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The Grand Solar Minimum
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  1. #4721
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,060
    Thanks, Martinhouse!

    There's a new Adapt 2030 podcast out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4I53GXBUdMA

    Global Volcanic Feedback Loop Now Causing Unusual Cold Temperatures (851)

    Run time is 19:35

    It is apparent that the feedback loop of volcanic ash in Earth's atmosphere is beginning to cool areas of the planet in the wrong season along with larger hail formation. The recent VEI 4 at Ulwun in Papua New Guinea and 20+ other eruptions of ash to 50,000 ft+ are having a cumulative effect. The Grand Solar Minimum - Cosmic Ray Effect are now in play. The cooling has begun in earnest.

  2. #4722
    Thank you for posting this the way it should be. Have you listened to it yet? I'm going to listen to again in a few minutes. Scary stuff!

    My truck was finished being serviced today so my sister is driving me in to get it first thing in the morning. I will likely spend most of tomorrow working on new shopping lists and then super-early Saturday I'll go all the way into town and get as much as I possibly can at both WM and the box store, which is one of the cost+10% stores.

    I may pick up a couple more of the galvanized trash cans at WM. I really shouldn't but they will make some of my storage an awful lot easier. I may lay in more cat food, too, and perhaps just try to tame one of the strays I have here now and then.

  3. #4723
    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    If you want to know more abou the history of the weather of CONUS dig up some of the diaries of the women who came out here and helped to settle the prairie, lots of accounts of how harsh the weather was... or the diaries of the old native elders. There are many stories of years w/o a summer, severe drought, mass die-offs, and the like. The natives thought the settlers were nuts for settling parts of Oklahoma, Texas, and Kansas because those states were prone to droughts that could last decades.
    I love reading that stuff! I ran across a book in college and wish I could remember the title. One chapter was about the Winter of 1864 and the Shoshone just called it Kisseowayo- It blows cold.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  4. #4724
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,060
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Thank you for posting this the way it should be. Have you listened to it yet? I'm going to listen to again in a few minutes. Scary stuff!

    My truck was finished being serviced today so my sister is driving me in to get it first thing in the morning. I will likely spend most of tomorrow working on new shopping lists and then super-early Saturday I'll go all the way into town and get as much as I possibly can at both WM and the box store, which is one of the cost+10% stores.

    I may pick up a couple more of the galvanized trash cans at WM. I really shouldn't but they will make some of my storage an awful lot easier. I may lay in more cat food, too, and perhaps just try to tame one of the strays I have here now and then.
    You're welcome! No, haven't listened to it yet, we were out most of yesterday then helping put together a futon at DD's house. We hurt like the dickens today, lots of driving, shopping, and maneuvering furniture around....isn't it amazing that things we could do younger without a second thought makes for a stiff and sore day after? We'll get stuff done today ahead of possible rain bands from TS Barry, but very slowly....

    That's great you got your truck back, it'll be good to be able to do what you want to. We still need to get extra trash cans, haven't gotten to that yet. Do you line your trash cans with black trash bags? Thinking of doing that if it's safe, we've had humidity/slight leaks ruin a bag of feed here and there, and can't afford to waste any. I'd actually like to get more chicks down the road if not sooner, eggs are a very large part of my diet, too, and we can always find a way to feed them.

  5. #4725
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Arkansas
    Posts
    560
    Quote Originally Posted by catskinner View Post
    Just got back from my local Wal-Mart. Only one sign up about the product shortage, but huge holes in the canned vegetables and fruit, as well as the instant potatoes, hamburger helper and dry pasta. When I say huge, I mean entire sections were empty.

    I went in with my son so he could pickup something and decided to let my curiosity to get the better of me. I've never seen the shelves that empty, not even after the first of the month.

    I asked an employee what it was about, and true to the Wal-Mart employee stereo-type, she didn't know "nuthin'."
    Update.....

    I had the displeasure of returning to WM yesterday. It was, again, a quick stop to pick up wireless earbuds. Evidently, 14 year old boys can not drive tractors to mow or feed fish without them. Who knew?

    I gave the grocery section a quick once over on my way out the door. This is what I noted.

    There was very little washing detergent. just a few bottles, maybe 10, of the small size of Tide. Huge empty expanse of shelving on either side of the Tide. There were also a few bottles of some other kind, in a blue bottle.

    The place where the instant mashed potatoes would have been was empty. None of any brand or size.

    The canned vegetables and fruit were even lower than they were before. There were about 7 or 8 people standing there looking at it and trying to find what they wanted.

    Sugar was low, but still available. It looked like it does when everybody is baking for the holidays. Flour was very short. no store/cheap brands at all. Only a few of the more expensive brands.

    Peanut butter was a bit low, but there was still a variety of brands and styles to choose from.

