Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 24, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


The Grand Solar Minimum
+ Reply to Thread
Page 113 of 123 FirstFirst ... 13 63 103 111 112 113 114 115 ... LastLast
Results 4,481 to 4,520 of 4888
  1. #4481
    I don't know how much longer we'll try to keep this up... farming commercially is getting worse and worse in terms of trying to make a profit. But the homesteading makes more sense all the time... although I'm thinking we are going yo have to put up a 20 x 60 foot hoop house for our vegetables if this damned weather pattern continues. Sigh... if we were 20 years younger, it would be easier!
    ST - DH and I are discussing the same. We are trying to figure out if keeping the cow herd we have is worth it or not. 2 years of losses is hard to handle - and how long do you throw good money after bad?

  2. #4482
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    There's a great thread on the main about problems people are seeing at the local level. Well worth the read!

    http://www.timebomb2000.com/vb/showt...96#post7319396

  3. #4483
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out this evening:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8IfpPhLhMM

    Your Life is About to Change Are World Events Adding Up Yet (843)

    Run time is 19:14

    Published on Jun 18, 2019

    NASA comes out with a shocking announcement that starting in 2020 we will experience the lowest solar activity in 200 years, and global temperatures will drop. With this jet stream will shift creating new precipitation patterns and volcanic eruptions will cause even more of a feed back loop intensifying cooling and global crop losses

  4. #4484
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    Ice Age Farmer has a new podcast out this evening:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nun7ftprv6I

    Catastrophic Growing Seasons Worldwide - Grand Solar Minimum "Trainwreck"

    Run time is 16:19

    Published on Jun 18, 2019

    Farmers across the nation--and indeed the world--are calling out in unison about a catastrophic growing season. Many are "cold and wet." Others are suffering from violent hailstorms. All are more volatile as the growing zones shift. Ensure your family's food security going forward: start growing your own food today.

  5. #4485
    TxGal, thanks. I've been wiped out all day from shopping and unloading concrete blocks and was going to go to bed in a few minutes, but I do believe I need to listen to these podcasts first.

  6. #4486
    Quote Originally Posted by moldy View Post
    ST - DH and I are discussing the same. We are trying to figure out if keeping the cow herd we have is worth it or not. 2 years of losses is hard to handle - and how long do you throw good money after bad?
    TWO years? The last profitable year dairy farmers had was mid 2014... milk price has been runnimg below the cost of production since. We were incredibly blessed that God changed our timetable and forced us to sell the cows about 3-4 years before we'd planned... we sold at the peak of both beef and dairy.

    I suspect we'll look for the next decent peak and disperse our herd then. But God may have other plans...

    Summerthyme

  7. #4487
    Well, my post just got lost, which hasn't happened in a while. GRRR!

    I listened to the latest podcasts posted above and my post was basically EEEEK!

  8. #4488
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    TxGal, thanks. I've been wiped out all day from shopping and unloading concrete blocks and was going to go to bed in a few minutes, but I do believe I need to listen to these podcasts first.
    You're welcome. We've been doing as much as we can in the evening hours, last evening setting up raised beds. Our heat index is up in the low 100s, actual temps mid to upper 90s. It's wiping us out. I went to bed right after posting those, I'll listen this morning....they did look ominous.

  9. #4489
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out this morning:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6Cw_w1s6AE

    Hottest Temperatures on the Planet but Forget the Record & Snow Cold Please (844)

    Run time is 7:15

    Published on Jun 19, 2019

    Global media running with the headlines of "hottest global temperature" , today in this place even though it's not a heat record, then repeats with "hottest global temperature" in that place the next day not a record, all the while forgetting record cold and snow in 13 places in the US and Canada. A look at the 156 year global temperature record, flat line. Scary.

  10. #4490
    This morning's short podcast is mainly about how the media twists temp reporting to make it sound new and sensational.

    Now I'm going to listen again to the two that were posted here last night, and I'm going to have my shopping list right in front of me.

    I think I'm going back to town and buy every plastic oil change pan I can find. I have several now but they make excellent water saucers under the three-gallon black nursery pots, which I have a ton of because I bought stacks and stacks of them when a local nursery went out of business several years ago. I can grow lots of things in three gallon pots, if I can just find a place to set them up in the greenhouse.

  11. #4491
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    Yep, we're still reworking storage and shopping lists. I think the time has finally come and people are catching on. For heaven's sake, if the grocery prices don't wake them up they are lost.

