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The Grand Solar Minimum
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  1. #6081
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    East Central Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    TxGal, thanks for all the links! Wow! I know what I'll be doing on this chilly morning!

    I don't have to go outside again this morning except to feed and water my new chickens and to wash off the cat poop that got on my tailgate when I slid the live trap into the back of the truck.

    I brought both kitties to the vet this morning. By evening if not sooner, I'll know for sure if I have a Millie or a Billie, and if the newer kitty gets a boy name or a girl name.
    You're welcome....I can't really complain about the cold this morning, I think we're in the upper 50s, but the wind chill should be much lower...quite a wind blowing out there. And again with the night storms! Around midnight-1 am I saw the flashes of light and not too long after that a sudden burst of I don't know what, small hail or just forceful rain. DH and I are really dragging, but all seems well and that's what counts.

    Great on the kitties! That's a big one off your list :-)

    I think you're better at avoiding germs than I am....I need to do more of what you do.

  2. #6082
    Can't do much avoiding at the vet's, but I'll do some tomorrow at WM. I hope to get up early again and go get what wasn't on the shelves yesterday. Mostly the baby food and the eggs. I'll do that super early before I pick up the cats at the vet's and hand over what's nearly the last of my stash of $$$$$.

    But it really is good to be getting all this stuff done.

    I did want to find some rabbits, too, but I think I'll let that ride until I get some of the canning done. I'm going to buy a cheap cooler because my fridge is so overcrowded. I do keep room in one freezer for four half gallon jugs of ice, so the cooler should make it possible to keep what I'm having a hard time stuffing into the fridge.

    Now that I've sort of re-established a relationship with the vet, maybe they can watch for some rabbits for me.

  3. #6083
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    North Central Louisiana
    Posts
    8,896
    I put Vicks under my nose to keep from breathing nasties. You could always wear gloves to keep the germs off your hands. Golden Seal is good to take as a preventative, plus vitamin C and Zinc.

    Judy

  4. #6084
    Nomifyle, I do use Vick's like that. I keep a little jar of it in the truck all through cold and flu season.

    When I take cash out of the bank it immediately goes into a tiny covered tote that contains a quart of 91% alcohol. After shopping, any change I've gotten goes into that tote, too.

    Easier to wash my hands than to keep washing gloves.

    Am extremely allergic to Goldenseal and Elderberry and most other herbs or meds that I'd be likely to need, and can't swallow any pills at all. I take cod liver oil with my tomato juice nearly every day.

  5. #6085
    TxGal, it's supposed to get down to 40 here tonight. UGH!

    I HATE WINTER!

  6. #6086
    There's a new MIAC up. #239. "Getting us to prepare for the opposite of what we're really facing".

    Runs 32:11

  7. #6087
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
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    3,810
    Thanks, Martinhouse! I was reading IceAgeFarmer's twitter page.

    Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbuPWGjaJpw

    (MIAC #239) Getting Us to Prepare for the Opposite of What We Are Really Facing

    888 views•Oct 16, 2019

    Run time is 32:11

    John Kitson from 5GAwareness.com and David DuByne from ADAPT 2030 discuss increasing space radiation from the Grand Solar Minimum combining with 5G and the effects on plants, animals and humans and which types of radio-protective foods you can eat to protect yourself during these changing times.

    •How electromagnetic frequencies effect plants
    •Where are all of the pollinators gone?
    •Implementing Agenda 2030 with a reduced population
    •Solar panel output reduction is forecast 25% in the Grand Solar Minimum
    •United Nations 2019 test to sell food by the calorie in California and Oregon
    •Shrinkflation globally as serving sizes decrease
    •Internet of Things (IOT)
    •2023 roll out dates for global 5G overlap with global crop losses in the Grand Solar Minimum



  8. #6088
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
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    https://www.dtnpf.com/agriculture/we...-freeze-killed

    Ag Weather Forum

    Harvest Considerations for Freeze-Killed Corn and Soybean Fields

    10/16/2019 | 8:26 AM CDT

    ROCKVILLE, Md. (DTN) -- The threat that has been building throughout the spring and summer is finally imminent.

    A major winter freeze and snowstorm looms for the northern Midwest, where many corn and soybean fields have yet to reach maturity. See the DTN story here: https://www.dtnpf.com/….

    Once the front passes, growers with freeze-damaged immature crops will face a host of harvest challenges. Experts recommend that growers in this situation prioritize freeze-damaged fields for harvest, adjust combine settings carefully and plan for high-moisture, low-quality grain.

    DTN digs into each of those factors here, with help from Michigan State University Extension Soybean Educator Mike Staton and Iowa State University Extension Croppings Systems Specialist Mark Licht.

    HARVEST PRIORITIES

    Growers with very late-planted soybean fields may need to take the time to assess if their field is still worth harvesting for grain after a freeze, Staton said.

