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GUNS/RLTD Why Glock Dominates the Handgun Market (And Better than Sig Sauer and Beretta)
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  1. #1
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    Why Glock Dominates the Handgun Market (And Better than Sig Sauer and Beretta)

    For fair use education/research purposes.

    The link: http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the...ig-sauer-23487

    The article:

    Why Glock Dominates the Handgun Market (And Better than Sig Sauer and Beretta)
    Kyle Mizokami

    The story of the Glock is simply amazing.

    Why Glock Dominates the Handgun Market (And Better than Sig Sauer and Beretta)

    In the intervening thirty-five years, the Glock has become the dominant handgun in a crowded field of competitors. Despite stiff competition from countries emulating his polymer design, Glock 17 handguns serve with such diverse forces as the British Armed Forces, the Swedish Armed Forces, Indian special forces, the Iraqi military, the Israeli Defense Forces and the Yemeni military. The Glock 17 outfits dozens of armies and hundreds of police forces worldwide. U.S. Army Rangers and Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command use the compact version, the Glock 19, and U.S. Special Forces—including the shadowy Delta Force—carry the .40 Smith & Wesson–caliber Glock 22.

    For much of the mid-twentieth century, handgun development was in a period of stagnation. The development of the semiautomatic pistol had ushered in a new weapon that, although more complex than a revolver, had a higher ammunition capacity. Quickly adopted by armies around the world, the steel-framed semiautomatic reigned for decades. Then, in the 1980s, something came along that disrupted the firearms industry: the Glock handgun. Today it’s carried by armies worldwide, from the U.S. Army Rangers to the British Armed Forces.

    The story of the Glock began in February 1980, when the Austrian army was looking to replace antiquated, World War II–era Walther P-38 handguns with something new. Gaston Glock, an Austrian citizen who ran a small business producing field knives and blades for the Austrian Army, overheard a conversation between two Austrian Army colonels and learned the Army was in the process of searching for a new pistol. According to Glock: The Rise of America’s Gun, Glock asked the minister of defense whether or not his shop could compete, and the answer was, “Yes, why not?”

    Glock knew nothing about handguns. He had spent two or three days in World War II as a conscript teenager in the Wehrmacht, but that had had no practical benefit for him. The machine shop owner went out and purchased a number of competing pistols, including the Italian Beretta 92F, the Swiss-German Sig Sauer P220, the Czech CZ75 and a modern version of the Walther P-38, the P-1. Glock took the weapons home and studied them, how they worked and how they were constructed. He also consulted firearms specialists, soliciting them for ideas on what they would like to see in a modern handgun.

    Glock learned that the Austrian army wanted a pistol with a high ammunition capacity, more than the eight rounds of the Walther P-38. It should weigh no more than twenty-eight ounces, with a streamlined design and a consistent, light trigger pull. It should also have no more than forty parts. After a year of tinkering and product development, Glock filed for a patent for a pistol design on April 30, 1981. He delivered four test pistols the Austrian army on May 19, 1982. The resulting pistol, known as the Glock 17, swept the army’s handgun trials and was accepted for service, earning Glock a contract for twenty thousand of his new pistols.

    The Glock 17 was a pistol unlike any other. Strong and light, the lower half of the pistol is a polymer frame housing a steel fire control group. The upper half of the pistol is made from a single block of steel. This use of plastics allowed Glock to keep the handgun’s weight down to twenty-three ounces—a quarter pound less than the army requirement. Other competitors such as the Beretta 92F and the CZ75 used a steel frame. Glock simplified the design to just thirty-four parts. Longtime gun manufacturer Beretta’s 92F pistol, by comparison, had more than seventy parts.

    Glock spent considerable time working on his pistol’s “pointability,” a term that describes a pistol’s natural ability to act as an extension of the shooter’s hand and eye coordination. This makes the pistol easy to aim, translating into a more user-friendly, accurate weapon. The Walther P-38, by comparison “points badly.” Glock also concentrated on making his weapon reliable over all else, and in a competition that allowed for twenty jams in ten thousand shots, his pistol only failed once.

