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GOV/MIL Prince Alwaleed was hung upside down 'just to send a message'
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  1. #41
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    Extortion pays, if you extort the right people in the right way.
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    Extortion pays, if you extort the right people in the right way.
    Heh. Yep.

    Why Saudi Prince bin Talal's 'friends' have abandoned him

    -Investing celebrity Prince Alwaleed bin Talal has now been detained and reportedly tortured for more than three weeks.
    -The political and financial world has remained mostly silent or at least relatively calm about it.
    -Here are the uncomfortable political and financial reasons his so-called friends appear to have abandoned him.



    Published 4 Hours Ago



    One of the world's richest men and most sought-after investors has been under arrest and even reportedly tortured for more than three weeks.

    That man is billionaire Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal. He owns major stakes in Twitter and Citigroup. He was a key shareholder in 21st Century FOX. His television interviews, including on CNBC, are promoted with "must-watch" status. He's routinely called the "Warren Buffett of Saudi Arabia."

    But since November 5, bin Talal has been detained in a room at the Ritz Carlton in Riyadh. The hotel has become a de facto prison for more than 200 of his fellow princes and Saudi officials as new Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman conducts a sweeping and stunning purge of his real and potential political opponents.

    To make matters worse, several credible reports have surfaced that bin Talal and the others are being tortured. One report says he's been hung upside down and beaten. Those stories gained a level of credence earlier this week when another prince, Miteb bin Abdullah, paid a reported $1 billion for his freedom.



    As bin Salman pushes to beef up Saudi Arabia's military power and alliances against Iran, the official reason for these arrests is that they are part of an "anti-corruption probe." But of course, the kingdom is not presenting anything in the way of documented evidence. That's not how they roll in a regime that Human Rights Watch points out has no written penal code or criminal rights.

    "Since November 5, bin Talal has been detained in a room at the Ritz Carlton in Riyadh. The hotel has become a de facto prison for more than 200 of his fellow princes."

    That brings us to an uncomfortable question: Where are Prince bin Talal's powerful business partners and political contacts who have been seen with him at DAVOS or dozens of other major world events?

    This was the man who stuck his neck out for years in support of the Murdoch family. And that includes the period in 2011 when calls to oust Rupert Murdoch and his sons were running high after the British News of the World phone tapping scandal. There has been no real protest on his behalf from the Murdochs or in their newspapers and TV networks.

    Others, like Bill Gates who called him an "important partner," have made lukewarm statements this past week. But none have met the level of urgency appropriate for a man detained with no documented charges and possibly under physical harm.

    Likewise, our political leadership on both sides of the aisle seems to be ignoring the story.

    So why this apparent acceptance of tyranny and brutality against an important global investor who appeared to be a friend of the West?

    The explanation is part economics and part politics, but the consequences for such silence could be devastating.

    Let's start with economics. The financial world has long been awaiting what will be the biggest IPO of all time: Saudi Aramco. This is a company that's already estimated valuations of anywhere between $1 trillion to $2 trillion. It's the definition of the term "big deal." Everyone wants a piece.

    There's a concerted effort by bin Salman to keep too many members of the extended family from interfering in Aramco's operations and spending. These arrests may have a lot to do with that effort. Either way, supporting bin Talal and the other detained princes with even a strongly worded statement could poison a foreign investor's Aramco prospects.

    The political reasons are a little less clear, but we do know there is strong support in the Trump administration for bin Salman's plan to cultivate a new partnership with Israel and his efforts to disrupt the long Saudi-funded Wahabist terrorist network. He's also trying to culturally modernize the country and remove anti-Semitic clerics.

    bin Talal has never been solidly linked to terror, but he has been critical of Israel. bin Salman may be looking to remove all doubts that he is serious about putting a lid on all real and possible sources for terror support.

    So for the Trump administration, supporters of Israel, and everyone else worried about Iran, there's a relatively clear acceptance of bin Salman's moves to achieve a greater good in the Middle East. The ends apparently justify the means.