    IMHO it's too early for the shortages to be caused by the current weather/flooding. Wouldn't next years crops be affected? I just don't know. Made me wonder if perhaps the .gov knows what is coming and is forcing suppliers to "put some back" for later.

    Thoughts anyone?

  6. #4726
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,060
    This is a tough one to answer with 100% certainty, but with fresh and canned fruit and veg's, I think it's the current situation and not stockpiling by the powers that be. I would not be surprised to see that with grains at all, but fruits and vegs either go directly to market or are processed. It's always possible canned items could be held back, I guess, but given the growing problems, my thinking is just that what we're seeing is due to lack of product.

    The quality of produce is down dramatically. The few red potatoes I've been able to buy of late - and I pick up some every shopping trip - aren't really red, they're more of a pale pink. Is anyone else seeing that? The cantaloupes that were on sale this week for 77 cents locally were small, mostly green, and looked kind of beat up. Anyone else seeing that, too?

    I could go on and on about how the produce just isn't as good as it used to be, but I guess rightfully I should compare it to our own garden. We've been gardening for upward of 50 yrs, I started as a kid with my parents' gardens, and this is the first year I'm struggling - it's the weather or sun or both, I don't know. Tomatoes and green peppers were just nothing, potatoes seem to be doing okay, cukes are just weird. Usually we're canning/freezing/giving produce away. This year, most of it is going to the chickens. Except the potatoes. We're prepping heavy for a fall garden with finger crossed, but not counting on it.

    Every single shopping trip we're adding extras here and there. A few cans of soup, a few cans of veg's, a 1 lb pkg of split peas, dried beans, legumes. And not just food. A few bars of soap (I like to add Ivory, it's basic and can be used for bathing, washing hair, hand washing clothes, doing dishes...all in a pinch, but it works).Also cold meds, vitamins, socks, tinfoil, garden seeds (many on clearance now), at the feed store we'll pick fence staples, trace mineral blocks, etc. The list goes on and on, but we're adding here and there to everything we use, a few bucks at a time...I could easily see some strong inflation as food shortages increase bringing on higher prices, and that always seems to spread to everything.

  7. #4727
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,060
    Ice Age Farmer has a new podcast out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc1PhTgd2-A

    Economic Collapse 2020: Cosmic "Perfect Storm" cause Rising Food Prices

    Run time is 19:34

    The continuing devastation to crops globally is causing food prices to rise, and ultimately will push the troubled global economy over the edge. The powers that be plan for (and welcome) this, in order to lock people down and maximize the efficacy of their blood sacrifice.

    Start growing food now.

  8. #4728
    I just caught up again on this thread. Leave it for a few days and it grows! Since no one is talking about the PNW I thought I'd chime in from my little corner of the Willamette Valley. We started summer about 6 inches short of our average rainfall. Winter was not bad considering, but the lack of rain always has consequences.

    A couple months ago I mentioned the sad state of the invasive Himalayan blackberries. I think they have leaf spot. Second year cane leaves are turning yellow with the disease and its hard not to notice that more areas are starting to look like late fall. It's weird. This year's cane leaves seem alright so far, bright green as usual
    but we just got over 1/2 inch of rain, with temps rising to the low 80's, so we'll see if the leaf spot spreads to the new leaves. There are tons of berries in some areas, but the poor shape of the foliage concerns me. I don't know if the crop will suffer or not, but I think it will. It's the second year canes that bear fruit, and they have the infected leaves.

    Leaf spot is now affecting the wild roses, snowberry, ash trees, and wild berries.

    We usually graze on wild cherries for two to three weeks. We got maybe a dozen total and our orchard trees lost their fruit as well after looking promising this spring. Some sort of blight or rust we hear. The plums ripened suddenly on our tree in the orchard, and there are a lot of them, but they are sorta bland this year. I think they needed more heat to bring out the flavor. They've ripened really fast and started splitting with the rain we got a couple days ago so I'll be picking the tree today and saving all I can.

    The apples look alright, but they seem to be advancing faster than normal. Grapes are doing well so far, but I wonder if they will need more heat, too.

    Our temperatures are a good five degrees lower than what they should be (and I can't complain about that!) and there's clouds almost every day. It's been a rare day with no clouds this year and our humidity is higher than normal. Our area is known for its brilliant blue skies in the summer, with low humidity and only occasional clouds and rain.

    It seems like we are walking between seasons, if that makes any sense. The summer wants to come, but we can't quite leave spring behind and are galloping towards fall. The pines have lost their cones early. Some of the Douglas aster, which aren't supposed to bloom until mid-August, are starting to show its purple flowers.