    The Glock 17 was also one of the first high-capacity pistols. The Browning Hi Power, designed by John M. Browning himself, was one of the first high-capacity shooters and carried thirteen rounds. The Beretta 92 could carry an impressive fifteen rounds. The Glock 17, however, beat the competition, packing seventeen rounds of nine-millimeter parabellum ammunition, more than doubling the P-38’s magazine capacity.

    In the intervening thirty-five years, the Glock has become the dominant handgun in a crowded field of competitors. Despite stiff competition from countries emulating his polymer design, Glock 17 handguns serve with such diverse forces as the British Armed Forces, the Swedish Armed Forces, Indian special forces, the Iraqi military, the Israeli Defense Forces and the Yemeni military. The Glock 17 outfits dozens of armies and hundreds of police forces worldwide. U.S. Army Rangers and Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command use the compact version, the Glock 19, and U.S. Special Forces—including the shadowy Delta Force—carry the .40 Smith & Wesson–caliber Glock 22.

    Gaston Glock credits his success in handgun design to his lack of knowledge about handguns. That gave him no preconceived notions about what a handgun should be, and allowed him to focus on just a handful of requirements: ease of use, simplicity and reliability. Glock didn’t try to invent a pistol that would take over the world, just win a contract for the Austrian army. The rest of the world simply decided it wanted what he was selling. Somewhere in there is a lesson for defense contractors everywhere.

  2. #2
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    Glocks suck.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    Glocks suck.
    I would like to know how many gun accidents involve Glocks. It's safety system is set up to go off an inconvenient times.
    "The misfortune of many is the consolation of fools" Ancient proverb

  4. #4
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    Over 40 years, I owned ten 1911s, and used many more. Also owned seven Beretta 92/M9A1s. Owned seven Glocks- 21/30/34. Now, at 68, only own Sigs. My EDC is two 9mm TACOPS. Why? It's taken that long for MY perfect pistol to arrive. If I were ever to switch back to a polymer handgun, I'd have to go with the S&W M&P 2.0 w/thumb safety- full size, plus threaded barrel, TruGlo TFX PRO sights, and competition SRT trigger job. Until then, my Sigs go where I go- from the time my feet hit the deck, to the time these tired old bones hit the rack. Glocks? Fuggedaboutit...

    OldARcher
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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Troke View Post
    I would like to know how many gun accidents involve Glocks. It's safety system is set up to go off an inconvenient times.
    Just about every accidental discharge I read about is a Glock.

    They fire every time, and sometimes when you don't want them to.
    Yes, I have one.

    No accidental discharges.....yet.


    Southside

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troke View Post
    I would like to know how many gun accidents involve Glocks. It's safety system is set up to go off an inconvenient times.
    According to Glock factory reps I've talked to over the years, the only safety is between one's ears... Glock, a cheap answer to bean counter's wet dreams...

    OldARcher
    "Make haste- slowly." -Marshall Wyatt Earp============ "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast." -Kyle Swanson, US Navy SEAL

    Proud Founding Member of the Nowski Brigade

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  7. #7
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    Tactical Tupperware.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

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  8. #8
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    I like glock not a fan boy by any means and do not believe the line in the story above about getting a glock to point better naturally. A 1911/2011 is still the best pointing handgun.
    I do give glock credit for making a cheap handgun that works glock has spurred on competition in the field and forced other companies to keep up.

  9. #9
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    I carry one everyday.
    Wicker agmfan3

  10. #10
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    I have shot several different Glock's and do like them. That being said, I would never buy/carry one. The simple reason is I do not feel comfortable or trust myself carrying a firearm that does not have an external safety. My Sig has both a hammer and external safety just like my 1911 and I trust myself carrying the Sig.

  11. #11
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    I love my Third Gen Glock(s) 19 and 20!!!!

    (Simple reason: "Double Stack")

    But my conceal carry is a Ruger LC9.
    JOHN 3:16 / John 8:32 And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you FREE.

  12. #12
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    I believe he may have been exposed to an HK VP 70. While not brothers the weapons are at least cousins.
    "You are allowed to be disappointed but not surprised"

  13. #13
    We're a Sig family, and the worst thing we've seen is that our magazines have to come from the mfg at 50 each, when you can get glock mags at gun shows for 15 or 20.
    Been reading for years, just now starting to talk.

