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ALERT Multiple fires and evacuations in North SF Bay Area
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  1. #161
    http://abcnews.go.com/US/thousands-f...ry?id=50383162

    Thousands flee as wildfires ravage California; at least 17 killed


    y KARMA ALLEN MORGAN WINSOR
    Oct 11, 2017, 1:59 PM ET

    Massive wildfires sweeping through California have killed at least 17 people and damaged thousands of homes, businesses and other buildings, authorities said.

    Firefighters were still battling 22 wildfires in multiple California counties early Wednesday. Intensified by strong winds, the flames have charred about 170,000 acres of land, damaged or destroyed at least 3,500 structures and forced nearly 20,000 residents to evacuate, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

    The causes of the fires are unknown.


    More than 2,700 firefighters and support personnel are battling the fires, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. California Gov. Jerry Brown has declared a state of emergency for Napa, Sonoma and Yuba counties in Northern California.






    St. Joseph Health said 168 patients have been treated, many for burns and smoke inhalation, at three of its hospitals in Napa and Sonoma counties as of Monday night.

    Of the 17 fire-related deaths, 11 were in Sonoma County, according to the coroner's office.

    An additional 560 people were missing in Sonoma County as of Wednesday morning, according to the sheriff's office.

    With mandatory evacuation orders still in place, many residents in the affected areas have been warned not to return to their homes until further notice.

    "Life is more important than property," Sonoma County Sheriff Robert Giordano said at a press conference Tuesday.

    He said he thinks the wildfires will be "one of the worst natural disasters in California history."

    Southern LNU Complex fires

    The so-called Atlas, Nuns and Patrick fires are considered branches of one giant blaze in Napa, Solano and Sonoma counties — collectively known as the Southern LNU Complex — according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

    Mandatory evacuations and road closures were underway in Napa, Solano and Sonoma counties, the heart of California's wine country, as the flames threatened thousands of structures.

    The Atlas fire has scorched 42,349 acres in Napa and Solano counties since the inferno began Sunday night, and just 3 percent of the blaze was contained Wednesday morning. The enormous fire has destroyed 125 structures.




    Central LNU Complex fires


    The Tubbs and Pocket fires make up another enormous blaze, known as the the Central LNU Complex, in Napa and Sonoma counties, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. More than 16,000 structures are threatened.

    The Tubbs fire has singed 28,000 acres in Napa County since the flames were sparked Sunday night. The fire has destroyed 571 structures.

    Meanwhile, the Pocket fire has scorched 1,800 acres in Sonoma County since Monday morning.



    Mendocino Lake Complex fires

    The Redwood/Potter fires and the Sulphur fire make up a giant blaze, known as the Mendocino Lake Complex, in Lake and Mendocino counties, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

    The Redwood/Potter fires have charred 29,500 acres in Mendocino County since Sunday night, and was just 5 percent contained Wednesday morning.

    The Sulphur fire has burned 2,500 acres in Lake County since late Sunday night, and was 30 percent contained by Wednesday morning.



    Wind Complex fires


    The Cascade, La Porte, Lobo and McCourtney fires make up one huge blaze in Butte, Nevada and Yuba counties, collectively known as the Wind Complex, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

    The Cascade fire has scorched 12,349 acres in Yuba County since it began Sunday morning, and it was 20 percent contained Wednesday morning, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.



    La Porte fire has charred 3,700 acres in Butte County since the blaze ignited early Monday morning, and it was 15 percent contained by Wednesday morning, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

    The Lobo fire has burned 857 acres in Nevada County since early Monday morning and 30 percent was contained Wednesday morning.

    Meanwhile, the McCourtney fire has singed 76 acres in Nevada County since early Monday morning, and was 65 percent contained Wednesday morning.

    Canyon 2 fire

    The Canyon 2 fire has scorched 8,000 acres in Southern California's Orange County since the flames started Monday morning. It was 45 percent contained Wednesday morning, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

    At least 3,000 residents were evacuated in and around Anaheim as thousands of structures were threatened by the blaze.

    Cherokee fire

    The Cherokee fire has charred 7,500 acres in Butte County since Sunday night, and it was 40 percent contained Wednesday morning, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

    Thirty-seven fire


    The 37 fire has burned 1,650 acres in Sonoma County since it started Monday afternoon. It was 65 percent contained by Wednesday morning, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

    What's ahead for California

    A cold front is expected to sweep through much of California on Wednesday, bringing more gusty winds and lower humidity, according to ABC News meteorologists.

    The National Weather Service has issued red flag warnings for Central and Northern California for Wednesday through Thursday. Fire weather watches were issued for Southern California for Thursday through Saturday.

    As firefighters work to snuff the raging blazes, Sonoma County Sheriff's Sgt. Spencer Crum told ABC News the county has asked everyone to "help us out."

    The wind's shifting gusts that helped the flames spread appeared to have subsided, he added.

    "The night before this, we had 60 mph winds, which is the reason why you have such devastation here," Crum told ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos in an interview Tuesday on "Good Morning America."

    Crum confirmed that the alert system put in place gave residents ample time to evacuate and likely prevented many deaths.

    "We have a subscription service where we can alert our residents, and we did that right away, trying to notify everybody where the fire was, where it was going and how fast it was going, and I think it saved a lot of lives," he said.

    The sheriff's sergeant conceded that it could take a long time for communities to bounce back.

    "We have a lot of rebuilding here," Crum said.

    [some repeated stuff from earlier articles snipped, also I did not copy all photos.]
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  2. #162

    'Some pretty significant monsters': More homes evacuated as Northern California fires grow

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/l...011-story.html

    Phil Willon, Cindy Carcamo, Sonali Kohli and Cindy Carcamo

    As s devastating wildfires continued to spread in Sonoma and Napa counties Wednesday, firefighters launched a desperate effort to extinguish key hot spots before heavy, fire-stoking winds could kick back up later in the evening.

    Officials fear that strong winds forecast for Wednesday evening and Thursday morning will spread embers from the deadly Tubbs fire to populated areas of Santa Rosa and Calistoga that have so far been spared the flames — a development that would prompt new evacuations.

    “We are facing some pretty significant monsters,” Cal Fire incident commander Bret Couvea told a room of about 200 firefighters and law enforcement officials at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds on Wednesday morning.

    Already, the fires have scorched more than 100,000 acres and left at least 17 people dead. The quickening winds threatened to make containment of the fires even more difficult.



    During the daytime, winds will be light, less than 5 miles per hours, from the north in the morning. They will increase to about 15 miles per hour in the afternoon in the valleys, officials said.

    At night however, “the return of the north wind will have a strong influence on the southern portions of the Tubbs fire,” a Cal Fire weather report said. "Winds will be 25 to 30 miles per hour after 2 a.m. These strong winds have the potential to push the fire south back towards Calistoga and Santa Rosa, especially where the fire was active yesterday [Tuesday] on the north side."

    On Wednesday, the Lake County Sheriff’s Department issued an advisory evacuation order for residents of Middletown — which was heavily damaged in the Valley Fire just two years ago and rebuilt — as the Tubbs fire approached from the south.

    Late Tuesday night, evacuations were ordered in Calistoga for the Tubbs fire, and in other areas of Napa and Sonoma counties for the Atlas Peak fire, the Nuns fire and the Pocket fire, officials said.

    Firefighters hope to take advantage of the lull in the winds Wednesday morning and afternoon to attack hot spots and put out as many embers as possible before they can be revived and blown into areas that haven’t burned yet, they said.

    By 7 p.m. Tuesday, the Tubbs fire had exceeded 28,000 acres with no containment. The Atlas fire in Napa County had grown to 26,000 acres and was 3% contained, said Cal Fire spokeswoman Lynne Tolmachoff. Other fires ranging in size from 1,800 to 21,000 acres burned throughout the area and in surrounding counties.

    As of Wednesday morning, the count of fire-related deaths stood at 17, including 11 people in Sonoma County and two in Napa County. Sonoma County has received about 300 reports of missing persons, and has confirmed that 110 of those people are safe, said Sonoma County Sheriff’s Deputy Brandon Jones.

    While some evacuation orders in Yuba and Nevada counties were lifted, allowing residents to return to their homes, officials estimate that upwards of 50,000 people are still evacuated. More people in Sonoma and Napa counties were asked to leave their homes Tuesday night.