    The cool crops in the containers did poorly, with the kale, chard and brocolli bolting before they did much. The peas did great! There will hopefully be tomatoes in the next few weeks. Peppers are doing well. Beans are growing but there's no sign of flowers yet. The critters are growing fat on strawberries. The little red squirrels and who ever else beat us to most of them, leaving bits of strawberry here and there along the sidewalk and lawn. The potatoes I put in the compost piles out in the fields did poorly. Some got dug up but mostly the lack of rain did them in. I put sprouting potatoes out like last year. Almost nothing this year, while last year was a successful experiment. We're getting squash and green onions. Growing in containers has its limitations, but I'm grateful for what I do have.

    The lack of rain and the resulting stress and beetles are still killing off trees and we just can't seem to catch up getting them down and burned as there is no commercial value in them. A neighbor just cut a stand that was dying as well. We went by a bark place up north of us which chips logs and they had a HUGE inventory of rough looking trees. Our soils are marginal for the type of trees planted here, so nature is just cleaning out those which can't tolerate the environment. It just is what it is.

    Hazelnut trees are being planted all over around here, replacing some of the grass seed fields. They do well and we have lots of natives ones which grow like weeds. The ones planted are a different type I'm told, and are doing well. Since the almond trees groves in CA have declined due to drought, the market is evidently switching to hazelnuts.

    No complaints about the summer thus far. We are so lucky to not have the terrible, devastating floods and rains of the East. No damaging tornadoes like the South and Plains. No big fires yet sending smoke our way, but there's plenty of time for that in the coming weeks although I hope not.

    Things don't seem normal here this year and it'll be interesting to see what comes. Take care, everyone. And please, anyone else in the PNW, can you chime in and let us know how things are going in your area? We live in a small valley, so we aren't necessarily a good indicator of things regionally.

  9. #4729
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    Ice Age Farmer has a new podcast out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc1PhTgd2-A

    Economic Collapse 2020: Cosmic "Perfect Storm" cause Rising Food Prices

    Run time is 19:34

    The continuing devastation to crops globally is causing food prices to rise, and ultimately will push the troubled global economy over the edge. The powers that be plan for (and welcome) this, in order to lock people down and maximize the efficacy of their blood sacrifice.

    Start growing food now.

    ALL, HE'S TALKING ABOUT SHORTAGES AT THE GROCERY STORE, WITH PICS!

  10. #4730
    These various reports are really great! It's so good to know what's going on all over the country and even the world. I wish a lot of the peanut butter thread on main wwas here on this thread.

    I picked up my truck this morning and the price for all the repairs was about half what I thought it would be. The guys jerry-rigged a couple of things where a part was not available for my old 1991 truck. I can now latch my hood all the way and roll down the driver's window without wrenching my back and not lose my gas cap from a brain-surgeon who pumps gas forgetting to put the cap back on...the new one is chained to the truck! Clutch is adjusted, parking brake is adjusted. Oil change, tighten belts,...all good!

    Now I'm not afraid to drive to town! I am going to get up early and so LOTS of shopping! Today I'll do a lot of thinking and then redo my shopping list and probably add a lot to it.

    A stray cat has been around again and it spends time on my roof. Haven't heard the rats thundering around up there for several nights now. I'm hoping it really is a stray and that I can persuade it to stick around.

    TxGal, thanks for posting the new podcast. I'll be listening to it when I'm done here. Oh, and yes, I do line the feed cans. A friend of mine gets these huge clear plastic bags at a place in town that makes frozen yogurt and they throw away oodles of them. No idea what is in them originally, but they are clean and often one bag is crammed full of others. They are lots bigger than the biggest leaf bags and fit a full-sized trash can with plenty to fold over when the can is completely full. I can get three bags of laying pellets in one can, and three and a half bags of whole corn. Between the these bags and plugging the holes where the handles are attached, the feed stores very well.

    I still need to find someone to repair my chicken pen, then I'll be all set for whatever decides to happen. (Except, of course, for getting murdered by that zombie horde, but I doubt many are all set for that!)
    -----
    Just saw your addition in bold caps. Gonna listen right now!

  11. #4731
    I just had a superb, long-winded conversation with my sister and she brought up something that I had totally forgotten about. Hay box cooking. She realized that we both had a nice plywood box with a deep hinged lid and a luggage type handle that could be adapted as a hay box. One year my folks built them and put Styrofoam lining with special cut-out in it and then built yule logs out of birch logs from their Wisconsin lake home. They were decorated with plastic pine, holly and berries, etc., and they fit perfectly into those boxes. There were candles with them, too. A box was made for each of my parents' eight children!

    Anyway, we figured it all out. We will remove the toxic Styrofoam and make cardboard pieces to fit all inside surfaces of both base and lid and cover those with the ultra-heavy-duty aluminum foil. I know from experience that foil will reflect almost all the heat back into the box and a few loose towels might do the rest of the insulating. No need for the mess of real hay.