    I'm reading the comments under last evenings ADAPT 2030 podcast, very interesting. Demand for dry goods and storable food is about to go way up, I think.

  12. #4492
    Finished re-listening to last night's two new podcasts. My brain is spinning almost painfully, trying to visualize a better way to stack things in my greenhouse so I can grow even more out there.

  13. #4493
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    First Coast
    Posts
    1,188
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    This morning's short podcast is mainly about how the media twists temp reporting to make it sound new and sensational.

    Now I'm going to listen again to the two that were posted here last night, and I'm going to have my shopping list right in front of me.

    I think I'm going back to town and buy every plastic oil change pan I can find. I have several now but they make excellent water saucers under the three-gallon black nursery pots, which I have a ton of because I bought stacks and stacks of them when a local nursery went out of business several years ago. I can grow lots of things in three gallon pots, if I can just find a place to set them up in the greenhouse.
    Not too long ago the TV weather personalities were dropping "heat index" from their temperature readings. The real temperature would be around 96 degrees with a heat index of 104. They would say "it's a 104 degrees out there folks, Global Warming is here!" I did a double take a couple of times before I caught on to what they were doing.

  14. #4494
    It's not just the news people who sensationalize. Average people do it, too. If someone has two thermometers in the shade of his house, he will tell you what the higher reading of the two is in the summer and the colder reading of the two in the winter.

    Probably just another example of human nature.

    It's hard to make ho-hum interesting.

  15. #4495
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    Interesting article, I've been thinking about crops and grocery stores, but not the effect of crop problems on farmer's markets and roadside stands. Pic(s) at the link:

    https://www.arkansasonline.com/news/...rops-20190617/

    Rains imperil specialty crops

    Farmers eat losses without help from federal subsidies

    by SCOTT McFETRIDGE The Associated Press | June 17, 2019 at 2:28 a.m. | Updated June 17, 2019 at 2:28 a.m.

    DES MOINES, Iowa -- This spring's torrential rains turned Andrew Dunham's land into sticky muck that set him back nearly a month in planting his crops.

    But unlike other farmers throughout the Midwest, Dunham won't get a piece of a $16 billion aid package to offset his losses, and he can't fall back on federally subsidized crop insurance. Dunham grows herbs, flowers and dozens of vegetable varieties, but not the region's dominant crops of corn and soybeans.

    "There are no federal bailouts for vegetable farmers," said Dunham, who owns an 80-acre organic farm with his wife near Grinnell, about 50 miles east of Des Moines, and is enduring weeks without sales as his crops ripen. "We'll just miss out on three weeks of income."

    Although the lack of federal safety net programs for farmers who grow everything from arugula to zucchini isn't new, one of the wettest springs in U.S. history has focused attention on the special status of so-called commodity crops, primarily corn, soybeans, cotton, rice and wheat. Growers of some of those crops received $11 billion in special aid last year and will get $16 billion more this year to offset losses caused by trade disputes that led to tariffs and resulting drops in demand.

    Federal support, including subsidized insurance and other protections against losses, is a long-standing tradition for growers of the major crops, who nevertheless are struggling to stay in business because of the tariffs, years of low prices and poor weather. The wet spring has also put growers of specialty crops in a tight spot, as they scramble to seed their fields and kill weeds that grew unhindered until recently.

    The persistent rain has been especially worrisome for farmers in central Illinois who grow most of the nation's pumpkins, and for the processors who turn the crop into pie filling for the nation's Thanksgiving feasts.

    "We had rain and rain and rain," said Mohammad Babadoost, a professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who closely follows the state's pumpkin crop. "They're planting from dawn to dusk and even during the night to catch up because they're about three weeks behind."

    Although corn is the nation's biggest crop, nearly all of it is so-called field corn that is used for animal feed, ethanol production and as seed for future crops. Only about 1% is sweet corn, which is grown for human consumption.

    For Scott Alsum, whose family owns Alsum Sweetcorn in central Wisconsin, rain made it nearly impossible to plant on schedule in mid-April. They planted some seeds between storms but they won't know if it will be enough to meet the demand for corn sold at seven roadside stands, some farmers markets and to wholesalers.

    "I don't know if I'll have enough corn to keep me going every day of the week or not," Alsum said. "It's going to depend on the weather. Right now it's a little sketchy looking."

