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OT/MISC Home Depot Makes Video Lessons for Millennials on How to Use Tape Measures & Hammers
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  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    Ask them about Shanks Mare!
    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Grey View Post
    I've got to admit it...I had to look up the term, "Shanks Mare." But I am under 50 (by a few months), lol!
    A lot of people around 60 are not familiar with that term.

    Have some fun... go to Home Depot... Lowe's... wherever.... and ask them if they sell "butt gauges."

    I have three.

    Sat:

    The insidiousness of the creeping Socialism has been going for years starting back in the 60's with the goddamned hippies and their type growing up and moving into govt to spread their mental malfunctions to the children and-today the fruits of this idiocy no one wanted to stop, cared enough to stop or had the balls to stop because they were beaten to death with the PC club.
    That was beautiful.

    I'll bet POTUS would read that in the State of the Union Address.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Behind Enemy Lines
    Posts
    140,304
    The hippies were ultimately as corrosive as acid to this country,

  3. #43
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    12,059
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    My bad. I was unaware of your technical jargon....



    What is the term for when you have to jump on the thing to get the bolt to loosen?
    I believe that would be "kinetic torque enhancement."


    The Obama Administration constitutes a pseudocompetocracy, i.e., rule by those whose primary skill is in feigning competence.

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    The hippies were ultimately as corrosive as acid to this country,
    As was the British Invasion as it applies to music.

    I loved the Beatles back then and now... I can barely stand to listen to them knowing the havoc to which they (and many others) contributed.

    I listen to old music nearly every night and that period introduced the leftist s*** we are experiencing today.

    Others were involved as well a bit earlier but 1963 was a pivotal year.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Behind Enemy Lines
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    Shank’s mare:

    One's legs, used as a means of transport.

    Origin

    Shanks' (or shanks's) mare (or nag or pony) derives from the name of the lower part of the leg between the knee and ankle - the shank, nowadays more often known as the shin-bone or tibia. This was alluded to in the early form of this term - shank's nag. This originated in Scotland in the 18th century. There are several early citations in Scottish literature, as here in Robert Fergusson's Poems on Various Subjects, 1774:

    "He took shanks-naig, but fient may care."

    When it crossed the Atlantic, the expression migrated into 'shank's mare', which remains the common form in the USA. It was first referred to there in the 1860s. This rather unfortunate prediction was made in the Iowa newspaper The Dubuque Daily Herald in May 1869:

    "A public exhibition of the velocipede [a predecessor of the bicycle] was given on the streets last evening by Mr. Clark, who managed the vehicle with considerable skill... They are a toy, and will never come into general use in competition with Shank's mare."

    In the UK and Australia the term is commonly 'shanks' pony'. It is sometimes capitalized as 'Shank's pony' as some reports claim it to have derived from an individual called Shanks, who previously manufactured lawn-mowing machines, or from the Shanks & Company Ltd. (formed in 1853 and now absorbed into Armitage Shanks). One such horse-drawn mower had no seat and the driver had to walk behind it. Examples of these machines still exist and this would be a plausible theory (albeit one lacking in any real evidence) if it weren't for the clear pre-dating of the Scottish references.

    An alternative version of this allusory phrase is "the horse of ten toes".

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    The Hinterlands
    Posts
    1,225
    I learned all the basics in carpentry, masonry, pipe-fitting, plumbing, shooting, hunting/fishing, cooking, sewing, animal husbandry, woodworking, machining, electronics, mechanics, and electrical before I was 18, now I'm 29. Just took apart a brad nailer today to pop a slipped seal back in place, works like a charm now. Not all of us millennials are completely useless.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Michiganistan
    Posts
    636
    Spending winters living in town and summers on the farm was the best education ever. There are few things I can’t fix or repair. Few now have that kind of opportunity and many are too lazy or scared to even try which is what really drives me crazy.
    "Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet"

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    OK
    Posts
    21,554
    Quote Originally Posted by Oilpatch Hand View Post
    I believe that would be "kinetic torque enhancement."
    There is a required string of oaths & curses to do it properly.

    A magic mechanical chant, if you will.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    3,364
    My first reaction was to join the 'pile on' and make fun of this . . . but, then, I thought back to when I had "shop class" in middle school (7th & 8th grade) and high school in the late '70s, early '80s; in addition to the instructor - I'll be gosh darned if we didn't also have . . . videos! Some were on VHS, and a few I remember on the old reel-to-reel (LOL), but, they were videos none-the-less.