    "The conventional wisdom from agronomists is that if soybeans are in the R6 growth stage at the time of the freeze, they are salvageable," he said. "Before then, they are likely not." See more on that topic here: https://www.pioneer.com/….

    For salvageable soybean fields, as well as cornfields, prioritizing freeze-damaged crops for harvest will be essential, Staton and Licht both stressed. While the immature crops will almost certainly be higher moisture than preferred, the risk of letting the damaged grain stand in the field may quickly outpace the inconvenience of wetter grain.

    "The longer we leave freeze-damaged corn in the field, the greater in-field loss will be," Licht said. "You'll start seeing things like lodging and ear drop increase."

    As soybeans sit through wetting and drying cycles of normal fall weather, their seed pods become more brittle and prone to shattering, Staton added. Waiting for green soybeans to dry out and mature in the field puts growers at high risk for losing yield from more mature soybean plants in the field, he warned. Staton recommends harvesting freeze-damaged soybean fields at moisture levels as high as 16% to 18%, if necessary.

    ADJUST COMBINE SETTINGS CAREFULLY

    Harvesting freeze-damaged grain requires combine adjustments. First, if large amounts of wet snow sit on top of corn and soybean fields for more than a few hours, lodging will be a near certainty, both scientists noted. See more on harvesting lodged corn and soybeans from the University of Minnesota here: https://blog-crop-news.extension.umn.edu/….

    Growers who rush to the field to get freeze-damaged corn out may also face tougher, greener stalks, Licht said. Cobs will be wetter and more easily broken, so growers may need to adjust their cylinder speeds carefully. They may also need to adjust their settings to account for lighter weight corn kernels that didn't have enough time to fill, he added. See more From Purdue University here: https://www.extension.purdue.edu/….

    Freeze-damaged soybean fields will likely hold a mix of green soybeans and mature soybeans, added Staton. "So you want to have your settings such that you can thresh the immature beans out of their pods without smashing them or crushing them," he said. "That's a challenge and relies on two settings: the clearance setting and the rotor speed, or cylinder speed."

    A good rule of thumb for all soybean harvesting, but especially with green-stemmed or lodged soybeans, is maintaining the cutter bar carefully, Staton added. "All knife sections need to be sharp and tight and the guards -- which are commonly overlooked -- have to be aligned properly," he said. "Think of it like a pair of scissors -- if one blade is sharp, but the other side is dull, it won't cut!"

    PREPARE FOR HIGH-MOISTURE, LOW-QUALITY GRAIN

    Immature corn and soybean plants hit by a freeze can have significantly higher moisture contents. Corn in the beginning dent stages, for example, can have moisture levels from 40% to 60%, Licht noted. Soybeans in the beginning of the R7 stage can be running at moisture levels of 50% to 60%.

    To add to the issue, daily grain-drying rates drop sharply in the Cornbelt as the days shorten and turn cool in October. That means mechanical drying will be necessary for most growers with freeze-damaged fields. For more details on the challenges of harvesting wet, immature grain this fall, see this DTN article: https://www.dtnpf.com/….

    Quality issues are also likely. Prematurely killed corn kernels will be much lower test weight and more prone to spoiling in storage, Licht noted. "We're talking about test weights below 52 pounds per bushel and maybe even in the mid-40s," he warned. Immature, freeze-killed kernels may also have lower protein content, which can make them less desirable as livestock feed, he added.

    Licht urged growers not to mingle their low test-weight, freeze-damaged corn with better-quality corn. "If you put them together, you risk losing quality on your higher-test-weight corn," he warned. "I would recommend taking freeze-damaged corn to a point of sale immediately, since its storability will be much lower."

    If you must store it, dry it down farther than normal, as low as 13%, to account for the moisture gradient that exists in immature kernels and to help limit spoilage, Licht added. "In a wetter kernel, there is greater difference in moisture between the outside and the middle of the kernel," he explained. "If you shell immature corn and test it, it will test 1% to 2% lower than it actually is, because that test is not capturing higher moisture content in the middle of the kernel."

    See more details on options for selling or using freeze-damaged corn here from North Dakota State University: https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/….

    Freeze-damaged soybeans are more likely to have a thinner, more fragile seed coat and lower vigor and shouldn't be harvested for seed use, Staton said. Immature, green soybeans also pose a problem for end-users, as they can affect the color and quality of the soybean oil. Growers can face hefty dockages or have loads rejected for a high percentage of green beans.

    If possible, Staton recommends trying to store and aerate green soybeans to remove the color. As with corn, the recommendation is to dry immature soybeans down lower than usual to 12%, as green soybeans can distort moisture readings.

    "Try to dry them down to 12%, put them in a bin with aeration and store them for about two months," Staton said. "The green color may fade and your dockage should be much lower after that." See more on handling freeze-damaged soybeans from Staton here: https://www.canr.msu.edu/…, as well as other late-season soybean problems here: https://www.canr.msu.edu/….

