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OT/MISC Home Depot Makes Video Lessons for Millennials on How to Use Tape Measures & Hammers
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  1. #1
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    15 Home Depot Makes Video Lessons for Millennials on How to Use Tape Measures & Hammers

    Home Depot Panics Over Millennials; Forced To Host Tutorials On Using Tape Measures, Hammering Nails
    by Tyler Durden
    Oct 10, 2017 11:00 PM

    As wall street analysts celebrate the coming of age of the millennial generation, a group of young people who were supposed to lead another revolutionary wave of consumerism if only they could work long enough to escape their parents' basement, retailers like Home Depot are panicked about selling into what will soon be America's largest demographic...but not for the reasons you might think.

    While avocado resellers like Whole Foods only have to worry about creating a catchy advertising campaign to attract millennials, Home Depot is in full-on panic mode after realizing that an entire generation of Americans have absolutely no clue how to use their products. As the Wall Street Journal points out, the company has been forced to spend millions to create video tutorials and host in-store classes on how to do everything from using a tape measure to mopping a floor and hammering a nail. Home Depot's VP of marketing admits she was originally hesitant because she thought some of their videos might be a bit too "condescending" but she quickly learned they were very necessary for our pampered millennials. In June the company introduced a series of online workshops, including videos on how to use a tape measure and how to hide cords, that were so basic some executives worried they were condescending. “You have to start somewhere,” Mr. Decker says.

    Lisa DeStefano, Home Depot vice president of marketing, initially hesitated looking over the list of proposed video lessons, chosen based on high-frequency online search queries. “Were we selling people short? Were these just too obvious?” she says she asked her team. On the tape-measure tutorial, “I said ‘come on, how many things can you say about it?’ ” Ms. DeStefano says. And just in case you think we're joking and/or exaggerating, here is Home Depot's tape measure tutorial in all its glory: [Embedded at source] Meanwhile, Scotts Miracle-Gro has been forced to start training classes to remind frustrated millennials, who can't seem to keep their flowers alive, that plants need sunlight to grow (apparently not a single millennial ever took biology in grade school). Commenting on the tutorials, a defeated VP of Corporate Affairs, Jim King, admitted "these are simple things we wouldn’t have really thought to do or needed to do 15 to 20 years ago"...sorry, Mr. King this is your life now. The Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. has started offering gardening lessons for young homeowners that cover basic tips—really, really basic—like making sure sunlight can reach plants.

    “These are simple things we wouldn’t have really thought to do or needed to do 15 to 20 years ago,” says Jim King, senior vice president of corporate affairs for Scotts. “But this is a group who may not have grown up putting their hands in the dirt growing their vegetable garden in mom and dad’s backyard.” “They grew up playing soccer, having dance recitals and playing an Xbox,” says Scott’s Mr. King. “They probably didn’t spend as much time helping mom and dad out in the yard as their predecessors or their predecessors’ predecessors.” Companies such as Scotts, Home Depot Inc., Procter & Gamble Co. , Williams-Sonoma Inc.’s West Elm and the Sherwin-Williams Co. are hosting classes and online tutorials to teach such basic skills as how to mow the lawn, use a tape measure, mop a floor, hammer a nail and pick a paint color.

    Unfortunately, at least for the Home Depots of the world, millennials now represent the largest demographic in America with 4.75 million 26 year olds roaming the streets of New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles without a clue as to how to use a tape measure. The biggest single age cohort today in the U.S. is 26-year-olds, who number 4.8 million, according to Torsten Slok, chief international economist for Deutsche Bank . People 25, 27 and 24 follow close behind, in that order. Many are on the verge of life-defining moments such as choosing a career, buying a house and having children. Millennials as a whole are America’s latest demographic bubble, overtaking the baby boom generation and, like them, transforming popular culture, retailing, media and lifestyles. They make up about 42% of all home buyers today, and 71% of all first-time home buyers, according to Zillow Group . Some 86% of millennial home buyers reported making at least one improvement to their home in the past year, more than any other generation, Zillow says.