  14. #14
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    I bought my 17 in 1988 started carrying it in 2005 when I moved to Florida and got my CCW. 17 in the mag, one in the pipe and a spare 17 on my belt and I'm ready for just about anything.

  15. #15
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    The Glock is to handguns what the AK47 is to Battle Rifles. Cheap, always goes bang, and has a high magazine capacity. But like the AK, there are better weapons depending on what your mission is. A 1911 easily has the best ergonomics, trigger pull and overall accuracy, not to mention both a passive safety and a manual external safety. If you want more rounds, carry a spare magazine.

  16. #16
    Glocks are popular for a few simple reasons
    1 price. They are cheaper that the competition
    2 the safe action is as close to a double action revolver as you can get
    3 they are simple to repair and modify
    4 they are reliable

    How durable they are as in how many rounds until failure, not sure
    How they will stand up to 25 years of use and abuse and no maintenance. We will see
    When the military uses some cheap after market magazines we will see the end result.
    Use it like a club, we will see what happens
    Use the same 124 gr fmj ammo and we will see it’s effectiveness
    Last edited by blueinterceptor; 12-04-2017 at 09:08 PM.

  17. #17
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    Glock's have several safeties. There is a firing pin block inside the slide that will 100% keep the gun from firing if it is dropped, or even slammed into a wall or concrete floor. If you drop a Glock, it is better to let it fall instead of trying to catch it and risk pulling the trigger.

    Another safety is in the trigger. It wont let the trigger go back unless it is also depressed with the trigger. Another is the fact that the firing pin/striker is not "Cocked" enough to fire a round without pulling the trigger. The trigger finishes pulling back the striker/firing pin and then releases it to fire the gun.

    The good and bad in a Glock are one in the same, if you pull the trigger, it will go bang, every time. It also wont go bang unless the trigger is pulled. You cant make it childproof or safe from anyone who pulls the trigger. Triggers can sometimes be accidentally pulled, or hang up on clothing, holsters or your trigger finger if you holster it or stick it in your pants with your finger on the trigger. Many former men had their junk blown off sticking a Glock in their pants with a finger on the trigger. I saw one cop blow a wallet out of his pants holstering a Glock with his finger on the trigger. It was the only accidental discharge that I know of out of 63 officers (Some to stupid to have a gun) in the 20 years I worked for my department.

    I have many handguns including Glocks in 10mm, 9mm, .40 SW, and a .380 Glock for my wife. I have carried one concealed for 23 years, supplemented by other pistols from time to time.

  18. #18
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    Later the FBI began testing the Glock. (After the S Hollywood shootout and the Florida armored car burglers) Thise things influenced them to go even bigger with the 10 mm.

    Initial trials experienced frame breakage and a lack of strength to handle the 10mm round. Also, the smaller framed testers couldn't handle the recoil; women, shot stature men, people with smaller hands, etc.

    The easy fix was for them to integrate a new heavy bolt at the the slide/handle rear area. The result was no further structural failures and if you couldn't shoot it, you were issued the .40 cal. version which is basically a 10mm cut down to size in shell and gunpowder. Now us hardcore fans still shoot it and with a little extra practice can nail pretty good tacks with it.
    "Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable."
    --John F. Kennedy

  19. #19
    Shot a couple at a rental place. Wouldn't have one in the house. The only thing almost as bad as a Glock was the M&P I tried.

  20. #20
    I carried one Mod 23 .40 cal. for about a year and a half.. qualified with it, it was reliable, no problem with safety, but... I suppose after years of '1911' grip angle I just didn't like it.. now I carry a HK USPc .45 and am completely comfortable with it... I still have my '1911's' and shoot them often, I'd put the HK, Sig's that I own and don't forget the S&W mod 584 L frame .357 I like that when I'm in the 'woods'... up alongside any of the 'new' pistols I just never got on the Glock gravy train...

  21. #21
    One of the best out-of-the-box handguns when it first came out. If one knew they were going into battle it would’ve been a good handgun to have. The safety issue is no longer confined to Glock. Sig, HK, S&W, and others have all came out with essentially a similar working handgun with no external safety.