    For more details on the final reproductive stages of soybeans and the impact of a freeze, see this article from the University of Nebraska: https://cropwatch.unl.edu/….
    For a comprehensive look at harvesting, drying and storing freeze-damaged corn and soybeans, see this guide from Purdue University: https://mdc.itap.purdue.edu/….
    Attached Images

  9. #6089
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    East Central Texas
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    https://www.farms.com/news/freezing-...ld-139683.aspx

    Freezing Temperatures: Potential Impacts on Crop Yield
    Oct 17, 2018

    By Mary Knapp

    Minimum air temperatures during the October 15-16 period dropped well below 30 degrees F in all but the extreme southeast corner of Kansas. This will pose a problem during the grain-filling period of summer row crops (Figure 1).

    The risk of damage to summer row crops is a function of the current developmental stage of the crop and the minimum temperature and the duration of the freeze events.

    Duration of damaging temperatures

    The coldest temperatures dropped into the single digits in northwest Kansas, with the lowest reading of 9 degrees F at the Cheyenne Mesonet station on October 15. In addition to the lengthy time below freezing on October 15, by the following day (October 16), the sub-freezing temperatures had penetrated into the southeast corner of Kansas for several hours (Figure 2).

    Effect on summer row crops

    Corn:

    In most of the state, corn is mature and being harvested. The most sensitive areas, with higher probabilities of showing effects of low temperature impacts, are the northwest and west central parts of Kansas but with a potential low impact on number of acres affected due to the advanced phenology (close or already matured). Corn can be affected when temperatures are below or at 32 degrees F. The further temperatures drop below 32 degrees, the less exposure time it takes to damage corn. Test weight is usually impacted, and grains are susceptible to mechanical and drying damage. However, even though final maximum weight is not affected once the black layer is formed, producers might encounter impacts on slow dry-down conditions to harvest.

    Soybean:

    Soybean is currently in the final reproductive stages (dropping leaves) in Kansas (87% dropping leaves based on the most recent USDA Crop Progress and Condition report). Temperatures below 32 degrees F can interrupt seed fill and affect yield through lower test weight and seed quality (primarily affecting protein deposition). Necrosis (death) of the leaf canopy is a visible symptom of freeze damage in soybeans. With soybean, absolute temperature is more important than the duration of the freeze event. The most severe injury occurs with temperatures less than 28 degrees F. As the crop approaches maturity, the impact of a freeze event on soybean yields declines. The most affected soybean acreage will be related to areas of late-planted and double crop soybean around the north central and western parts of the state. In addition, soybeans impacted by freeze are often slow to dry, influencing costs if additional drying is required.

    Sorghum:

    More than half of the sorghum in Kansas has already reached maturity (79% mature based on the most recent USDA Crop Progress and Condition report) but is not yet in fully harvesting mode (only 19% harvested – behind the 28% average for the last 5-years). Most likely the lowest proportion of mature sorghum is located in the north central and northwest areas of Kansas. Low temperatures will reduce seed growth, affecting final test weight and seed quality, making the harvest process more difficult. A freeze will kill sorghum if the stalks are frozen, impairing the flow of nutrients to the grain. A freeze at the hard dough stage (before grain matures) will result in lower weight and chaffy seeds. Implications on drying conditions, slow to dry, and harvest operations should consider in sorghum that was affected by a hard freeze.

    Source: ksu.edu
    Attached Images

  10. #6090
    Am listening to the MIAC now. I realize that 5G is important, but I have to admit I'm getting a little tired of hearing the same thing over and over about it.

    Just got the call-back from the vet. Seems Millie isn't a Millie at all but a tom that was already neutered. The newer kitty is also a male and they neutered him this morning and I can pick up both cats any time today. The name thing could be a problem if I let it be one, but since I am now the proud owner of two former tomcats, I might just go ahead and keep calling them Millie and Mollie. Those nicknames can stand for anything I decide, at my leisure. I once had a neighbor whose name was Molly, short for his last name because he was this big burly Paul Bunyan type guy who had the misfortune of parents who chose the name Lambert for his first name.

    I have to say I'm rather disappointed about Millie, but I can console myself because all this is going to cost less than it otherwise would have. And they will use the spay coupon for the neuter and just change the cat's name and gender on the coupon when they redeem it.

    And depending on the forecast, I may wait until Saturday morning to finish shopping. Much less traffic and no school buses.

    Sigh.
    Last edited by Martinhouse; Yesterday at 12:06 PM.