    While we have our doubts that it will save their business, retailers like J.C. Penney and West Elm are trying to adapt to the millennial generation by offering basic in-home services like installing televisions or hanging wall art. J.C. Penney Co. says the group is willing to hire others for projects. The retailer has pushed into home services, including furnace and air-conditioning repair, water-treatment systems and bathroom renovations, and expanded its window-covering installation. “They’re much more of a ‘Do-It-for-Me’ type of customer than a ‘Do-It-Yourself’ customer,” says Joe McFarland, executive vice president of J.C. Penney stores. “You don’t need a ladder or a power drill, you don’t even have to wonder if you measured your window right.” Home-furnishings retailer West Elm offers service packages, which start at $129, to provide plumbing and electrical work, painting, installing a television and hanging wall art and mirrors.

    All that said, at least some millennials are trying to be more self-sufficient...as an example, the WSJ notes the case of 26-year-old Breanne Loes who recently borrowed her dad's power tools to craft a wooden headboard...which went really well AFTER she realized the saw blade was on backwards. Ms. Loes enjoys do-it-yourself projects, and two summers ago built with her now-husband a wooden headboard in her parents’ garage, with help from an online tutorial, her dad, two older brothers and their tools. The saw wasn’t working at first because the blade was backward. “That was embarrassing,” says Ms. Loes.

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-1...measures-hamme
    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right time, but also to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

    Worrying does not take away tomorrow's troubles, it takes away today's peace .

  2. #2
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    I tell you what kiddies, a video isn't going to teach you how to pound nails straight and true. That takes hundreds/thousands of bent nails to figure out. It's kind-of an art.

    Next thing we're going to hear about are vids made to show millennials how to wipe their asses.

  3. #3
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    Make fun of them all you want but the truth is our generation or whichever generation popped them out and set them loose also set them up for failure.

    I get the generations mixed up for the damned names but, going back to my dad-he grew up as a carpenter, hated it and went into managment.

    He can and does do some fine work when he wants to but he passed little of that on to me.

    His ideal world is calling someone to fix it for him and that's what he passed on.

    Me? Being both inquisitive and perpetually broke since my 20's when the vision started going-I had to learn to do shit for myself. Not doing it was not an option unless I just did not care if it's broke or not.

    Next gen? They learn what their parents teach them and, as I understand it shop and such has been removed from schools so they have no where to learn and no one to teach them.

    The insidiousness of the creeping Socialism has been going for years starting back in the 60's with the goddamned hippies and their type growing up and moving into govt to spread their mental malfunctions to the children and-today the fruits of this idiocy no one wanted to stop, cared enough to stop or had the balls to stop because they were beaten to death with the PC club.
    "It ain't no secret I didn't get these scars falling over in church."


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  4. #4
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    Good. If dad don't show them then somebody has to.
    "When law and morality contradict each other, the citizen has the cruel alternative of either losing his moral sense or losing his respect for the law." ~ Frederic Bastiilt

    "Duty is ours; results are God's."

  5. #5
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    10 I'm So Mean........

    Show them an analog clock and ask what time is it.
    Fly Into Southern California International Airport - Ontario Instead. Shorter Lines And Hassle Free Makes Flying So Much Easier. http://www.airfarewatchdog.com/cheap...location%2CASC

  6. #6
    delete

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSTemplar View Post
    Good. If dad don't show them then somebody has to.
    My thought, as well. There is a lot that homeowners can do for themselves with just a basic set of tools. Yes, it takes practice to learn to paint or use hand tools, but so what? Given the cost of hiring pros, I save hundreds of dollars each year doing my own painting and minor repairs. And, yes, I would hire a licensed pro for things like major electrical repairs or furnace overhauls but not for simple repairs or small decorating jobs.

  8. #8
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    wow
    words fail me to this article.
    Have we really raised a generation this inept?
    But the scorn heaped on this from a survivalist site is understandable
    But we are all self sufficient, self proficient and raised our kids the same so

    Now if this self same article were to be posted in vogue or teen it would probably be met with accolades'
    What say you

  9. #9
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    S.C., just give one $21 for a $15.50 sale and ask them to make correct change without the cash register telling them the correct amount.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sleeping Cobra View Post
    Show them an analog clock and ask what time is it.
    That is so cruel!
    I love it!
    Let's have Roman numerals as well
    "...Cry 'Havoc' and let slip the cats of war..."
    Razor sharpening while you wait - Occam
    If it works, it doesn't have enough features. - Windows 10 design philosophy.
    Forget the beer, I'm just here for the doom!
    Humans, just a tool for amino acids to make Swiss watches.