    But that's a clear moral hazard. When a nation accepts brutality and tyranny in one regime in order in order to stamp it out in another, blowback can happen. America should have learned that the hard way after its years of supporting the Shah of Iran and some other dictators in the region without any real pressure to introduce democratic reforms and the rule of law. Iran is a greater danger right now. But a more suppressive Saudi Arabia could be close behind. There's nothing democratic or civilized about what's happening now in Riyadh.

    Money and the push to challenge Iran are clearly silencing any protest so far. Maybe bin Talal isn't the most sympathetic victim. But his case is illuminating because he is so well connected and famous. What does that say about other Saudis who aren't?

    Perhaps these frightening means to the end will be worth it. But our track record in the Middle East doesn't make the odds all that encouraging.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/12/01/why-...ommentary.html

  3. #43
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    Majority of Detained Saudis Agree to Monetary Demands

    December 06, 2017

    Saudi Arabian Attorney General Sheikh Saud Al-Mujib has released his first statement more than a month after the kingdom’s Supreme Anti-Corruption Committee conducted its crackdown on over than 300 princes, ministers, and businessmen.

    The kingdom’s state-run Saudi Press Agency released the full statement, saying 320 had been subpoenaed of which 159 remain incarcerated. That means a majority of those detained “agreed to a settlement”—effectively returning vast sums of their personal wealth back into the kingdom’s treasury.

    “As a precautionary measure,” the bank accounts of 376 individuals were frozen, but the attorney general confirmed all assets were being protected for others who are supposed to have access to them. He said the process involves two phases—negotiation and settlement followed by transfer to public prosecution—and is already well under way.

    The first phase is expected to be completed within the next few weeks. The second will then begin with no detention to continue beyond six months without a court order.

    The statement also states:

    The Attorney General reiterates that the Law of Criminal Procedures guarantees defendant’s rights, such as the right to an attorney during the processes of investigation and prosecution, the right to contact any person to inform of his detention and the right not to be detained for more than six months except by court order issued by the relevant court. The Law of Criminal Procedures also prohibits subjecting the detainee to any harm.

    It has been reported that the kingdom might recoup as much as $800 billion as part of this crackdown. Other reports state many of the detainees were tortured by "American mercenaries."

    https://www.trunews.com/article/majo...netary-demands

  4. #44
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    Highest profile prisoner: Prince Alwaleed bin Talal was hung upside to 'send a message' after being lured to a meeting with the crown prince. He is worth at least $7 billion

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz50UnKTMqv

  5. #45
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    The Price of Freedom for Saudi Arabia’s Richest Man: $6 Billion

    Prince al-Waleed bin Talal is trying to hold onto his company after crown prince’s corruption crackdown

    Dec. 22, 2017 5:31 p.m. ET
    127 COMMENTS

    Saudi authorities are demanding at least $6 billion from Saudi Prince al-Waleed bin Talal to free him from detention, people familiar with the matter said, potentially putting the global business empire of one of the world’s richest men at risk.

    The 62-year-old prince was one of the dozens of royals, government officials and businesspeople rounded up early last month in a wave of arrests the Saudi government billed as the first volley in Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s campaign against widespread graft.

    The Saudi government has disclosed few details of its allegations against the accused, many of whom have since been released from detention in a makeshift prison at the Riyadh Ritz-Carlton after negotiating financial settlements. The $6 billion Saudi officials are demanding from Prince al-Waleed, a large stakeholder in Western businesses like Twitter, is among the highest figures they have sought from those arrested, some of the people familiar with the matter said.

    The prince’s fortune is estimated at $18.7 billion by Forbes, which would make him the Middle East’s wealthiest individual. But Prince al-Waleed has indicated that he believes raising and handing over that much cash would be an admission of guilt and would require him to dismantle the financial empire he has built over 25 years, other people said.

    Prince al-Waleed is talking with the government about instead accepting as payment for his release a large piece of his conglomerate, Kingdom Holding Co., people familiar with the matter said. The Riyadh-listed company’s market value is $8.7 billion, down about 14% since the prince’s arrest. Kingdom Holding said in November that it retained the support of the Saudi government and that its strategy “remains intact.”