  11. #6091
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    Sep 2012
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    https://www.iceagenow.info/the-handw...s-on-the-wall/

    The handwriting for a Super-Grand Solar Minimum is on the wall
    October 16, 2019 by Robert


    Due to cover 60 to 70% of Earth’s habitable landmasses with ice-sheets two miles thick.
    __________

    The handwriting for a Super-Grand Solar Minimum is on the wall
    Lloyd Martin Hendaye

    Alas and well, the handwriting for a 90-year Super-Grand Solar Minimum c. AD 2020 – 2110 is on the wall.

    In 2005, Danish researcher Henrik Svensmark correlated 11-year sunspot cycles with Sol’s far-reaching “solar wind” whose streaming plasma sheath varies in intensity with solar radiation. Connecting this plasma barrier with cosmic-ray penetration of Earth’s atmosphere, from 2015 Russia’s Valentina Zharkova proposed that energetic galactic particles seeded Earth’s global cloud-cover, producing heavy overcast that dropped temperatures by blocking total solar irradiance (TSI).

    Of course, this process dates from the formation of Earth’s solar system… yet Gaia suffered no global Ice Ages from pre-Cambrian Ediacaran eras to the mid-Pliocene, well over 1.50 billion years. What’s different now is continental landmasses’ plate-tectonic dispositions: From mountain-building planetary orogenies in the mid-Oligocene some 45 million YBP, conjoined North and South American continents have walled off Eastern from Western hemispheres, stalling global atmospheric-oceanic circulations patterns.

    However this occurs, for some 3.6 million years resulting “climate cells” have induced cyclical Pliocene-Pleistocene Ice Ages lasting an average 102 kiloyears, interspersed with median 12,250-year interstadial remissions such as the recent Holocene Interglacial Epoch, which began c. 14,400 YBP and ended 12,250 + 3.500 – 14,400 = AD 1350, coincident with Kamchatka’s strato-volcano Kambalny Eruption, a 70-year Grand Solar Minimum similar to that of 1645 – 1715, and a 500-year Little Ice Age through AD 1850/1890.

    In geophysical context, these long-term climate cycles have no anthropogenic CO2 component whatsoever, a fact confirmed by Australian Robert Holmes’ December 2017 “Mean Molar Mass version of the Ideal Gas Law”, where global atmospheric surface temperature GAST = PM/Rp (qv). Following Earth’s 140-year “amplitude compression” rebound from the Little Ice Age (LIA) –where succeeding warm-cool phases occurred 1890 – 1939; 1940 – 1979; 1980 – 2009; and 2010 – 2029– Millennials and subsequent generations are shortly due for rude comeuppance.

    Already some 670 years into a Pleistocene Ice Age due to cover 60 – 70% of Earth’s habitable landmasses with ice-sheets two miles thick, transhuman populations will either remove en masse off-Earth to intrasolar refugia or face civilizational extinction. In brief: Changes due through AD 2125+ will outweigh everything from AD 1600 by orders of magnitude, as inconceivable to present-day prognosticators as aircraft, radio and television, nuclear power, DNA and info-tech would be to Max Planck in 1900.
    Last edited by TxGal; Yesterday at 03:15 PM.

  12. #6092
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    Sep 2012
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    This was on the main a day or so ago, but now that Felix has picked it up I thought it should be here, too:

    https://www.iceagenow.info/historic-...e-crop-losses/

    Historic Midwest Blizzard Has Farmers “Expecting Massive Crop Losses”
    October 16, 2019 by Robert

    “As Devastating As We’ve Ever Seen”
    ____________

    “Historic Midwest Blizzard Has Farmers “Expecting Massive Crop Losses – As Devastating As We’ve Ever Seen”
    14 October 2019
    by Michael Snyder

    An unprecedented October blizzard that hit just before harvest time has absolutely devastated farms all across the U.S. heartland.

    One state lawmaker in North Dakota is saying that the crop losses will be “as devastating as we’ve ever seen”. This is the exact scenario that I have been warning about for months, and now it has materialized. Due to endless rain and horrific flooding early in the year, many farmers in the middle of the country faced very serious delays in getting their crops planted. So we really needed good weather at the end of the season so that the crops could mature and be harvested in time, and that did not happen. Instead, the historic blizzard that we just witnessed dumped up to 2 feet of snow from Colorado to Minnesota. In fact, one city in North Dakota actually got 30 inches of snow. In the end, this is going to go down as one of the worst crop disasters that the Midwest has ever seen, and ultimately this crisis is going to affect all of us.

    According to the USDA, only 15 percent of all U.S. corn and only 14 percent of all U.S. soybeans had been harvested as of October 6th…

    Only 58% of U.S. corn was mature as of Oct. 6 and just 15% was harvested, according to the latest data from U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). North Dakota’s crop was furthest behind, with just 22% of corn mature and none harvested as of Sunday, while South Dakota’s corn was 36% mature with 2% harvested.

