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CHAT Recommendation for kitchen knife set
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  1. #1
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    Recommendation for kitchen knife set

    We spent about $200 on our last set from Bed Bath and Beyond (15 piece set w/scissors) and got dull pretty fast. Took to a knife shop and said probably not worth paying to sharpen. Made in China and doesn't hold an edge long.

    Any ideas for a quality set that will be worth sharpening for the long term.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    I like Chicago Cutlery. Have had not so good luck with the QC on German brands. Choose carbon steel and learn to sharpen them...acquired skill. Sharpening blades is a bit of an art, but worth learning.

  3. #3
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    Chicago Cutlery is very good. So it Cutco. Very good.

  4. #4
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    I cannot sharpen a knife. Never learned how, and evidently I’m too dense to understand the vids (sigh). That being said, I’d NEVER buy Chinese anything in terms of steel. Ever.

  5. #5
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    So the cheaper sets get dull faster.... not a problem if you can sharpen them yourself. I use a 1 inch belt sander with a 600 grit belt if the knife is very dull, otherwise I use a leather belt with compound. As an added bonus I get to use the belt sander for woodworking or modeling. It takes just minutes to bring a dull blade back into service, and anyone can do it. Using a hone or grinder takes skill, not many can master.

    Here is a YouTube link showing how it can be done.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ptspof6CXOg

  6. #6
    I was looking for a set myself but we really only needed just some basic general use steak knives. Was down at Smoky Mountain Knife Works and purchased these Victorinox knives as they had them out in singles.

    https://www.smkw.com/forschner-set-of-4-steak-knife-set

    So far they are working well. We had some other knives that lasted for a while (don't recall the brand), but they eventually started to come apart at the handle at the same time. The lady at the store said it might be because we put them in the dishwasher. She said that even if the top end brands say dishwasher safe, she recommended always hand washing and fast drying of higher end knives.

    Chicago Cutlery is popular, but them seem to have different levels of quality. I've seen one set is very cheap, but then another set with basically the same amount and type of items is around $100+ more expensive. Some of the "higher end" European companies are even making some of their knives in China and usually have different pricing brands.

  7. #7
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    Cutco knives made in the US and have a lifetime warranty. My daughter has a set and I am jealous! They are the nicest, sharpest knives I've ever used! But they are expensive.

  8. #8
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    Henchel is what we have. I have a sharpening stone and it's pretty easy to keep them sharpened. I've had my set for 17 years.
    The Lord lives, and blessed be my rock; And exalted be the God of my salvation.

  9. #9
    I like Wustof. But be aware they have two levels - one made in China and the other Germany. I believe it's the Classic style that's made in Germany. Knives are easy to keep sharp so that sharpening isn't needed as frequently - a wood cutting board will help, although I do like the plastic boards for meat - just control the cut stroke, so that you're not chewing up the board. The other tip is to hand wash, real hot water rinse and dry immediately - just like cast iron - but you can use soapy water first.

  10. #10
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    I use Rada. Made in the USA, and gifted to me decades ago when my girlfriend got tired of using my craptastic collection for our party preps.
    If white privilege exists, why did Senator Warren have to pretend to be an Indian?

  11. #11
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    If you want cheep but good look at Dexter Russell. They are commercial kitchen grade stuff usually with nylon handles.
    I'll look when I get home for some links.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    I cannot sharpen a knife. Never learned how, and evidently I’m too dense to understand the vids (sigh). That being said, I’d NEVER buy Chinese anything in terms of steel. Ever.
    I use stones to sharpen my knives. There are plastic angle guides out there to get used to the hold angle.

    The Mrs. asked me once to sharpen her cheapo kitchen cleaver. I did a little too good of a job. She almost cut herself washing it when it "parted" the dishwashing sponge she was using.

  13. #13
    Another vote for Chicago Cutlery although mine is years old so I have no idea if the good quality continues. I also have a couple good paring knives from Taiwan and a Ginsu bread knife from Japan. The Ginsu is a beautiful knife with a very sharp serrated blade, but a plastic handle. I do not want a plastic handle on any knife used for food harder than bread, but I do love it for bread. I bought a block of Great Blades knives at a garage sale for $5. These are extremely high quality molybdenum steel, heavy with solid wooden handles -- top top quality. The set includes a clever that would make one heck of a self defense weapon as well as for the use intended!! The set includes a sharpening steel as well as a full set of butcher, boning, carving, chef, fillet & utility knives plus the clever. The paring knife was replaced with a look alike cheap knife that isn't any good, but the rest of the set is excellent and I still cannot believe I got it for $5.