    We also remembered and discussed Thermos cooking. Last fall I bought her a 2-quart Stanley thermos. She argues when I buy her anything so I just handed it to her and told her "This is a big sister present and I bought it for you because I think you need one and if you argue about it I'm gonna be really pissed so just take it and say "Thanks you".

    Anyway, the way things are getting, we thought this was a good topic to remember and discuss and refine our plans about. What we call a good blab. We are both planning to go shopping tomorrow and spend too much money. Not together though. Both of us make terrible passengers after so many years of being the driver.

  12. Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    I picked up my truck this morning and the price for all the repairs was about half what I thought it would be. The guys jerry-rigged a couple of things where a part was not available for my old 1991 truck. et for whatever decides to happen.
    If you own a GM, Ford or Dodge truck, LMC may have the part(s) that you are looking for.

    LMC Truck Parts

    http://www.lmctruck.com/


    intothegoodnight
    "Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light."

    — Dylan Thomas, "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night"

  13. #4733
    Thank you for the suggestion, but it is a Toyota truck.

  14. #4734
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,060
    Ice Age Farmer has a new podcast out (not the nicest title, sorry):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oViPKbnK_mw

    Hurricane Barry to DUMP on Flooded US - USDA Goes Full Retard

    Run time is 4:57

    As Hurricane Barry threatens to dump huge amounts of water on an already flooded US, posing huge issues for farmers, the USDA’s lies have reached a point where analysts are literally advising farmers to ignore them — but why? Christian breaks it down.

  15. #4735
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    S.W. Mich. near South Bend, IN
    Posts
    6,331
    Howdy.....I just found this thread, thanks to the peanut butter thread, on Main. Very interesting and informative, also!

    Since you folks do discuss prepping, and I think, somewhere on one of these pages, there was mention of a food storage company, I would really appreciate it if you would share some of those companies you have dealt with and like. I do know about Emergency Essentials and Augason Farms....also that Amazon carries some of these products. Honeyville, as well. Are there any others you have liked?

    I started prepping for Y2K, and still have most of those big cans untouched.....they are supposed to be good for 25 years, which may outlive me. But, I'd like to stock up on a few items that will probably be in short supply....what I don't use, my kids will.

    Since the flooding and food shortage warnings, I have been stocking up on cornmeal and grits, white wheat, legumes and dried beans, brown rice...much of it has come from the health food store, non GMO and organic.

    I've been buying whole wheat flour, too, but wonder what the shelf life is, once the wheat is ground. (I did buy a nice grain mill, before Y2K.)

    I recently read a comment by a lady who said she prefers the long term storage scrambled eggs to the powdered eggs. I wonder if that is true for you folks....I looked at the ingredients of the long term storage scrambled eggs by Emergency Essentials, and saw that one ingredient is vegetable oil. It didn't say which kind of veg. oil, but I have to assume it was the partially hydrogenated kind, and that is unhealthy. I never buy vegetable oils at the grocery store, just olive or coconut oil.
    Last edited by Michiana MaJo; 07-13-2019 at 12:36 PM.

  16. #4736
    The shelf life of whole wheat flour isn't all that great, but it will last a few months in the freezer.

  17. #4737
    MM, any time I see vegetable oil listed as an ingredient, I just automatically assume it's soybean oil. I think all soybeans grown in the US are GMO to be Roundup-ready. The label always says when it's other oils, like corn oil, sunflower, canola, etc. And I think canola is a GMO crop, to and never could understand why it's always said to be such a wonderful substitute for other oils.

    I don't think the oil is hydrogenated. I think that's done to it when it has to remain solid at room temperature, which would mean shortening and margarine.

    The comment about dehydrated scrambled eggs vs the powdered egg was mine, if you read it on this thread. My sister told me about it. She said the powdered eggs are okay for baking, but awful to try to make into scrambled. I never bought either type for myself because until recently I've always had chickens.
    ------
    True about whole wheat flour, and also about brown rice which might last a year if it's kept in the freezer.

  18. #4738
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    S.W. Mich. near South Bend, IN
    Posts
    6,331
    Hi, Martinhouse, and anyone else interested....I have read that we should avoid the vegetable oils in the grocery stores....such as corn, soy, and canola....they are partially hydrogenated, and that means they are bad for the heart.
    https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/neg...-oil-8605.html

    I am sorry to learn that whole wheat flour has such a short time that it is at its best. Who has room in their freezer for that???? Not me! I guess the only answer is to store the wheat and grind it, ourselves. I might be able to store a bag in my extra frig.

  19. #4739
    Thanks for the info about oils. I don't have any here at home that I can check, but I want to look at labels next time I'm at the grocery store.

  20. #4740
    I'm about to order some of these items...

    https://hoosierhillfarm.com/

    I had a 5 gallon, unopened plastic bucket of coconut oil that was over 10 years old, and there was no trace of rancidity. I used it for family soap.