    U.S. soybeans were only 14% harvested as of Sunday, 20 percentage points behind the average pace, USDA data showed. North Dakota and Minnesota beans were just 8% gathered while Iowa’s and South Dakota’s crop was only 5% harvested.

    So that means that the vast majority of our corn and the vast majority of our soybeans were exposed to this giant storm, and the losses are going to be off the charts.

    According to North Dakota state lawmaker Jon Nelson, we should expect “massive crop losses – as devastating as we’ve ever seen”…

    The early season snowstorm showed no mercy to some farmers and ranchers, especially in North Dakota.

    “I’m expecting massive crop losses – as devastating as we’ve ever seen,” said Jon Nelson, a state lawmaker who farms several hundred acres near Rugby in north-central North Dakota.

    Unharvested wheat in the region probably will be a total loss, he told the Associated Press.


    Please let that last sentence sink in.

    Yes, “a total loss” really does mean “a total loss”.

    Millions upon millions of acres of wheat and soybeans that were about to be harvested are now completely gone.

    In some parts of the state, the snow drifts are “as high as 5 feet”, and this is going to leave many farmers “without a crop to sell”…

    Snowdrifts in the Jamestown area rose as high as 5 feet, said Ryan Wanzek, who farms land south and west of the city. In his fields, corn and soybean crops sit unharvested after near-historic rainfall late this summer.

    It’s a situation farmers across the state are facing, and without a crop to sell, Wanzek is worried many of them will run into cash flow problems.

    This isn’t just bad. We are talking about complete and utter devastation that will have ripple effects for years to come.

    Of course corn and soybeans are not the only crops that have been affected. According to one expert, things are looking “pretty bleak” for the region’s potatoes as well…

    With more than half of North Dakota’s potatoes still in the field, the outlook for harvesting a good quality crop after the latest round of rain and snowfall is poor.

    “It’s pretty bleak,” said Ted Kreis, Northern Potato Growers Association marketing and communications director. As of Sunday, Oct. 6, 45 percent of North Dakota’s potato crop had been harvested, National Agricultural Statistics Service-North Dakota said. Last year, 73 percent of the state’s potato fields had been harvested by that day, the statistics service said. On average, 69 percent of the North Dakota crop is harvested as of Oct. 6.


    In case you are wondering, yes, this is going to affect you very much.

    Just think about what you eat on a daily basis. How many of those items contain corn, soy or potatoes?

    If you are anything like most Americans, at least one of those ingredients can be found in most of the packaged foods that you consume.

    Needless to say, food prices are going to go up. If you are wealthy and you don’t need to worry about food prices, then good for you.

    But if you are like most of the country and your finances are already tight, this is going to hurt.

    I very much encourage you to stock up and get prepared, because we are facing a major shift.

    This was already going to be one of the worst years ever for Midwest farmers, and now this storm has put an exclamation mark on an absolutely horrific growing season.

    Nobody is sure exactly what is coming next, but since we all have to eat, the truth is that every man, woman and child in America should be deeply concerned about what just happened.

    http://endoftheamericandream.com/arc...weve-ever-seen
    Attached Images

  13. #6093
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    Sep 2012
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    East Central Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martinhouse View Post
    Am listening to the MIAC now. I realize that 5G is important, but I have to admit I'm getting a little tired of hearing the same thing over and over about it.

    Just got the call-back from the vet. Seems Millie isn't a Millie at all but a tom that was already neutered. The newer kitty is also a male and they neutered him this morning and I can pick up both cats any time today. The name thing could be a problem if I let it be one, but since I am now the proud owner of two former tomcats, I might just go ahead and keep calling them Millie and Mollie. Those nicknames can stand for anything I decide, at my leisure. I once had a neighbor whose name was Molly, short for his last name because he was this big burly Paul Bunyan type guy who had the misfortune of parents who chose the name Lambert for his first name.

    I have to say I'm rather disappointed about Millie, but I can console myself because all this is going to cost less than it otherwise would have. And they will use the spay coupon for the neuter and just change the cat's name and gender on the coupon when they redeem it.

    And depending on the forecast, I may wait until Saturday morning to finish shopping. Much less traffic and no school buses.

    Sigh.
    I've often debated about not posting those 5G podcasts...it's not just you...

    Well, with two boys around, they may well bring in a lady friend or two. Maybe you'll get lucky?

    I've with you there, we're pooped out from yesterday and are putting off our Costco/LDS run until maybe next week.

  14. #6094
    Well, my computer was off all afternoon because our power suddenly went off at 1:25 PM. My brother in Iowa has remote sensor thingies up at Mom's place here, which is his now, and he saw that the power was down and called me. He found out that someone ran off the road and broke a power pole. Estimated finish of repair to be around 7:30 PM. It went on at 5:55 PM so I was out only 4 1/2 hours instead of six.