    In northeastern Iowa, Daquan Campbell, market manager for the Waterloo Urban Farmers Market, said many area farmers are in a similar situation and it has kept about a third of fresh produce growers from selling produce. The market still has plenty of baked goods and crafts, but customers shouldn't expect to find asparagus or spring onions, which typically would be available this time of year.

    "Customers are probably expecting a little bit more," Campbell said. "We've been trying to educate them about the farmers and how the weather is dictating what's available right now."

    Chad Hart, an Iowa State University economist, said the reason giant crops such as corn and soybeans have been treated differently is because they're so important to the national economy.

    "There are only so many things you can feed to our livestock and keep the meat production going," he said.

  16. #4496
    It's good to see another aspect of this whole "trainwreck" get some exposure. So, if my own tomatoes don't grow, I'm not very likely to find them at the farmers' market or any roadside stands, either.

    Important to consider this now, before things get right down to the wire.

  17. #4497
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    It's good to see another aspect of this whole "trainwreck" get some exposure. So, if my own tomatoes don't grow, I'm not very likely to find them at the farmers' market or any roadside stands, either.

    Important to consider this now, before things get right down to the wire.
    Excellent point. Usually every summer by now we see an older farmer in our little town selling watermelons. His are usually really good and we always buy from him when we see him. Haven't seen him once yet this summer.

    Our tomatoes just don't look right at all. We've never had a problem growing tomatoes, no matter where we've lived. I love a tomato fresh from the garden, still warm from the sun or a fresh tomato sandwich. Not looking likely this year.

  18. #4498
    This is why I've mentioned planting about twice what one would normally plant in order to get a certain yield, and to expect that even then there's apt to be a lot less than the hoped-for yield.

    And I'm not trying for a great variety of things. Just a few different plants that cover as wide a range as possible of important nutrients. I still intend to bring in some dandelions and see what I can grow in the greenhouse in extra good soil. I would plant three of them in each of those 3-gallon nursery pots I mentioned earlier.

    When I find dandelions seeding out in the yard, I try to bring one or two seed heads into the greenhouse or outdoor garden and strew the seeds. It's nice to have them growing all over, not just in one patch where they can all die from mildew, or get a fatal haircut from a passing cottontail.

    A dandelion sandwich might not be as tasty as a tomato sandwich, but I'll bet it has a lot of the same nutrients and probably a lot more besides.

    And perhaps bringing in new seeds every year helps keep up the genetic diversity.

  19. #4499
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    42,326
    Quote Originally Posted by Sandune View Post
    Not too long ago the TV weather personalities were dropping "heat index" from their temperature readings. The real temperature would be around 96 degrees with a heat index of 104. They would say "it's a 104 degrees out there folks, Global Warming is here!" I did a double take a couple of times before I caught on to what they were doing.
    And the useless eaters lap that crap up like it's manna.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  20. #4500
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    42,326
    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    Excellent point. Usually every summer by now we see an older farmer in our little town selling watermelons. His are usually really good and we always buy from him when we see him. Haven't seen him once yet this summer.

    Our tomatoes just don't look right at all. We've never had a problem growing tomatoes, no matter where we've lived. I love a tomato fresh from the garden, still warm from the sun or a fresh tomato sandwich. Not looking likely this year.

    So far this year the watermelons coming up out of texas have been horrible, don't taste right and are mushy in the middle, if not rotten in the middle. But they look perfect on the outside.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  21. #4501
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    42,326
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    It's good to see another aspect of this whole "trainwreck" get some exposure. So, if my own tomatoes don't grow, I'm not very likely to find them at the farmers' market or any roadside stands, either.

    Important to consider this now, before things get right down to the wire.
    It's time for me to purge my pantry this weekend and restock before the others figure it out and limits are put on buying by the case. You're right, it's coming. My tomato plants are about a foot tall, they should be pushing three feet by now.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  22. #4502
    PW, don't forget what I posted a few days back about my sister saying that Dollar General's Clover Valley brand has very good canned green beans. 65 cents a can is a pretty good price.

    Maybe their other vegetables are good, too?

    They haven't been giving out their $5 coupons this week, but if it were me, I wouldn't wait for a coupon, as the price could go up for good at any time, the way things are going lately.

