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ALERT Multiple fires and evacuations in North SF Bay Area
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  1. #201
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    a couple of answers

    I can answer a couple of question people have asked

    Raisins - the raisin grapes are mostly grown in the San Joaquin Valley and are not affected by the fires. However, we had some rain right after harvest that splashed sand on the drying grapes. Gets in the wrinkles and that isn't good. (Sand in wrinkles is never a good thing)

    PG&E is clearing trees from around power lines. I had a crew in front of my house this morning. When hurricane force winds take out poles there just isn't much anyone can do except get the fire out quickly. The wind made that impossible & the fires took off.

    Sometimes you can't win!

  2. #202
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    Maine
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    Spoke to my mother. My cousin lives in Healdsburg. As of last night they were preparing to evacuate and 10% of the kids in my cousins kids school have lost their homes.

    My sister is going to a wedding this weekend in the area and could clearly smell the smoke from San Francisco airport when she landed today.

  3. #203
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    Nov 2003
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    ABC7 News‏Verified account @abc7newsbayarea 2m2 minutes ago

    #BREAKING: Death toll rises to 29 in devastating #NorthBayFires & crews working to find hundreds still missing


    Thursday, October 12, 2017 04:48PM

    *snip*

    NAPA, Calif. --
    The death toll has now risen to 29 in the devastating wildfires tearing through the North Bay, and crews are currently looking for hundreds of people who remain missing as the fires continue to destroy communities.

    Officials said 15 of those deaths are from Sonoma County.

    MISSING PERSONS: Help find, reunite people missing in North Bay fires

    Cal Fire officials said personnel is closely watching the communities of Calistoga, Sonoma, Geyserville, Middletown and Solano counties.

    In Napa County, advisories were issued for people living east of Silverado Trail, Soscol Avenue, Highway 221, Highway 29 and north of Jameson Canyon Road. In Sonoma County, Palomino Lakes as well as parts of Windsor and Healdsburg. In Solano County, north of Jameson Canyon Road and I-80 and west of Suisun Valley Road.

    An evacuation advisory means prepare to leave if the situation worsens.

    LIST: Evacuations ordered, shelters open for North Bay fires

    More here:

    http://abc7news.com/death-toll-rises...fires/2523038/
    Attached Images
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  4. #204
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    Quote Originally Posted by mzkitty View Post
    ABC7 News‏Verified account @abc7newsbayarea 2m2 minutes ago

    #BREAKING: Death toll rises to 29 in devastating #NorthBayFires & crews working to find hundreds still missing


    Thursday, October 12, 2017 04:48PM

    *snip*

    NAPA, Calif. --
    The death toll has now risen to 29 in the devastating wildfires tearing through the North Bay, and crews are currently looking for hundreds of people who remain missing as the fires continue to destroy communities.

    Officials said 15 of those deaths are from Sonoma County.

    MISSING PERSONS: Help find, reunite people missing in North Bay fires

    Cal Fire officials said personnel is closely watching the communities of Calistoga, Sonoma, Geyserville, Middletown and Solano counties.


    In Napa County, advisories were issued for people living east of Silverado Trail, Soscol Avenue, Highway 221, Highway 29 and north of Jameson Canyon Road. In Sonoma County, Palomino Lakes as well as parts of Windsor and Healdsburg. In Solano County, north of Jameson Canyon Road and I-80 and west of Suisun Valley Road.

    An evacuation advisory means prepare to leave if the situation worsens.

    LIST: Evacuations ordered, shelters open for North Bay fires

    More here:

    http://abc7news.com/death-toll-rises...fires/2523038/
    Most of Middletown was destroyed last year in a fire. There were some deaths involved in that fire. That was the fire that was started by a faulty hot tub - improperly wired. Windsor is a beautiful town, my daughter lived there before moving to Ukiah (near the Redwood Valley fire). A firefighter told me that there was lots of looting in that fire. They were so bold as to bring in an old fire truck pretending to be firefighters. The give away was the missing water tank which served as their loot bin.

  5. #205
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bardou View Post
    Most of Middletown was destroyed last year in a fire. There were some deaths involved in that fire. That was the fire that was started by a faulty hot tub - improperly wired. Windsor is a beautiful town, my daughter lived there before moving to Ukiah (near the Redwood Valley fire). A firefighter told me that there was lots of looting in that fire. They were so bold as to bring in an old fire truck pretending to be firefighters. The give away was the missing water tank which served as their loot bin.
    Yes. I read about some looting starting a few days ago, but there's not much left to pick through, unless the scumbags think they're going to find gold coins or something. Garbage. I hate looters.