    “The [Atlas] fire became active overnight, started burning more of the community,” Tolmachoff said.

    During a packed community meeting with emergency officials inside the Santa Rosa High School gym Tuesday evening, Sonoma County residents battered by the deadly wildfires were told that a "red flag" warning forecasting potentially hazardous fire conditions had been issued for Wednesday.

    This comes after cooler weather allowed firefighters to gain ground battling multiple blazes in the county Tuesday morning, only to see the flames flare up again with afternoon winds.

    "This is nowhere near over. This is still very dangerous," Sonoma County Sheriff Rob Giordano said Tuesday night.

    Officials hope, though, that they won’t again face the 80 mile-per-hour winds that stoked fires so quickly Sunday night.

    In Mendocino County, where three people have died and the Redwood and Potter fires have reached a combined 21,000 acres without any containment, one resident recalled the rush to get out in time.

    It was just after 1 a.m. Monday when Jaime Lynn Lojowsky woke up to a pounding at the door.

    “There is a fire on the mountain,” she heard her neighbor tell her husband. “It’s an emergency. It’s an emergency.”

    Lojowsky, who lives in Redwood Valley with her husband, Mac, and two young girls, looked out her back window. Normally, she’d see bright stars, the moon peeking between the redwoods, pines and oak trees. It was one of the reasons why she’d moved from crowded and light-polluted Southern California more than a year ago.

    This time, white smoke choked the night sky. The hillside was on fire. Flames licked the backyard of her 1-acre lot.

    Lojowsky’s husband ran out the door to knock on neighbors’ doors to wake them, telling them to get out. One home had already caught fire.

    The winds picked up. The flames raced toward them.

    “Jaime, the house is going to go. What do you want to take?” he asked.

    She had minutes.

    On the outside, the couple tried to stay calm for 5-year-old Isabella. Lojowsky asked her to grab some things she’d like to take. Isabella grabbed her blanket and a stash of Halloween-themed toys.

    On the inside, Lojowsky panicked.

    “We’re going to die. I don’t want my babies to die like this,” she thought. “This can’t be happening.”

    Lojowsky roused her youngest — 2-year-old Lourdes — from bed. She piled the girls into her Kia Sedona. They were met with a cloud of white smoke when she opened her garage door. Ash and fire rained down on the vehicle as she drove down the driveway and into the main road. Her husband followed in a truck behind them. About a mile down the road, a wall of flames blocked their path.

    It was the main way out. She’d never gone the back way — a windy, dirt and gravel mountain road through a canyon.

    Some cars barreled through the flames. Others went off the road.

    She was uncertain on what to do. If she turned back, would she be met by a raging fire?

    That’s when she spotted a Cal Fire truck. The crew directed her to go back through the mountain pass. It was safe, they reassured her. She turned back and drove past her home. She zoomed by her neighbor’s house and saw the cars still parked outside. She wondered if they’d make it out. They had three young boys.

    “They have to leave now,” she thought.

    Her car climbed up the mountain pass, tailing her husband’s truck. She called him on her cell, asking him to dial 911 to find out what they should do. She just wanted someone to tell her what to do or where to go.

    The sky was still full of white smoke. She could see the flames in her rearview mirror. Lojowsky just kept driving, looking forward and keeping an eye on the gravel road speckled with potholes. Her vehicle weaved on a dirt road through a dense forest of redwoods, pines and oak trees. She could hardly see the road in front of her.

    Ten minutes later, Isabella broke her silence.

    “Great news, Mom. I can see the moon,” she said. “I can see stars.”

    Lojowsky, who has fire insurance, would later discover that her house and farm had burned down. Only the brick fireplace remains of Lojowsky's three-bedroom home. It’s unclear whether her chickens survived. But her family, two dogs and cats had made it out alive.
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  3. #163
    Quote Originally Posted by bev View Post
    Praying for you and your DH, BeWell!
    Thank you, I am nervous. He's going to the Santa Rosa area.
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  4. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by Be Well View Post
    Thank you, I am nervous. He's going to the Santa Rosa area.
    Prayers for his safety, BW.

    ------------------

    NBC Bay Area‏Verified account @nbcbayarea 2m2 minutes ago

    #BREAKING: At least 21 dead, over 170,000 acres burned as a result of fires burning across California, per Cal Fire.

    'Pure Devastation': Winds Thwart Fight Against Wine Country Blazes

    Fires have destroyed more than 3,500 homes and businesses, scorched in excess of 115,000 acres — or nearly 180 square miles — and forced at least 20,000 people to evacuate since Sunday


    Oct 11, 2017 | Updated 1 minute ago

    Firefighters in Northern California are struggling to contain over a dozen fast-moving wildfires scorching the state's world-famous wine country as officials warn that strong winds Wednesday could further threaten the fight against the blazes.

    Fourteen blazes across eight counties in Northern California, propelled by gusty winds, have killed at least 21 people.

    Fires have destroyed more than 3,500 homes and businesses, scorched in excess of 170,000 acres — or nearly 180 square miles — and forced at least 20,000 people to evacuate since Sunday, officials said Wednesday.

    Long article, continued here:

    http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local...owTwt_BAYBrand
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  5. #165
    Quote Originally Posted by marsh View Post
    There was a fire in Bakersfield that started yesterday. Air is very smoky today S. of Sacramento.

    They said yesterday that damage thusfar totaled around $83 billion. Some of the most expensive houses in the country attached to vineyards burned. With all the storms and previous fires in Montana, Idaho, Washington, Oregon and N. CA, I would imagine several insurance companies would be on the ropes.
    Marsh, do you have explanation of why none of these CA fires are being put up on Inciweb? I try to read the Calfire website but it is so difficult to wend my way around it compared to Inciweb.
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  6. #166
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    Latest facebook video on the Orange County (S. CA ) fires. (almost 4 hrs? compilation but seems to repeat) This starts out on Jamboree and Canyon View streets. My parents lived in Newport Beach and we used to have to turn on Jamboree. Besides the devastating human costs, this area can have some real pricey real estate. https://www.facebook.com/realist.tv/...0243249199624/
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  7. #167
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.13df90a81685

    ‘A serious, critical, catastrophic event’: At least 21 dead as California wildfires spread

    Cleve R. Wootson Jr., Kristine Phillips and Joel Achenbach October 11 at 3:51 PM

    SANTA ROSA, Calif. — The deadly wildfires devastating Northern California regained momentum Wednesday as winds whipped back up, pushing blazes through parched hills and vineyards and prompting more evacuations from an menacing arc of flames that has killed at least 21 people, destroyed more than 3,500 buildings and battered the region’s renowned wine-growing industry.

    Fires advanced overnight toward populated areas in flame-ravaged Sonoma County, prompting officials to order a fresh round of mandatory evacuations — some of which were announced by deputies “running toward the fire, banging on doors, getting people out of their houses,” said Misti Harris, a Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman.

    “It’s rapidly changing, it’s moving quickly, it’s a very fluid situation,” she said.

    Nearly two dozen large fires have been raging in the northern part of the state, burning roughly 170,000 acres — a collective area larger than the city of Chicago.

    On Wednesday, Cal Fire Chief Ken Pimlott said he’s worried that “several of these fires will merge.”

    “This is a serious, critical, catastrophic event,” Pimlott said at a news briefing, where he made a grim but expected announcement:

    The official death toll from the fires has increased, from 17 to 21.


    That figure is almost certain to rise: Sonoma County Sheriff Robert Giordano said that 560 people in his county remained unaccounted for as of late Wednesday morning.

    It’s unclear if those who are still missing have been harmed, or are simply unable to reach friends and families, as fires have disabled much of the communication system in the region.


    Authorities located more than 100 people who were reported missing. But hundreds of others were still missing — and deputies had not been able to reach most of the areas called “hot zones” that were immolated in the firestorm, Giordano said. When they begin doing searches in those areas, “I expect that [death toll] to go up.”

    Evacuation zones in Sonoma County will remain off limits, partly to limit the possibility of looting, which has resulted in several arrests. Giordano, the sheriff, doubts residents will be allowed to return to their homes this week.

    “If you have a place to go, go; you don’t need to be here,” Giordano said, adding later: “I can’t stress this enough. If you’re in an evacuation zone, you cannot come home.”