    Prince al-Waleed, currently chairman of the company, would want to stay on in a leadership role in the new state-backed company, one person close to him said.

    “Keeping [the empire] under his control, that’s his battle,” the person said.

    According to a senior Saudi official, Prince al-Waleed faces accusations that include money laundering, bribery and extortion. The official didn’t elaborate.

    Salah Al-Hejailan, a lawyer who has worked with Prince al-Waleed in the past and remains in contact with his family, said that “there are no formal accusations” against the prince, and that the prosecutor would only open a judicial case against him if no understanding is reached.

    The Saudi government is merely “having an amicable exchange to reach a settlement” with the tycoon, said Mr. Al-Hejailan, adding he wasn’t currently retained by Prince al-Waleed.

    The prince has indicated to people close to him that he is determined to prove his innocence and would fight the corruption allegations in court if he had to.

    “He wants a proper investigation. It is expected that al-Waleed will give MBS a hard time,” said a person close to Prince al-Waleed, referring to the crown prince by his initials, as many do.

    Kingdom Holding, the Saudi Royal Court and the Saudi Embassy in Washington didn’t respond to requests for comment.

    Saudi officials have said they expect the state to receive tens of billions of dollars from settlements with those arrested last month. Prince Miteb bin Abdullah, once seen as a leading contender to the throne, paid more than $1 billion to secure his release in a settlement with the government, said senior Saudi government advisers.

    The detentions are part of a large-scale shake-up of Saudi society engineered by 32-year-old Prince Mohammed. He is also allowing women to drive next year, opening movie theaters for the first time in decades and orchestrating the public listing of the state’s oil company to raise cash for an economic transformation.

    Prince Mohammed has also moved quickly to consolidate power in a royal family in which different branches often ran pieces of the government as private fiefs. In the past two years, the crown prince has taken control of internal security services, national defense and the economy from uncles and cousins who had long been in power.

    Prince al-Waleed, a cousin to the crown prince, has never been seen as a contender for the throne because his father, Prince Talal bin Abdulaziz, called for liberal social and political reforms in the 1960s and fell out of favor.

    Like his father, Prince al-Waleed has long been an outspoken advocate for social reforms, such as allowing women to drive. He is also a sort of independent Saudi ambassador to the global business world, amassing big stakes in companies such as Apple, General Motors and News Corp. (all of which he has sold). News Corp is the owner of The Wall Street Journal. Currently, he is a major shareholder in Twitter, the ride-sharing service Lyft, AccorHotels and the Four Seasons Hotel & Resorts. His company’s skyscraper, Kingdom Centre, is one of Riyadh’s most striking landmarks.

    Some people close to Prince al-Waleed say they believe his high profile helped turn Prince Mohammed against the tycoon. Kingdom Holding has long acted like an arm of the Saudi state, striking deals that could have also been done by the crown prince or the kingdom’s own sovereign-wealth vehicle, the Public Investment Fund.

    On a holiday that took him through nine countries this summer, Prince al-Waleed met the president of Portugal and the prime minister of Albania. In September, he sat down with French President Emmanuel Macron to discuss a “strategic alliance” with France, according to a news release about the meeting issued by Kingdom Holding.

    Kingdom had been talking to France’s sovereign-wealth fund, its partner in a $400 million fund to invest in Saudi businesses, about bringing the Saudi government into the deal, people familiar with the matter said, adding there had been no progress on the matter since the prince’s arrest. A spokesman for the French fund declined to comment.

    Inside the Ritz-Carlton, Prince al-Waleed has been allowed limited communication, is eating what people close to him call his “diet food” and exercising.

    Prince al-Waleed’s arrest took his international business partners by surprise and cast uncertainty over the future of his company. Prince al-Waleed had expressed support for Prince Mohammed’s reform plans, and Kingdom Holding appeared likely to play a role in carrying out pieces of the economic and social change under way. Now the prince’s international business dealings have stalled, though the Kingdom board met in Riyadh on Wednesday, its first publicly announced meeting since Prince al-Waleed’s arrest.