    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  6. #206
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    Nov 2003
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    Sad, sad, sad, sad, sad...... old people who nobody came and got. The forgotten.




    Devon Heinen‏ @DevonHeinen 2m2 minutes ago
    Replying to @DevonHeinen

    #BREAKING
    At least 31 people have died in the #CAwildfires, acc'd to #CALfire stmt.


    #CAfires #CaliforniaWildfires #CaliforniaFires
    Attached Images
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  7. #207
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    Remembering Those Lost In Wine Country Wildfires


    October 12, 2017 5:35 PM

    SANTA ROSA (CBS SF/AP) —- The wine country wildfires that have been so destructive have also taken a terrible human toll.

    On Thursday, the death toll stood at 31 – victims who were someone’s mother, wife, husband, son, daughter, sister, brother, aunt or uncle.

    Early Thursday evening, the Sonoma County Sheriff announced that the coroner’s office had positively identified ten more fire victims mostly from Santa Rosa.

    Those victims were:

    • Carol Collins-Swasey, 76 years old from Santa Rosa
    • Lynne Anderson Powell, 72 years old from Santa Rosa
    • Arthur Tasman Grant, 95 years old from Santa Rosa
    • Suiko Grant, 75 years old from Santa Rosa
    • Donna Mae Halbur, 80 years old from Larkfield (Santa Rosa)
    • Leroy Peter Halbur, 80 years old from Larkfield (Santa Rosa)
    • Valerie Lynn Evans, 75 years old from Santa Rosa
    • Carmen Caldentey Berriz, 75 years old from Apple Valley, CA
    • Michael John Dornbach, 57 years old from Calistoga, CA
    • Veronica Elizabeth McCombs, 67 years old from Santa Rosa

    Earlier, seven victims were identified by their family members. They included a couple who met in grade school back in the 1920s, two beloved mothers, a teenage boy trying to escape the flames with his family and a young woman who loved music and animals.

    Charles and Sara Rippey

    The Rippeys lived near the Silverado golf course when the Altas Fire roared through their neighborhood early Monday.

    Charles and Sara grew up in a small town in Wisconsin and met in grade school when their life-long love affair began.

    “He was in sixth grade and she was in fourth grade,” their son Mike Rippey told KPIX 5. “They went to the University of Wisconsin together and have been together ever since.”

    When the fire came, Rippey said his father attempted to save his mother, but died in the attempt.

    “From where they found his body, he was trying to get from his room to her room,” he said. “He never made it. Even if he had gotten there, he wouldn’t have been able to get her out. She just couldn’t move well at all. And there is no way he would have left.”

    Linda Tunis

    Jessica Tunis screamed at her mother to run out of the burning house but Linda Tunis said she was trapped, there was fire everywhere, and the last thing she said to her daughter was that she was going die before the call dropped.

    The younger Tunis immediately called 911 early Monday, but didn’t know if they rescued her 69-year-old mom before her house was leveled in wildfires that swept Northern California’s wine country.

    She turned to social media, along with hundreds of others looking for loved ones. She posted a picture of her mother smiling at a café with the caption,

    “Does anyone know if Journey’s End Mobile Home Park got evacuated before it burned down? I can’t find my mom, Linda Tunis.”

    On Wednesday, her brother Robert Tunis picked through the debris where his mother’s house once stood, searching for clues to what happened to her.

    “She’s spunky, she’s sweet, she loves bingo and she loves the beach, she loves her family,” said Jessica Tunis, crying. “Please help me find her. I need her back. I don’t want to lose my mom.”

    Hours later Tunis texted an AP reporter to say her brother had found their mother’s remains among the debris.

    Jessica Tunis didn’t forget to update her friends on Facebook:

    “My mother’s remains have been found at her home at Journey’s End. May she rest in peace, my sweet Momma.”

    Sharon Robinson

    Sharon lived in Reible Rd. area in Santa Rosa when the Tubbs Fire burned through her neighborhood. Her family frantically tried to locate the 79-year-old, turning to Facebook in the hopes she had escaped the flames.

    On Thursday, her daughter went on Facebook to post that her mother had not escaped.

    “We know she found peace in her passing,” her daughter wrote.

    Kai Logan Shepherd

    Kai was with his family when they attempted to flee a wildfire approaching their mountain home in Mendocino early Monday morning, according to a fundraising page posted for the family.

    “We may never know all the details, and ultimately, right now, they don’t matter. Only the lives of our loved ones matter now,” the posting read. “We know they tried to escape down the driveway in a car. We know the car caught on fire and they left on foot.”