    The fast-moving flames have swept through densely populated neighborhoods over the past several days, causing residents to flee from homes in the middle of the night as smoke filled their rooms.

    The fires continued to grow Wednesday as conditions worsened.

    “We’re not out of the woods, and we’re not going to be out of the woods for a number of days to come,” said Pimlott, the Cal Fire chief. “We’re literally looking at explosive vegetation. These fires are burning actively during the day and at night.”

    What makes these fires particularly dangerous, Pimlott said, is that they “aren’t just in the backwoods. … These fires are burning in and around developed communities.”

    High winds that whipped up 22 large wildfires had faded Tuesday, and humidity increased, assisting an operation that has drawn resources from throughout the state and neighboring Nevada. But the sharp northern wind, known as a Diablo, soon returned, allowing only a brief window for firefighters to carve clearings in place to stop the fires from spreading to vulnerable populated areas.

    The National Weather Service expects “red-flag” conditions — dry air and wind gusts up to 40 mph — to remain until Thursday in the North Bay Area, which includes Sonoma and Napa counties.

    As a thick haze coated the sky and settled into the region’s canyons and valleys, state officials remained focused on rescue and containment.

    On Wednesday morning, as weary firefighters attempted to control the fires on the front lines, dozens of fire crews from cities as far away as Bakersfield, more than 300 miles to the south, were briefed at a makeshift command center on the deteriorating conditions.

    More than 25,000 people have fled homes from seven counties north of San Francisco, filling dozens of shelters that state officials had hoped to consolidate in the coming days to provide more-efficient services. Many left houses with nothing, and officials acknowledged Tuesday that it could be weeks before some are able to return to what is left. In Sonoma County, 5,000 people have taken refuge in 36 shelters as of Wednesday morning, officials said.

    The scope of the damage prompted President Trump on Tuesday to approve federal emergency assistance to California, agreeing to a request made by Gov. Jerry Brown (D). The declaration, announced by Vice President Pence during a visit to the state’s Office of Emergency Services near Sacramento, provides immediate funds for debris clearing and supplies for evacuation centers, among other aid.

    The fires are the most destructive in what already has been a severe wildfire season for California and much of the West, where more than 8 million acres have been charred this year. In his letter to Trump, Brown said that nearly 7,500 fires have flared in California this year. Ten of them have prompted him to declare a state of emergency.

    The cause of the fires, which flared overnight Sunday and blew swiftly through 170,000 acres in the following days, was unknown and likely to remain so for some time.

    Pimlott, the Cal Fire chief, said the possibility that a lightning strike started the fires was “minimal.” In California, he said, 95 percent of wildfires are started by people, inadvertently or intentionally.


    “This is just pure devastation and it’s going to take us a while to get out and comb through all of this,” he said.

    State officials said that firefighters planned to clear lines between the Atlas Fire and the city of Napa, and between the Tubbs Fire and the city of Santa Rosa — the largest in Sonoma County and gateway to the wine-tourism industry.

    Those barriers would protect the areas from the south with the expectation that winds will shift back to the north in the days ahead.

    Officials said the idea, in the case of the Tubbs Fire, was to prevent a “reburn” of Santa Rosa.

    For Dylan Sayge, the original burn was devastating. He and his roommates were awake early Monday morning when they noticed an unusual sight outside their $1,600-a-month rental home in the Coffey Park neighborhood of Santa Rosa.

    “We realized ash was falling from the sky,” said Sayge, 23, a musician who works at Trader Joe’s.

    Soon after, online, they learned that a fast-moving fire had jumped Highway 101, propelled by howling winds. The power flickered and an explosion followed as a transformer blew nearby. They grabbed their three dogs — Cash, Willie and Shorty — and their cat, Apollo. Sayge packed up baby pictures and musical instruments.

    They headed out in three cars and into a traffic jam. Sayge left behind a 1998 Ford Taurus that he had just been given as a gift. The dense smoke clouded visibility. He eventually made it to a friend’s home in Fairfax, down the road in Marin County.

    The next day, he learned that the house was gone, the Taurus a charred husk.

    “The world can change in any moment,” Sayge said. “Anytime.”

    The disruption to daily life in a region known as a calm, sometimes intoxicating, tourist destination was immense.

    The 100,000 acres of vineyards — the focal point of California’s wine industry and the tourism business built around — remained threatened and, in some cases, damaged or destroyed. The extent remained unclear.

    In Healdsburg, a quaint town known to tourists for its wine tasting, food and antiques, the cast was dystopian.

    Smoke as thick as fog shielded the sky. On the hillside, houses burned unattended with stretched-thin firefighters busy elsewhere. The wooden guardrails along Highway 101 — one of the state’s most prominent north-south arteries — smoldered after burning the night before.

    More than a dozen schools were shuttered in the seven counties most affected by fires, and damage to the power grid meant that everything from charging cellphones to pumping fuel was curtailed.

    Nearly 80 cell towers have been damaged or destroyed, complicating efforts by even those with a charged battery to contact relatives or call for emergency assistance. The National Guard plans to bring in communications equipment to bolster the network, which state emergency officials called a priority.


    The remains of the buildings at Stornetta Dairy in Napa. (Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
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  8. #168
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    Here is a link to a NOAA sat pic of the fires in California. If somebody can post it, that would show the scale of the ongoing fire disaster in California.

    http://6abc.com/weather/satellite-im...fires/2513346/
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  9. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doomer Doug View Post
    Here is a link to a NOAA sat pic of the fires in California. If somebody can post it, that would show the scale of the ongoing fire disaster in California.

    http://6abc.com/weather/satellite-im...fires/2513346/
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  10. #170
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    http://www.pressdemocrat.com/news/75...ens?artslide=3 (go to site for aerial photos of the shocking devastation)

    As winds return, fire threatens large swath of Santa Rosa, surrounds Oakmont
    GUY KOVNER, JULIE JOHNSON, RANDI ROSSMANN AND MARY CALLAHAN

    THE PRESS DEMOCRAT | October 11, 2017, 12:33AM

    Uncontrolled wildfires burned in Santa Rosa and across Sonoma County for a second day Tuesday, adding to a deadly natural disaster that continued to outflank firefighters and menace rural and urban residents, with conditions expected to deteriorate again today.

    The fires extended existing evacuation orders covering 20,000 people and prompted new directives into Tuesday night, when flames threatened Oakmont on three sides and nipped at the eastern edges of Santa Rosa in Bennett Valley and along Highway 12.

    With the heavy smoke lifting and breezes increasing Tuesday evening, the new flare-ups were a distressing sign of flames potentially extending into another heavily populated area of the city. Winds are forecast to pick up further and shift through Wednesday and Thursday, according to the National Weather Service.

    The largest of the blazes, the Tubbs fire, was threatening at least 16,000 homes, authorities said.

    “We’re not taking any chances. We don’t know what the wind is going to do,” said Santa Rosa Fire Chief Tony Gossner, who is helping manage the Tubbs fire, which had burned 28,000 acres. “We’re concerned for sure.”

    The causes of the fires were undetermined Tuesday.

    Evacuations launched late Tuesday by the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office included residents near Bennett Valley Golf Course, greater Montgomery Village and north of Geyserville along Ida Clayton Road.

    Orders were also issued for the wooded Annadel Heights area, bordered to the north by Parktrail Drive and to the west by Summerfield Road. To the east, fire continues to burn in 5,000-acre Trione-Annadel State Park, which divides Annadel Heights from Oakmont.

    The local death toll rose to 16 on Tuesday, including 11 fatalities in the Tubbs fire. Three deaths were confirmed in the inferno that burned through Redwood Valley in Mendocino County and two occurred in Napa County.

    Together, wildland blazes in Sonoma, Napa, Lake and Mendocino counties have burned 90,000 acres since late Sunday

    Officials stressed that Sonoma County fires were uncontained and presented a serious risk to public safety in the coming days, with pockets of flame burning within the existing perimeters and new fronts pushing outward from the foothills of Windsor in the north to rugged terrain overlooking Sonoma Valley further south.

    “That’s really discouraging to hear,” Sonoma County Supervisor Shirlee Zane said during Tuesday’s board meeting. More than 24 hours after the Tubbs fire broke out in Calistoga and stormed across the Napa-Sonoma border into Santa Rosa, firefighters were scrambling to catch up.