  23. #4503
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    Here's an article on cover crops for farmers and the likelihood of seed shortages this year. Any one else besides me think that vegetable seeds might be in short supply this fall?:

    https://agfax.com/2019/06/17/cover-c...order-now-dtn/

    Cover Crop Seed: Tight Supplies, Order NOW – DTN

    June 17, 2019
    By Matt Wilde DTN Progressive Farmer Crops Technology

    Cover crop seed will be in short supply this year. Farmers and landowners need to get orders in early, according to dealers and veteran cover croppers.

    Demand for cereal rye, chickpeas, tillage radishes and other cover crop seed was already strong as more farmers adopt the conservation practice. The latest Census of Agriculture indicates nearly 15.4 million acres of cover crops were sown in 2017, an increase of 50% from the last census in 2012.

    Persistent wet conditions throughout the Midwest could prevent a record amount of corn and soybean acres from being planted this year, up to 15 million acres by some estimates. Cover crop experts urge landowners and farmers to seed unplanted acres with some type of plants to keep weeds at bay and maintain soil health.

    Potential seed shortages were discussed during a cover crop and interseeding field day June 13 at FloLo Farms, owned by Loran and Brenda Steinlage of Grundy Center, Iowa. Experts said the problem isn’t insurmountable with proper planning.

    “Farmers better be calling their seed dealers early with orders to get what they need. Supplies will be tight,” said Kevin Glanz, a dealer for Albert Lea Seed. “Cover crop rates may have to be trimmed to cover acres if seed shortages occur. Whether or not you planted corn or soybeans this year, you want something growing all the time.”

    Persistent, heavy rains this spring caused massive amounts of soil erosion in many northeast Iowa fields without cover crops, he stated. Gullies, washouts and precious topsoil in waterways and ditches were common.

    Glanz said that didn’t happen on his Manchester, Iowa, farm. All of his 700 acres are planted with cereal rye and other cover crop seed mixtures. The roots and heavy biomass keep soil in place and improve water infiltration.

    “I cringe when I see all the erosion, it just makes me sick,” Glanz said. “My soil stayed put. That’s a big indicator that what I’ve been doing the last 10 years planting covers is working.”

    Cover Crops Pay

    Long-time cover croppers told more than 70 people at the field day about the practice. They said the benefits like improved soil health, water quality, weed suppression and a better bottom line far outweigh the challenges.

    Cover crops keep soil in place and sequester nutrients like nitrogen on farmland and out of waterways, studies show. Soil health improves by sowing cereal rye, oats, radishes and other plants just before or after harvest, building organic matter. Cover crops extend biological activity of the ground until spring planting.

    Glanz said it takes time to learn which covers work best for a farmer’s soil types and geography, and initial yield hits may occur. But, in time, the practice can pay for itself in reduced nutrient and herbicide inputs and increase production. Glanz uses 33% less nitrogen in corn production than in the past and yields increased 10%-15%.


    “I’m not farming for fun,” he said. “To stay in business, anything I do needs to pay.”

    Cover crop seed and application costs can vary from $10 to $30 or more per acre, depending on mixture and methods used.

    Steinlage often hosts field days to share the agronomic and economic benefits of cover crops. He said it’s more important this year so farmers new to the practice keep doing it, even if seed is hard to find.

    “Knowledge sharing is the key,” said Steinlage, who’s been planting cover crops for more than a decade.

    Steinlage interseeds a cover crop mixture of 32 species, mainly small grains, into corn at the V4 to V6 stage. He also plants covers after corn and soybean harvest.

    All of Steinlage’s cover crop seed is in the shed for 750 acres. He encourages farmers to order seed now to lock in delivery. Farmers may have to order species of cover crops in less demand to get enough seed. It’s worth it, he said.

    “I don’t run a non-profit,” Steinlage said. “I’m getting an extra 15 bushels of corn per acre on $15 worth of cover crop seed.”

    Crazy Smart

    Jack Boyer of Reinbeck, Iowa, started interseeding cover crops into corn in 2014. By planting early, he said the plants build more biomass to capture more nutrients for the cash crop. In 2015, the amount of nitrogen retained was more than double the amount in non-interseeded corn, or 66 pounds per acre, worth an extra $30, he said.

    Boyer said organic matter climbs 0.1% annually due to cover crops, which promotes organic nutrient use to bolster yields.

    “People think I’m crazy when I say I’m getting 1 bushel of corn per half-pound of nitrogen,” he said.

