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Seed Good sweet corn for northern gardens and cool soil
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    WI
    Posts
    2,243

    Good sweet corn for northern gardens and cool soil

    Sweet corn in WI is a struggle. I am surrounded by corn fields, so isolation, unless I get lucky with different pollination times, is hard.

    The biggest struggle though, is just getting it to germinate! The soil temp in the 2 patches I have set aside for sweet corn (not raised beds for sweet corn, one is a classic garden area, the other is a bastard version of a sheet compost/back to eden) never gets to 60+ degrees most years until mid June, some years early July!

    Anyone have any recommendations for the best sweet corn variety for short season (65 days, preferably less) AND good cool soil germination?
    “Pay heed to the tales of old wives. It may well be that they alone keep in memory what it was once needful for the wise to know.” – J.R.R. Tolkien
    "Happiness can be found, even in the darkest of times, if one only remembers to turn on the light." - J.K. Rowling "Remember who the real enemy is." - Suzanne Collins "Winter is coming." - George R.R. Martin

  2. #2
    Did you know you can transplant corn? This would solve the germination problem and allow a slightly longer season corn.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    37,721
    We grow something here called Candy Corn it's a yellow and white variety that is super sweet and grows in a short season.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  4. #4
    sold by different seed companies - Painted Mountain seed corn - developed for the Montana seasons - supposedly good stuff ....

    https://www.rareseeds.com/painted-mountain-corn/
    Illini Warrior

  5. #5
    Might also check the offerings at a Johnny's Selected Seeds and Adaptive Seeds

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    The Last Frontier
    Posts
    1,790
    I've had pretty good success here in my growing zone 3a using Denali Seed's Yukon Chief https://bestcoolseeds.com/search/node/corn ; their site has some corn-growing tips that might help too.

    I do add manure at the end of the season and mulch. In spring when I can get to the soil, but before it's done thawing, I cover with ground cover/weed barrier to speed up the warming. I plant with full southern exposure and while not really growing a whole lot of it, I do have the advantage of being the only corn grower in the area, lol!

    The key for my short season is that I do grow seedlings in my greenhouse, then transplant when it stays above 50 overnight.
    All that is gold does not glitter....

  7. #7
    Painted Mountain is a colored Indian corn... not something I'd eat by choice even at it's very earliest stage. You may have to transplant to get eating corn, though.

    I'll second Johnny's seeds for varieties and good information on them.

    Summerthyme

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    The Frontier of Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    285

    Corn plants?

    Quote Originally Posted by naturallysweet View Post
    Did you know you can transplant corn? This would solve the germination problem and allow a slightly longer season corn.
    We have been doing this for years.......best if pants are in the 6-8" range.....we use plant cell packs ( 72 to a traditional flat which is about 11 x 21") ...build a mini-greenhouse or cold frame to get them started...this even gives you a jump on the weeds when planted in the field.......we work with different open pollinated varieties..and if you plan it right..you can grow different day length varieties in the same area without getting cross pollination.
    "Some men live by fate and accept things as they are; Some men live by determination and are willing to die for what they believe in! It is said that a wise man lives by neither. But a wise man is not wise unless he realizes that a choice must be made." Dennis C. Bruce

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