    It’s “really kind of horrifying,” Zane said. “There really aren’t enough words to explain the type of grief in our community right now.”

    Rep. Mike Thompson, D-St. Helena, noted the unprecedented scope of the fires burning across the region.

    “We have never been taxed by a natural disaster to the extent we are being taxed now,” he told an audience of about 600 people Tuesday night at Santa Rosa High School.

    Fires across the region have destroyed up to 3,000 structures, according to Cal Fire.

    Most of those losses occurred in the firestorm early Monday in the neighborhoods of northwest Santa Rosa, in Coffey Park, and to the east across Highway 101 in the Mark West-Larkfield area and the hilly, upscale subdivisions of Fountaingrove.

    Added to that official list Tuesday were 75 homes lost along Bennett Ridge in east Santa Rosa, where residents walked their hillside neighborhood and compiled their own grim survey of the damage — more than 20 homes on Rollo Road, 20 on Bardy Road, 25 on Bennett Ridge and nine on Old Bennett Ridge

    Surviving homes totaled about 35, according to the residents’ tally.

    “Lost. Lost. Lost. Lost. All these houses are just burned to the ground,” said Rollo Road resident Matt Jennings.

    Trouble flared again late Monday — and reared in the same area late Tuesday — in eastern Santa Rosa, when the Nuns fire, centered in Sonoma Valley, ignited a rugged wooded canyon along White Oak Drive in the exclusive Wild Oak subdivision above Oakmont, threatening more than a dozen luxury homes.

    The first Santa Rosa firefighters arrived at 10:43 p.m. Monday and quickly called for backup after seeing not only scrub brush burning but also manzanita and fir trees exploding, said Capt. Mike Harrison.

    The winds were nowhere near like those that whipped the deadly Tubbs fire across the northern end of Santa Rosa, but they were stiff enough to make firefighters concerned about being so far up a narrow, dead-end road covered by trees, he said.

    Three hours of work by the crews, including Sebastopol firefighters, kept the fire away from the homes.

    “It’s good that we got here in time to make a difference,” Harrison said.

    Thankful residents in the area included Valerie Stamps, mother of world-class runner and Santa Rosa native Julia Stamps Mallon. She walked up the driveway and thanked the firefighters for saving her daughter’s home.

    “I am so impossibly grateful to them,” Valerie Stamps said.

    But fire officials also faced continued questions over their deployment of resources, especially the limited use of air tankers to fight the Sonoma County blazes.

    “Where are the f---ing fire aircraft?” Ryan Wilber, a Santa Rosa criminal defense attorney wrote on Facebook Tuesday. “No one has heard or seen them. We see them when there are other fires.”

    Cal Fire Chief Ken Pimlott said at a media briefing Tuesday that “we have access to almost every aviation and firefighting aviation asset in the country right now.”

    On Monday, aircraft dropped a record 266,000 gallons of fire retardant on 45 missions on fires in Napa and Sonoma counties, Pimlott said.

    Cal Fire spokeswoman Amy Head noted that helicopter water drops occurred Tuesday in low-visibility conditions that prevented missons by fixed-wing aircraft.

    Air tankers “are just one tool in our toolbox,” she said.

    “When we had the opportunity to fly the aircraft, we flew them,” said Richard Cordova, a Cal Fire spokesman.

    Authorities late Tuesday released new information on the 11 Sonoma County deaths, all in the Tubbs fire.

    One person died on rural Mountain Home Ranch Drive in the hills off Petrified Forest Road leading into Calistoga, close to where the fire started just north of town.

    Three people died in a rural hillside community along Mark West Springs Road — on Crystal Court and on Sundown Trail off Riebli Road.

    In Larkfield, authorities confirmed two deaths on Angela Drive, two on Mark West Springs Road and one on Wikiup Bridge Way.

    Two people were found dead in Santa Rosa’s Coffey Park neighborhood, one on Coffey Lane and another person on Hemlock Street.

    The identities of the victims were not released.

    Fifty-seven of the 240 people reported missing as of Tuesday have been located, and some of the missing are expected not to have survived the fire, Sonoma County Sheriff Rob Giordano said. Deputies and Cal Fire personnel are slowly inspecting damaged and destroyed homes.

    There have been no arrests for looting and only a few unconfirmed reports, Giordano said.

    Sonoma County fire officials estimate 28,000 people — representing 7,300 families — live in the fire-affected areas, according to Andrew Parsons, the county’s assistant fire marshal.

    Among the 36 county shelters open Tuesday evening, about 3,900 people were seeking refuge. The shelters had capacity for more than 6,800.

    About 51,000 customers remained without power Tuesday morning.

    Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital’s emergency department has treated approximately 100 people since the wildfires began, including 14 who were burned.

    Most patients came in with respiratory issues, including difficulty breathing, asthma and throat irritation, and about 15 percent were admitted to the hospital, spokeswoman Vanessa deGier said.

    Petaluma Valley Hospital treated about 35 patients in its emergency department, most of them with mild to moderate injuries such as shortness of breath, dizziness, asthma and smoke inhalation.

    Kaiser Permanente and Sutter Santa Rosa hospitals both remained closed, with no immediate plans to reopen.

    “The fire has to be contained, and then local county resources have to tell us that we can come back online,” said Dr. Joshua Weil, assistant physician-in-chief for hospital operations at Kaiser Permanente Santa Rosa Medical Center. “We have to bring PG&E back online for electricity, we have to bring water back online and then we begin the process of testing and confirming systems, and once that happens, probably somewhere in the area of 48 hours.”

    Giordano on Tuesday morning described a massive response from law enforcement throughout the Bay Area, saying some 500 officers had come to help. The San Francisco Police Department had 100 people in the Sheriff’s Office building at 8 a.m. Monday, Giordano said.

    “Alameda (County) brought 150 yesterday. We had to turn them away, because we had too many at the time, believe it or not,” he said.

    The massive property losses have impacted Sonoma County’s workforce, including up to 20 sheriff’s deputies who have lost their homes. All are still working, the sheriff said.

    The losses may extend to Supervisor Susan Gorin, who represents Sonoma Valley and eastern Santa Rosa. She said she suspected her home was destroyed.

    “Every part of my district has been affected,” Gorin said.

    Flames cropped up in a variety of places Tuesday, sending firefighting teams in numerous directions, including back to the neighborhoods of Coffey Park and Fountaingrove that were devastated during Monday’s morning firestorm.

    Fire still was still burning at the Hilton Sonoma Wine Country, one of numerous businesses and landmarks destroyed in Santa Rosa.

    Flare-ups were expected to continue in burned-over areas and pockets of unburned homes, Cal Fire spokesman Jonathan Cox said.

    In the hills above Windsor, a fire that had burned in the Shiloh Park area also kicked up, and evacuations were ordered in the area of Montebello Road and the south side of Shiloh Ranch Regional Park.

    The evacuated area in Santa Rosa stretched from Fulton Road east to Montecito Boulevard and from Mark West Springs Road south to Steele Lane and Chanate Road, plus the Oakmont area along Highway 12.

    Everyday life throughout the county has been staggered, stalled and permanently transformed.

    Campuses in the vast majority of Sonoma County school districts, including Santa Rosa, Cotati-Rohnert Park, Petaluma, Windsor, Healdsburg, West Sonoma County schools have been shuttered since Monday.

    All athletic contests in the North Bay and Sonoma County leagues have been canceled this week.

    Two cultural events on Saturday, and theater performances were also canceled through the weekend.

    “First, and most importantly, is the safety of our student-athletes and coaches, as well as the entire communities in which they reside,” NBL Commissioner Jan Smith-Billing said in a statement Tuesday. “The air quality is terrible and it would be unsafe to have anyone doing anything outside.”

    Staff Writers Kevin McCallum and J.D. Morris contributed reporting.