    Prince al-Waleed’s media company Rotana had been in talks with French conglomerate Vivendi to set up a joint venture with Saudi Public Investment Fund to sell music and open cinemas in Saudi Arabia, according to people familiar with the matter. But his arrest has scuttled any further discussions, they said. A Vivendi representative confirmed that Prince al-Waleed and Vivendi Chairman Vincent Bolloré held talks but said the venture was “not followed up” and “is not on agenda.”

    It appears unlikely Prince al-Waleed had any inkling he was under investigation or faced imminent arrest, according to people close to him.

    About a month before the arrests, he sent a text message—reviewed by the Journal—to Bakr bin Laden, the chairman of the massive construction firm Saudi Binladin Group, congratulating him on having been cleared of wrongdoing in relation to a crane collapse in Mecca. Prince al-Waleed told Mr. bin Laden in that message that it was now time to get back to work on the Jeddah Tower, a partnership with Kingdom Holding that would be the world’s tallest building when completed.

    The tower remains unfinished. Mr. bin Laden is detained at the Ritz with the prince.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-pri...ion-1513981887

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    Pretty much every US servicemember in uniform today can be said to have hired out to the highest bidder as well.

    Rather than having you accept whole cloth the MEEEdia construct of Blackwater, I'd invite you to read Prince's book ... https://www.amazon.com/Civilian-Warr...1484559&sr=1-1
    an unfortunately SAD BUT TRUE statement Doz . . . the honor and might of the US Military has been usurped by global multinational corporations to wage resource and manufacturers wars for the fun and profit of the rich men of the earth
    “So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth.” REV 3:16

    Raging Deplorable - we do NOT forget; we do NOT forgive; we are LEGION

  7. #47
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    image.jpeg

    More likely these guys, off shoot of blackwater and CIA deep cover inforcement arm.
    "When law and morality contradict each other, the citizen has the cruel alternative of either losing his moral sense or losing his respect for the law." ~ Frederic Bastiilt

    "Duty is ours; results are God's."

  8. #48
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    December 28, 2017

    Two Saudi princes released from detention in anti-corruption probe: source


    DUBAI/RIYADH (Reuters) - Two sons of Saudi Arabia’s late King Abdullah have been released from detention at Riyadh’s Ritz-Carlton hotel, days after nearly two dozen other detainees in the kingdom’s two-month-old anti-corruption campaign were also freed.

    Saudi Arabia’s attorney general approved the release of Prince Meshaal bin Abdullah and Prince Faisal bin Abdullah after they reached financial settlements with the government, a senior Saudi official with knowledge of the matter told Reuters.

    The source did not elaborate on the settlements.

    The attorney general had not yet reached a decision on whether to release a third brother, Prince Turki bin Abdullah, the source said.

    A related member of the royal family, Princess Nouf bint Abdullah bin Mohammed bin Saud, tweeted photos of the two princes and exclamations of thanks on Thursday.

    Saudi security forces rounded up some 200 princes, ministers and business leaders and converted the Ritz-Carlton into a luxurious prison for them in early November in what Riyadh said was a crackdown on corruption.

    The move was also widely seen by analysts as helping Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman consolidate his grip on power, after he ousted his cousin as heir to the throne in the summer.

    The most powerful of King Abdullah’s sons, former National Guard chief Prince Miteb bin Abdullah, was released last month after agreeing to pay the government $1 billion.

    Prince Miteb had been the last member of Abdullah’s Shammar branch of the family to retain a key position in the Saudi power structure, after Prince Meshaal and Prince Turki were relieved of their posts as governors in 2015.

    Saudi newspaper Okaz reported on Tuesday that 23 individuals had been released after reaching deals with the government and that more were expected to follow in the days ahead.

