk…

    The record-setting floods deluging the Midwest are about to get a lot worse. Fueled by rapidly melting snowpack and a forecast of more rainstorms in the next few weeks, federal officials warn that 200 million people in 25 states face a risk through May.

    A lot of people out there seem to think that the flooding will just be isolated to the major rivers, but that is simply not true.

    Yes, all-time flooding records will continue to be shattered along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, but the National Weather Service is telling us that nearly “the entire eastern two-thirds of the nation” will be dealing with flooding this spring…

    Almost the entire eastern two-thirds of the nation should see flooding this spring, National Weather Service deputy director Mary Erickson said at a news conference on Thursday. Some 25 states are forecast to see “moderate” to “major” flooding, the weather service said.

    The Midwest floods are “a preview of what we expect throughout the rest of the spring,” she said. “The flooding this year could be worse than what we have seen in previous years … even worse than the historic floods we saw in 1993 and 2011,” Erickson added.

    Are you starting to get the picture?

    This is the worst case scenario for U.S. flooding that surpasses all previous worst case scenarios. Thousands more farms will be destroyed. Billions of dollars worth of additional damage will be done to our agricultural industry. Food production is going to come up way short, and we are all going to experience tremendous pain at the supermarket as food prices skyrocket.

    If you live in any of the following areas, you need to have your emergency plan ready, because things are about to get really, really bad…

    The areas under the highest risk of moderate to major flooding, according to NOAA, are the upper, middle and lower Mississippi River basins, including the mainstem Mississippi River, Red River of the North, Great Lakes, eastern Missouri River, lower Ohio River, lower Cumberland River and Tennessee River basins.

    U.S. farmers have already lost millions upon millions of bushels of wheat, corn and soybeans to the flooding that has already happened. As I have repeatedly stressed, our planet is changing, weather patterns are becoming more severe, and even if they understood what is happening there is absolutely nothing that the radical environmentalists can do to stop it.

    Just look at what is happening on the other side of the world. Australia was just hit by a “severe category 3 cyclone”, and this came exactly one day after it was hit by a category 4 cyclone…

    A severe category 3 cyclone blew into the key mining region of Pilbara in Western Australia Sunday, forcing evacuations and a halt to port operations, as the north of the country dealt with the effects of an even more powerful storm that hit the previous day.

    Cyclone Veronica weakened from a category 4 storm before its core winds hit the coast near the mining centre of Port Hedland, but officials warned the system was slow moving and would continue pounding the region with gale force winds and heavy rain for 24 to 48 hours.

    We are witnessing things that we have never seen before, and “the new normal” is just going to keep getting stranger and stranger.

    If you live anywhere in the middle portion of the country, please take this flooding very seriously. Authorities are using apocalyptic language to describe this crisis, and they are not exaggerating the potential threat one bit.

  17. #3697
    My shopping list just got longer again.

  18. #3698
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    2,384
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    My shopping list just got longer again.
    I have my shopping list right next to me, and it's growing....

  19. #3699
    Same here with the shopping list...It's a living, ever-changing organism by now.

  20. #3700
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Same here with the shopping list...It's a living, ever-changing organism by now.
    I carry mine with me at all times, along with a pen, to add to it as things occur to me. Unfortunately, there are only 24 hours in a day, we are on a budget, and I don't have easy or frequent access to Lowe's/WM. Also, my previously sketchy health has fallen to a new low; basically, chronic plain all day, and most days, not just some days.

    Ugh.
    It is what it is.
    Stay sane guys!

  21. #3701
    My list is always in my purse, AKA "The Ol' Deathtrap", except often during the day it's alongside me on the kitchen table. I don't use a pen...just a pencil with a good eraser. And I've had to stop abbreviating on this list, since lately I often forget what the abbreviations are for.

    First Axiom for aging: Write EVERYTHING down. Corollary: Abbreviate NOTHING.

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