    1:11 min

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuvCus8M6hA

    another Facebook video of the damage as far as the eye can see: https://www.facebook.com/jerry.lange...4979466948426/ and
    https://www.facebook.com/NBCNews/vid...9470189739667/
    Last edited by marsh; 10-11-2017 at 07:31 PM.
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  11. #171
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    NBC Bay Area‏Verified account @nbcbayarea 55s55 seconds ago

    #BREAKING: Mandatory evacuations in effect for entire city of Calistoga. Residents should leave immediately.
    http://nbcbay.com/LAFxX8G

    Tons of info here:

    http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local...owTwt_BAYBrand


    Too bad, such a pretty place:


    https://www.google.com/search?tbm=is....0.ZWmGaSr-96E
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  12. #172
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    Just heard on the local news that more than 700 people missing. A friend on Facebook said the humidity is so low there right now that one doesn't even think of farting for fear of starting another fire.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  13. #173
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    Looking at the fire damage, it reminds me of Oklahoma City's EF5 Tornado damage.

  14. #174
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    https://yubanet.com/Fires/tubbs/

    October 11, 2017 at 3:12 PM

    Napa County Sheriff:

    Forecasted conditions have worsened. In the interest of life safety, it has become necessary to expand and implement the CalFire Mandatory evacuation for the entire city of Calistoga
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  15. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by marsh View Post
    Latest facebook video on the Orange County (S. CA ) fires. (almost 4 hrs? compilation but seems to repeat) This starts out on Jamboree and Canyon View streets. My parents lived in Newport Beach and we used to have to turn on Jamboree. Besides the devastating human costs, this area can have some real pricey real estate. https://www.facebook.com/realist.tv/...0243249199624/
    That is really heart wrenching to watch. Those firefighters are so brave, it almost looks futile. The winds are picking up here and 30 mph tonight. The Loma Rica/Bangor fire is 30% contained and the Cherokee fire here is 30% contained. My daughter lives 1 mile from the Redwood Valley fire in Mendocino and they are on standby evacuation. They have acreage with vineyards. Thankful we cleared our property this Spring but there's still no guarantees. People insist on planting nonnative trees that shed their bark and are full of oil. Once it catches on fire there's no holding it back - think Oakland Hills fire.

  16. #176
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    Thanks, Ragnarok. Are all the white spots in the sat pic FIRES now burning, or are they electric lights? When you look at it you get to see exactly how much of California is now burning. Is anybody saying it will get to San Francisco and burn it to the ground, Bardou?

    Sheesh, a few months ago we were all worried about Oroville Dam collapsing and flooding California, and now it is being burnt to ash. At least Governor Moonbeam will be gone in January. How California voters elected Governor Moonbeam for four terms is beyond me.
    Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
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  17. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by mzkitty View Post
    NBC Bay Area‏Verified account @nbcbayarea 55s55 seconds ago

    #BREAKING: Mandatory evacuations in effect for entire city of Calistoga. Residents should leave immediately.
    http://nbcbay.com/LAFxX8G

    Tons of info here:

    http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local...owTwt_BAYBrand


    Too bad, such a pretty place:


    https://www.google.com/search?tbm=is....0.ZWmGaSr-96E
    Lots of old vine vineyards in Calistoga and wineries. My daughter worked for a winery in Calistoga. There's also hooty-tooty mineral spas in Calistoga as well. Many high priced homes/ranches there.

  18. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doomer Doug View Post
    Thanks, Ragnarok. Are all the white spots in the sat pic FIRES now burning, or are they electric lights? When you look at it you get to see exactly how much of California is now burning. Is anybody saying it will get to San Francisco and burn it to the ground, Bardou?

    Sheesh, a few months ago we were all worried about Oroville Dam collapsing and flooding California, and now it is being burnt to ash. At least Governor Moonbeam will be gone in January. How California voters elected Governor Moonbeam for four terms is beyond me.
    Not a chance of it getting to San Francisco Doomer. It would have to burn down everything including the Golden Gate Bridge. It's a good 60 miles from San Francisco. One thing for sure though, it will devastate the economy here in CA and the nation to the tune of $80+ billion dollars. The wine industry brings in billions of dollars and jobs. It will take years and years to rebuild that industry that's been lost. Some of those vines were 100 years old. Those are the ones that produced the high priced wines. Lodi, CA is a big grape growing area so it will take up some of the slack. Tourism will greatly diminish the economy for the Napa/Santa Rosa area, thousands of jobs have been lost. It will recover for sure, but it will be years to do so.

    I forgot to mention that Calistoga is near The Geysers where earthquakes are an ongoing thing. Lots of hot spring spas up there. People go wine tasting then relax in the springs. Not any more....

  19. #179
    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/l...011-story.html

    Death toll rises to 21 as Northern California fires spread to more than 160,000 acres

    Phil Willon, Paige St. John, Louis Sahagun, Sonali Kohli and Chris Megerian Oct 11 2017 3:40 PM

    The death toll rose to 21 Wednesday as multiple wildfires continued to spread across Northern California’s wine country, according to state fire officials.

    Winds were projected to be light, less than 5 miles per hour, from the north in the morning. They will increase to about 15 miles per hour in the afternoon in the valleys, officials said.

    At night, however, “the return of the north wind will have a strong influence on the southern portions of the Tubbs fire,” a Cal Fire weather report said. “Winds will be 25 to 30 miles per hour after 2 a.m. These strong winds have the potential to push the fire south back towards Calistoga and Santa Rosa, especially where the fire was active yesterday [Tuesday] on the north side.”

    On Wednesday, the Lake County Sheriff’s Department issued an advisory evacuation order for residents of Middletown — which was heavily damaged in the Valley fire just two years ago and rebuilt — as the Tubbs fire approached from the south.

    Late Tuesday night, evacuations were ordered in Calistoga for the Tubbs fire, and in other areas of Napa and Sonoma counties for the Atlas Peak fire, the Nuns fire and the Pocket fire, officials said.

    “The [Atlas] fire became active overnight, started burning more of the community,” Cal Fire spokeswoman Lynne Tolmachoff said.

    Firefighters hoped to take advantage of the lull in the winds Wednesday morning and afternoon to attack hot spots and put out as many embers as possible before they can be revived and blown into areas that haven’t burned yet, they said.

    By Wednesday, the Tubbs fire had reached 28,000 acres with no containment, Tolmachoff said. Other fires ranging in size from 1,800 to 21,000 acres burned throughout the area and in surrounding counties.

    As of Wednesday morning, Sonoma County had received about 300 reports of missing persons and had confirmed that 110 of those people were safe, said Sonoma County Sheriff’s Deputy Brandon Jones.
    As firefighters were dealing with wind shifts Wednesday afternoon, new evacuation orders were issued. All residents of Calistoga were ordered to leave their homes.

    “Winds have shifted out of the northeast,” said Sgt. Scott Fleming of the St. Helena Police Department. “Our goal is to have all 5,000 residents out by 5 p.m.”

    State and federal officials portrayed an all-out effort to fend off the devastating wildfires at a news conference at a state emergency operations center outside Sacramento.

    “It’s an extremely stressful and challenging time,” said Office of Emergency Services Director Mark Ghilarducci. “We are all hands on deck.”

    The situation remains very dangerous, officials said.

    “We’re not going to be out of the woods for a great many days to come,” said Cal Fire director Ken Pimlott. The state is still feeling the effects of the drought despite a recent wet winter, and there’s “explosive vegetation” fueling the blazes.

    “We’ve had big fires in the past,” Gov. Jerry Brown said. “This is one of the biggest.”

    According to Cal Fire spokeswoman Heather Williams, 11 people have died in Sonoma County, six in Mendocino County, two in Yuba County and two in Napa County.

    Crews launched a desperate effort to extinguish key hot spots before heavy, fire-stoking winds could kick back up later in the day.

    Officials fear that strong winds forecast for Wednesday evening and Thursday morning will spread embers from the deadly Tubbs fire to populated areas of Santa Rosa and Calistoga that have so far been spared the flames — and new evacuation orders were issued.

    “We are facing some pretty significant monsters,” Cal Fire incident commander Bret Couvea told a room of about 200 firefighters and law enforcement officials at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds staging area Wednesday morning.

    Exhausted and sore firefighters fanned across scorched mountainsides attacking hot spots, chopping shrubs and using shovels and axes to clear smooth paths down to bare soil roughly four feet wide as possible.

    They were taking advantage of a lull in erratic winds to extinguish as many embers as possible and contain portions of fires burning out of control near populated areas before north winds were expected to pick up after midnight. Forecasts call for winds of up to 35 mph on mountaintops and heavily forested ridgelines north of Santa Rosa and Calistoga.