    I picked up the cats and got home before I had to dodge school buses. I put out food for Millie first and released "him" and it got gobbled up. When the new cat was better awake I let it smell the bowl of food for a while, hoping it was hungry enough to stay and eat, but it took off like a shot when I opened the trap. I'm sure it will be back, by morning at least, when I put food out again. Millie then came back and gobbled up that bowl of food, too.

    I've tried and tried to think of a masculine name for a cat that starts with M-o-l and all I could come up with was Molson, which is a brand of beer. If I can't think of anything else, Mollie's name will be Molson and Millie's name will be Miller, not Milton. I haven't had a beer in probably 30 or 35 years, but that's okay...they're still pretty good names.

    Still haven't decided what day to go shopping. The ten-day forecast won't pop up for me on Wunderground. Very frustrating! Its charts are the best because they show both times and amounts of rain expected, as well as the chance of rain in percent figures.

  15. #6095
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    East Central Texas
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    Kinda neat to be able to find out what's wrong with the power, really glad it came back on sooner for you. We're going down to the low 40s tonight...

    The cats sound like they're doing fine, that's great. Mil and Mol for short? I'm sure they'll both appreciate the good food, and good for Millie!

    We've lost most of our local stations on Wunderground, I have no idea why. I've heard there's a big could front coming in for next weekend. Ugh!!

  16. #6096
    Weirdly, i can get the Northeast radar just fine, but when I click on the continental US, it stays blank. Doesn't even show it's trying to load... just the whole page stays blank.

    This is on www.weatherforyou.com

    Summerthyme

  17. #6097
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    SW IA
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    138
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    Weirdly, i can get the Northeast radar just fine, but when I click on the continental US, it stays blank. Doesn't even show it's trying to load... just the whole page stays blank.

    This is on www.weatherforyou.com

    Summerthyme
    thanks for the link, nice website..

  18. #6098
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    Sep 2012
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    Ice Age Farmer has a new podcast premiering today at 2pm, I think:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDTdK7X3xIw

    Top Farmer Warns: Forces At Work to Hide Massive Crop Losses

    Run time unknown at this time

    Paul, a top 1% producer of commodities and specialty crops on over 4000 acres, joins Christian to voice his concerns after the catastrophic growing season in the US. He also describes “a force, an energy” that is working to keep people unaware of the severity of the situation. Without this information, farmers are unable to adjust production, and the market cannot act to ration supply. What happens when the US runs out of grain? — Start growing your own food today.


  19. #6099
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    Grand Solar Minimum News has a new podcast out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-yRObNSQIC4

    Midwest Blizzard = Massive Crop Losses
    2,351 views•Streamed live 11 hours ago

    Run time is 44:15

    No synopsis provided except as suggested by the title.


  20. #6100
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    https://www.iceagenow.info/buried-in...mn/#more-29725

    Buried in winter at the beginning of autumn
    October 16, 2019 by Robert


    Shrieking about “climate crisis”, while the Prairies are buried in winter at the beginning of autumn.
    _____

    Buried in winter at the beginning of autumn
    Ian Campbell

    The media have to report the record snowfall in the Canadian Prairies, but they tiptoe around the subject, and certainly don’t discuss the ramifications for agriculture.

    We are in the midst of a federal election campaign here in Canada. Media and politicians are shrieking about “climate crisis”, while the Prairies are buried in winter at the beginning of autumn. Little wonder that many in the western provinces are becoming increasingly angry.

    As a farmer, I am quite concerned about the way the “Extinction Rebellion” and “Climate Crisis” folks have been vilifying agriculture. Production of meat and milk should be eliminated, according to them. They also seem to be opposed to the production of our major grain crops.

    Yet most of these folks live in the industrial west, which has the safest, most abundant supply of food that mankind has ever enjoyed. Some of our critics even go so far as to suggest that most of our agricultural lands should be “rewilded”.

    It strikes me that the parts of the World where the most human progress has occurred; where democracy has taken firm root; and where moves to eliminate injustices based on gender, race, etc. are strongest, enjoy the foundation of a strong agriculture and food system.

  21. #6101
    Quote Originally Posted by flame View Post
    thanks for the link, nice website..
    It was as close as I could find to intellicast after they were bought out and ruined. We depend on a usable, reliable and accurate weather forecast because we're farmers. I HATE weather.com and most of the rest.

    I actually paid the $10 for a years freedom from ads... worth every penny! Our internet is slow enough out here that too often, the ads would load, but the radar animation would take 10 minutes! No longer an issue. If you notice too, way down at the bottom is a nice statement honoring Christ.

    My only real complaint (I have a couple other grumbles, mostly about a slightly clunky interface that sometimes doesnt "let you get there from here") is the radar animation lacks any indication of time! VERY frustrating when you're trying yo get an idea of how long before a line of storms might arrive! Given that the radar maps are the exact ones intellicast used, (and they had the date and time at the top), I don't understand the problem!