  22. #22
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    Marketing, all inclusive contracts and volume are why they've proliferated as much as they've done even with their general mechanical reliability.

    Now since the latest US Military pistol competition there is a whole new crop of offerings to challenge Glock, both in price point and reliability.

  23. #23
    If you say you just don't like them because they don't feel good in your hand or you don't like the grip angle or you want an external safety or something solid, that is one thing. But those of you who, who are clearly know that the US SOCOM, Rangers, SF, Delta, SEALs, Marine Special Operations Command, not to mention the Israelis, and various special forces around the world use Glock and you say how worthless junk they are, you really sound silly.

    It reminds me of a local gun shop I went into and asked "I notice, you never carry AKs" and the skinny little redneck who had never served a day in the military said "Yea, that's because they are crap. Yea, right, go tell Spetnaz of your high and might knowledge and skills they made a mistake and let me know how it goes.

  24. #24
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    When I trained with a para-military school, all the instructors carried Glocks. Mil guys, off-duty cops and some off-duty military. I like them but I know they aren't for everybody. I like the 1911 to but in a competition I'll take the G30 in .45. I can shoot the eyes off a house fly with that thing. Also goes to show that some Glocks are easier to shoot than others and just seem to jive with my grip.
    "Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable."
    --John F. Kennedy

  25. #25
    I have fooled with Glocks. They are a nice toy.

    For true social situations I only carry my 1911's.

    I know others have their opinions, some based on personal experience.

    I would not be typing this were it not for my 1911's and .45 ACP ammunition on several occasions.

    Daddy always told me if it ain't broke, don't fix it. For me the 1911 isn't broken. John Moses Browning got it right and it's still right.
    Dosadi

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  26. #26
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    My 19 just fits, thankyou.
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  27. #27
    There is a reason Glock dominates the market. When I pull the trigger I need it to go bang. If you don’t want it to go bang then don’t pull the trigger. I have had many striker fire pistols and only run Glocks at this point for the past 10 years or so. When I am at the Sig Academy many of us run Glocks and while the other are doing there unintended malfunctions drill we are putting lead down range. I cannot count the times that I am up and running while others are clear malfunctions. I carry what works for me, I put hundreds of rounds down range every week no malfunctions. It’s not that I have not experienced unintended malfunction with the Glocks but it is very rare. I go with what works for me Glocks, LMT AR, and 870. I carry a G19 (winter) or G26 (summer) every day.

  28. #28
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    Go ahead...go ahead and try them all...
    Rent 'em ..buy 'em...I don't care...
    Go try all of them...
    Then try a Sig....If it doesn't feel at home in your hand...You must be deformed...
    This from me..an old 1911 guy...carried in service and after...
    Till I tried a full sized Sig...
    The ONE firearm made for the human hand...period...
    Guess I'm a "fanboy".....windsail....

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    Glocks suck.
    Glocks have triggers like caukling guns... other than that they are fine.

  30. #30
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    I bought my first Glock (a 9mm Glock 19) in 1990. At the time my carry gun was a Colt Lightweight Commander in .45ACP. I bought the Glock because I was going somewhere that salt water was involved, that I was not legally allowed to carry a pistol and therefore could not perform routine maintenance on a sidearm - and my Colt was blued steel. The Tennifer finish on the Glock was supposed to be rustproof.

    It was not easy to transition from the 1911 pattern to the Glock. I had no problem with the grip angle (I use arched mainspring housings on my 1911s) but it took a while for me to get confidence in the Glock action - to start with, I had a Glock rep at a conference/exhibition on Ft. Bragg put a 'New York' trigger in mine. The transition took a while, just as it took me a while to transition from S&W revolvers to confidence with the 1911 pattern. My Glocks have always lived in holsters that protected the trigger guard securely. And I have always been hyperaware of safety considerations.

    I carried Glocks until I shifted back to a J frame S&W for the Snubby Summit late in 1995, and have used the J frame since then - though I have an Apex accessorized S&W M&P9C waiting in the wings.

