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CHAT Recommendation for kitchen knife set
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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    CA
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    750
    Quote Originally Posted by Tristan View Post
    Henkels has been a good brand. I even have a few 'Made in China' kitchen knives that are very good.

    I'm curious - did the knife shop have any recommendations? For example, of products they were selling? hmmm.
    I have a Henckels set, they are made in China. The knife shop said they don't think it's worth paying them $3 a knife to sharpen them as it won't last long.

    They did not try to upsell me to buy some of theirs. Straight shooters.

    I know how to sharpen a straight edge knife. Its not too hard. Its all the different type edges in this set.

    Thanks for all the input here. Looks like I'm leaning towards Chicago Cutlery/Cutco....

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    West Virginia
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    33,350
    Quote Originally Posted by Publius View Post
    Buck does sell direct to the public and they sell individual kitchen knives. Anyone thats interested you have to visit Buck knife website and view all they have.
    I have one of their hunting knives a Buck Special N0# 119, I have used many times as a kitchen butcher knife at home as well as at camp and yearly picnic's to cut meat and veggies. Its easy to sharpen and takes a seriously scary sharp edge.


    Heres a link to the Buck Website and I'm doing this to offer more options and a 100% American made product. Buck does offer a life time limited warrantee so if the handels come lose they will fix and or replace it with a new one. LINK: http://www.buckknives.com/knives/cutlery/
    Last edited by Publius; 12-06-2017 at 01:01 PM.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Happy on the mountain
    Posts
    52,861
    Dishwashers are for dishes, not kitchen cutlery. Leaving sharp knives in the sink is an invitation to cuts.

    I ran across https://www.amazon.com/AmazonBasics-.../dp/B00R3Z3ZF2 as a result of this thread. Looks interesting for $56. Good reviews...
    The wonder of our time isnít how angry we are at politics and politicians; itís how little weíve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  4. #44
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    Mar 2007
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    West Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    Dishwashers are for dishes, not kitchen cutlery. Leaving sharp knives in the sink is an invitation to cuts.

    I ran across https://www.amazon.com/AmazonBasics-.../dp/B00R3Z3ZF2 as a result of this thread. Looks interesting for $56. Good reviews...


    I have gotten after my wife for doing this and she is quite indifferent to the care of knives and safety. All the cutlery in this house is razor sharp and I use a diamond lap rod (professional butcher sharpener) to touch up the blades to maintain the keen edge.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    Little cabin in da big woods.
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    26,726
    Quote Originally Posted by Publius View Post
    Heres a link to the Buck Website and I'm doing this to offer more options and a 100% American made product. Buck does offer a life time limited warrantee so if the handels come lose they will fix and or replace it with a new one. LINK: http://www.buckknives.com/knives/cutlery/
    This is the one I have except mine doesn't have the open part up near the handle. Just solid steel. But I love it. And boy can you get an edge on it. Need one if you are cutting up a pork butt or ribs or deer or moose. Takes dh just a couple mins to put the edge back on it.

    https://www.buckknives.com/product/t...e/0655BKSTP-B/


    In his heart a man plans his course, but the Lord determines his steps.

    Proverbs 16:9




  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    WI - On the scene, like a sex machine.
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    33,281
    I have never been good at using a honing stone. Especially with the very high hardness stainless steel blades.

    About 15 years ago I started using the Chef's Choice 300 Diamond Hone Knife Sharpener with great success, even on my vintage (pre-China) Henckel Zwilling chef's knives.

    The biggest trick with these is to use -very- light pressure when sharpening.

    This is currently $40.00 USD on Amazon.

    Last edited by Red Baron; 12-06-2017 at 01:58 PM. Reason: Spelling
    "The most intriguing point for the historian is that where history and legend meet."

    "None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who think they are free."

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


  7. #47
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    Mar 2007
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    West Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Owl View Post
    This is the one I have except mine doesn't have the open part up near the handle. Just solid steel. But I love it. And boy can you get an edge on it. Need one if you are cutting up a pork butt or ribs or deer or moose. Takes dh just a couple mins to put the edge back on it.

    https://www.buckknives.com/product/t...e/0655BKSTP-B/



    Their knives are well known to take a edge. I have owned a few of their pocket knives as well as two of their Model #119 hunting knives, one of which my wife cannot remember where she put it (1970s vintage) and to this day we have not found it, so I went and bought another one (1998 vintage) and just like the older one. Its not the biggest hunting knife but it is up to the task to butcher a whole moose.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Baron View Post
    I have never been good at using a honing stone. Especially with the very high hardness stainless steel blades.

    About 15 years ago I started using the Chef's Choice 300 Diamond Hone Knife Sharpener with great success, even on my vintage (pre-China) Henkel Zwilling chef's knives.

    The biggest trick with these is to use -very- light pressure when sharpening.