  11. #11
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    I was shown how to do these things at a very young age and I have a hard time understanding how they would not know how to used these things.
    In my life time I have come across a eight or so young men that could not read a ruler. The last time I meet someone like that was about 20 years ago and all but one of them in and around the West Virginia, Maryland and Virginia area, It was almost 40 years ago the fist guy I seen that could read a ruler was in my home town in eastern long island N.Y. and he was locally known loser that worked in a tire shop and he had to be at lest 10 years older than me.

  12. #12
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    If you have Netflix watch the show the Worst Handyman in Canada... it's off the chain hilarious and makes me so glad that I have some basic skills and OC is very skilled at handy work and home maintenance.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  13. #13
    Does it really surprise anyone? How many opportunities have they had to do such things? They moved into houses that were ready-made, bought by their parents, who then didn't do a whole lot of upgrading that wasn't done by contractors.

    Might as well mock them for not knowing how to use a grain flail or a buggy whip.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by 33dInd View Post
    wow
    words fail me to this article.
    Have we really raised a generation this inept?
    But the scorn heaped on this from a survivalist site is understandable
    But we are all self sufficient, self proficient and raised our kids the same so

    Now if this self same article were to be posted in vogue or teen it would probably be met with accolades'
    What say you
    The good news is, if you're on FB, is there is a HUGE push amongst the 20-30 somethings to learn skills, and this includes gardening, canning, fermenting foods, and hunting. Weird how these things cycle like this. HD is ahead of the rest, they saw a need and are tending to that need which will pad their bottom line with repeat customers.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  15. #15
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    OC and I took a class at Lowes some 15 years ago on how to properly tile a bathroom/shower. Time well spent, we were more curious on how to cut the tiles w/o them breaking, getting chipped, etc., the rest of the information was pure refresher course for us.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  16. #16
    I expect one of them to smash their thumb while following the video. Next step is that they will sue Home Depot.
    But not likely to die free

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    If you have Netflix watch the show the Worst Handyman in Canada... it's off the chain hilarious and makes me so glad that I have some basic skills and OC is very skilled at handy work and home maintenance.
    Well, Packy, that is indeed something else.

    First part of season 4, a 10 minute introduction to our handymen. Of sorts.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPrNIw_vY_c


  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacknarwhal View Post
    Well, Packy, that is indeed something else.

    First part of season 4, a 10 minute introduction to our handymen. Of sorts.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPrNIw_vY_c

    I highly recommend a couple of shots of bourbon before you watch this series!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  19. #19
    I have 3 millennials, two daughters and a son. They are all "do it yourselfers" or "figureitoutters". They have grown up in a construction family as did I and three sisters. They, like I, grew up with cows, horses, gardening, canning, fishing etc., they are not afraid to do and not afraid to keep on learning. This gives me peace of mind. Not all millennials are incapable.

    The tape measure video certainly does make one think though. What troubles me is the younger generation depending on fast food, frozen food, convenient food, microwaves ect. with little thought towards how they expect to grow/harvest/preserve/prepare food when the lights are out and the food is NOT on the shelf around the corner at their friendly neighborhood superstore or gas station. That is what worries me. Shop and Home EC is what should remain in the schools first and foremost. Forget the social and political indoctrination. We need to raise children/teens/young adults how to survive and provide.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by fairywell View Post
    I have 3 millennials, two daughters and a son. They are all "do it yourselfers" or "figureitoutters". They have grown up in a construction family as did I and three sisters. They, like I, grew up with cows, horses, gardening, canning, fishing etc., they are not afraid to do and not afraid to keep on learning. This gives me peace of mind. Not all millennials are incapable.