    You can get 102 oz jugs of coconut oil at Big Lots for 12$, or less if you get their coupons, or they're having their 20% off sale.
    Been reading for years, just now starting to talk.

  21. #4741
    [QUOTE=Michiana MaJo;7347107]Howdy.....I just found this thread, thanks to the peanut butter thread, on Main. Very interesting and informative, also!

    Since you folks do discuss prepping, and I think, somewhere on one of these pages, there was mention of a food storage company, I would really appreciate it if you would share some of those companies you have dealt with and like.

    Hi MaJo,

    Since you are in SW Michigan, try Country Life Natural Foods in Pullman. 7th Day so no animal products, but the quality if excellent. Most of the products, even grain, are kept in a warehouse with A/C to protect the foods. I usually put in a large order 2X a year which they set aside for me to pick up. They now deliver to many areas.

    https://www.clnf.org/
    that which one man receives without working for, another man must work for without receiving." -- Kenneth W. Sollitt

  22. #4742
    Quote Originally Posted by mudlogger View Post
    I'm about to order some of these items...

    https://hoosierhillfarm.com/

    I had a 5 gallon, unopened plastic bucket of coconut oil that was over 10 years old, and there was no trace of rancidity. I used it for family soap.

    You can get 102 oz jugs of coconut oil at Big Lots for 12$, or less if you get their coupons, or they're having their 20% off sale.
    I have not been impressed with Hoosier Hills' cream cheese or sour cream powders for fresh use. They might be fine in baked items, but the off taste was too much for eating fresh.

  23. #4743
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    TX & ID
    Posts
    1,646
    Whole wheat flour is only good for 1 to 3 months at room temperature, but lasts a whole lot longer if stored in the freezer.
    Personally, I just try to grind what I need for the bread I'm making at the time and generally bake often enough that the rest gets used well before then as well.

    As for oils ----
    Coconut Oil might not be readily available if we have an economic glitch or a transportation problem.

    Manual and electric home user oil presses are available and can even be found on Amazon.
    Big bags of black sunflower seeds are inexpensive at feed stores and they produce a good amount of oil yield.
    Sunflowers are easy to grow too, so you could always plan ahead to produce your own pesticide free non- GMO, and non-hydrogenated oils for cooking etc...

    I have an electric oil press currently, but I'll probably pick up a manual one as well. Oh, and the pulp can be fed to some animals such as pigs or chickens I suppose - or composted for soil improvement. Win win!
    “The consolidation of the states into one vast empire, sure to be aggressive abroad and despotic at home, will be the certain precursor of ruin which has overwhelmed all that preceded it.” – Robert E. Lee

  24. #4744
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    S.W. Mich. near South Bend, IN
    Posts
    6,331
    Thanks, Gingergirl, for the suggestion on the Country Life website. Seeing that it is 7 Day reminded me that around Y2K, I had bought a supply of things...I do recall several kinds of nuts. Good company....I don't drive that much, anymore, but think I will order something from them, and certainly will keep a record of the website.

    Martinhouse, I doubt if any of the cooking oils at the grocery stores will say they are partially hydrogenated...I have a very old bottle of Shurfine oil which I haven't used for cooking (once I learned about the dangers of partially hydrogenated, I stopped), but I do use it to season my cast iron pan. This bottle does not say it is partially hydrogenated. (I am an old lady, and I remember, years ago, how these many cooking oils were introduced as being so healthy!!!!!

    mudlogger, which items do you especially like and use from hoosierhill farm?

    I thank those of you who have mentioned these "new" sites for me to check out!

    About the coconut oil....I bought some way over 10 years ago and keep it in my basement, where it is reasonably cool. I got it from a company that specializes in coconut oil (along with many other healthful items)....tropicaltraditions.com

    I bought it in gallons.....got quite a lot, at the time, and as I need a new one, will pour it into qt. jars, keeping just one upstairs at a time. I use it for frying and even sometimes for baking. I prefer the non-virgin kind, as I don't care to have my foods taste like coconut. This oil is excellent quality, made in the Phillipines. Seems to last indefinitely.

    This company is in the US, but they outsource their oil from the Phillipines. If you're interested, they supply a lot of very high quality products including grass fed meats....not cheap, but they have half price sales, occasionally, and free shipping over a certain amt. (I should mention that their grass fed meats are grown in the U.S. The company describes the type of cattle, bison, etc. And, no, I am not connected to Tropical Traditions, I just think they are a very high quality company.)
    Last edited by Michiana MaJo; 07-13-2019 at 06:32 PM.

  25. #4745
    Quote Originally Posted by school marm View Post
    I have not been impressed with Hoosier Hills' cream cheese or sour cream powders for fresh use. They might be fine in baked items, but the off taste was too much for eating fresh.
    Thanks for that info...I'm mainly looking at the butter and cheese.
    Been reading for years, just now starting to talk.