    “Our sweet boy — our brave, strong, talented boy — Kai Logan Shepherd, 14 years old, had already succumbed to the fire when he was found on the driveway. We are utterly devastated. ”

    Christina Hanson

    Christina Hanson loved music and animals. She volunteered at an Alzheimer’s residential care facility. Her stepmother, Jennifer Watson, told the San Francisco Chronicle she was “a very happy, social and positive person.”

    The 28-year-old, who used a wheelchair, lived in a Santa Rosa neighborhood next door to her father. As the flames approached her home, she attempted to reach her father.

    When she couldn’t reach him, she called his ex-wife.

    Little is known what happened next, but her father — Michael Hanson — was badly burned and somehow made it the hospital. He eventually was taken to the Saint Francis’ Bothin Burn Center.

    Her cousin, Brittney Vinculado, said Christina had died in the blaze.

    “I know that’s how he got burned,” her aunt Cathy Riordan told the paper. “(He) was trying to save her.”

    Karen Aycock

    Karen lived on Dogwood Drive in Santa Rosa’s Coffey Park neighborhood that was devastated by the Tubbs Fire. Her home was destroyed by the fire and her niece Jeanette Scroggins joined police in searching the debris for any sign of her aunt.

    Her charred car was still in the driveway.

    Aycock’s family has been active on Facebook, searching for any word.

    On Thursday another niece — Victoria Rilling — posted that searchers had located her aunt’s remains within the burned out home.

    “It’s with a heavy heart that I say this, the sheriffs department called me to inform me that Karen was found in her home,” she wrote on a Faceobok post. “We thank you for all your support in locating her.”

    http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/201...country-fires/
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  8. #208
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    dup.
    Last edited by mzkitty; 10-12-2017 at 09:07 PM.
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  9. #209
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Georgia
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    6,196
    My son and daughter-in-law live near San Francisco, about an hour south of these fires. DS just sent me this video, which I have no idea how to embed, of the USPS delivering mail in Santa Rosa. Very eerie, very sad.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3wsegE01zUE

    (1:39 run time)

    Also, they said the air quality where they live and work is deteriorating. DS's boss (in the city of SF) has now provided all employees with masks. DIL works for Apple in Cupertino (?) and says she could smell smoke IN HER OFFICE today.

    Thank God they live on the west side of the Bay.

  10. #210
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    Quote Originally Posted by bev View Post
    My son and daughter-in-law live near San Francisco, about an hour south of these fires. DS just sent me this video, which I have no idea how to embed, of the USPS delivering mail in Santa Rosa. Very eerie, very sad.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3wsegE01zUE

    (1:39 run time)

    Also, they said the air quality where they live and work is deteriorating. DS's boss (in the city of SF) has now provided all employees with masks. DIL works for Apple in Cupertino (?) and says she could smell smoke IN HER OFFICE today.

    Thank God they live on the west side of the Bay.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wsegE01zUE&app=desktop 1:39 minutes long

  11. #211
    [QUOTE]
    Quote Originally Posted by mzkitty View Post

    Remembering Those Lost In Wine Country Wildfires


    October 12, 2017 5:35 PM

    SANTA ROSA (CBS SF/AP) —- The wine country wildfires that have been so destructive have also taken a terrible human toll.

    On Thursday, the death toll stood at 31 – victims who were someone’s mother, wife, husband, son, daughter, sister, brother, aunt or uncle.

    Early Thursday evening, the Sonoma County Sheriff announced that the coroner’s office had positively identified ten more fire victims mostly from Santa Rosa.

    Those victims were:

    • Carol Collins-Swasey, 76 years old from Santa Rosa
    • Lynne Anderson Powell, 72 years old from Santa Rosa
    • Arthur Tasman Grant, 95 years old from Santa Rosa
    • Suiko Grant, 75 years old from Santa Rosa
    • Donna Mae Halbur, 80 years old from Larkfield (Santa Rosa)
    • Leroy Peter Halbur, 80 years old from Larkfield (Santa Rosa)
    • Valerie Lynn Evans, 75 years old from Santa Rosa
    • Carmen Caldentey Berriz, 75 years old from Apple Valley, CA
    • Michael John Dornbach, 57 years old from Calistoga, CA
    • Veronica Elizabeth McCombs, 67 years old from Santa Rosa
    What utter horror for these victims, their families, their neighbors. So very sad. Utter devastation of complete neighborhoods etc. Prayers for all of them and that these fires are put out soon.