    In a worst-case scenario, the winds would shoot embers into still-green terrain, igniting walls of flame that could march back into already devastated communities such as Santa Rosa.

    “The clock is ticking, so we’re giving it everything we’ve got — hand crews, fire engines, bulldozers, air support — to keep the fire within the perimeter,” Cal Fire Division Chief Ben Nicholls said, while using a razor-sharp blade to slice through dry grass and stubborn roots.

    “We like fighting massive fires,” he added. “A lot of what we’re doing isn’t that sexy. It’s called mop-up, and right now it is critical.”

    Already, the Northern California fires have scorched more than 160,000 acres. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection estimates that around 3,500 structures have been destroyed.

    [Lots of articles including this one, have re-hashed same stuff at the end, snipped it but there is still a lot of redundancy.]
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  20. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doomer Doug View Post
    Thanks, Ragnarok. Are all the white spots in the sat pic FIRES now burning, or are they electric lights? When you look at it you get to see exactly how much of California is now burning. Is anybody saying it will get to San Francisco and burn it to the ground, Bardou?

    Sheesh, a few months ago we were all worried about Oroville Dam collapsing and flooding California, and now it is being burnt to ash. At least Governor Moonbeam will be gone in January. How California voters elected Governor Moonbeam for four terms is beyond me.
    I didn't vote for that asshole and I ain't voting for the next one either. The Oroville spillway won't be done by Nov. 1 deadline. We need rain!

  21. #181
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    If nothing else, it will certainly make raisins scarce too. The city pictures look like Germany after World War Two in 1945. Eisenhauer is reported to have said when he flew from Paris to Berlin he didn't see a single undamaged building.

    I think FEMA is being overwhelmed since they are simotaneously dealing with the aftermath of Hurricanes in Texas, Puerto Rico, Florida and now the fires in California. I think the "system" is now stretched to the limit. Do these homeowners in California have fire insurance that will pay replacement costs for homes burnt, or just market value? It will take decades to replace any vines that burnt, unless the fire didn't burn hot enough to destroy the root system.

    When we had the fires up here in Oregon this summer, the smoke, haze and air quality was some of the worst in the USA at the time. I am wondering if people in San Francisco are starting to have breathing problems from all the smoke?
    Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
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  22. #182
    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/10/11...returning.html

    The Latest: Entire California town ordered to evacuate fire

    SONOMA, Calif. – The Latest on wildfires in California (all times local):

    3:15 p.m.

    Authorities are ordering all residents of the Northern California town of Calistoga to evacuate, saying "conditions have worsened."

    The Napa County Sheriff's Office says in an alert sent via cellphone and email that residents need to leave by 5 p.m. Wednesday.

    Earlier, officials went through the town of 5,000 people, knocking on doors to warn about 2,000 of them to leave.

    Dangerous gusty winds and low moisture were forecast to reach the region Wednesday afternoon, fanning already raging wildfires.

    In neighboring Sonoma County, authorities issued an evacuation advisory for the northern part of the town of Sonoma and the community of Boyes Hot Springs. By then, lines of cars were already fleeing the community.

    ___

    1:20 p.m.

    Officials say they have thousands of firefighters battling 22 blazes burning in Northern California and that more are coming from nearby states.

    California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection Chief Ken Pimlott says close to 8,000 firefighters have been deployed and are fighting the blazes by air and on the ground.

    Pimlott says Oregon, Nevada, Arizona and Washington are sending firefighters and the U.S. Forest Service is sending fire engines, bulldozers and hand crews.

    He also says there are concerns several fires could merge into one big blaze. The fires north of San Francisco are among the deadliest in California history.

    The blazes have also left at least 180 people injured and have destroyed more than 3,500 homes and businesses. More than 4,400 people were staying in shelters Wednesday.

    ___

    12:25 p.m.

    California Gov. Jerry Brown warns that catastrophic wildfires will keep ripping through the state as the climate warms. [SHUTE UP, IDIOT!]

    Brown told reporters Wednesday that more people are living in communities close to forests and brush that easily ignite because of dry weather. Blazes burning in Northern California have become some of the deadliest in state history.

    He says a warming climate has contributed to catastrophic wildfires and that they will continue to happen. The governor, who's positioned himself as a leader in the fight against climate change, says residents and officials have to be prepared and do everything they can to mitigate the problem. [SHUT UP, IDIOT!]

    Brown says the federal government has pledged assistance but points out resources also are going to hurricane recovery efforts in Texas and Florida.

    ___

    11:50 a.m.

    Authorities say some of the most destructive wildfires in California's history have killed 21 people.

    California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection Chief Ken Pimlott gave an updated death toll Wednesday, calling the series of wildfires in wine country "a serious, critical, catastrophic event."

    He says 8,000 firefighters are focusing on protecting lives and property as they battle the flames chewing through critically dry vegetation.

    ___

    11:15 a.m.

    Authorities in Northern California say they have discovered a body at a burned home, bringing the number of people killed by wildfires to 18.

    The Yuba County Sheriff's Office said on its Facebook page that deputies found the remains Tuesday after a resident asked for a welfare check on a family friend who was missing.

    The office says the body was found in the Loma Rica area, where another body was found earlier.

    People have also died in Sonoma, Napa and Mendocino counties.

    The fires north of San Francisco are among the deadliest in California history.

    The blazes have also left at least 180 people injured and have destroyed more than 3,500 homes and businesses.

    ___

    10:35 a.m.

    Sonoma County officials say 670 people are still listed as missing from fires in California wine country.

    But Sheriff Robert Giordano said Wednesday that many of those people may have been found but have not yet updated a registry of missing people.

    Desperate family members and friends are turning to social media with pleas for help finding loved ones missing from the 22 fires in Northern California.

    It's unclear if some of those people are actually OK.

    Authorities pleaded with previously missing people to mark themselves as safe on the registry and alert authorities.

    Napa County Supervisor Brad Wagenknecht says many people are staying with somebody else and haven't checked in.

    ___

    9:30 a.m.

    A California fire official says at least 3,500 homes and businesses have been destroyed by wildfires burning in Northern California wine country.

    California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection spokesman Daniel Berlant says fire activity increased significantly overnight, destroying more buildings and leading to new mandatory evacuations in several areas.

    Berlant said Wednesday that 22 wildfires are burning in Northern California, up from 17 on Tuesday.

    Officials in Napa County say almost half of the population of Calistoga, a town of 5,000 people, has been ordered to evacuate. New evacuation orders are also in place for Green Valley in Solano County.

    After a day of cooler weather and calmer winds, officials say low moisture and dangerous gusty winds will return to the region Wednesday afternoon, complicating firefighters' efforts.

    ___

    8:10 a.m.

    The return of cooler weather and moist ocean air is helping an army of firefighters gain ground against a wildfire that has scorched more than a dozen square miles in Southern California.

    Orange County Fire Authority Capt. Steve Concialdi says the fire has laid down significantly Wednesday due to the marine layer and the work of more than 1,600 firefighters and a fleet of aircraft.

    Concialdi says the blaze is 45 percent surrounded and full containment is expected by Saturday, but commanders are holding onto resources because of forecasts for another round of gusty winds and low humidity levels starting Thursday night.

    Incomplete damage assessments have now tallied 15 structures destroyed and 12 damaged, including homes and outbuildings.

    All evacuations have been lifted except for certain homes in the city of Orange.

    The fire erupted Monday about 45 miles southeast of Los Angeles as warm, dry Santa Ana winds swept the region. The cause remains under investigation.

    ___

    6:45 a.m.

    Animals from the Orange County Zoo are among evacuees returning home as crews get a handle on a Southern California wildfire that destroyed 14 buildings and damaged 22 others.

    Evacuation orders were lifted Tuesday for thousands of people in Anaheim, Orange and Tustin. And more than 100 animals — including small birds, mammals and reptiles — were returned to the zoo within Irvine Regional Park, where flames roared on Monday.

    Zoo officials tell the Orange County Register that the remaining animals including bears and mountain lions will be brought back in the coming days.

    The newspaper says the zoo had undergone an emergency drill a week before the fire, which helped the evacuation run as smoothly as possible.

    Cooler, more humid air is helping firefighters tame that blaze in northern Orange County.