    True, by the time I graduated high school, I had done all of the following in SCHOOL SHOP CLASSES - which helped my understanding of some of the skills discussed in this thread:
    • rebuilt several V-8 engines
    • rebuilt several single cylinder small engines
    • built several wood projects (shelving units, foot stools, tool bins, etc.)
    • printed many objects (on paper, on fabric, etc.)
    • built many metals projects (welding, cutting, shaping, etc.)
    • sewn many items (aprons, pillows, blankets, shirts, etc.)
    • baked many meals (breakfasts, lunches, dinners, deserts, etc.)
    • all of this, and more, in general school settings - with boys AND girls

    In addition to this, my family was involved in motorsports, so, I was around mechanical & general garage actions from a very young age.

    However, even with all that mentioned: I tend to be a positive type of person . . . so, in my most humble opinion, for those who missed out on this type of learning in their home or school environment - it's never too late to learn.

    I say, good on 'em - for making the effort.


    HB
    "The national budget must be balanced. The public debt must be reduced; the arrogance of the authorities must be moderated and controlled. Payments to foreign governments must be reduced, if the nation doesn't want to go bankrupt. People must again learn to work, instead of living on public assistance."
    Cicero, 55 BC
    Roman author, orator, & politician (106 BC - 43 BC)
    "The more things change, the more they stay the same." -- popular cliché

  10. #50
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    140,304
    I was taught how to balance a checkbook in high school. And it wasn't even a Home Economics class, but in math.

  11. #51
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    U.S.A.
    Posts
    3,364
    Yup, that too.

    I'm a firm believer that school shouldn't replace good parenting . . . to that end, I try my "darndest" to pass along my knowledge and life skills to my "Jr. Haybails".

    However, I also believe that dropping these "hands on" general mechanical type classes (I think it was called "Home Economics" in my school system) is a huge failure of our school systems.



    HB

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    I was taught how to balance a checkbook in high school. And it wasn't even a Home Economics class, but in math.
    "The national budget must be balanced. The public debt must be reduced; the arrogance of the authorities must be moderated and controlled. Payments to foreign governments must be reduced, if the nation doesn't want to go bankrupt. People must again learn to work, instead of living on public assistance."
    Cicero, 55 BC
    Roman author, orator, & politician (106 BC - 43 BC)
    "The more things change, the more they stay the same." -- popular cliché

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    11,221
    Digital Workshops: How-To Basics
    Become a DIY expert from the comfort of your own home with digital workshops from The Home Depot.

    TOOL BASICS
    HOME BASICS
    WORKSHOPS

    How To Use a Power Drill
    Master the basics of how to use a power drill and the purpose of different types of drill bits.

    How To Use A Circular Saw
    You'll always have the exact size lumber needed for any project once you know how to safely operate a circular saw.

    How To Use a Nail Gun
    Dramatically increase the rate at which you complete DIY projects and save your arms from getting tired by using a nail gun.

    How To Use a Tape Measure
    Knowing how to read a tape measure is a basic but crucial skill needed for any DIY project.

    Home Basics

    How To Snake A Drain
    Quickly eliminate any clog without calling a plumber.

    How To Mount a Flat Screen TV
    A flat screen TV wall mount is not complicated, you just need a few tools and a buddy to help.

    How To Hide Cords
    Covering the loose electrical cords around your home's entertainment center will instantly clean up the look of the room.

    Find Local Home Depot Workshops in Your Area
    Home Improvement Tips from the Experts

    Being able to safely handle and operate basic tools is a crucial skill every homeowner – or even renter – should know. The home tips on this page will help you feel comfortable enough to tackle minor home improvement projects on your own, saving you money. The home improvement guides on this page teach you tool tips such as how to use a power drill, how to use a nail gun, how to use a tape measure and how to use a circular saw. Once you’ve mastered these tools, follow along with our home improvement videos to learn basic home improvement tips and projects, including how to snake a drain, how to wall-mount a flat screen TV and how to hide cords behind an entertainment center or desk. If you’re ready to learn more after watching our Home Depot DIY videos, visit our DIY projects and ideas page for more inspiration.

    http://www.homedepot.com/c/Digital_Workshops
    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right time, but also to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

    Worrying does not take away tomorrow's troubles, it takes away today's peace .

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    35,072
    Quote Originally Posted by Racing22 View Post
    You really need to get out more in the real world and break away from the "hive"mentality.
    And yet you tell me this here, on one of the greatest hive minds on the planet, Time Bomb 2000!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    35,072
    The insidiousness of the creeping Socialism has been going for years starting back in the 60's with the goddamned hippies and their type growing up and moving into govt to spread their mental malfunctions to the children and-today the fruits of this idiocy no one wanted to stop, cared enough to stop or had the balls to stop because they were beaten to death with the PC club.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    The hippies were ultimately as corrosive as acid to this country,
    my parents warned us kids to stay away from hippies, that they were dangerous. Looks like they were right!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    35,072
    Quote Originally Posted by Haybails View Post
    My first reaction was to join the 'pile on' and make fun of this . . . but, then, I thought back to when I had "shop class" in middle school (7th & 8th grade) and high school in the late '70s, early '80s; in addition to the instructor - I'll be gosh darned if we didn't also have . . . videos! Some were on VHS, and a few I remember on the old reel-to-reel (LOL), but, they were videos none-the-less.