    But it still beats any others I've found.

    Summerthyme

  22. #6102
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,810
    https://electroverse.net/north-ameri...-winter-storm/

    (please go to the link for graphics, most of electroverse's are difficult to bring over)


    North America Braces for its THIRD Historic Winter Storm in as many weeks — Grand Solar Minimum
    October 17, 2019 Cap Allon

    North America is bracing for its THIRD truly historic early-season snowstorm is as many weeks. The storm is on course to roll-in over the weekend, and will likely pack an even bigger punch than either of the previous two.

    Starting in Western & Central Canada on Thursday, October 17, a mass of brutal Arctic air will gradually sink southwards engulfing ALL of the Western U.S. by Sunday, October 20.

    Temperature departures are expected to hold as much as 16+C below the seasonal average across the Canadian Provinces of Yukon, NWT, British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan; as well as across ALL Western U.S. states, with the worst hit appearing to be Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado: (graphic)

    Very cold, for sure, though it’ll likely be the snow that once again steals the show — for the THIRD time in as many weeks, North America’s snow line will encroach historically-far south for the time of year.

    According to latest GFS runs, a staggering 30+ inches (2.5+ feet) will fall in parts of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado over the weekend. While Canada’s British Columbia is forecast to receive a jaw-dropping 60+ inches (5+ feet) from Thur, Oct 17 thru Sun, Oct 20: (graphic)

    And it doesn’t stop there.

    Next week will see the Polar Invasion expand to the SE (primarily) seizing practically ALL of the United States (a long with ALL of central & southern Canada) by Friday, October 25: (graphic)

    The snow line will also once again drop anomalously-far-south, with heavy snow, at times blizzard conditions, burying a myriad of U.S. & Canadian states & provinces: (graphic)

    The pattern keeps repeating itself.

    This is now the THIRD truly historic early-season snowstorm to batter North America in as many weeks, with the previous two responsible for felling THOUSANDS upon THOUSANDS of cold records, as well as burying Midwest and Canadian growing regions.

    Grain futures have been driven higher as a result, to levels not seen since July; soon after the USDA released their bogus “can-kicking” report (for more on that debacle from IAF, click here).

    Well, this is as far as the “can” got USDA — record cold is STILL negatively impacting crops, only now it’s delaying the harvest instead of the planting season, and food prices are again on the climb.

    Low solar activity is disrupting the jet stream, reverting its usual tight Zonal flow to a weak Meridional one. This wavy flow diverts Arctic air to the lower latitudes —where us humans reside— and for time-immemorial has heaped untold miseries on the established civilization of the day, rendering growing regions useless, leading to famine, unrest, war, and ultimately the society’s collapse.

    And these cold times are returning, in line with historically low solar activity.

    NASA has revealed this next solar cycle (25) will be “the weakest of the past 200 years” and have tied previous solar shutdowns to prolonged periods of global cooling here.

    Overlaying the peak of past civilizations atop the GISP2 Ice Core data clearly illustrates the pattern: (graphic)

    Prepare

  23. #6103
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,810
    https://electroverse.net/record-brea...ica-this-week/

    Again, Electroverse's articles are heavy with graphics which are difficult to bring over; please go to the link for the graphics. They are very important.

    Record-Breaking Cold Ravages South America
    October 17, 2019 Cap Allon

    Following on from one of the continent’s coldest winters of the past 50 years, South America’s meteorological spring is STILL delivering long-bouts of anomalous cold and snow.

    Temperatures this week have held as much as 20+C below the seasonal average in many regions — with the nations of Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil (SE), Paraguay, and Bolivia worst affected: (graphic)

    Some of the all-time low temp records broken this month include the 37F (2.8C) set at Rio Cuarto, Argentina on Oct 5 — which beat the previous record for the date of 38F (3.3C) from 2005. And the 33F (0.6C) observed at Marco Juarez, Argentina on Oct 7 — which comfortably surpassed the 36F (2.2C) set back in 1991.

    Many more will have tumbled this week, the books simply haven’t updated yet.

    While brief bursts of heat steal MSM headlines, it’s the persistent cold that’s the real story of 2019 so far, and not just in South America either — North America is currently bracing for its THIRD historic early-season snowstorm in as many weeks: (graphic)

    While Russia continues to topple all-time low temperature records: (graphic)

    And, returning to South America, Peru just suffered its coldest winter in half a century, according to climatology expert Lourdes Menis Álvarez: “Peru’s winter of 2018 was one of the coldest in almost 50 years — however, the winter of 2019 has surpassed it in intensity.”

    These types of cold winters were once common-place in Peru, explained Álvarez, but of late, strong El Niños have brought “long summers and warm winters” to the region.

    The evidence suggest the tide is now turning, however.

    THE CHANGING JET STREAM

    Studying the jet stream has long been an indicator of the weather to come, and to study the jet stream attention must turn to the sun.