  12. #212
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    83,909
    For links see article source.....
    Posted for fair use.....
    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/10/13...oved-ones.html

    4 hours ago

    Californians under siege try to fight fires, find loved ones

    By ANDREW DALTON and JOHN L. MONE, Associated Press

    SONOMA, Calif. – *They are trying to find lost loved ones, to sift through the remains of lost homes, to count, identify and mourn the dozens of dead — all while the fires rage on.

    The communities of Northern California were preparing for another day under siege Friday, despite being driven to exhaustion by evacuations, destruction and danger amid the deadliest week of wildfires the state has ever seen.

    "It wears you out," said winemaker Kristin Belair, who was driving back from Lake Tahoe to her as-yet-unburnt home in Napa. "Anybody who's been in a natural disaster can tell you that it goes on and on. I think you just kind of do hour by hour almost."

    The death toll had climbed to an unprecedented 31, and was expected to keep rising. Individual fires including the Oakland Hills blaze of 1991 had killed more people than any one of the current fires, but no collection of simultaneous fires in California had ever led to so many deaths, authorities said.

    "We had series of statewide fires in 2003, 2007, 2008 that didn't have anything close to this death count," said Daniel Berlant, a deputy director with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

    Hundreds more were injured or missing.

    Real recovery would have to wait for firefighters to bring under control the 21 wildfires spanning more than 300 square miles (777 square kilometers). Most were less than 10 percent contained. New evacuations were still being ordered for fires that broke out on Sunday night.

    "We are not even close to being out of this emergency," said Mark Ghilarducci, director of the state's Office of Emergency Services.

    Choking smoke hung thick in the fire counties and drifted all over the San Francisco Bay Area, where masks to filter the fumes were becoming a regular uniform and the sunsets were blood-red from the haze.

    "It's acrid now," said Wayne Petersen in Sonoma. "I'm wearing the mask because I've been here two or three days now, I live here, said Wayne Petersen in Sonoma. "It's starting to really affect my breathing and lungs so I'm wearing the mask. It's helping."

    Even some members of the Oakland Raiders were wearing the masks during workouts Thursday.

    The fires drove hundreds of evacuees northward to beaches, some sleeping on the sand on the first night of the blazes.

    Since then, authorities have brought tents and sleeping bags and opened public buildings and restaurants to house people seeking refuge in the safety and clean air of the coastal community of Bodega Bay, where temperatures drop dramatically at night.

    "The kids were scared," said Patricia Ginochio, who opened her seaside restaurant for some 300 people to sleep. "They were shivering and freezing."

    California Highway Patrol Officer Quintin Shawk took relatives and other evacuees into his home and office, as did many others.

    "It's like a refugee camp," Shawk said.

    Teams with cadaver dogs began a grim search Thursday for more dead, resorting in some cases to serial numbers stamped on medical implants to identify remains in charred ruins.

    Sonoma County Sheriff Robert Giordano said officials were still investigating hundreds of reports of missing people and that recovery teams would begin conducting "targeted searches" for specific residents at their last known addresses.

    "We have found bodies almost completely intact, and we have found bodies that were nothing more than ash and bones," said the sheriff, whose office released the names of 10 of the dead, all age 57 or older, on Thursday.

    Some remains have been identified using medical devices uncovered in the scorched heaps that were once homes. Metal implants, such as artificial hips, have ID numbers that helped put names to victims, he said. Distinctive tattoos have helped identify some.

    Since igniting Sunday in spots across eight counties, the fires have transformed many neighborhoods into wastelands. At least 3,500 homes and businesses have been destroyed and an estimated 25,000 people forced to flee.

    Fire officials were investigating whether downed power lines or other utility failures could have sparked the fires.

    Some lucky evacuees returned to find what they least expected.

    Anna Brooner was prepared to find rubble and ashes after fleeing Santa Rosa's devastated Coffey Park neighborhood.

    Then she got a call from a friend: "You're not going to believe this." Her home was one of only a handful still standing.

    "I swore when I left I was never coming back to this place," Brooner said. "I feel so bad for all the other people. All of us came back thinking we had nothing left."
    ___

    Dalton reported from San Francisco. Associated Press writers Olga R. Rodriguez and Janie Har in San Francisco, Jonathan J. Cooper in Santa Rosa and Brian Skoloff in Calistoga contributed to this report.