    For prevented-planting acres, Boyer suggested seeding brassica radishes, buckwheat or other warm-season plants. Millet, sorghum and Sudan grasses are also good.

  24. #4504
    Not enough seed available is truly scary!

    I've been wondering if Bonnie Plants will be delivering bedding plants to the garden centers this September? I'm hoping to do kale and broccoli the same way as I did it this past fall/winter season in my greenhouse.

  25. #4505
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Not enough seed available is truly scary!

    I've been wondering if Bonnie Plants will be delivering bedding plants to the garden centers this September? I'm hoping to do kale and broccoli the same way as I did it this past fall/winter season in my greenhouse.
    That's a good question. There are a lot of vegetables we can plant in September, too. Hmmm, maybe I'll send them an email and see if they expect any problems in getting transplants in stores for September.

  26. #4506
    Let us know what you find out. I'm hoping to do the same thing I did last year and get the huge double to triple harvest of greens again.

    Looks like we have about four days in the 90s with extra warm nights, and then chances of rain again for several days. Hope the rain doesn't fizzle again as it did this time, since I think by the end of this week or the beginning of next, we may be needing some moisture.

  27. #4507
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Let us know what you find out. I'm hoping to do the same thing I did last year and get the huge double to triple harvest of greens again.

    Looks like we have about four days in the 90s with extra warm nights, and then chances of rain again for several days. Hope the rain doesn't fizzle again as it did this time, since I think by the end of this week or the beginning of next, we may be needing some moisture.
    I just sent an email both for myself in Tx and a friend in your state :-) I'll let you know what they say.

    We have a chance of nasty storms overnight and possibly another inch of rain. Then it looks like more rain Sunday and Monday. We're getting close to 100 out there now. This heat will sap the moisture pretty quickly.

  28. #4508
    Park Seeds has been having a "10 for $10" seed sale. Mostly basic (OP) varieties, but they aren't j7nk (floor sweepings like some "bargain seeds" can be. They are well packaged, and we've had excellent results with their stuff.

    So I stocked up, just in case. I save my own tomato and sweet pepoer seeds (5-6 varieties of each) and occasionally watermelons and cucumbers. Also peas and beans. But so much of the rest can be complicated, and isolation in an area where there are many large gardens in a square mile area is difficult, so as long as they are available and I can afford them, I'll keep on buying a good portion of our seeds.

    But having enough on hand to plant at least a 2 acre truck garden with nutrient dense varieties is just good insurance.

    Summerthyme

  29. #4509
    Also, guys... if you've got a couple of feet square "spare" space, you can easily grow 4 dozen pkants for your own fall starts, indoors under an LED light. 2 flats (they're about 11" x 22") will hold at least 48 plants. Cole crops (broccoli, cabbage, kale, chard, etc) will sprout well in cooler indoors temps and can be transplanted out when it starts to cool off...

    Summerthyme

  30. #4510
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    I was planning on doing our own starts, too. We bought a lot of extra seeds for this spring, and I've been saving garden center pots of all sizes, along with grocery store berry containers, etc. I think we'll try to do everything possible, to try to get as much as possible growing...successfully.

  31. #4511
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    Update on Texas crops by region. It's interesting that such a large state with a variety of growing areas is having much of the same problems as other states further north - in many areas, too much rain for equipment or excessive rainfall causing problems with health of crops. There are some pics/graphics on the website:

    https://today.agrilife.org/2019/06/1...-june-18-2019/

    Texas Crop and Weather Report – June 18, 2019

    June 18, 2019

    Watermelon harvest delayed but in time for July 4

    COLLEGE STATION – The Texas watermelon crop was delayed by spring weather, but plenty should be available for the Fourth of July holiday, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

    A watermelon patch in East Texas gets some sun after a cloudy, rainy and cool spring. Many fields are behind schedule because of the weather and could miss the peak sales weekend as people celebrate the Fourth of July (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo by Adam Russell)

    Dr. Larry Stein, AgriLife Extension horticulturist, Uvalde, said the state’s melon crops were showing good fruit sets and are progressing well after a challenging spring.

    Stein said melon producers avoided major disease and pest issues this season. However, cloudy weather has pushed their grow date later than usual. Some areas in which melons are typically ripening in time for the Fourth of July holiday weekend could miss that peak melon-sales period.

    “They want to have them ready for market a week to 10 days before the holiday weekend,” he said. “The cloudy weather may delay the beginning of harvest for a lot of producers who usually aim for that window.”