  14. #14
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    If you're looking for quality, Cutco is my recommendation. I bought a set of it, when I was in my 20's, and it is still in great shape, some 60 years later! I have always taken good care of it.....it has special knife holders that go into my cupboard drawers. Cutco offers knife blocks that stand on the counter, as well.

    I have added several pcs., since then, so have quite a few nice extras, like serving pieces. Cutco pcs. have always come with black handles, but for some years, now, has added pretty white ones, as well.

    It is a bit pricey, but quality can't be beat!

  15. #15
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    Wood handles split in the dishwasher over time. I’ll take plastic or nylon.

  16. #16
    Any knife can be sharp. We have a 30 yo Chicago chef and the rest are the white handled knives from Sams. I use the paring knives when I butcher.

    My husband manufactures this machine/clamp and we sell them. The key to sharpening is keeping the angle consistent, which is very hard to do by hand unless you're the grandpa that has been doing it for 50 years--muscle memory, you know.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXlxPM8CDME

    The Stinging Edge Sharpener

    We do gun shows, and the Blade show in Atlanta (biggest knife show in the world) and we hear over and over from guys that have bought every system out there, but ours is the one that works.

    There is also a video showing how to change the angle of the clamp--for example, a filet knife is usually about 17 degrees, hunting knives are usually sharpened at 25.

    If you're familiar with the Lansky system, the principle is the same, but this is a lot faster.

    Also, the last step is polishing compound on a synthetic felt belt, because even a 600 grit belt leaves a burr. (When I sharpen, while I'm changing to the felt belt, I'll hand the knife to the owner and ask him which side the burr is on after using the 600 grit. You should see the looks on their faces, because the knife is sharp at that point, but not finished, and they can always find the burr. Teeny tiny, but there.) The felt polishes the burr off instead of grinding it, and then you have a razor edge on the knife.

    My husband put a razor edge on a cheap $20 katana once. We don't do that at shows because of the noise, but he was able to do it. It's the equipment, not the operator.
    Last edited by mudlogger; 12-05-2017 at 06:31 PM. Reason: clarification
    Been reading for years, just now starting to talk.

  17. #17
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    For kitchen knife porn, go look at the selection from Japan Woodworker. the also have some very good very low priced knives.

    For example, the kitada Hontanren 210mm Chinese Cleaver - Mizuno
    $449.97 CLEARANCE

    https://www.japanwoodworker.com/page...ign=11/27/2017

  18. #18
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    I really don't have an answer for you, since our daily use stuff is such a mismatch of different brands of utensils, we have a dining cabinet with the high quality stuff which only seems to be used for Holiday events.

    But I do have a suggestion which in a pinch might be handy as a backup to whatever you choose.

    I bought them as a 'throw in' to the sweeties Christmas gifts.

    The link: http://www.pulsetv.com/default.asp I am not affiliated with them in any way, except giving them funds for something I know will be useful for me. You can find it in the kitchen section of their menu. Very inexpensive, which doesn't bother me since almost everything I've received from them has been a great value.

    The item I thought might be handy as a back up is posted at the bottom.

    Michael

    19 Piece Stainless Steel Cutlery Set

    This knife set by Diamond Cut includes 19 blades for every kind of cutting you need to do in the kitchen. The best part is that these stainless steel knives never need sharpening!

    The ergonomic plastic handles are similar to those found on popular Ginsu knife models, making cutting comfortable and safe. But you won't pay nearly as much for this incredible set as you would for Ginsu. Sharp, durable and stylish, what more could you ask for in a knife set?

    Here's what you get:

    - Butcher's Knife
    - 12.5" Chef's Knife
    - Bread Slicer
    - Utility Knife
    - Meat Cleaver
    - Filet Knife
    - Boning Knife
    - Tomato Slicer
    - X2 Paring Knives
    - Curved Paring Knife
    - X8 Steak Knives

    This collection is perfect as a starter kit or replacing and upgrading your old knives. They make a great gift as well!

    Features and Benefits:

    - 19 Piece Knife Set
    - Surgical Grade Stainless Steel Blades
    - Never Need Sharpening
    - Durable Polypropylene Handles
    - Ergonomic Grip
    - Dishwasher Safe
    - Limited Lifetime Warranty

    Last edited by michaelteever; 12-05-2017 at 06:44 PM.

  19. #19
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    Oh boy you can blow some serious money on kitchen cutlery. I have a complete set of KOCH MESSER knifes.
    One Company that gets over looked is Buck knife they make kitchen knife sets and I just did a quick search they have a four knife set in about the $100 range.
    Now the buck set is just like their other knives and known for easy sharping and taking a razor sharp edge.

  20. #20
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    Henkels has been a good brand. I even have a few 'Made in China' kitchen knives that are very good.