  26. #4746
    MaJo, I haven't ordered yet.
    Been reading for years, just now starting to talk.

  27. #4747
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Looking Up
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    10,892
    Quote Originally Posted by Zahra View Post
    Whole wheat flour is only good for 1 to 3 months at room temperature, but lasts a whole lot longer if stored in the freezer.
    Personally, I just try to grind what I need for the bread I'm making at the time and generally bake often enough that the rest gets used well before then as well.

    As for oils ----
    Coconut Oil might not be readily available if we have an economic glitch or a transportation problem.

    Manual and electric home user oil presses are available and can even be found on Amazon.
    Big bags of black sunflower seeds are inexpensive at feed stores and they produce a good amount of oil yield.
    Sunflowers are easy to grow too, so you could always plan ahead to produce your own pesticide free non- GMO, and non-hydrogenated oils for cooking etc...

    I have an electric oil press currently, but I'll probably pick up a manual one as well. Oh, and the pulp can be fed to some animals such as pigs or chickens I suppose - or composted for soil improvement. Win win!
    That is a very well thought out prep on sunflower oil. I like the final consumptive use to the chickens and pigs. Very nice. I like making our own bread. Wheat berries can go years if properly stored. I like to use Montana wheat flour, non GMO, unbleached with high gluten. The sourdough yeast loves to eat the gluten and rise. No problem storing since it comes sealed in 10# bags.

  28. #4748
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubble Head View Post
    That is a very well thought out prep on sunflower oil. I like the final consumptive use to the chickens and pigs. Very nice. I like making our own bread. Wheat berries can go years if properly stored. I like to use Montana wheat flour, non GMO, unbleached with high gluten. The sourdough yeast loves to eat the gluten and rise. No problem storing since it comes sealed in 10# bags.
    I am considering a Piteba Nut & Seed Oil Expeller Oil press they claim is built in Holland- not China. What is your opinion of this press?

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Piteba-Nut-...53.m1438.l9372

    Oops! Post was meant for Zahra but anyone can answer. Working on first cup of coffee.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  29. #4749
    TxGal, it looks like both Adapt 2030 and Ice Age Farmer have new podcasts out this morning. I can't listen to them until later because my sis is coming down to help me do stuff this morning, but I sure intend to get to them asap.
    -----
    Oops, I'm wrong. the Adapt 2030 is not a podcast, it's an article on oilseedcrops .org and I haven't checked it yet to see what it's about.

  30. #4750
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    TX & ID
    Posts
    1,646
    Quote Originally Posted by Seeker22 View Post
    I am considering a Piteba Nut & Seed Oil Expeller Oil press they claim is built in Holland- not China. What is your opinion of this press?

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Piteba-Nut-...53.m1438.l9372

    Oops! Post was meant for Zahra but anyone can answer. Working on first cup of coffee.
    That's the model I was thinking about getting too Seeker, and it's only $120 on Amazon. There are quite a few videos of it in operation on YouTube and it's been around for years so I think it appears to be reliable.
    “The consolidation of the states into one vast empire, sure to be aggressive abroad and despotic at home, will be the certain precursor of ruin which has overwhelmed all that preceded it.” – Robert E. Lee

  31. #4751
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,060
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    TxGal, it looks like both Adapt 2030 and Ice Age Farmer have new podcasts out this morning. I can't listen to them until later because my sis is coming down to help me do stuff this morning, but I sure intend to get to them asap.
    -----
    Oops, I'm wrong. the Adapt 2030 is not a podcast, it's an article on oilseedcrops .org and I haven't checked it yet to see what it's about.
    Actually, there is a podcast now! Posting below, sorry, just got in from taking care of chickens and ducks....
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avKZYrczDrE

    Storm Barry Washing Away U.S Agricultural Output (852)

    Run time is 7:07

    Tropical Storm Barry forecast to be a rainmaker and drop 6-10 inches of rain on already soaked and flooded US farmland. This time though it is happening in the pollination period for rice so that is expected to take a hit as well. Mississippi will hit massive flood stage again delaying barge traffic and this will ruin many fields with newly emerged corn. Another and possibly final blow to US 2019 agriculture.


    And, Ice Age Farmer has a new podcast out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68xnu0aOLps

    WHERE ARE THE PEAS? Walmart's Nationwide Shortages Don't Add Up

    Run time is 8:02

    Walmarts across the United States are bereft of canned peas. The media blames Beyond Meat's Bleeding Burgers for creating pea protein -- but does this add up? Christian breaks down the facts and offers some high-octane speculation.

    Start growing your own food today!

  32. #4752
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,060
    Y'all, read the comments below the Ice Age Farmer podcast. Lots of really good info there coming in from around the US as people post.