    ___

    6:30 a.m.

    A wildfire tearing through California's wine country continues to expand unabated, prompting authorities to order more evacuations.

    The Sonoma County Sheriff's Office said Wednesday it ordered mandatory evacuations for several areas of Sonoma Valley after a blaze grew to 44 square miles (113 square kilometers).

    After a day of cooler weather and calmer winds, officials say dangerous gusty winds will return to the region Wednesday afternoon, complicating firefighters' efforts.

    The blaze in Sonoma County is one of a series of fires that flared up north of San Francisco on Sunday night and continue to burn with little to no containment. Seventeen people have died in the blazes, 11 of them in Sonoma County.

    The fires have also left at least 180 people injured and have destroyed more than 2,000 homes and businesses.

    ___

    12:00 a.m.

    Jose Garnica worked for more than two decades to build up his dream home that was reduced to ashes in a matter of minutes by the deadly firestorm striking Northern California.

    Garnica's house was among more than 2,000 homes and business destroyed by the fires that have also killed 17 people.

    He moved to the U.S. from Mexico more than 20 years ago, and after saving money from his steady job with a garbage company he fixed up his Santa Rosa house with new flooring and stainless steel appliances.

    All of it burned early Monday when the fires broke out. But Garnica says he's still better off than when he came to America.

    The fires have scorched large sections of the state's wine country.
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  23. #183
    Quote Originally Posted by Doomer Doug View Post
    If nothing else, it will certainly make raisins scarce too. The city pictures look like Germany after World War Two in 1945. Eisenhauer is reported to have said when he flew from Paris to Berlin he didn't see a single undamaged building.

    I think FEMA is being overwhelmed since they are simotaneously dealing with the aftermath of Hurricanes in Texas, Puerto Rico, Florida and now the fires in California. I think the "system" is now stretched to the limit. Do these homeowners in California have fire insurance that will pay replacement costs for homes burnt, or just market value? It will take decades to replace any vines that burnt, unless the fire didn't burn hot enough to destroy the root system.

    When we had the fires up here in Oregon this summer, the smoke, haze and air quality was some of the worst in the USA at the time. I am wondering if people in San Francisco are starting to have breathing problems from all the smoke?
    A good friend in El Dorado County in the foot hills said there is massive smoke there.
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  24. #184
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    Our cousin moved from Napa area to Paso Robles and built another new winery and B&B, developing new kinds of award-winning wines - I imagine she is so thankful she did - a whole lifetime of work would have been gone in hours.

    I keep comparing the devastation to Fort McMurray where 80,000 were evacuated, but most of them were in quadrants in the city where it was easier for them to get out.....once they reversed the traffic flow on the highways. These poor people seem to live in hills and dales and on mountainsides where there is only one way in and out.
    True North Strong and Free

  25. #185
    A friend in the Fresno area said that the smoke is like a light fog in her area. That is a ways from any of the fires.

    I suspect that this may be a watershed moment in how fire suppression is managed in the future....at least for a while. It seems like the memories of these catastrophes only last for a short while and then someone comes along and decides they know much better how things should be done.

    Jacki
    McKenziefatwood.com
    JackiGossSpecial-Tees.com

  26. #186
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    Right now I'm in north Santa Clara and the smoke here is so bad you can't see the hills to the east or west and it's been like that all day.

    When I drove in from Tracy I couldn't see the hills to the west on 206 until I was on top of them on the Altamont grade and merging with 580 and even then it was thick.

    As to the non-native trees in the Oakland Hills, the Australian eucalyptus were planted in the late 1870s as erosion control and renewable source of timber that was fast growing after they clear cut the East Bay of redwoods and pine to build up the area. The eucalyptus was thought to be a harvestable tree until they actually planted them and found they were both not usable for construction and highly flammable.

  27. #187
    And they suck a tremendous amount of water from groundwater, from what I've heard.
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  28. #188
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    Ryan Mac‏ @RyMac818 10m10 minutes ago

    #Breaking the entire town of Geyserville, Ca being evacuated due to wild fire. Everyone told to leave now.



    Geyserville is pretty too:

    https://www.google.com/search?tbm=is....0.kgvrSlwbm78


    North Bay Firestorm: Sonoma County Sheriff issues mandatory evacuations in Geyserville


    October 11, 2017, 6:26 pm

    GEYSERVILLE (KRON) — The Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office is issuing mandatory evacuations in Geyserville.

    This area extends on Highway 128 east to River Rock Casino, south on 128 to Geysers Road up to Cal Pine.

    Stay with KRON4 for updates on this breaking news story on-air, online, and on the KRON4 app.

    http://kron4.com/2017/10/11/north-ba...n-geyserville/
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  29. #189
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    ABC7 News‏Verified account @abc7newsbayarea 8m8 minutes ago

    #BREAKING: PG&E source believes downed power lines started deadly North Bay fires. Exclusive info here:


    Wednesday, October 11, 2017 06:57PM

    NAPA COUNTY, Calif. (KGO) --
    The ABC7 News I-Team has spoken with a current PG&E lineman who believes downed power lines and exploding transformers may have sparked the wildfires raging in the North Bay.

    LIST: Buildings damaged, destroyed by North Bay wildfires

    The lineman wants to remain anonymous, but the I-Team reviewed emergency dispatch recordings and in the early moments of this disaster, several calls came in about power lines falling in the high winds and transformers exploding.

    FULL LIST: North Bay fires prompt evacuations, road closures

    He also told the I-Team customers may also be to blame, because they often resist when crews try to cut back vegetation.

    PG&E sent the I-Team this statement: PG&E maintains an unwavering focus on delivering safe and reliable electric and gas service to the customers and communities that we serve. The historic wind event that swept across PG&E's service area late Sunday and early Monday packed hurricane-strength winds in excess of 75 mph in some cases. These destructive winds, along with millions of trees weakened by years of drought and recent renewed vegetation growth from winter storms, all contributed to some trees, branches and debris impacting our electric lines across the North Bay. In some cases we have found instances of wires down, broken poles and impacted infrastructure. Where those have occurred, we have reported them to our state utility regulator and CalFire. Our thoughts are with all those individuals who were impacted by these devastating wildfires. We want our customers, families and friends to know that we will stand beside them and work together throughout this restoration process.

    IMPORTANT: If you are in need of resources, shelter, or assistance please click here -- and we will continue to update this page for resources and complete updates on road closures, school closures, and evacuation orders.

    Click here for full coverage on the North Bay fires.

    http://abc7news.com/pg-e-source-beli...fires/2521710/
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  30. #190
    So let's see PG&E show a map where the downed power lines and blown transformers were. They must have records of calls so they can pretty much locate them. Then overlay that map with the original 60 fires. Just for the sake of clarity. Bardou or maybe it was marsh, posted something about how PG&E seriously cleans out vegetation and brush around the power poles, wondering about that.


    ETA: It was Bardou, from this thread:

    http://www.timebomb2000.com/vb/showt...ries-etc.-here

    PG&E has continuous ongoing maintenance of its power poles. They hire contractors to sterilize grass around poles with transformers. Tree removal of any tree that is encroaching on any of their power lines is removed. The wind that night was in excess of 70 mph and higher in some places. It's bone dry here. Lines could have slapped together and arced. Fires do not start on their own. Homeless people set up campfires all the time, and in the case of the Ponderosa fire here a month ago, a homeless man did just that. He had a campfire going and it got out of control, and burned hundreds of acres and homes with it. There's homeless encampments down by the river and out in the refuge here. There's always a fire started out there, it's a given with so many homeless people living in the bush. They get stoned and do crazy stuff - even murder. One of them jumped off the bridge and hit a rock - ouch.
    Last edited by Be Well; 10-11-2017 at 10:38 PM.
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  31. #191
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    For the past three days caravans of trucks from Humboldt count have headed south with relief supplies. Everything from water/stock tanks, animal feed, can openers, cots sleeping bags and cots, food, water, tea, coffee, tents, personal care items, phone cards and gift cards, books, board games and gas cards. Love our regional response to help folks down south. The local community also responded to help folks in Montana this past summer, folks harmed by the hurricanes. Lots of kind folks up here.