    I'm curious - did the knife shop have any recommendations? For example, of products they were selling? hmmm.

    My main kitchen knife set was made in Taiwan about 30 years ago; it's still doing great and cost all of $15 back in the day when I bought it...

    However, consider a couple other options:

    Learn to sharpen them yourself. For the price of a decent stone and ceramic, you could have razor sharp knives again. If the metal is a bit soft, it just makes it easier to sharpen.

    Be sure the cutting area/board you are using isn't made of a material which will unnecessarily dull your knives. I know someone who uses a ceramic plate to cut on, and always complains about how dull their cutlery is.
    Buckle up, boys and girls. This could get a bit rough.

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    Wood handles split in the dishwasher over time. I’ll take plastic or nylon.
    You're never supposed to put wood handles in the dishwasher... Good choice on the plastic or nylon handles.
    Buckle up, boys and girls. This could get a bit rough.

    Gardening: the next great hobby!
    Got Seeds?
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  22. #22
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    12

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    I cannot sharpen a knife. Never learned how, and evidently Iím too dense to understand the vids (sigh). That being said, Iíd NEVER buy Chinese anything in terms of steel. Ever.

    Not just Dennis here, but anyone that wants to sharpen their knives and get it right every time! Do a search for ChefsChoise electric knife sharpener's and you want the 3 station sharpener. I have their model 100 for the last 10 years and yeah it will put that 15 degree edge on your blades that you want and its Diamond Honed to razor edge sharp.

  23. #23
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    I have used Cutco for more than 20 years. Every couple of years, I send my knives in to be sharpened when I am going away on a trip and by the time we get back, the knives are, too, even here in Alaska. They fit wonderfully and comfortably in my now arthritic hands. Worth every penny we spent; a true store of value. The scissors, also are exceptional.
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  24. #24
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    I have a Chicago Cutlery set I got from Smokey Mtn Knife Works and never had a problem with these knives and they stay sharp. Plus they are dishwasher safe and come in different colors for the different style of knife.

  25. #25
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    https://agrussell.com/knife/A-G-Russ...set--AGKK-SET9

    A.G. Russell Knife Sets and Knife Block Sets $365 w/o block, $395 with

    I really liked the kitchen knives that Erika Dahmann made for us in Solingen from the 1970s until she sold the company in the mid-1990s. Our Italian partner is capable of that same quality. Those German knives were bought by a great many of the top handmade knifemakers for use in their own kitchens.

    These knives, like the ones from Germany, give you the heft, style and quality of traditional forged European style kitchen knives. The blades are a Molybdenum-Vanadium high-carbon stainless that will really hold an edge. The secret of great cutting is not just in the steel but in the way the blades are ground. These are ground VERY thin. They are not the knives to use for chopping bones or frozen food, they are designed to slice and dice all day long as a professional chef would use his favorite slicing knife. Fiberglass reinforced Polypropylene makes the handles dishwasher safe, but water and detergent driven at high speed will dull your blades and the sharp edges will damage your racks and baskets. We recommend that you never put a sharp knife in a dishwasher or let them set in a sink full of water.
    Because you are buying direct, not through worldwide distribution, these knives are priced at much less than the cost of better known brands. With a better blade steel and better cutting ability, they are priced at about thirty-five percent less than a comparable Henckels knife.
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  26. #26
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  27. #27
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    I have been using CERAMIC knives for nearly a decade, a whole new cutting experience!! They last for ages without needing resharpening.
    I only user steel knives on hard items such as Pumpkin and similar "hard" items - I use a sharpening steel such as most Butchers use, to re-edge my steel knives.
    sb
    Scarletbreasted

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tristan View Post
    Be sure the cutting area/board you are using isn't made of a material which will unnecessarily dull your knives. I know someone who uses a ceramic plate to cut on, and always complains about how dull their cutlery is.
    I sometimes try to explain to someone who I've noticed doing that. When they don't get it I just try to avert my eyes and think of something else.

  29. #29
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    The steel is NOT a "Sharpening Steel" it IS a "Honing Steel" or "Stropping Steel" and is used to simply complete the sharpening process after use of normal sharpening tools, AND to touch up the blade before or after each use.

    If you are replacing the edge or seriously in need of actual SHARPENING go with an honest sharpening system finishing up with the steel. AND use the steel every time you use the larger knife. Parers not so much.
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  30. #30
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    I'm an Old Hickory guy. Yeah, they have wood handles, yes they look strange once the patina sets and No, they never go in the dish machine-I hand wash and dry each time. I treat the handles to protect the wood and am happy, easy to sharpen-I got a cheap sharpener with the V-notch at the proper angle and never an issue keeping them sharp.
    "It ain't no secret I didn't get these scars falling over in church."