    Producers in the Rio Grande Valley have been harvesting early varieties for a few weeks and should have plenty of melons for July 4. Other melon-producing areas, including the Texas Wintergarden area, Central Texas and East Texas should follow.

    Cloudy days may delay harvest, but recent sunshine should improve flavor, Stein said.

    “The amount of rain really won’t affect the flavor,” he said. “It’s the sunshine that matters. Cloudy weather slows growth, but the leaves can’t manufacture the sugar for the melon, so taste could be a problem on some early varieties if they haven’t been getting the sun they need.”

    Producers applied fungicides to avoid disease issues related to above-average soil moisture levels, but their management of wind could be an issue as the crops progress.

    Stein said windbreaks are sometimes overlooked as a valuable part of melon production. Some producers plant winter wheat and leave rows of stubble for vines to cling to throughout the season as well as reduce the impact of winds.

    Melon vines that are not provided windbreaks can become twisted together by winds, which can restrict vine growth and productivity, Stein said.

    “It’s amazing what windbreaks can do to help vines to grow,” he said. “Providing protection from the wind is important from the start. You don’t really see how it affects the plants’ output, but we know it hinders development of the vines, especially for producers who use plastic and drip lines.”

    Texas continues to rank No. 1 in the nation in watermelon production, Stein said.

    Watermelons were an $87.5 million crop in 2018, according to an AgriLife Extension economic report. Other melons add more than $5 million to that crop value.

    AgriLife Extension district reporters compiled the following summaries:


    CENTRAL: Temperatures were cooler but returned to normal highs late in the reporting period, reaching the mid-to-upper 90s. Rains of 1-2 inches were reported in some areas while other areas missed additional moisture. Some low-lying areas were underwater. Hay balers were very active but were stalled again by rains. Producers reported four to five bales per acre. Weeds were a big issue for crop and vegetable growers due to rain. Pastures and rangelands were producing well. Crops were growing steadily, but maturity varied across the district. Soils were still too wet to plant cotton. Planted cotton was starting to grow well. Wheat harvest and other fieldwork resumed, and most producers have gotten wheat out of their fields. Corn and sorghum were not doing well because of excessive rainfall. Nearly all counties reported livestock were in good condition.

    ROLLING PLAINS: The district received up to 5 inches of rain. Wet conditions prevented cotton planting in some fields, and some wheat harvest was delayed. Storms created more damage in unharvested fields. Some producers reported above-average yields, but test weights and protein levels were lower than normal due to prolonged rain. Pastures looked very good, and cattle were in good shape. Hay swathing and baling was slowed due to high humidity and rains.

    COASTAL BEND: Beneficial rains fell with amounts ranging from 2-4 inches. Early planted cotton was starting to bloom, but much of the cotton crop was about three weeks behind schedule. Wharton County reported some cotton fields near the Tres Palacios River remained submerged as waters were slow to recede from flood levels in the previous reporting period. Wet weather conditions brought cotton fleahoppers, which reached threshold and required repeated applications of insecticide. Moist conditions also created ideal conditions for southern corn rust. Some fungicide applications were made in the upper portion of the reporting area. Corn and grain sorghum continued to look exceptional and should have adequate moisture to finish out. Weeds were still an issue in some fields. Hay harvest continued. Bales were in abundance and selling for below-average prices. Some ranchers were shredding weeds due to lack of favorable spray conditions in early spring. Livestock were doing well.

    EAST: The abundance of rainfall caused water damage to corn crops and prevented the planting of cotton in Anderson County. Hay producers baled large quantities of quality hay. Pasture and rangeland conditions were good. Subsoil and topsoil conditions were adequate. Temperatures were cooler than the previous reporting period. Livestock were in good condition. Houston County continued to report problems with the fly populations. Wild pigs were very active in Henderson and Anderson counties.

    SOUTH PLAINS: Temperatures were warmer, and pockets of rainfall were reported. Subsoil and topsoil moisture remained short to adequate as some area counties received more rainfall than others. Cotton was growing with good heat unit accumulation. Producers were active in the field. Cotton planting continued with some being replanted due to rain. Some cotton was emerging, but most was behind schedule due to all the rain. Producers tried to control windblown dirt as the crop emerged. Sorghum was being planted where weather prevented cotton planting. Pasture, rangeland and winter wheat remained in fair condition. Producers continued to plant. Cattle were in good condition.