    Glocks are like Craftsman hammers. Mass produced, one just like the next, functional reliable dependable economical but uninspired. Shooting machines, in the term the British like to use to describe American repeating shotguns. Glocks have no class, no soul, no real historical affection associated with them as does, say, my 1951 commercial Colt Government Model 1911 that was re-built for me by the 'smith who built the initial 1911s for Delta. But Glocks work.

    Yeah, people manage to discharge them in negligent fashion from time to time. Pull the trigger on a loaded Glock and it will fire. Pull the trigger on one of my loaded J frames and it will fire too. Big deal. It's always the gun's fault.
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
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  31. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    Glocks suck.
    Except they don't.

  32. #32
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    Key features of the glock are
    ergonomics
    natural pointing
    reasonable trigger pull right out of the box
    no sharp points or edges to catch on things
    No external hammer that can snag on things
    light weight
    the backing of over half of the US law enforcement community
    good reliable high capacity magazines
    a good aftermarket for parts


    So what is not to like?
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dex View Post
    Later the FBI began testing the Glock. (After the S Hollywood shootout and the Florida armored car burglers) Thise things influenced them to go even bigger with the 10 mm.

    Initial trials experienced frame breakage and a lack of strength to handle the 10mm round. Also, the smaller framed testers couldn't handle the recoil; women, shot stature men, people with smaller hands, etc.

    The easy fix was for them to integrate a new heavy bolt at the the slide/handle rear area. The result was no further structural failures and if you couldn't shoot it, you were issued the .40 cal. version which is basically a 10mm cut down to size in shell and gunpowder. Now us hardcore fans still shoot it and with a little extra practice can nail pretty good tacks with it.
    The FBI 10mm was the Smith and Wesson 1076. Smith made a civilian version called the 1006, I have one. The Glock 10mm was not used by the FBI, they abandoned the 10mm after the 1076.

  34. #34
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    No having to think of disengaging the safet, nothing to hang up on when you draw. Glock is earning its soul everytime it saves a life in battle, it builds up its soul by being a good tool that can be used by anyome.
    "Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable."
    --John F. Kennedy

  35. #35
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    I have no issue with Glock's.

    That said, I don't own one, but that's probably more happenstance than any thing.

    I'm a 1911 fanboy and admit it. I grew up shooting them and they, to me feel like an extension of my hand. I trust in my Springfield Champion and shoot it regularly.

    Jeff B.
    "The real destroyer of the liberties of the people is he who spreads among them bounties, donations and benefits"
    Plutarch (Roman Philosopher and Statesman)

  36. #36
    I've shot both their 9mm and 45, and found their light weight to be uncontrollable. I'm certainly no shooter, but a bit heavier gun is easier to handle. Now granted my DE .44 is quite a bit heavier, but I can at least hit the target with that and it has significantly more oomf than a 45 ACP. True the Glocks carry more rounds per mag, but you only need to hit once with a .44 mag.

  37. #37
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    FNP 45 15 round capacity has very low felt recoil and hits targets like a hammer with +P rounds. Points like my own index finger....the knurled barrel nut is missing from the end of this one, perhaps the silencer was just removed?
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  38. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by RB Martin View Post
    FNP 45 15 round capacity has very low felt recoil and hits targets like a hammer with +P rounds. Points like my own index finger....the knurled barrel nut is missing from the end of this one, perhaps the silencer was just removed?
    15 round 45s makes for a fat grip.

  39. #39
    I carried a very modified 1911 for over a decade. Shot it a lot. Knew and repeated all the Glock jokes.
    I carried a Berretta 92 for a couple years.
    My wife carried a Sig 220 for about a decade.
    I am now a Glock man.
    "The AK of pistols".
    I carried a G19 and shot the heck out of it for the past 10 years. I think it is the perfect CCW pistol. Love that gun - my whole family has one. Each.
    Recently started carrying the G21 because I have been yearning for the .45 again
    I like Glocks - they work for me.
    Every time I pull the trigger

    "accidental" discharges? Nope - negligent discharges. Keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot.
    "Be Prepared" - Boy Scouts Motto
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  40. #40
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    I was going to make a long post, but people will feel like they want to feel. I have a G23 and I like it. It does what it is supposed to do. Every time.

    Chili

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