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The Grand Solar Minimum
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  1. #521
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    While this is all true, and while I'm certain we'd see tremendous societal upheaval and likely loss of life, we have many advantages that simply weren't even dreamed of during the last temperature downturn.

    First, MUCH better insulation in houses. "Energy Star" compliant homes are now being built using 6" uprights, not the previously standard 2x4's. Insulation in attics, etc, is 2-4x as much as was "normal" even 40 years ago: forget in the 1800's!! While log houses had a certain built-in R value, the gaps between logs, no matter how well chinked, let a lot of cold air- and often actual snow- in. Then we have windows... from poorly puttied single pane, we now have triple pane glass. Again, the increase in heat gain/loss prevention is huge.

    In terms of food supply, the one major difference is the "worldwide" transportation system. While energy intensive, it still allows for foodstuffs to be moved from areas with a surplus to those with shortages. The "breadbasket" in the US may well move farther south by a couple/few hundred miles, although soil differences will likely mandate different crop choices. Still, currently, 40% of the corn grown in the US is turned into fuel (stupid beyond belief, but if the climate begins to change for the worse, all these idiotic "global warming" mandates will quickly be seen for the idiocy they are) and 36% is fed directly to livestock. The current model of feedlot raising of cattle and hogs is completely dependent on cheap grain. Diets will change rapidly if the price of meat rises to it's actual value in the human diet and to account for the REAL cost of raising it.

    Those who are set up for raising beef or hogs on pasture will be much better off, although there isn't any possible way to produce the current numbers of beef animals on pasture. But if the southern states cool off, some of the current problems in raising livestock there (diseases and insect issues which cold tends to mitigate or even eliminate) will be reduced.

    As far as raising livestock in cold (and getting colder) climates, again, we have multiple technological improvements, starting with running water in the barns... and things like low-energy input heated waterers which require less energy than a 100 watt lightbulb to keep enough water thawed for 50 head of cattle. Add either some solar panels or wind generation, and you're good to go.

    And for season extending in gardens, etc, we now have plastics and other technology which is within financial and technological reach of almost anyone. Greenhouses or conservatories- made from hand leaded glass in the 1800's- were the province of the very rich. Almost anyone can put up a small grow tunnel in their lawn these days.

    The very real problem, as I see it, will be the cities. The cities in the Northern Tier of states already have days (and even weeks) when they are almost completely shut down due to severe snowstorms. Ice storms in the Southern states are already problematic, and are likely to become worse. Because no one was farsighted enough to insist on burying most of the power grid when the money was available, we have a VERY vulnerable grid, and power outages will see many people die if they go on for long.

    As you said- and as always- it will require preps, and not just a stash of long term storage food in the basement! But it's certainly possible to survive and even thrive in the coming years, with some foresight, luck and prayer.

    Summerthyme
    Perhaps. I hope you are right.

    We will only know in the fullness of time.

    History suggests otherwise; every previous empire world wide has collapsed during a Solar Minimum.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  2. #522
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    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    Perhaps. I hope you are right.

    We will only know in the fullness of time.

    History suggests otherwise; every previous empire world wide has collapsed during a Solar Minimum.

    von Koehler
    I dearly hope and pray Summerthyme is right, but I am not nearly as optimistic. I envision vast problems.

    Extended and repeated power outages due to wind, wet snow on lines, trees down, and delays in getting repairs made and power restored due to difficulty in getting roads plowed for crews to get into areas needing repairs, etc. Heavy power demands due to the need for more heat for longer periods of time, that strain the system. People without heat because they have no back-up heat source, or at least a fireplace or wood stove, or wood for those that is cut, split, dry and ready for use and in ample supply. Freezing water lines in homes that aren't ready for winter, those that don't have an alternative way to cook or reheat canned food, if they even have more than a few days' worth of easy to fix foods and enough bottled water to see them through a long storm.
    .
    I can envision a lot of unprepared people demanding their local governments 'do something' to help them when they have no power, food, water, etc. Overwhelmed municipalities when these wintery conditions happen over and over again to a populace that isn't prepared to be on their own for awhile.

    Then there would be distribution problems of a larger nature. Gas stations not getting fuel restocked as quickly as usual due to weather problems, pipeline problems, etc. Grocery stores that don't get restocked quickly after getting cleaned out within a day of an impending large winter storm. Not to mention less availability of certain foods due to crop loss or reductions, and the higher prices of available foods due to all of the above.