    PANHANDLE: Producers played catch-up following recent weather events. A few cotton producers finished replants. Most cotton and peanut fields were switched to other crops such as sorghum or corn because of time limitations. Planting into moisture caused fungus on cotton leaves and could not be salvaged. Cattle and pasture conditions looked great with the abundant rainfall.

    NORTH: Soil moisture was adequate to surplus across the district. Storms brought half an inch to 4 inches of precipitation. Before the rains, soils had dried enough for producers to harvest wheat. Farmers reported good yields, 30-50 bushels per acre. Croplands were still too wet to access in some places. Late-planted corn was responding well to the extra moisture. Most pastures were in good shape. Hay producers were able to get in most pastures. Ponds were full. Creeks, ditches and some streets were full or overflowing. Saturation was causing concern in some areas. Cattle were in good condition.

    FAR WEST: Temperatures ranged from highs in the upper 90s to lows in the mid-50s. Scattered showers were reported throughout the district. Rain averages were around half an inch to 2 inches. Producers made progress harvesting wheat with high yields reported. Cotton was starting to mature and not far from squaring as temperatures warmed. The main threat to emerged cotton was sandblasting by high winds. Many producers were sandfighting and trying to hold the soil in place. Some producers were forced to replant fields due to inclement weather. Sorghum was starting to head out. Corn was expected to begin tasseling soon. Pastures were starting to dry, and there was a limited amount of grass. Livestock conditions remained good. Jumbo grasshoppers were reported and controlled in the eastern part of the district.

    WEST CENTRAL: The district had a relatively dry week. Cotton producers were able to resume planting. Winter wheat harvest resumed and mostly completed. Some producers harvested their first cutting of hay. Sorghum fields were in excellent condition. Rangeland continued to look good with good grazing for cattle. Most ponds were full and running over. The cattle market opened with an aggressive tone on most calves and yearlings. Stocker steers and heifers sold steady to $5 higher per hundredweight. Prices on feeder steers and heifers were steady to up to $3 higher per hundredweight. Packer bulls sold $2 higher, and cows sold $1 higher. Replacement cattle sold steady.

    SOUTHEAST: Some areas received rain while other areas stayed dry. A lot of hay was cut, and conditions were starting to dry. Pastures were too saturated to access in some areas. A smaller percentage of producers were harvesting their second cuttings. Vegetable gardens were doing well. Tomato producers were monitoring moisture levels to prevent blossom-end rot. In Jefferson County, the rain prevented rice from being planted before the final planting date. The rains also put forage production into overdrive. Rangeland and pasture ratings were excellent to poor with good being most common. Soil moisture levels were adequate to surplus with adequate being most common.

    SOUTHWEST: Most counties received more rain, from trace amounts up to 7 inches. Rangeland and pastures continued to thrive. Thistles were particularly abundant. Most wheat was harvested. Cotton continued to look good, and corn was maturing nicely. Livestock and wildlife were in good condition. Rivers, creeks and streams were flowing.

    SOUTH: Northern and southern parts of the district reported hot weather and short soil moisture levels. Eastern parts of the district reported hot and dry weather conditions with adequate soil moisture levels. Western parts of the district reported warm weather conditions with rainfall and adequate to short soil moisture levels. Maverick County reported beneficial rains of half an inch to 1 inch in some areas. Some producers in Zapata County reported up to 4.5 inches of rainfall. Starr County reported scattered rains with amounts ranging from traces up to 5 inches. Potato and sweet corn continued to be harvested. Bermuda grass cutting and baling started. Corn fields continued to turn color and were maturing. Cotton fields received beneficial heat units and were entering the first bloom stage under irrigation. Native rangelands and pastures were mostly good due to adequate rainfall, but some areas reported declining conditions due to heat and little rain. Cattle body condition scores were fair to excellent. Coastal Bermuda grass fields were in good condition and producing good hay bales. Pecan orchards were also in good condition with no reports of pest issues. Watermelons and cantaloupes were being harvested on schedule. Cotton, sorghum, corn and cucumbers were under irrigation due to dry, hot conditions. Producers in Dimmit County were still providing supplemental feed and hauling water for livestock.

  32. #4512
    Reading a Texas crop report is like reading one for an entire country!

  33. #4513
    Local feed stores and Amazon have bulk seeds for turnips and radishes.