    AT and T got fiber optic lines repaired up to Lake County today. Went to the Credit Union and I had to convince the teller to take my check to cash. Their system is still down and skrewedmthree ways from Sunday. Had to prove it was my branch, told her I had x amount in our money market savings and checking account. She was visibly shacking and on the verge of tears after being yelled at all day by customers wanting their money. Thankfully she cashed my check and she cautioned I keep it on the down low.

    I told her able to use my debit card as a credit card charge at the gas station. None of the local banks ATM machines are able to process requests for funds at this time. In Siskiyoumom county cards can be run because their trunk lines do not come from the sou5h but from the north.

    Many of our local fire departments and police officers are going south as mutual assistance personnel.

    Most of the fires are still at zero containment.

  32. #192
    I wish the Cal Fire info page was as clear as Inciweb.

    Here it is:

    http://www.fire.ca.gov/current_incidents

    You have to keep going to more pages to see the individual fires. The ones on the first several pages are little to not contained, they get better as you look on more pages.
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  33. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by Be Well View Post
    So let's see PG&E show a map where the downed power lines and blown transformers were. They must have records of calls so they can pretty much locate them. Then overlay that map with the original 60 fires. Just for the sake of clarity. Bardou or maybe it was marsh, posted something about how PG&E seriously cleans out vegetation and brush around the power poles, wondering about that.


    ETA: It was Bardou, from this thread:

    http://www.timebomb2000.com/vb/showt...ries-etc.-here

    PG&E has continuous ongoing maintenance of its power poles. They hire contractors to sterilize grass around poles with transformers. Tree removal of any tree that is encroaching on any of their power lines is removed. The wind that night was in excess of 70 mph and higher in some places. It's bone dry here. Lines could have slapped together and arced. Fires do not start on their own. Homeless people set up campfires all the time, and in the case of the Ponderosa fire here a month ago, a homeless man did just that. He had a campfire going and it got out of control, and burned hundreds of acres and homes with it. There's homeless encampments down by the river and out in the refuge here. There's always a fire started out there, it's a given with so many homeless people living in the bush. They get stoned and do crazy stuff - even murder. One of them jumped off the bridge and hit a rock - ouch.
    It was me who said that. After the Grass Valley fire 20+ years ago, PG&E stepped up to the plate and started heavy maintenance of tree trimming, and power pole vegetation maintenance. It's a continuous on going effort. Davey Tree, Utility Tree Company, were all throughout California doing tree trimming maintenance. Even with that, during a wind/rain/Pineapple Express, power lines come down. BTW, The CPUC gave PG&E rate increases to do this work. DH worked for PG&E and is retired from the company.

  34. #194
    Quote Originally Posted by Bardou View Post
    It was me who said that. After the Grass Valley fire 20+ years ago, PG&E stepped up to the plate and started heavy maintenance of tree trimming, and power pole vegetation maintenance. It's a continuous on going effort. Davey Tree, Utility Tree Company, were all throughout California doing tree trimming maintenance. Even with that, during a wind/rain/Pineapple Express, power lines come down. BTW, The CPUC gave PG&E rate increases to do this work. DH worked for PG&E and is retired from the company.
    We get wildfires from downed power lines almost every year but generally they're caught and don't get bad.
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  35. #195
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    JW Watch‏ @JW_Watch 29m29 minutes ago
    JW Watch Retweeted JW Watch
    Fires are common in CA. CAL FIRE & Democrats simply not prepared. Failing damns/infrastructure. @NancyPelosi Too busy protecting immigrants
    Don't just go to church. BE THE CHURCH!

  36. #196
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    SFChronicle‏Verified account @sfchronicle 1m1 minute ago

    #BREAKING: Wildfire death toll rises to 28 after 4 bodies found in Yuba and Mendocino counties. Latest updates >>>
    http://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/a...s-12271728.php

    Lots here, including over 70 pictures, if you are interested:

    http://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/a...s-12271728.php
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  37. #197

    California wildfires update: More wind, more evacuations, more destruction

    http://wildfiretoday.com/

    Jason Pohl on October 12, 2017

    After a day of relative calm and progress, high winds — some gusting to 50 mph overnight — prompted red flag warnings in Northern California and will hinder firefighters trying to gain an edge in what will likely go down as the most deadly and destructive wildfire event in state history.

    The latest figures on this week’s wildfire outbreak, per CAL FIRE as of late Wednesday:
    • 22 wildfires have burned more than 170,000 acres
    • 3,500 homes and structures have been destroyed
    • 21 people have died, and that figure is expected to rise
    • More than 8,000 firefighters are working fires across the state, primarily those in Northern California’s wine country. This includes crews on 550 engines, 73 helicopters and 30 air tankers.

    This New York Times analysis, from the air and ground adds to grim picture emerging from wine country, where the number of structures destroyed stands to climb.

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...smtyp=cur&_r=0

    Troy Griggs‏ @TroyEricG
    Surreal drone footage of neighborhoods in Northern California that were basically erased from the map by wildfires. https://nyti.ms/2kFaVmq

    https://twitter.com/TroyEricG/status...retoday.com%2F

    While progress has been made on containment for many of the smaller fires, several major fires continue to expand, forcing even more evacuations Wednesday night and into Thursday, including the 5,000 people who live in Calistoga.

    “Forecasted conditions have worsened. In the interest of life safety, it has become necessary to expand and implement the CAL FIRE Mandatory evacuation for the entire city of Calistoga,” city officials said.

    Among the largest incidents, as of Wednesday night’s update:
    • Atlas Fire: 43,000 acres and 3 percent contained
    • Tubbs Fire: 27,000 acres and 10 percent contained (at least 11 people were killed in this incident, making it the single deadliest blaze in this outbreak, according to CAL FIRE.
    • Redwood/Potter Fires (Mendocino Lake Complex): 30,000 acres and 5 percent contained

    Here’s a list of the 20 most damaging fires in California history. Atop the list is the Tunnel Fire a 1,600-acre blaze that rekindled in October 1991 and tore through Oakland Hills, killing 25 people and destroying 2,900 structures. We wrote about the two of the top five, the Cedar and Witch fires, in a post earlier this week. Four of the top five started in October, when fuel loads are driest and Santa Ana wind events are inevitable.

    On Thursday night, perimeters expanded on some fires with the return of high winds. The National Weather Service re-issued red flag warnings through Thursday for much of Northern California.

    Among the largest incidents, as of Wednesday night’s update:

    Atlas Fire: 43,000 acres and 3 percent contained
    Tubbs Fire: 27,000 acres and 10 percent contained (at least 11 people were killed in this incident, making it the single deadliest blaze in this outbreak, according to CAL FIRE.
    Redwood/Potter Fires (Mendocino Lake Complex): 30,000 acres and 5 percent contained

    The bulletin today:
    “Although the wind will not be as strong as Sunday and
    Sunday night, the dry northerly winds could rapidly spread
    current and new wildfire activity…”
    Easing winds and a shift in a direction should reduce some fire dangers by the afternoon.


    But it stands to be a busy weekend.

    “A stronger wind event will impact the area late Friday night into Sunday. The strongest winds winds look to occur late Friday night and Saturday. Winds for the valley will taper off Saturday night but increase once again for many mountain and foothill areas before tapering off on Sunday. Most critical areas of concern where the strongest winds are expected will be across exposed ridges and through wind-aligned drainages.”





    [DH called me this morning and said if the wind is good he won't be down in CA that long, but if the wind/weather are not good, then longer. FF are told not to post photos etc of the fires on FB/social media.]
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  38. #198
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    Schools in several counties in the Bay Area are closed due to the smoke. We finally have a clear day here with a slight breeze. Rain is forecast for next week. Hearing more and more that it was downed power lines and exploding transformers that caused the fires. A man went looking for his mother at the burned out trailer park and found her corpse in Santa Rosa. We'll all be dumbfounded when the final toll of the amount of destruction and death these fires have caused. One dead in Yuba County fire and 1 dead in the Mendocino fire. Heard this on KFBK about an hour ago.

  39. #199
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    Brad Belstock‏ @BradBelstock 6m6 minutes ago

    #BREAKING Santa Rosa mayor says 2,834 homes destroyed in the fire
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  40. #200
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    though I realize fellow Americans are suffering right now
    its a tad harsh of me to think well it is California.
    Please dont think less of me than I already do myself

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