    All of this really isn't new at all, we see it all the time when blizzards or hurricanes are forecasted. What will be different, I believe, is that these storms will be greatly more severe, affecting larger populations, and for longer durations...and repetitively.

  3. #523
    Quote Originally Posted by TxGal View Post
    I dearly hope and pray Summerthyme is right, but I am not nearly as optimistic. I envision vast problems.

    Extended and repeated power outages due to wind, wet snow on lines, trees down, and delays in getting repairs made and power restored due to difficulty in getting roads plowed for crews to get into areas needing repairs, etc. Heavy power demands due to the need for more heat for longer periods of time, that strain the system. People without heat because they have no back-up heat source, or at least a fireplace or wood stove, or wood for those that is cut, split, dry and ready for use and in ample supply. Freezing water lines in homes that aren't ready for winter, those that don't have an alternative way to cook or reheat canned food, if they even have more than a few days' worth of easy to fix foods and enough bottled water to see them through a long storm.
    .
    I can envision a lot of unprepared people demanding their local governments 'do something' to help them when they have no power, food, water, etc. Overwhelmed municipalities when these wintery conditions happen over and over again to a populace that isn't prepared to be on their own for awhile.

    Then there would be distribution problems of a larger nature. Gas stations not getting fuel restocked as quickly as usual due to weather problems, pipeline problems, etc. Grocery stores that don't get restocked quickly after getting cleaned out within a day of an impending large winter storm. Not to mention less availability of certain foods due to crop loss or reductions, and the higher prices of available foods due to all of the above.

    All of this really isn't new at all, we see it all the time when blizzards or hurricanes are forecasted. What will be different, I believe, is that these storms will be greatly more severe, affecting larger populations, and for longer durations...and repetitively.
    I am afraid you are right. Believe me I have no desire to experience a Solar Minimum, but it's a natural cycle that will happen whether or not there are humans on planet Earth.

    Porto Rico is a case study of how a natural disaster can adversely affect its human population. The power grid is still down for parts of the island and after only a single weather event. The Grand Solar Minimum is predicted to last for many years.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  4. #524
    I should clarify that I don't believe for a second that IF- God Forbid- this dramatic cooling trend is real and permanent (at least at my age, I won't see the other side!) it won't cause major disruptions, and even potential mass die offs in the cities.

    I DO believe it's entirely survivable, even in the northern tiers of the country, barring the "instant glacier" theory (which, given the previous glacial record, which includes huge valleys and gigantic "rock tracks" which show the track the glaciers took as they grew, doesn't seem all that likely).

    Even in the collapse of empires, small communities managed to survive and even thrive, by working with the new normal, rather than attempting to maintain the status quo. I'm under no illusions that I have any power to do anything more than that... prepare in whatever way possible (under very limited income and with an aging body) to keep our family healthy and thriving.

    Over the past 20 years, I stocked up on several large Rubbermaid containers full of wool blankets, down comforters, wool socks and also several bolts of Malden Mills Polar Fleece, wool fabrics (when you can get 100% washable wool jersey knits for $6 a yard, you grab it... I KNOW how much time and labor it takes to make wool yarn and then either knit it (even on a knitting machine, and this is one reason why I've never sold mine, despite simply not finding the time or energy to use it for almost 10 years) or weave it into fabric.

    If the weather does continue to cool, a pit greenhouse will be on the "must do" list very shortly.

    As far as things like the grid going down... I've long since believed that while I love my "Kilowatt slaves", and we do have a generator, preparing to live an 18th century lifestyle (hopefully with a few 21st century improvements, such as solar panels to run the circulating pump on our outdoor wood furnace- filling with large logs once or twice in 48 hours beats splitting wood finely and then filling a woodstove 6-8 times in 24 hours, believe me!) makes the most sense.

    Summerthyme

  5. #525


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvmzErMyii4

    4:46 minutes

    Deep South Homestead
    Published on Dec 9, 2017

    I believe he is located in Louisiana. Just an example of how unusual this is. I am sure some of humanity will pull through this somehow; the question is how many will?
    Since video was done, he has harvested cool weather vegetables.

    von Koehler
    Last edited by von Koehler; 05-09-2018 at 09:17 AM.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  6. #526
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    This morning iceagenow.info/Robert Felix has posted his continuing notes on the video on the Little Ice Age. Honestly, everyone and their families should watch this vido. It's well done and rather sobering, if not stunning. I'm learning more about the history of the period and how weather affected it than I ever learned in school.