  13. #213
    http://goldrushcam.com/sierrasuntime...ures-destroyed


    CAL FIRE California Statewide Fire Summary for Friday Morning, October 13, 2017 – 17 Wildfires Have Burned Over 221,000 Acres with 31 Deaths and 3,500 Homes and Structures Destroyed


    Last Updated: Friday, 13 October 2017 08:06

    October 13, 2017 - Overnight firefighters continued their battle against 17 wildfires that have burned 221,754 acres. Several of the wildfires merged with other fires, while full containment was made on three other.



    CalFireWhile several of the fires experienced winds overnight they were relatively light, but a Red Flag Warning has been issued for later tonight when winds are expected to increase again. Tonight the winds are forecast to be stronger that experienced Thursday with gusts up to 45mh.

    The death toll has risen to 31 across 4 fires as estimates remain that 3,500 homes and other structures have been destroyed. Hundreds of additional fire engines and firefighters have begun to arrive from several other states, not only to help relieve crews on the frontlines, but to be ready for the possibility of new wildfires that may ignite during the Red Flag Warnings.

    With wildfire risk high, residents are urged to remain prepared for wildfires.

    Links at each fire, CAL FIRE link: http://www.calfire.ca.gov/

    Fires of Interest:

    **CAL FIRE Incidents**

    CENTRAL LNU COMPLEX (4 fires)

    In unified command with Santa Rosa Fire Department & Sonoma County Sheriff
    CAL FIRE Incident Management Team assigned
    17 civilian fatalities

    Tubbs Fire, Sonoma and Napa Counties(more info…)

    Between Calistoga and Santa Rosa

    34,770 acres, 25% contained
    Significant number of structures destroyed



    Pocket Fire, Sonoma County(more info…)

    Pocket Ranch Rd and Ridge Ranch Rd, Geyserville

    9,996 acres, 5% contained



    Nuns Fire, Sonoma County(more info…)

    north and west of Glen Ellen

    44,381 acres, 5% contained
    Overnight the Adobe Fire merged with the Nuns Fire, which also includes the previous Norrbom Fire.







    Pressley Fire, Sonoma County

    East of Rohnert Park

    473 acres, 10% contained





    SOUTHERN LNU COMPLEX (2 fires)

    CAL FIRE Incident Management Team assigned

    Atlas Fire, Napa & Solano Counties(more info…)

    South of Lake Berryessa and northeast of Napa

    48,228 acres, 27% contained
    2 civilian fatalities
    Significant structures destroyed



    Partrick Fire, Napa County(more info…)

    west of Napa

    12,379 acres, 18% contained



    MENDOCINO-LAKE COMPLEX (2 fires)

    CAL FIRE Incident Management Team assigned

    Redwood Valley, Mendocino County (more info…)

    North of Hwy 20 in Potter Valley and Redwood Valley

    34,000 acres, 10% contained

    8 civilian fatalities
    Significant structures destroyed



    Sulphur Fire, Lake County (more info…)

    Clearlake Oaks

    2,500 acres, 55% contained





    WIND COMPLEX (4 fires)

    CAL FIRE Incident Management Team assigned

    Cascade Fire, Yuba County (more info…)

    Loma Rica area

    10,120 acres, 55% contained
    4 civilian fatalities
    Significant structure destroyed



    Lobo Fire, Nevada County (more info…)

    Rough and Ready area

    829 acres, 52% contained
    Multiple structures destroyed





    McCourtney Fire, Nevada County (more info…)

    Southwest of Grass Valley

    76 acres, 89% contained



    LaPorte Fire, Butte County (more info…)

    Bangor area

    6,059 acres, 25% contained



    OTHER FIRES



    Cherokee Fire, Butte County (more info…)

    North of Oroville

    8,417 acres, 70% contained



    Honey Fire, Butte County (more info…)

    Southwest of Paradise

    150 acres, 75% contained



    Silver Fire, Fresno County

    Northwest of Squaw Valley

    · 58 acres, 80% contained



    Quarry Fire, Kern County NEW / FINAL

    5 miles southeast of Arvin

    · 183 acres, 100% contained



    Point Fire, Calaveras County (more info…) FINAL

    Hwy 26 & Higdon Rd., West Point

    130 acres, 100% contained



    37 Fire, Sonoma County FINAL

    Hwy 37 & Lakeville Highway near Skaggs Island

    1,660 acres, 100% contained



    **Unified Command Incidents**

    Canyon 2 Fire, Orange County (more info…)

    Hwy 91 & Gypsum Canyon Rd, Anaheim City

    9,217 acres, 65% contained
    Unified command with CAL FIRE, Orange County, Anaheim and City of Orange



    **Federal Incidents**

    Ice Fire, El Dorado County(more info…)

    13 miles east of Camino

    US Forest Service – El Dorado National Forest

    29 acres, 95% contained
    Source: CAL FIRE
    https://soundcloud.com/user-309670005
    Audio Bhagavad Gita downloadable

    This knowledge is the king of education, the most secret of all secrets. It is the purest knowledge, and because it gives direct perception of the self by realization, it is the perfection of religion. It is everlasting, and it is joyfully performed.