    True, by the time I graduated high school, I had done all of the following in SCHOOL SHOP CLASSES - which helped my understanding of some of the skills discussed in this thread:
    • rebuilt several V-8 engines
    • rebuilt several single cylinder small engines
    • built several wood projects (shelving units, foot stools, tool bins, etc.)
    • printed many objects (on paper, on fabric, etc.)
    • built many metals projects (welding, cutting, shaping, etc.)
    • sewn many items (aprons, pillows, blankets, shirts, etc.)
    • baked many meals (breakfasts, lunches, dinners, deserts, etc.)
    • all of this, and more, in general school settings - with boys AND girls

    In addition to this, my family was involved in motorsports, so, I was around mechanical & general garage actions from a very young age.

    However, even with all that mentioned: I tend to be a positive type of person . . . so, in my most humble opinion, for those who missed out on this type of learning in their home or school environment - it's never too late to learn.

    I say, good on 'em - for making the effort.


    HB
    I had four years of shop and four years of home ec when I was in high school. I think it made me a better person, skills wise, because of those classes.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  16. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Weps View Post
    I learned all the basics in carpentry, masonry, pipe-fitting, plumbing, shooting, hunting/fishing, cooking, sewing, animal husbandry, woodworking, machining, electronics, mechanics, and electrical before I was 18, now I'm 29. Just took apart a brad nailer today to pop a slipped seal back in place, works like a charm now. Not all of us millennials are completely useless.

    No....

    but those with your skill set are as rare as hen's teeth.

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    State of Jefferson - On the Darkside where the cookies are...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    I learned from my mother, and I taught myself. I was a toddler when my mother divorced. The only house she could afford was a hundred plus cheaply built two-story shack. By the time I left for college, everything was finally fixed. One of my earliest memories was of her sitting on the dining room floor crying. She had pulled up some cheap particle board type overlay, only to find rotted floor boards underneath. She fixed the broken windows, the leaky roof, she shoveled dirt against the foundation to try to keep the stone foundation from leaking during one terrible rain storm, she used a hair dryer in the crawl-space to keep the pipes from freezing when the temp went way below zero, she built our back porch stairs, and repaired the front porch stairs. She spread smooth the concrete when the truck came to pour our patio, and had to pick me up from school the day the truck came to pour the drive way (fell off the monkey bars, and hit my head). She put joint compound over all the horse-hair plaster in every room. Every room originally had multiple layers of wall paper (and in some places news paper - 1920's. Lots of memories painting and plastering along side of her.
    Faroe....that is an AWESOME MOM you have. What a AMERICAN ICON of womanhood!!


    My Mom put my younger brother and I though what she called "Bachelor Survival Training". She insisted that we learn how to: plan a meal, shop for the meal, clip coupons, cook and serve a meal, properly clean a house from top to bottom, sort and wash clothes, iron, knit, mend clothes and everything about running a household. She felt that needing these things done was no reason to get married. Both my brother and I TAUGHT OUR FIRST WIVES HOW TO COOK!! And you don't want to compete against the "ShadowMan" Brothers when it comes to cooking, cleaning or housekeeping!
    Last edited by ShadowMan; 10-13-2017 at 08:21 PM.
    We have done so much, with so little, for so long....We can now do anything, with nothing, forever.

  18. #58
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    Sep 2002
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    STILL Too Close to Yellowstone
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    S.C., just give one $21 for a $15.50 sale and ask them to make correct change without the cash register telling them the correct amount.
    It doesnt help to confuse them Dennis!
    Thus let me live, unseen, unknown; thus unlamented let me die; steal from the world, and not a stone tell where I lie.

    The best place to be in the event of a nuclear explosion is anywhere you can say: "what the hell was that!?!"
    ><>
    Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions.

    Men are NOT interested in what God has to say - but what they would rather believe themselves (shamelessly stolen from INVAR).
    <><
    "...no one can jump into the arms of God.
    Oh, no. You have to fall."



  19. #59
    I work with people on an archery range and reference six oclock and twelve oclock on the bullseye. Most get it, some need a hint.......

  20. #60
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    Jan 2012
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    OK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ractivist View Post
    I work with people on an archery range and reference six oclock and twelve oclock on the bullseye. Most get it, some need a hint.......
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


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