    When solar activity is high, the band of meandering air flowing some 6 miles above our heads is tight, stable and follows somewhat of a straight path. But when solar activity is low, as it is now, the jet stream loses strength and its band of fast-moving air becomes wavy which, in the NH, has the effect of dragging Arctic air south to much lower latitudes than normal: (graphic)

    This mechanism fully explains why far-northern latitudes have been experiencing pockets of anomalous heat of late, while the lower-latitudes –where us human’s reside– have been dealing with record-breaking, harvest-hampering cold: (graphic)

    THIS is the reality we’re living — not some folkloric, CO2-induced eco-tastrophe.

    The cold times are returning in line with historically low solar activity.

    Even NASA agrees, in part at least, with their forecast for the next solar cycle (25) revealing it will be “the weakest of the past 200 years,” and they’ve correlated past solar shutdowns to global cooling here.

    Prepare for the cold

  24. #6104
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    SW IA
    Posts
    138
    Naples Daily News
    Tomato virus found in imported tomatoes causes concern for growers

    State inspectors have identified imported tomatoes in Naples that contain a virus that can cause fruit loss in tomatoes and peppers but does not pose a health risk to humans.

    Florida’s Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services issued an alert Wednesday advising of the tomato brown rugose virus (ToBRFV).

    “The ToBRFV tobamovirus was recently intercepted by FDACS inspectors in packaged Mexican tomatoes in Naples, Florida and Gainesville, Florida. These tomatoes have been destroyed,” a news release says.



    Tomatoes infected with the virus could have yellow leaf veins, yellow spots, brown rugose (wrinkled) patches and necrotic (dead) lesions on the tomato fruit.

    “If (consumers) purchase tomatoes, they need to be very careful if they look funny,” said Gene McAvoy, who works with the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. “Usually there’s browning or chlorosis (a yellow pattern on the tomato).”

    It these symptoms are spotted, the tomatoes should immediately be destroyed, said McAvoy.

    “Be alert and if they see tomatoes that look funny, report them or bring them to a local IFAS extension office,” he said.

    Even though there are no adverse health effects to humans, the virus can wipe out nearly three quarters of a grower’s crop.

    “The virus can cause 30-70% loss of tomato yield on plants, which may severely disrupt the domestic tomato industry,” the news release says. “The virus may also make infected fruit less desirable to consumers, a concern for grocery retailers.”

    ToBFVR can be transmitted mechanically, McAvoy said. Meaning that the virus can remain on tools, hands, clothing and soil and contaminate other fruit that touches those items.



    “Really, the only way to get rid of it is to destroy the crop,” he said. “Workers have to wash hands before and after handling tomato plants to reduce spread.”

    The virus originated the the Middle East, McAvoy said, but was recently found in Mexico. There was an earlier outbreak in California, but the crop was destroyed before it could do too much damage.

    “For the past six months, our inspectors have been watching vigilantly for the ToBRFV virus and are moving swiftly to prevent its introduction in our state,” said Agriculture Commissioner Nicole “Nikki” Fried in the release. “Mexican-grown tomatoes carrying the ToBRFV virus are a serious threat to Florida, the nation’s leading producer of tomatoes and a $262 million industry in our state. We need the USDA to step up, initiate tracebacks to Mexican producers, and fulfill its responsibility to protect American growers and consumers.”

    The virus in Naples was spotted by an IFAS researcher who purchased tomatoes in Naples and noticed that they looked funny. An alert was issued to growers and breeders months ago, McAvoy said.

    “Consumers are encouraged to select foods bearing the “Fresh From Florida” logo, which have been grown in Florida, not imported,” the FDACS release says.

    Karl Schneider is an environment reporter at Naples Daily News. Follow him on Twitter: @karlstartswithk

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddri...ers/ar-AAIAimJ

  25. #6105
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    East Central Texas
    Posts
    3,810
    Thanks, flame! Cripes...what next? The garden was bad enough this year...

  26. #6106
    And it sounds a little like what's happened here to our cucumbers for the last three summers.

  27. #6107
    The two posts Robert Felix just put up on his iceagenow.info site are VERY interesting!

  28. #6108
    About that new IAF podcast:

    On his twitter page, Ice Age Farmer just posted, "this is the most important broadcast I've done and I don't say that lightly."

    Also saw that the podcast will be at 4 PM eastern time, so I'll get it at 3 PM here in Arkansas.
    -----
    Edit, just checked again and it is changed to 3 PM eastern so that's 2 PM central.

    I think I'll just wait and look for it later today.
    Last edited by Martinhouse; Today at 01:10 PM.

  29. #6109
    The Ice Age Farmer podcast is finally ready. It runs 33;13 minutes

    TxGal, I hope you'll post the link when you get back to this thread.

    Thanks!

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