  14. #214
    From a Free Republic thread about Fires:

    My son texted me this morning.

    Guy he works with has been hauling horses out or the fire zone all week.

    He said they caught SIX people trying to start fires in Santa Rosa.

    For some reason the media is NOT reporting this.

    My mother called this morning.

    Last night around midnight someone had set a car fire in the middle of the road in front of her house.

    She is on the outskirts of town in a little valley. There is a dry creek bed in front of her house with lots of dead vegetation and some giant eucalyptus trees. It is also a very windy area. Fire could spread to Vallejo, Benicia and Cordelia.

    Maybe all you people were right about arsonists being responsible.

    Is it jihad or some kind of sinister distraction or agenda 21 antifa type thing?

    It’s starting to look more coordinated by the day.
    https://soundcloud.com/user-309670005
    Audio Bhagavad Gita downloadable

    This knowledge is the king of education, the most secret of all secrets. It is the purest knowledge, and because it gives direct perception of the self by realization, it is the perfection of religion. It is everlasting, and it is joyfully performed.

  15. #215
    http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/10/1...cane-strength/

    California fire mystery: PG&E lines fell in winds that weren’t ‘hurricane strength’

    PUBLISHED: October 12, 2017 at 7:38 pm | UPDATED: October 13, 2017 at 12:15 pm

    The heavy winds that downed power lines Sunday night at the start of the deadly wildfires raging across Northern California were far from “hurricane strength,” as PG&E has claimed, according to a review of weather station readings.

    On Tuesday, the Bay Area News Group reported that Sonoma County emergency dispatchers sent fire crews to at least 10 reports of downed power lines and exploding transformers as the North Bay fires were starting around 9:22 p.m. In response, PG&E said that “hurricane strength winds in excess of 75 mph in some cases” had damaged their equipment, but they said it was too early to speculate what started the fires.

    However, wind speeds were only about half that level, as the lines started to come down, the weather station records show. At a weather station in north Santa Rosa where the Tubbs Fire started, the wind gusts at 9:29 p.m. peaked at 30 mph. An hour later, they were 41 mph.


    [Map with wind speeds and other details can't copy]

    Similarly, at another weather station east of the city of Napa, on Atlas Peak, where the Atlas Fire started, wind gusts at 9:29 p.m. peaked at 32 mph. An hour later they were 30 mph.

    Both speeds were substantially under the speed specified in state law: Power lines must be able to withstand winds of at least 56 mph.

    “This is classic PG&E — trying to spin things without first taking a look at the hard facts,” said Burlingame attorney Frank Pitre. “The winds were well within the threshold of design standards. If they failed, this was a failure in their system.”

    Investigators are looking at power line failures as a possible cause of the historic fires.

    PG&E officials did not respond to specific questions Thursday about the wind speeds and whether their power lines were in compliance with state safety laws.

    “There will likely be reviews of these wildfires by the appropriate agencies, but right now we are focused on life safety and service restoration,” said PG&E spokesman Donald Cutler.

    Pitre sued PG&E after the utility was found responsible by the state Public Utilities Commission for starting the Butte Fire in Amador County in 2015 because of the utility’s failure to maintain its power lines. That fire burned for 22 days, killing two people, destroying 549 homes and charring 70,868 acres. The PUC fined PG&E $8.3 million and Cal Fire sent PG&E a bill for $90 million to cover state firefighting costs.

    Meanwhile, the “hurricane strength winds” that PG&E referenced are not “hurricane strength,” according to the National Weather Service.

    “It’s not a good analogy,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Roger Gass in Monterey.

    To qualify as “hurricane strength,” winds must be sustained — lasting for more than 1 minute — at a minimum 74 mph. Such winds are the speeds in a Category 1 hurricane, the weakest of five categories.

    In the Napa-Sonoma area, one weather station used by the National Weather Service, on Hawkeye Peak near Geyserville, recorded gusts of 79 mph at 11:56 pm on Sunday night. But gusts are defined as lasting only 3 to 5 seconds, and the sustained wind speed there at that time was 48 mph. Also, Hawkeye Peak is 22 miles north of Santa Rosa and 50 miles north of Napa, far from where the major fires broke out.