  34. #4514
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    I just sent an email both for myself in Tx and a friend in your state :-) I'll let you know what they say.

    We have a chance of nasty storms overnight and possibly another inch of rain. Then it looks like more rain Sunday and Monday. We're getting close to 100 out there now. This heat will sap the moisture pretty quickly.
    Martinhouse, I already heard back from Bonnie Plants. They said they are greenhouse growers and they expect no problems at all in having plants for the fall. Yay!

  35. #4515
    TxGal, thanks for that about the fall plants! I really want to plant that Winterbor kale one last time, without having to mail order seed, so that's good news!

    I would still like to find some hard red winter wheat. I only want about a cupful, and I don't think I'd find anything like that here in Arkansas.

    If I get desperate, I'll plant any wheat I can get, and I know I can get it at the health food store in town. Sigh.

  36. #4516
    I am curious. Several people have mentioned working on their "shopping lists" for food products after reading these reports. What are you focusing on in your food shopping and preps, as some have mentioned revising their lists after listening to some podcasts.

    I have been shopping and my stuff is listed on the prep of the day thread in the prep forum, so I am not trolling, just seeking viewpoints.

  37. #4517
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    yankee baptist land
    Posts
    17,317
    Quote Originally Posted by prudentwatcher View Post
    I am curious. Several people have mentioned working on their "shopping lists" for food products after reading these reports. What are you focusing on in your food shopping and preps, as some have mentioned revising their lists after listening to some podcasts.

    I have been shopping and my stuff is listed on the prep of the day thread in the prep forum, so I am not trolling, just seeking viewpoints.
    I bought an $80 package of organic heirloom seeds this year that included a bunch of cold climate food plants to start shifting my gardening to a more sustainable enterprise.

    Also, because I had to replace my consuming of modern hybrid wheat a few years back because of gluten causing chronic fatigue in myself, I have been trying to stock up on the original ancient wheat grain called Einkorn wheat, and up till this past month have been able to buy it wholesale organic from Italy, but that deal has come to an end, so I stocked up as much as I could afford. I only buy whole grain, and store it in a cool shed and grind it when making sourdough bread for freshness. I guess I will have to resort to growing it myself next year. It has only half as much gluten as modern wheat.

    And apparently the gluten has a different DNA than hybrid wheat. And of course I don’t worry about roundup ready residue on organic Einkorn. Also was told by a lady who has it grown for her in upstate NY that a few years back most of the wheat grown there suffered from a cold wet year, but her Einkorn grower had no problems at all.

    Anyways, at least I found a solution to a serious health problem I had and since “bread is the staff of life”, it is a prime focus of mine.
    ” Watch ye therefore and pray always that ye may be accounted worthy to escape all these things that shall come to pass and to stand before the Son of Man”
    Luke 21:36

    COLLAPSE NOW: avoid the rush

  38. #4518
    The shopping lists I talk about are some groceries, including some things for storage, but also various little articles of sewing supplies, hardware, yard and garden supplies, topping off gas tank and gas cans...anything that would make life a little easier should I soon be able to no longer get some of those things.

    Also a list can have things on it that I've been putting off getting for one reason or another. For example, fabric. I want to get more fabric for warm pajamas, but I like to be back home by 9 AM at the latest and my store's fabric department never has anyone working it until at least 9 AM. Sooner than later, I'll have to stop putting it off. Same for the health food store.

    As often as I revise and add to my list, the first item on it should be a big pack of the erasers that fit on the end of a pencil!

  39. #4519
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Paradise, New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,240
    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    Martinhouse, I already heard back from Bonnie Plants. They said they are greenhouse growers and they expect no problems at all in having plants for the fall. Yay!
    Don't know about your Southern growers but several of our Northeast suppliers are having powdery mildew issues... (NOT Bonnie)
    Last edited by alpha; 06-20-2019 at 08:19 AM. Reason: clarify
    “Don’t pick a fight, but if you find yourself in one, I suggest you make damn sure you win.” - John Wayne

  40. #4520
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,086
    Martinhouse, you okay this morning? I know your state got hit by our storms yesterday evening and likely overnight. We got hit at 1230 am and again at 0500. All looks well, but it was a severe storm warnings night for us. Ugh! Just one tomato plant blown over, and branches down, but otherwise we missed the golf ball sized hail and 65mph winds. This is getting really old...I hate night storms.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.