    The tape measure video certainly does make one think though. What troubles me is the younger generation depending on fast food, frozen food, convenient food, microwaves ect. with little thought towards how they expect to grow/harvest/preserve/prepare food when the lights are out and the food is NOT on the shelf around the corner at their friendly neighborhood superstore or gas station. That is what worries me. Shop and Home EC is what should remain in the schools first and foremost. Forget the social and political indoctrination. We need to raise children/teens/young adults how to survive and provide.

    Again, come on over to Facebook and be shocked at how many are learning how to cook, garden, can, ferment, quilt, knit, crochet, and much, much more!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    Again, come on over to Facebook and be shocked at how many are learning how to cook, garden, can, ferment, quilt, knit, crochet, and much, much more!
    Yes, I know, and that is fabulous. And I do agree that things cycle, so l hope more continue to take interest.

  22. #22
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    Was riding down the road listening to talk radio the other day and the announcer said, "news at the top and bottom of every hour." I wondered how many folks would have no clue what he meant. I worked in a radio station back in high school, so it is ingrained in my head, but so many have no clue about analog clocks.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by fairywell View Post
    Yes, I know, and that is fabulous. And I do agree that things cycle, so l hope more continue to take interest.
    One of the positives I've seen on social media is people like me post photos of our food, and then we're asked tons of questions on how to cook said food. I have many friends my age that do not know how to cook. And as such they raised children who do not know how to cook. Said children see mouth watering dishes on Instagram and demand to know how to make those meals.

    It's been great actually, I love teaching the young'ins how to cook!

    I joined a group recently on FB called Classic Country Cooking, there's 87k+ members I'd say the average age there is 32. And the youngsters are bothering us oldsters for recipes, tips, and techniques. The cooking shows on tv also help to push the youngsters into the kitchen. The next step for many of them is pushing them to buy real plates and cutlery, and stop using paper plates and plastic forks, sigh.

    Baby steps, it's all about baby steps.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Grey View Post
    Was riding down the road listening to talk radio the other day and the announcer said, "news at the top and bottom of every hour." I wondered how many folks would have no clue what he meant. I worked in a radio station back in high school, so it is ingrained in my head, but so many have no clue about analog clocks.
    Ask them about Shanks Mare!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  25. #25
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    change a flat tire............

    ...or how about one when you have rusted lug nuts..............using WD40 and extending the leverage of the lug wrench with a tire iron to break that bond loose.

    Like to see their faces on that one.....

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by PghPanther View Post
    change a flat tire............

    ...or how about one when you have rusted lug nuts..............using WD40 and extending the leverage of the lug wrench with a tire iron to break that bond loose.

    Like to see their faces on that one.....
    Hey now, I know how to change a tire and had to have OC come rescue me because the lug nuts were on so tight it actually took the two of us to get the damned lug nuts loosened. Thank heavens he brought a cheater bar long enough for me to stand on. He quipped that had the shop had gotten them on any tighter they would have stripped them.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  27. #27
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    You don’t use a tire iron to add leverage to a lugwrench. You use a cheater bar/pipe.


  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    You don’t use a tire iron to add leverage to a lugwrench. You use a cheater bar/pipe.

    true dat!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    One of the positives I've seen on social media is people like me post photos of our food, and then we're asked tons of questions on how to cook said food. I have many friends my age that do not know how to cook. And as such they raised children who do not know how to cook. Said children see mouth watering dishes on Instagram and demand to know how to make those meals.

    It's been great actually, I love teaching the young'ins how to cook!

    I joined a group recently on FB called Classic Country Cooking, there's 87k+ members I'd say the average age there is 32. And the youngsters are bothering us oldsters for recipes, tips, and techniques. The cooking shows on tv also help to push the youngsters into the kitchen. The next step for many of them is pushing them to buy real plates and cutlery, and stop using paper plates and plastic forks, sigh.