    Under state law, utilities are required to maintain power lines safely and cut back trees to prevent fires. When they are found to have started fires, they are liable for fines and damages in court to people who have lost homes, businesses and family members in the blazes.

    If PG&E is found to be at fault in this fire, the utility could use an “act of God” defense, arguing that weather conditions were so bad it couldn’t do anything to stop power lines from coming down.

    “They could use that as a defense,” said Britt Strottman, an Oakland attorney representing victims in Calaveras County of the Butte Fire. “Then it will be up to the PUC and Cal Fire — along with any judge and juries in civil cases — to decide whether that holds water.”

    In 1994, PG&E was found guilty of 739 counts of negligence and fined nearly $30 million by state regulators when trees touched its high-voltage wires in Nevada County in the Sierra foothills, sparking a fire near the town of Rough and Ready that destroyed 12 homes and a 19th century schoolhouse. Afterward, prosecutors found that PG&E had diverted nearly $80 million from its tree-cutting programs into profits.

    “If PG&E is at fault or partially at fault for these fires, it could be devastating to the company,” Strottman said. “PG&E could face significant fines and penalties.”

    The company was fined $1.6 billion by the PUC after it was found negligent in causing the 2010 San Bruno gas line explosion, which killed eight people and destroyed 38 homes.

    Investigators continue to probe the cause of the more than 20 fires that are still burning across Northern California, killing at least 31 people, destroying more than 3,000 homes and charring 190,000 acres.

    “There isn’t anything we can talk about because those are active investigations,” Cal Fire Chief Ken Pimlott said Thursday. “We all want to get to the bottom of what caused the fires. But at the end of the day, they need to do their job and we need to do the job of putting these fires out — and that’s going to be our focus.”

    Despite strong winds this week, parts of the Napa and Sonoma valleys have experienced stronger winds this year. Atlas Peak had gusts of 66 mph last February, for example.

    “It was a strong wind event, but not unprecedented,” said Jan Null, a meteorologist with Golden Gate Weather Services in Saratoga.

    Strong wind storms commonly send trees into power poles, cutting off power to thousands of customers. But what was different on Sunday night was the time of year: In the winter, downed power lines don’t cause giant conflagrations.

    “Trees and power lines go down in winter winds all the time,” he said. “But that’s on wet ground, not ground that is tinder dry.”

    “We’ve had stronger wind events, but it was during a different time of year,” Null said. “This was a matter of everything lining up” to bring down poles and wires. “It was a very dry, warm wind from the northeast.”
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  16. #216
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    BW, thanks. Arson is a completely logical conclusion. If they grab any arsonist, they ought to just drill them dead on the spot.

    ------------------

    NBC Bay Area‏Verified account @nbcbayarea 6m6 minutes ago

    #BREAKING: Mandatory evacuation order in northern Geyserville: north of Highway 128 from Geysers Rd to Chalk Hill Rd
    http://nbcbay.com/4nig8co
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  17. #217
    Quote Originally Posted by mzkitty View Post
    BW, thanks. Arson is a completely logical conclusion. If they grab any arsonist, they ought to just drill them dead on the spot.

    ------------------

    NBC Bay Area‏Verified account @nbcbayarea 6m6 minutes ago

    #BREAKING: Mandatory evacuation order in northern Geyserville: north of Highway 128 from Geysers Rd to Chalk Hill Rd
    http://nbcbay.com/4nig8co
    Arsonists really should be dropped into a hot fire but shooting would be okay too.
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  18. #218
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    Quote Originally Posted by Be Well View Post
    Arsonists really should be dropped into a hot fire but shooting would be okay too.
    Yeah, either way.
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  19. #219

    20

    Who believes this is the result of faulty PG&E engineering and the drought?
    The people of the United States are the rightful masters of both Congress and the Courts, not to overthrow the Constitution, but to overthrow the men who pervert the Constitution. Abraham Lincoln, 1859

  20. #220
    Quote Originally Posted by Gercarson View Post
    Who believes this is the result of faulty PG&E engineering and the drought?
    And the rainy season/winter in CA was extremely wet with tons of snow so I think the "drought" really means "normal hot dry CA summer" and rainy season hasn't started yet, which is also normal. IMHO a few fires could have been started from downed power lines or transformers, but no way all of them could.