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  31. #31
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    Henkles or Wusthof would be the knife suggestion. PLAN on having the set price having comma in it....
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satanta View Post
    I'm an Old Hickory guy. Yeah, they have wood handles, yes they look strange once the patina sets and No, they never go in the dish machine-I hand wash and dry each time. I treat the handles to protect the wood and am happy, easy to sharpen-I got a cheap sharpener with the V-notch at the proper angle and never an issue keeping them sharp.
    I love my old hickory knives. Carbon steel, take a razor's edge, great edge retention...
    Buckle up, boys and girls. This could get a bit rough.

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  33. #33
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    JA Henkel, Wusthoff and others are great knives. They are a bit pricey though.

    We have a complete set of Rada knives now. While the handles are a bit small, they hold an edge pretty well. If they need dressing up, I use the Rada wheel sharpener/hone. Since they use hollow-ground blades, that sets the perfect angle. For my larger chef's knives (Chicago Cutlery, Tramontina*) I use an Arkansas soap stone and a steel. I would love a complete set of Cutco though! But, the Rada is both American made and affordable.


    *early Tramontina, Imported, not from China (Brazil?)

  34. #34
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    All great knives have been recommended, for sharpening I use a lasky. Will make any knife razor sharp in no time.
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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Publius View Post
    Oh boy you can blow some serious money on kitchen cutlery. I have a complete set of KOCH MESSER knifes.
    One Company that gets over looked is Buck knife they make kitchen knife sets and I just did a quick search they have a four knife set in about the $100 range.
    Now the buck set is just like their other knives and known for easy sharping and taking a razor sharp edge.
    I pretty much use my large Buck Knife and a paring knife. For everything except slicing bread. For that I have a bread saw with a real hack saw meat blade set into a curved wooden handle. My sis in law gave it to me years ago and it's still doing a fabulous job. Hand made by some guy in Pentwater Michigan and he sold them at art shows.

    DH sharpens my Buck knife on his stone and I use a cheap knife sharpener with a tungsten sharpener on one end and the ceramic rods on the other. Works fine for what I need.

    I don't have room for a dozen knives in my kitchen and I don't need that many. I hate plastic handles and my Buck has sort of a rubberized molded grip on it. It has cut up a LOT of meat including whole deer carcasses and it holds an edge a long time. Ran about $50 brand new. Worth every penny. Been using it almost 20 years now. Excellent quality.


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  36. #36
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    Back in the day when we had money, I broke down and got the wife a set from Cutco. The big set! Best investment ever! Almost 20 years now. I also collect Chicago Cutlery knifes from garage sales. Being a 45 year machinist, I can put an edge on anything.
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Owl View Post
    I pretty much use my large Buck Knife and a paring knife. For everything except slicing bread. For that I have a bread saw with a real hack saw meat blade set into a curved wooden handle. My sis in law gave it to me years ago and it's still doing a fabulous job. Hand made by some guy in Pentwater Michigan and he sold them at art shows.

    DH sharpens my Buck knife on his stone and I use a cheap knife sharpener with a tungsten sharpener on one end and the ceramic rods on the other. Works fine for what I need.

    I don't have room for a dozen knives in my kitchen and I don't need that many. I hate plastic handles and my Buck has sort of a rubberized molded grip on it. It has cut up a LOT of meat including whole deer carcasses and it holds an edge a long time. Ran about $50 brand new. Worth every penny. Been using it almost 20 years now. Excellent quality.

    Buck does sell direct to the public and they sell individual kitchen knives. Anyone thats interested you have to visit Buck knife website and view all they have.
    I have one of their hunting knives a Buck Special N0# 119, I have used many times as a kitchen butcher knife at home as well as at camp and yearly picnic's to cut meat and veggies. Its easy to sharpen and takes a seriously scary sharp edge.

  38. #38
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    I bought a set of Henkles about 5 years ago. I did get the ones made in Germany but they are now junk. I took them to have them sharpened and they guy did it but told me that the metal was inferior. Apparently Henkles et al are all using Chinese steel in their knives, regardless of where the knife is actually made. I am not pleased.

  39. #39
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    I have my grandmother's set of Old Hickory -- I'm with Sat on them, they are excellent (though you do have to sharpen them once in a while). And I love Cutco in spite of their price. My ex sold them briefly as a young Airman, so we used to have his set of samples to use in our kitchen. Someday I will get my own set.

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  40. #40
    Yep. Old hickory. Never dishwash, just handwash immediately after use. Of all my knives, they are my go-to and rarely need sharping.

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