    Many people seem to believe that because the last Grand Solar Minimum happened so long ago it is going to be a past event forever, as when dinosaurs roamed the earth. They are failing to comprehend or accept that just as weather comes in cycles within each year - winter, spring, summer, and fall - so do the climate changes that will affect or direct the weather for decades, or longer. We can only hope that the GSM comes in gradually, and not abruptly.

    https://www.iceagenow.info/horrifyin...age-segment-3/
    Last edited by TxGal; 05-09-2018 at 10:06 AM. Reason: Reflecting one video but several posts with Robert Felix's synopsis notes.

  7. #527
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    https://www.twincities.com/2018/05/0...atest-ice-out/

    White Bear Lake ties 68-year-old record for latest ice-out

    White Bear Lake ended up tying its 68-year-old record for the latest ice-out.

    According to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, the east metro’s biggest lake lost its ice cover on Friday. That tied the May 4, 1950, record.

    The median ice-out date for White Bear is April 13. Ice-out data for the lake go back to 1928.

    The west metro’s biggest lake also tied its record for latest ice-out last weekend.

    Lake Minnetonka was declared ice-free on Saturday. This year’s ice-out tied May 5, 1857, for the latest on record.

    Minnetonka’s median ice-out date is April 14. Ice-out data for the lake go back to 1855.

    With the state’s fishing opener this Saturday, the DNR says the lingering cold weather has delayed ice-out on many Minnesota lakes and rivers, though sunny, warmer weather in May has accelerated melting.

    The agency said Monday that even if ice does go out on many lakes in time for the opener, the delay was making it difficult for its crews to have the 1,500 public water accesses it manages ready in time.

    There are about 3,000 public water access sites statewide, and the DNR’s Parks and Trails Division manages about half of them.
    Was known as dairyfarmer but sold the cows.

  8. #528
    TxGal, I was under the impression that the video Robert is posting each day on iceagenow is the same video, but he is adding the notes being made for the video in fifteen minute segments, one segment per day.

    Guess I need to listen to today's post of that video to see if I am mistaken and am missing more good videos.

  9. #529
    The one video I watched posted here was pretty good; it was dated on the Norse but a lot of the new stuff there is very recent and only suggests that some people may have survived and joined the Inuit as well as making it back to Europe (aka they didn't all starve to death) also, they probably didn't feel the Natives were exactly inferior; but as one Inuit Elder who has a Ph.d. in Archeology from Denmark said "they would have had to learn all the special prayers and such if they wanted to learn hunting from us and they would have found that to be Heathen and they would have been correct, and so probably refused my ancestor's help" or words to that effect.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  10. #530
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    TxGal, I was under the impression that the video Robert is posting each day on iceagenow is the same video, but he is adding the notes being made for the video in fifteen minute segments, one segment per day.

    Guess I need to listen to today's post of that video to see if I am mistaken and am missing more good videos.
    Good grief, you're right - my error, and apologies to all....I've been watching it about 10 minutes at a time due to a few first time calves being born, and assumed it was three separate videos not just his notes. I'll edit my previous post to reflect Robert Felix's notes....sheesh.

  11. #531


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4HtHX1EvOYU

    This video isn't on the Grand Solar Minimum but she gives great advice on homesteading; what to do and not to do.

    I think she is definitely a survivor.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  12. #532
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    Perhaps. I hope you are right.

    We will only know in the fullness of time.

    History suggests otherwise; every previous empire world wide has collapsed during a Solar Minimum.

    von Koehler
    Many differences between now and then. Folks also need to realize this isn't an Iceage. Where ice is miles think in Montreal. It's just an average temp 3-4 degrees lower. It will mean later frosts and more snow. But it's not the end of things. Heck I successfully grow in a climate much colder than the expected change for most. My median temp is 41F with a yearly average GDHs of 1500. So don't worry about being able to grow for you and yours. Cooler weather in the south will make summer vegetable growing possible with much less effort. Right now the sweet spot for outdoor growing vegetables on the east coast is Lancaster Co, Pennsylvania. Lots of room to move south. No?