    This is currently $40.00 USD on Amazon.




    I have their model 100 with three sharping stations and I highly recommend their sharping tools. This takes all the guess work out of it anyone can do it and get it right.

  9. #49
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    Dec 2001
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    WV
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    Quote Originally Posted by Macgyver View Post
    If you want cheep but good look at Dexter Russell. They are commercial kitchen grade stuff usually with nylon handles.
    I'll look when I get home for some links.
    I found several of those at a yard sale. The woman had been a cook for the local school system and evidently brought them home, also got a bread proofing lidded metal bucket with a crank.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    America, The Beautiful
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    https://altonbrown.com/10-knife-buying-tips/

    10 Knife-Buying Tips

    By Mr. Brown.
    Published on April 24, 2015



    No tools define a cook more than his or her knives. Why do you think we carry them around in rolls instead of hauling backpacks full of pots and pans? Exactly.

    Here are some random tips when shopping for kitchen knives:

    1. You donít need many. Honest. If youíre just starting out look for a chefís knife in the 8-10? range, a large serrated bread knife and a utility blade blade in the 4-6? range. What? No paring knife? Actually, I hate paring knives. I donít even own one any more. When youíre ready to move on, contemplate a semi-flexible boning knife for butchery duties and a long slicer for thinly dispatching roasts and the like. Also, Iíd get a decent pair of kitchen shears, the kind that come apart into two pieces. I never cut with a knife what I can cut with scissors. After all, Iíve been using those things since kindergarten.

    2. By and large I think the Japanese manufacture the best cutlery in the world, much better than the big European brands that came to dominate the American market in the 90s. Superior steel aside, many find that Japanese shapes such as those of the santoku, with itís dropped point, and the cleaver-like nakiri, are handier in the modern kitchen.

    3. That said, when youíre ready to invest in R.G.S. (really good s***) Iíd look to America. For my money, Cut Brooklyn and Murray Carter Cutlery (made in New York and Oregon respectively) are as good as any knives in the world. Both can be sought out on the interwebs. Cheap Ö no. Worth it? Totally.

    4. Steer clear of sets Ö period. No exceptions. Ever.

    5. When it comes to storage, I have two words: magnetic strips. [I use magnetic strips and can't recommend them enough.]

    6. Cutting is a system involving your hand, a knife, some food and a cutting board. I cannot over-empasize the importance of the omega component. Iíve seen people buy $300 blades and then run them on a cheap board and curse the knife. Your board needs to be heavy and it needs to be rock maple. Plastic boards are fine for butchery, but when it comes to serious slicing and dicing (not to mention chopping and mincing) you want wood. Bamboo? Iím not a fan. Give me a maple board from the John Boos company every time. And no, they donít pay me to say that.

    7. Want to know how to turn a quality knife into a box cutter? Cut a box. Itís just that simple.

    8. Want to know another way to turn a quality knife into a box cutter? Put it in the dishwasher. Once is all it takes. [This rule is gospel in my kitchen.]

    9. If you like your knives sharp, have those edges maintained regularly by a professional knife sharpener once or twice a year. Do not use a honing steel. Youíll put your eye out!

    10. Never, ever, ever run with knives.

    Pictured above: A few of my favorite things including two Carter knives, two Cut Brooklyn knives and one very old Sabatier knife. All are made of carbon steel which can be sharpened to near light saber sharpness. They tend to discolor, however, and require more sharpening. The bottom is a good example of a nakiri, and the second from the top is a utility knife with a santoku-style tip.
    Qui tacet consentire videtur

  11. #51
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    Behind Enemy Lines
    Posts
    142,692
    Damn those knives are ugly.

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Western Oregon
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    168
    Quote Originally Posted by brokenwings View Post
    Cutco knives made in the US and have a lifetime warranty. My daughter has a set and I am jealous! They are the nicest, sharpest knives I've ever used! But they are expensive.
    Been using my Cutco for 20 years and never sharpened it!

    Best ever

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Happy on the mountain
    Posts
    52,861
    Damn those knives are ugly.

    So is cast iron....
    The wonder of our time isnít how angry we are at politics and politicians; itís how little weíve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  14. #54
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Behind Enemy Lines
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    142,692
    I don’t use that either.

  15. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by KittyKatChic View Post
    I bought a set of Henkles about 5 years ago. I did get the ones made in Germany but they are now junk. I took them to have them sharpened and they guy did it but told me that the metal was inferior. Apparently Henkles et al are all using Chinese steel in their knives, regardless of where the knife is actually made. I am not pleased.
    What a shame! My Henckels Four-Star knives are about 25 years old, and are still going strong. Another venerable brand down the tubes . . . sigh . . .

    Note to all: Never put your knives in the dishwasher. Hand wash, and towel dry immediately. If you store your knives in a block, position them so the knives' weight doesn't rest on the blade.

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