    I was going shopping today anyhow after visiting family today, guess I'm doing a bit more grocery shopping, too. Again.

  33. #4753
    We were in Wally yesterday, sw Virginia, and the empty shelf we noticed...was salt. There were some Morton cylinder sea salts, but not much of anything else. We were looking for the Lite salt for the oral rehy. formula.
    Been reading for years, just now starting to talk.

  34. #4754
    Salt supply was scant yesterday at my WM, too. And there was no turkey of any kind at all and I suspect there won't be any more until the first part of November. Doubt I'll want to pay what they'll be asking for it by then, if they do actually have any then or ever.
    -----
    My sister likes only the frozen peas. I need to tell her to stock up on those, if they are not missing like the canned ones.

  35. #4755
    The Dust Veil Environmental Disaster of AD 536

    by K. Kris Hirst
    Thoughtco.com
    Updated September 24, 2018

    According to written records and supported by dendrochronology (tree ring) and archaeological evidence, for 12-18 months in AD 536-537, a thick, persistent dust veil or dry fog darkened the skies between Europe and Asia Minor. The climatic interruption brought by the thick, bluish fog extended as far east as China, where summer frosts and snow are mentioned in historical records; tree ring data from Mongolia and Siberia to Argentina and Chile reflect decreased growing records from 536 and the subsequent decade.

    The climatic effects of the dust veil brought decreased temperatures, drought, and food shortages throughout the affected regions: in Europe, two years later came the Justinian plague. The combination killed perhaps as much as 1/3 of the population of Europe; in China, the famine killed perhaps 80% of people in some regions; and in Scandinavia, the losses may have been as much as 75-90% of the population, as evidenced by the numbers of deserted villages and cemeteries.

    Historical Documentation

    The rediscovery of the AD 536 event was made during the 1980s by American geoscientists Stothers and Rampino, who searched classical sources for evidence of volcanic eruptions. Among their other findings, they noted several references to environmental disasters around the world between AD 536-538.

    Contemporary reports identified by Stothers and Rampino included Michael the Syrian, who wrote:

    "[T]he sun became dark and its darkness lasted for one and a half years [...] Each day it shone for about four hours and still this light was only a feeble shadow [...] the fruits did not ripen and the wine tasted like sour grapes."

    John of Ephesus related much the same events. Prokopios, who lived in both Africa and Italy at the time, said:

    "For the sun gave forth its light without brightness, like the moon, during this whole year, and it seemed exceedingly like the sun in eclipse, for the beams it shed were not clear nor such as it is accustomed to shed."

    An anonymous Syrian chronicler wrote:

    "[T]he sun began to be darkened by day and the moon by night, while the ocean was tumultuous with spray, from the 24th of March in this year till the 24th of June in the following year..."

    The following winter in Mesopotamia was so bad that "from the large and unwonted quantity of snow the birds perished."

    A Summer Without Heat

    Cassiodorus, praetorian prefect of Italy at the time, wrote: "so we have had a winter without storms, spring without mildness, summer without heat."
    John Lydos, in On Portents, writing from Constantinople, said:

    "If the sun becomes dim because the air is dense from rising moisture—as happened in [536/537] for nearly a whole year [...] so that produce was destroyed because of the bad time—it predicts heavy trouble in Europe."

    In China, reports indicate that the star of Canopus could not be seen in as usual in the spring and fall equinoxes of 536, and the years AD 536-538 were marked by summer snows and frosts, drought and severe famine. In some parts of China, the weather was so severe that 70-80% of the people starved to death.

    Physical Evidence

    Tree rings show that 536 and the following ten years was a period of slow growth for Scandinavian pines, European oaks and even several North American species including bristlecone pine and foxtail; similar patterns of ring size decrease are also seen in trees in Mongolia and northern Siberia.

    But there seems to be something of a regional variation in the worst of the effects. 536 was a bad growing season in many parts of the world, but more generally, it was a part of a decade-long downturn in climate for the northern hemisphere, separate from the worst seasons by 3-7 years. For most reports in Europe and Eurasia, there is a drop in 536, followed by a recovery in 537-539, followed by a more serious plunge lasting perhaps as late as 550. In most cases the worst year for tree ring growth is 540; in Siberia 543, southern Chile 540, Argentina 540-548.

    AD 536 and the Viking Diaspora

    Archaeological evidence described by Gräslund and Price shows that Scandinavia might have experienced the worst troubles. Almost 75% of villages were abandoned in parts of Sweden, and areas of southern Norway show a decrease in formal burials—indicating that haste was required in interments—up to 90-95%.

    Scandinavian narratives recount possible events that might be referring to 536. Snorri Sturluson's Edda includes a reference to Fimbulwinter, the "great" or "mighty" winter that served as a forewarning of Ragnarök, the destruction of the world and all of its inhabitants.