    We also have huge equipment to move snow and paved roads to travel on. We have heating systems and homes better built with less materials than in times past. An average american lives better than kings of old Europe. Electrical grids can be built to withstand ice and snow... Ours in the north do well if they keep the trees cut. The topic of forests. In the eastern states huge forests have returned so much so that the states are encouraging the cutting of forest for renewal purposes. My county in Northeastern Pa put out the statistic that the largest land use change for the last 50 years has been from cultivation to standing timber. So I have no worries about wood usage. Lastly on the topic of wood. They cut the eastern forest to tame it for the plow. Then they cut the midwest for lumber. It wasn't cut for heating, that's a myth.

  13. #533
    In the 1300's the real problem wasn't so much the cold, it was the RAINS; which at the start of the century went on for FIVE YEARS in Northern Europe - that makes growing things very hard; not impossible but hard.

    Personal and community gardens would/will become very important...
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  14. #534
    http://www.noaa.gov/news/us-had-its-...-than-20-years









    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    U.S. Department

    U.S. had its coldest April in more than 20 years

    Below-average temperatures spanned the Rockies to the East Coast

    May 8, 2018 Everyone seems to be wondering, "What happened to spring?" Last month, a persistent flow of Arctic air blanketed the eastern two-thirds of the nation. Record cold, and even snow in some areas, delayed the onset of warm spring-like conditions.

    Let’s dive deeper to see how April 2018 and the year to date fared in terms of the climate record:

    Climate by the numbers

    April 2018

    The average April temperature across the contiguous U.S. was 48.9 degrees F (2.2 degrees below average), making it the 13th coldest April of the 124-year record, according to scientists from NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information. This was the coldest April since 1997. The month saw record- and near-record-cold temperatures from the Northern Plains to Gulf Coast and the Northeast. The Southwest was warmer than average.

    The average precipitation for the month was 2.41 inches (0.11 of an inch below average), which ranked near the middle of the record. Record dryness was observed in parts of the Southwest and mid-Mississippi Valley with areas of record-wet conditions in the Northwest.
    Last edited by von Koehler; 05-09-2018 at 10:39 AM.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  15. #535
    Quote Originally Posted by Stanb999 View Post
    Many differences between now and then. Folks also need to realize this isn't an Iceage. Where ice is miles think in Montreal. It's just an average temp 3-4 degrees lower. It will mean later frosts and more snow. But it's not the end of things. Heck I successfully grow in a climate much colder than the expected change for most. My median temp is 41F with a yearly average GDHs of 1500. So don't worry about being able to grow for you and yours. Cooler weather in the south will make summer vegetable growing possible with much less effort. Right now the sweet spot for outdoor growing vegetables on the east coast is Lancaster Co, Pennsylvania. Lots of room to move south. No?

    We also have huge equipment to move snow and paved roads to travel on. We have heating systems and homes better built with less materials than in times past. An average american lives better than kings of old Europe. Electrical grids can be built to withstand ice and snow... Ours in the north do well if they keep the trees cut. The topic of forests. In the eastern states huge forests have returned so much so that the states are encouraging the cutting of forest for renewal purposes. My county in Northeastern Pa put out the statistic that the largest land use change for the last 50 years has been from cultivation to standing timber. So I have no worries about wood usage. Lastly on the topic of wood. They cut the eastern forest to tame it for the plow. Then they cut the midwest for lumber. It wasn't cut for heating, that's a myth.
    I never claimed we are facing a Ice Age; but rather a minimum.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  16. #536
    Hate to be a negative Nelly here, but while we have more stuff, we have fewer skills.

    Also, we have a lot more glorious *Diversity!*, and a lot less social trust.
    Community gardens, Melodi? Really? I can imagine (maybe) extended family gardens, but not community gardens. (Maybe community gardens in Hungary, Poland, maybe in Japan - but, most of us don't live in those places.) I think most people are going to spend the first few years of real scarcity fighting 24/7 to keep what they have, never mind sharing. Until things settle out, people might not even have much time left over for producing.

    I think the diversity problem will be the most serious problem the invaded West will face once people start going hungry.

    I agree with Summerthyme that humans can survive and flourish under almost any conditions the Earth has to offer. However, harsh climates confer harsh codes of *social justice* on the resident populations. Life gets stripped down to essentials. No parasites allowed. The generation that grows up in and survives this will have a very different set of morals and virtues than most people have today.
    Last edited by Faroe; 05-09-2018 at 10:48 AM.

  17. #537
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    I never claimed we are facing a Ice Age; but rather a minimum.

    von Koehler

    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    Of all the charts I have posted so far, #509 is the most disturbing.