    Baby steps, it's all about baby steps.
    Hah, I'll see ya there, went to check it out and it appears that you have to join. My kids will love the site, me too. Thanks, Packy

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by fairywell View Post
    Hah, I'll see ya there, went to check it out and it appears that you have to join. My kids will love the site, me too. Thanks, Packy
    Be prepared to gain weight! There's a whole lot of southern comfort food being shared in that group!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  31. #31
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    Jump starting a dead battery vs. emergency road service? (We, DH and I, were out of town and in a parking lot when it happened. We had cables but needed another car . . . I asked a youngster in his BIG TRUCK - he rolled the window up and blew out of there as fast as he could. I figured he thought we were going to ask him to do it?
    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right time, but also to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

    Worrying does not take away tomorrow's troubles, it takes away today's peace .

  32. #32
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    Home Depot Makes Video Lessons for Millennials on How to Use Tape Measures & Hammers
    That's what happens when you look down on the trades and blue collar jobs, take shop classes out of the schools and discourage DIY endeavors. OMG....working with your hands!! The SHAME OF IT!!

    Growing up my brother and I played with hammers and nails and power saws and drills, drank out of the garden hose and played in the mud and GOT DIRTY!!

    Heck I was working on a backyard project with a young friend of mine when I bent a nail pounding it in. I pulled the nail out and started straightening it to pound right back in. HE HAD NEVER SEEN ANYONE DO THAT!! Blew his mind! "What are you doing?" "You can really do that?" My dad rarely ever gave my brother and I a new nail for any of our "fort" projects. "Waste of a good nail." Was his answer. We had several coffee cans of old nails, bolts and screws that we could draw from. You get pretty good at straightening out bent nails with all the practice we had growing up.........we called it FUN back in the day.
    We have done so much, with so little, for so long....We can now do anything, with nothing, forever.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    You don’t use a tire iron to add leverage to a lugwrench. You use a cheater bar/pipe.

    Professionally known as a "torque enhancer" in the millwright world.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

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  34. #34
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    My bad. I was unaware of your technical jargon....



    What is the term for when you have to jump on the thing to get the bolt to loosen?

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    My bad. I was unaware of your technical jargon....



    What is the term for when you have to jump on the thing to get the bolt to loosen?
    It's called making your wife happy because she got her truck back and that much sooner!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  36. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by SSTemplar View Post
    Good. If dad don't show them then somebody has to.
    I learned from my mother, and I taught myself. I was a toddler when my mother divorced. The only house she could afford was a hundred plus cheaply built two-story shack. By the time I left for college, everything was finally fixed. One of my earliest memories was of her sitting on the dining room floor crying. She had pulled up some cheap particle board type overlay, only to find rotted floor boards underneath. She fixed the broken windows, the leaky roof, she shoveled dirt against the foundation to try to keep the stone foundation from leaking during one terrible rain storm, she used a hair dryer in the crawl-space to keep the pipes from freezing when the temp went way below zero, she built our back porch stairs, and repaired the front porch stairs. She spread smooth the concrete when the truck came to pour our patio, and had to pick me up from school the day the truck came to pour the drive way (fell off the monkey bars, and hit my head). She put joint compound over all the horse-hair plaster in every room. Every room originally had multiple layers of wall paper (and in some places news paper - 1920's. Lots of memories painting and plastering along side of her.

  37. #37
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    I've got to admit it...I had to look up the term, "Shanks Mare." But I am under 50 (by a few months), lol!

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    Why bother teaching them to build anything. They are only interested in destroying things not building things.

  39. #39
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    I was talking to a MSgt from the local state police post. We were discussing his roof, and what repairs he could use. Somehow we got to talking about qualified applicants for the state police, and he mentioned that they needed to be able to read a tape measure. That floored me. He said he had some candidates who couldn't read a tape measure. (I'm glad they didn't require knowing how to read a Vernier caliper, or we wouldn't have any troopers to replace the retirees.) My dad taught me to read a micrometer while I was still in Jr. Hi.

    Skills are simply not being passed on like when we were young.
    "Freedom is not something to be secured in any one moment of time. We must struggle to preserve it every day. And freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction."
    -Ronald Reagan

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    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    Again, come on over to Facebook and be shocked at how many are learning how to cook, garden, can, ferment, quilt, knit, crochet, and much, much more!
    You really need to get out more in the real world and break away from the "hive"mentality.
    ...Rubbin' is Racin'......

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