    Others who had not reached settlements would face trial, the report said.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-s...-idUSKBN1EM1L4

  9. #49
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    Saudi Prince Al Waleed bin Talal’s Ex-Wife Tells All: Orgies with Underage Girls, Drugs, Bangladeshi Children Traded as Sex Slaves

    December 31, 2017

    Saudi Princess Amira Bint Aidan Bin Nayef went on a rampage against the ruling Saudi regime in her exclusive statements to the French newspaper Le Monde, saying slavery in Saudi Arabia has different forms, but it is done in secrecy and permitted only among the primary beneficiaries of the princes of the House of Saud.

    She mentioned one of the most repulsive things: buying and renting the children, especially the orphans, from countries like Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, Djibouti, Somalia, Nigeria, Romania and Bulgaria.

    According to Aidan, the ex-wife of the Saudi Prince Al Waleed bin Talal, who was recently arrested in scope of the anti-corruption purges in the country, those who accuse others of corruption and money laundering, are in fact highly corrupted themselves.

    Russian online newsportal Fort Russ reports quoting Aden’s interview on Le Monde, the princess said they’ve turned the city of Jeddah into a slave market where underage girls are being exploited for noisy sex parties involving drug and alcohol abuse.

    She said that one of the main reasons why this keeps going on is that the members of the Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice (Saudi Sharia police) tend to keep away from the matter, fearing they might lose their jobs, should they intervene.

    The newspaper quoted the princess as saying that a Hallowen event was recently held in Jeddah, and which was attended by 150 people, including employees of the consulates. The scene was like a typical nightclub anywhere outside the Kingdom, with available wines, dancing couples in fancy costumes, and a DJ.

    Bint Aidan said the price of smuggled liquor in the country is very high. For instance, the price of the Smirnoff vodka is $400, sometimes forcing party organisers to refill the original bottles with a local wine called Siddiqui.

    The children become the property of those who buy them and are not allowed to leave without permission.

    Even the Asian maids who come to work often find themselves in a kind of slave-like position. Young girls are divided into smaller groups and exploited for immoral acts.

    Trafficking of white women and exploiting them for sexual practices is also relatively common.

    https://truepundit.com/saudi-prince-...ed-sex-slaves/

  10. #50
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    Saudi Prince Alwaleed’s Fate Remains Uncertain as Corruption Probe Enters Critical Stage

    2 Jan 2018

    Two months after a sweeping series of arrests and temporary detentions made in connection with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s corruption probe, the fate of perhaps the biggest fish caught in the net remains uncertain: Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, one of the wealthiest, most famous, and well-connected men in the world.

    Most of the detainees were released from their often remarkably luxurious quarters after about a month, and a sizable amount of the money allegedly lost to corruption has been recovered in a string of enormous settlements, a few of them approaching nine figures. But Prince Alwaleed, who the L.A. Times observes is “the public face of the Saudi royal family to many foreign executives and investors,” is still twisting in the wind.

    “People with knowledge of the matter say Alwaleed is balking at demands that could see him relinquish control of Kingdom Holding Co,” L.A. Times and Bloomberg News report. “He also is resisting any suggestion of wrongdoing because of the impact it would have on his reputation, they said. The prince owns the vast majority of the $9-billion conglomerate, which has stakes in household names from Citigroup Inc. to Twitter.”

    Alwaleed is a crucial case because the ostensible purpose of the massive corruption crackdown was to make Saudi Arabia a more stable, open, and attractive home for foreign investment—a crucial component of Crown Prince Mohammed’s “Saudi Vision 2030” program to transition the Kingdom away from an oil-based economy.

    advertisement

    The alternative and far more cynical interpretation of the crackdown is that MBS, as he is widely known, was simply trying to consolidate power and claw back a hundred billion dollars frittered away by profligate royals during the heyday of Saudi oil. If Prince Alwaleed’s case drags on, even though it makes foreign investors palpably nervous, it will lend credence to the cynical view in many eyes.