    It basically predicts that for the next hundred years, the Earth will slip back into A Little Ice Age.

    I can only hope some will prep in time; I suspect that most will most ignore and go into denial.

    You do NOT want to live anywhere above the black line [even the dashed line section will be marginal] in the chart below.



    von Koehler


    You said anyone above this LINE... That is the Iceage glacial ice line. While I totally agree with and have planned for the coming little iceage. That image has no place. It's far warmer in northern NY near the lakes than it is in the mountains of West Virginia. Planning should take these realities into account.

  18. #538
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    Hate to be a negative Nelly here, but while we have more stuff, we have fewer skills.

    Also, we have a lot more glorious *Diversity!*, and a lot less social trust.
    Community gardens, Melodi? Really? I can imagine (maybe) extended family gardens, but not community gardens. (Maybe community gardens in Hungary, Poland, maybe in Japan - but, most of us don't live in those places.) I think most people are going to spend the first few years of real scarcity fighting 24/7 to keep what they have, never mind sharing. Until things settle out, people might not even have much time left over for producing.

    I think the diversity problem will be the most serious problem the invaded West will face once people start going hungry.

    I agree with Summerthyme that humans can survive and flourish under almost any conditions the Earth has to offer. However, harsh climates confer harsh codes of *social justice* on the resident populations. Life gets stripped down to essentials. No parasites allowed. The generation that grows up in and survives this will have a very different set of morals and virtues than most people have today.
    Very well said. By and large, most metropolitan areas and even suburbs have little sense of community, or perhaps not the deep sense of community that will help people get through an extended difficult period with extreme strain on resources.

    While no one here believes this will be a true ice age, those that would compare a Grand Solar Minimum to just a little colder or wetter weather....it would be nice if we got so lucky. I believe, and history seems to support (thank you von Koehler for the many excellent charts), that it's going to be far more severe in waves over the span of an extended winter, a later spring growing season, and likely an earlier fall. And, for decades, not just one year. It's hard to grow crops - and I don't mean a big garden patch like most of us have - hundreds or thousands of acres of crops in those conditions. Many of us have experienced extended power outages due to ice storms.....when the storms train (as our winter storms did this year), the same areas get hit over and over. Anyone living in those areas knows it's hard for resources (food and power especially) to stretch to cover the needs, and even harder to bounce back from service interruptions and storm damage.

  19. #539
    Quote Originally Posted by Stanb999 View Post
    You said anyone above this LINE... That is the Iceage glacial ice line. While I totally agree with and have planned for the coming little iceage. That image has no place. It's far warmer in northern NY near the lakes than it is in the mountains of West Virginia. Planning should take these realities into account.
    I see that I wasn't clear or explicit enough. I used the geological history to indicate where growing food is going to be difficult, especially on an agribusiness scale. It will take more effort to stay warm in this area.

    Could someone overcome this? Yes, of course. You can grow bananas in Maine if you expend enough money and efforts at it. $100 a bunch?

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  20. #540
    Two things:

    There actually ARE community gardens in many places including some urban h...l holes in the US; they tend to be on vacant lots and run by the grandparents and great-grandparents of both folks from the "Old" country (like Vietnam) and some elderly African-Americans and Whites; there are also community garden and farm projects in rural areas, I know people active on them.

    Two, during WWII some huge amount (like 80 percent, I forget exactly) of vegetables were grown in homes and community gardens in the UK and the USA; the government tends to play that down (in both places) because they don't want people to actually do this sort of thing full time anymore. The UK tolerates it better but tends to push things like growing flowers and a few carrots, not tearing up lawns as was done during WWII and/or vacant lots in cities.

    My point is that these things probably WILL end up happening, maybe not a first and not everywhere; but they will happen; in Ireland most people even in major cities still often have vegetable plots and during the 2008 recession the government did prime-time broadcasts to remind people that keeping chickens in Dublin was perfectly legal and encouraged during the crises.

    Real food shortages, especially gradual ones CAN result in mob violence but it also often gets people to work together, be prepared for both options is a good idea.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  21. #541
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    I see that I wasn't clear. I used the geological history to indicate where growing food is going to be difficult, especially on an agribusiness scale. It will take more effort to stay warm in this area.