    "First of all that a winter will come called Fimbulwinter. Then snow will drift from all directions. There will then be great frosts and keen winds. The sun will do no good. There will be three of these winters together and no summer between."

    Gräslund and Price speculate that the social unrest and sharp agrarian decline and demographic disaster in Scandinavia may have been a primary catalyst for the Viking diaspora—when in the 9th century AD, young men left Scandinavia in droves and sought to conquer new worlds.

    Possible Causes

    Scholars are divided concerning what caused the dust veil: a violent volcanic eruption—or several (see Churakova et al.), a cometary impact, even a near miss by a large comet could have created a dust cloud made up of dust particles, smoke from fires and (if a volcanic eruption) sulfuric acid droplets such as that described. Such a cloud would reflect and/or absorb light, increasing the earth's albedo and measurably decreasing the temperature.

    Sources

    · Arrhenius B. 2012. Helgö in the shadow of the dust veil 536-37. Journal of Archaeology and Ancient History 2013(5).
    · Arjava A. 2005. The Mystery Cloud of 536 CE in the Mediterranean Sources. Dumbarton Oaks Papers 59:73-94.
    · Baillie M. 2007. The case for significant numbers of extraterrestrial impacts through the late Holocene. Journal of Quaternary Science 22(2):101-109. doi: 10.1002/jqs.1099
    · Baillie MGL, and McAneney J. 2015. Tree ring. Climate 11(1):105-114. effects and ice core acidities clarify the volcanic record of the first millennium of the Past
    · Churakova OV, Bryukhanova MV, Saurer M, Boettger T, Naurzbaev MM, Myglan VS, Vaganov EA, Hughes MK, and Siegwolf RTW. 2014. A cluster of stratospheric volcanic eruptions in the AD 530s recorded in Siberian tree rings. Global and Planetary Change 122:140-150.
    · Engvild KC. 2003. A review of the risks of sudden global cooling and its effects on agriculture. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 115(3–4):127-137. doi:10.1016/s0168-1923(02)00253-8
    · Gräslund B, and Price N. 2012. Twilight of the gods? The ‘dust veil event’ of AD 536 in critical perspective. Antiquity 332:428-443.
    · Larsen LB, Vinther BM, Briffa KR, Melvin TM, Clausen HB, Jones PD, Siggaard-Andersen M, Hammer CU, Eronen M, and Grudd H. 2008. New ice core evidence for a volcanic cause of the AD 536 dust veil. Geophysical Research Letters 35(4)
    · Rigby E, Symonds M, and Ward-Thompson D. 2004. A comet impact in AD 536? Astronomy & Geophysics 45(1):1.23-1.26


    https://www.thoughtco.com/dust-veil-...-europe-171628

  36. #4756
    A very sobering article...thanks for posting this, northern watch.

    When I saw David DuByne's article or podcast with the satellite (or space station?) picture of brown clouds (from volcanic dust) I decided that I'm back to prepping more for a bigger pantry and less for gardening. If it's possible that NOTHING will grow for many, many years, I want to make sure there's plenty on my shelves!

    The time described in this article makes the 1816 Year without a Summer sound like a rainy weekend.

  37. #4757
    Quote Originally Posted by Zahra View Post
    That's the model I was thinking about getting too Seeker, and it's only $120 on Amazon. There are quite a few videos of it in operation on YouTube and it's been around for years so I think it appears to be reliable.
    I'll be getting one then. I have packages of Sunflower seed from the Dollar store and will plant them tomorrow. There are all kinds and colors. Very pretty. Is there a variety that is recommended for oil production over all the others? I will be milling for oil with the Piteba and also roasting/dehydrating some to eat. Thanks for the help!
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  38. #4758
    Seeker22, I think the black oil sunflower seeds like you find in the mixes of wild bird seed are the best for oil production. Someone gave me a small amount of the birdseed last year and I painstakingly sorted it and I have little jars with several kinds of seeds. I didn't plant them this year but I'm sure they'll be okay next spring. I'll plant them then if the sun is still shining at least part of the time.

  39. #4759
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Seeker22, I think the black oil sunflower seeds like you find in the mixes of wild bird seed are the best for oil production. Someone gave me a small amount of the birdseed last year and I painstakingly sorted it and I have little jars with several kinds of seeds. I didn't plant them this year but I'm sure they'll be okay next spring. I'll plant them then if the sun is still shining at least part of the time.
    Years ago, I got my mama a bird feeder that looked like a tube with perches. The only thing to ever go in that feeder was Black Oil Sunflower seed. I'll grab some next time I'm in town.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  40. #4760
    Wouldn't it be nice to grow enough of those sunflowers to help a few chickens through a long cold winter?

    Actually, it would be a bit easier, at least at this point, to buy a 50# sack of them, wouldn't it?

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