    The L.A. Times floats a third possibility: the cratering oil market and regional tensions caused the clock to run out much sooner than Saudi reformers anticipated when the Saudi Vision 2030 plan was formulated, and they had to act very quickly to restore the national treasury and cleanse the government of corruption. MBS and his advisers may have concluded that short-term instability was an acceptable price to pay for executing long-term reform faster than they wanted to, or that shock and awe is the only way to reform a system with as much financial, political, and cultural inertia as the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Alwaleed definitely lives well, but he also plowed Saudi money into investments with a great many partners and employees. The largest settlement known to have been paid for corruption charges so far was the billion dollars tendered by the highest-ranking detainee, the late King Abdullah’s son Prince Miteb. According to the Wall Street Journal, Saudi authorities are demanding six times as much from Prince Alwaleed. That would amount to fully a third of his personal holdings and business empire. The global economic shockwaves from such a settlement would be huge.

    CNBC reported in early December that there are conflicting accounts of how Alwaleed has been treated in detention. He is ostensibly cooling his heels in a house-arrest situation at the Ritz Carlton in Riyadh along with many other royals whose cases have not yet been resolved, but “several credible reports have surfaced that bin Talal and the others are being tortured.”

    CNBC found it curious that Alwaleed’s high-profile partners and friends—a roster of global celebrity billionaires including the likes of Rupert Murdoch and Bill Gates, plus a fair number of prominent Western politicians—have not spoken up more loudly in demanding his release.

    A big part of the answer is the looming sale of stock in Saudi Aramco, the national oil company. Even in today’s glutted oil market, it will easily be the biggest IPO of all time. It is not just that everyone is clamming up because they want a slice of that titanic financial pie; it is that everyone understands the Aramco sale will be a crucial component of Saudi Arabia’s transformation.

    Financial planners and regional strategists alike are hoping Saudi Arabia will liberalize because it has concrete reasons for doing so—about $2 trillion of them, given the projected sale price of Aramco stock. Destroying that value and ruining the Saudi Vision 2030 plan could destabilize the country and region further, with little hope of long-term gain. The question is how much latitude the rest of the world is willing to give MBS to finish what he started with his corruption crackdown.

    Minister of State Ibrahim al-Assaf returned to work on Tuesday, attending a cabinet meeting after weeks in detention. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman was also at the meeting. Bloomberg Politics notes that Assaf did not smile for the photograph taken afterward. The expression on Prince Alwaleed’s face when he finally checks out of the Ritz Carlton will tell us something about where Saudi Arabia is headed.
    http://www.breitbart.com/national-se...ritical-stage/

  11. #51
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    Saudi Arabia Arrests 11 Princes Protesting Over Bills, Okaz Says

    January 6, 2018, 5:14 AM EST

    -Princes wanted the government to resume paying their utilities
    -Royal decree stopped payment of princes’ bills, newspaper says


    Saudi authorities made a fresh round of arrests of royal-family members as a group of princes staged a protest at the royal palace over the non-payment of their electricity and water bills, Okaz newspaper reported.

    The royal guard arrested 11 princes objecting to a decree that ordered the state to stop paying their utilities after they refused to leave the palace in the capital, Riyadh, the Jeddah-based newspaper reported Saturday, citing people it didn’t identify. The government’s Center for International Communication will seek more information from relevant authorities, it said in response to a request for a comment about the detentions.

    In November, authorities swept up dozens of Saudi Arabia’s richest and most influential people, including princes and government ministers, and detained them at the Ritz Carlton in Riyadh. The arrests were ordered by a newly established anti-corruption committee, headed by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

    King Salman ordered on Saturday extra pay for Saudi government workers and soldiers this year after the implementation of value-added taxation and a surge in fuel prices stirred grumbling among citizens, highlighting the kingdom’s struggle to overhaul its economy without risking a public backlash. The handouts will cost the state more than 50 billion riyals ($13.3 billion), Saud Al-Qahtani, an adviser to the royal court, said on his Twitter account.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...lic-complaints

  12. #52
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    A hive of scum and villainy - has been since WW1, too.
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    A hive of scum and villainy - has been since WW1, too.
    Arguably a lot further back than that....

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