    Could someone overcome this? Yes, of course. You can grow bananas in Maine if you expend enough money and efforts at it.

    von Koehler
    This was exactly the point of my posting. One must really consider their current conditions. The glacial lines have nothing to do with it. Being north of Labrador on the coast could be better than being above 8,000 ft in the pacific north west.. It's going to be 2-3 degrees colder. You can check your local weather data for what to expect. Then plan accordingly.

  22. #542
    http://www.syracuse.com/weather/inde...r_service.html

    Tornado with winds of 100 mph touched down in Finger Lakes
    : weather service
    Updated 10:47 AM; Posted May 8, 4:03 PM



    This file photo shows damage from a 2015 tornado in Scotia. The National Weather Service confirmed that a tornado of similar strength touched down last Thursday in Yates County.(Patrick Dodson)


    By Glenn Coin gcoin@syracuse.com,
    syracuse.com

    Syracuse, N.Y. -- A tornado with maximum winds of 100 mph touched down last week in Penn Yan, the National Weather Service confirmed today.

    After a daylong investigation, the weather service determined a tornado tore through the Yates County village about 8:20 p.m. Thursday.

    No one was killed or injured. The tornado hit a barn, which collapsed, on East Swamp Road, and tossed the debris on neighboring farm field, a weather service report said.

    The tornado's path was about a mile long, and it lasted just two minutes.

    "Along the path, the tornado took down several trees, which fell in different directions," the report said. "The tornado continued eastward to Voak Road, where it blew down a fence and another tree before lifting."

    The tornado was rated an EF-1, the second-lowest of six Enhanced Fujita Scale categories of tornadoes.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  23. #543
    I have a favor to ask. Earlier in this thread, a few posted about heritage types of corn they grew.

    I have not been able to find them so would greatly appreciate either giving the post number or submitting them again.

    Thanks!

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  24. #544
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    I have a favor to ask. Earlier in this thread, a few posted about heritage types of corn they grew.

    I have not been able to find them so would greatly appreciate either giving the post number or submitting them again.

    Thanks!

    von Koehler
    I have 2. Calais Flint, which is supposedly the only one to survive in new England during the year without a summer. Also wapsie valley dent another short season. Both can be had from fedco.

  25. #545
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    Quote Originally Posted by mecoastie View Post
    I have 2. Calais Flint, which is supposedly the only one to survive in new England during the year without a summer. Also wapsie valley dent another short season. Both can be had from fedco.
    Fedco should have several cold-hardy varieties, since they are based in Maine. Another one I have is Painted Mountain (developed in Idaho in the higher elevations, I believe). There are a couple of others you can look for.

    If you can't grow corn, oats or barley may be your best options, though you need to plan for dehulling them. Barley grows even in the Interior of Alaska.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  26. #546
    Quote Originally Posted by mecoastie View Post
    I have 2. Calais Flint, which is supposedly the only one to survive in new England during the year without a summer. Also wapsie valley dent another short season. Both can be had from fedco.
    I am pretty sure it was Calais Flint we planted the year we got enough corn to have for lunch (which was better than the other years)...fun but not really worth it for us but we are wetter than colder.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  27. #547
    bye
    Last edited by von Koehler; 05-10-2018 at 11:32 AM.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  28. #548
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    East Central Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    bye
    No no no, you aren't leaving permanently, are you?

  29. #549
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
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    37,851
    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    bye
    ???
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  30. #550
    Wet years are definitely going to be a huge problem in growing food, even on a small, homestead or self sufficiency basis. The old timers knew this very well... hence the ancient truism I've quoted here before: "a dry year will scare you to death, but a wet year will starve you to death". In dry or even drought conditions, especially given some of our newer technology (drip hoses, plastic mulch, using deep organic mulch, etc) as long as you have a reliable source of water for irrigation (a bigger problem in the naturally more arid regions), you can usually keep even large gardens growing and producing well.

    Many wheat varieties will produce with as little as 15" of rainfall. Winter wheat is often planted to take advantage of the moisture in snow and the naturally wetter soils before the summer heat hits.

    Wet years, however, are a problem in many ways. All sorts of blights, rusts, viruses and other diseases thrive in humid conditions. Plants actually drown if the water table stays too high...roots need oxygen, which is forced out by water. And fruits such as tomatoes and melons (also cabbage) will often split if they get too much water.

    You can help prevent some problems by aggressive pruning of fruit trees and vines... pruning to a very open shape allows more air flow, and can help limit some fungal diseases. Spraying with fungicides (copper is relatively safe and effective) on a rigid schedule can help prevent late blight in tomatoes and potatoes. Part of my preps includes a fairly good supply of copper concentrate... i HATE getting gorgeous, lush green tomato plants loaded with fruit and then having them blight and die within a few days!

    Growing pole varieties of peas and beans can help, as the pods are kept off the ground, and are much cleaner... rare to see mold or rot in the pods, while the bush varieties are often susceptible to both, sometimes even in the immature pods.Getting them to the stage to dry for next years seed (or harvest stage for dry or soup beans) is nearly impossible.

    For livestock, being set up to be able to rotationally graze pastures as long as possible helps reduce the amount of stored forage necessary to manage to harvest. We've moved to putting up most of our first crop hay as baleage (large round bales, baled green, and then wrapped in plastic to "pickle".) It will store for 2-3 years, IF you can keep rodents from chewing into the wrappings... once breached, the feed molds very quickly.

    Even in wetter years, we usually get several dry weeks by mid summer, which allows us to put second, and sometimes third crop hay into the barn.

    For corn, using the more traditional spacing (30" to 36" between rows, and 12" between plants) allows better drying and ripening of the ears. Production is lower than in the insane high density planting currently being practiced (plant populations of 40,000 plants per acre, as compared to the traditional 18,000!), but the corn can dry on the stalk, not need to be combined and then use propane to dry it. The Silver Mine corn variety I've mentioned before does very well grown the "old fashioned" way. Huge ears... as much as 3" diameter, with 12 ounces of corn (shelled) per ear, and 2 ears per plant. My only real complaint was that I often have to reach to head height (and I'm 5'8") to pick the lower ear! The plants get HUGE.

    I fully expect these next years to be challenging, but if we're willing to adapt and change eventime honored practices as needed, there is no reason we shouldnt be able to survive and thrive.

    Summerthyme

  31. #551
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
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    I'm afraid we may have lost von Koehler, sadly. I have learned a vast amount from him, and I always looked forward to his postings.

    Edited to add: We have seen the first of the price increases at the feed store. Picked up mineral/salt blocks and cattle cubes, and both were up about $1.00 each. We are also moving into hot and dry conditions for the next two weeks or so...the lack of rainfall is now worrying me. It's hard to tell if the price increases are due to rising cost of gas alone, or if the weather is playing a role...likely both. I have finally seen hay being made, which is a great relief. If we slide into drought, those prices are all going to go up.

  32. #552
    TxGal, I've been wondering what happened to him, too. I was busy outdoors a few day and then found the "bye" message here.

    I hope he didn't leave because of this thread being moved to Earth Changes. I like how much easier it is to find it now. But I sure do miss all of his good posts. They just aren't the same on his own site, without all of our (and his) accompanying comments.

    We've been having late June weather here in North Central Arkansas this month. High temps, warm nights, and no rain for a good while and none worth mentioning in the ten-day forecast.

  33. #553
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
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    1,728
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    TxGal, I've been wondering what happened to him, too. I was busy outdoors a few day and then found the "bye" message here.

    I hope he didn't leave because of this thread being moved to Earth Changes. I like how much easier it is to find it now. But I sure do miss all of his good posts. They just aren't the same on his own site, without all of our (and his) accompanying comments.

    We've been having late June weather here in North Central Arkansas this month. High temps, warm nights, and no rain for a good while and none worth mentioning in the ten-day forecast.
    I've tried several times to register on his site, but I can't get the 'captcha' picture to show, just get the little 'x' instead. It's not his site, it's my old laptop...it just doesn't care much for pictures/graphics. I do hope he comes back, he is a wealth of knowledge and at a very important time, methinks. Possibly the naysayers bothered him, I certainly don't blame him. I think, though, that they are all going to come around sooner rather than later that he is right. Gosh, rising grocery prices and spot vegetable shortages in the stores should get their attention. Still, many are slow to connect the dots, they just don't believe it can happen again.

    Yep, our weather seems similar to yours. Normally we wouldn't be this dry in May, not until June. We've started pumping from our well into the stock ponds to keep the level/freshness up. The last time we went dry in May was in the drought of '09 and it didn't rain again until the fall/winter. Please God spare us from that again. That's why we picked up more salt/mineral blocks and a few bags of cubes. I like to stay ahead on the blocks, just in case (their supply was low, as I thought it might be). We don't normally feed cubes until either drought or the dead of winter. We're starting them again, albeit in small quantities. I keep saying this, but this is just not normal. And, it's deeply troubling.

  34. #554
    I got a "two point infraction" for my efforts.

    Will continue posting at www.webwidediscussions.com

    If you troubles viewing it, shoot me a private message here.

    von Koehler
    Last edited by von Koehler; 05-16-2018 at 08:02 AM.
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  35. #555
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    I got a "two point infaction" for my efforts.

    Will continue posting at www.webwidediscussions.com

    If you troubles viewing it, shoot me a private message here.

    von Koehler
    Oh my.....but thanks so much for popping in again!! I will, and thank you :-)

  36. #556
    Woke up to heavy penny sized hail this morning... I honestly don't ever remember hail in .May here. We got another inch of rain on top of the inch and a half Saturday. Fields and gardens are sodden, and I have no idea when we'll be able to do the main planting.

    Thankful for our pasture and permanent hay fields style of farming... if we were trying to plant more than the half acre of corn this year, we'd be getting very frustrated. Also thanking God for the raised beds we have... not nearly enough for our garden needs, but very useful for planting early seeds, and as "insurance". While the 1800 or so onion plants in the main garden seem to be growing well, they are sitting in water at the end of the row, and if things don't start drying out soon, we'll be seeing disease problems or even drowning plants.

    The 200 or so plants in the raised beds are "insurance"... possibly sufficient for our own needs, but we won't have the extras we usually distribute to family and the local soup kitchen. But it beats having to buy onions all winter!

    Hoping we go back to a drier weather pattern very soon... the hay is starting to really grow, and i hate trying to bale hay in muddy fields!

    As far as the "infraction"... it doesn't mean anything in the big picture. Dennis just tries to enforce basic rules for posting videos, for the benefit if those members on dial-up (yes, we have them) or on limited bandwidth contracts, where watching too many videos can cost them. All we ask is that each video posted have the run time, and a *brief*, basic synopsis if what it's about. A sentence or two, to give people an idea of whether or not they want to click on the link.

    Summerthyme

  37. #557
    I'm glad to see I'm not the only one who likes to stay ahead on salt blocks! I'm not comfortable having fewer than 10 blocks on hand, and we're down to 3 in the haymow right now. Hubby suddenly lost his CDL, thanks to the incompetence of a local eye doctor, so our income just was cut by more than half. Hoping we'll be able to find buyers for a nice Dexter beef steer who should be nicely finished in 5 weeks, and we do have a buyer for 1400 bales of first crop hay... if we can find the weather to make hay! But, of course, property taxes will be due in September, and we have to start putting money away for that now... it's our biggest expense by far, and the one thing we dare not get behind on.

    I have a small emergency fund, but I hoard it jealously, and at this point, I don't think having fewer salt blocks stored than I like is a true emergency!

    But it's important, because we don't feed any grain or supplemental feed... we have excellent pastures, generally, and grain would just get the cattle fat; dat cows aren't any healthier than fat people! But certain trace minerals are lacking, including sodium and selenium. And they are vital for animal health.

    Summerthyme

  38. #558
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    TxGal, I've been wondering what happened to him, too. I was busy outdoors a few day and then found the "bye" message here.

    I hope he didn't leave because of this thread being moved to Earth Changes. I like how much easier it is to find it now. But I sure do miss all of his good posts. They just aren't the same on his own site, without all of our (and his) accompanying comments.

    We've been having late June weather here in North Central Arkansas this month. High temps, warm nights, and no rain for a good while and none worth mentioning in the ten-day forecast.
    Members can post away while "quests" can read only.
    Send me your email address and I will enter you as a member.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

    Christianity is the estranged descendent of a bizarre Jewish apocalyptic cult.

    Kein Krieg für Israel!

  39. #559
    Robert Felix just posted a short but disturbing article on his website iceagenow.info. It's about cold winters, hot summers and DROUGHT during a little ice age.

  40. #560
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    1,728
    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Robert Felix just posted a short but disturbing article on his website iceagenow.info. It's about cold winters, hot summers and DROUGHT during a little ice age.
    Oh no....we finally got about 2 inches of rain a few days ago, but it's now full on hot summer and I'm going to worry anyhow. Thanks for this info, I'll go check that out. I still owe von Koehler a msg...incredibly behind here with pasture work, livestock, and kids.

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