    Another story:

    sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2017/10/13/multiple-wine-country-fires-merge-into-nuns-fire/

    Multiple Wine Country Fires Merge Into Nuns Fire

    October 13, 2017 12:30 PM

    NAPA COUNTY (KPIX 5) – Several of the large fires burning in Wine Country have consolidated Friday according to authorities, with some are crossing over from Sonoma County into Napa County.

    Five of the big fires are now being called the Nuns Fire. Prior to Friday morning, the Adobe, Norrbom, and Nuns fires had merged into one. Now the Partrick and Pressley fires are also expected to join the Nuns Fire.

    Cal Fire Chief Barry Biermann told KPIX 5 that a sixth smaller fire is in that mix too.

    With another red-flag warning and increased wind gusts forecast to take effect later Friday, fire crews hope to get a lot of productive work done while the weather is still cooperating.

    “We have a fire line that is uncontained and any time we have an uncontained fire line, it is a big concern because it will continue to progress,” explained Biermann. “Anywhere we have uncontained lines, where we need to reinforce line that still has fire activity in it, those are our priorities right now.”

    Some of the big fires on the Sonoma side of the ridge are now working their way onto the Napa side, compounding the effort of putting them out and officially making some of these fires a two-county problem.

    Among the major areas of concern in Napa County are:
    • Dry Creek Road
    • Mount Veeder in Lokoya
    • Areas above Rutherford and St. Helena

    These areas are where Cal Fire said the flames are heading. Officials plan to put containment lines in there Friday.

    The Nuns Fire has grown to just over 44,000 acres and is only five percent contained.

    Video at link, can't embed. 5 big name fires are now Nuns fire.
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  21. #221
    DH called, they're on 24 hour shifts, nap when they can night or day in between whatever fire work. No fire camp set up where he is, or at least for the engines he's sort of working with; they're told to go here or there and stop fire from spreading, and are moving to various locations.

    DH and the other 2 men on the engine needed some stuff and wanted to go to Walmart, but couldn't take engine, and were figuring out if they could get a ride, and a couple stopped and practically forced them to ride with them, and went into Walmart with them. And when DH and the other 2 FF were buying their stuff the couple plus another couple from the area DEMANDED that they pay for the supplies (stuff like rubber slippers, shaving stuff, etc) and got upset when the FF said no thanks, we'll pay. So the generous people wound up paying half, I think. The people there are so appreciative of the firefighters.
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  22. #222
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    Cherokee Fire, Butte County (more info…)

    North of Oroville

    8,417 acres, 70% contained
    I drove past the Cherokee fire today. It burned the whole hillside, through the railroad tracks that runs through the Feather River Canyon, clear down to Coal Canyon where there's olive orchards. It nearly burned out a cattle and horse ranch located near the tracks. It burned clear down to Hwy 70. I didn't see any structure (maybe 1) that was burned on the west side of Table Mountain. I didn't drive up Cherokee Rd to assess what has been burned up that way. It says 70% contained but I did not see any smoke in the area.


    Just got a message from my daughter who lives in Ukiah. They just had a 4.0 earthquake. She also said they are allowing people to go back home in Redwood Valley where many homes burned down. What the hell is going on? Enough already!

  23. #223
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    Ashan Paranahewa‏ @anp66 1m1 minute ago

    Death toll rises to 33 in #California wildfires, state officials say. Warnings of very dangerous winds
    #usa #breaking
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    One of my son's computer gaming acquaintances in CA put up a video describing how he barely escaped with his and his 3-yr-old daughter's life, and one change of clothes. As this article shows, not everybody got notice of the fire. He didn't. His wife and older daughter were visiting relatives in Germany, so they're safe. He is left with nothing; everything burned to the ground, including his brand new $5,000 computer set-up. OMG.

    ----------------

    myPRwire‏ @myprwirenews 5m5 minutes ago

    #BREAKING #NEWS: They tried to escape towering flames by car or on foot, but for many, it was too late http://nyti.ms/2yjC9Cd

    -------------

    In California, Fires So Fast Hesitation Proved Lethal


    OCT. 13, 2017

    SANTA ROSA, Calif. — With towering flames bearing down, one victim delayed escape in hopes of saving his new truck — but he could not find the keys. An elderly couple slept as danger erupted, not waking until it was too late to flee down their one-lane road. Another couple, who barely missed their chance to drive away, huddled in a pool, surrounded by fire and choking smoke; he survived, but she did not.

    As widely varied stories emerged of how people died in the wind-driven fires that have ravaged Northern California, the element common to each tragedy — and to many of the tales of people who got out alive — was how quickly it happened. Advance warning was measured in minutes or seconds, or never came at all. Hesitation was lethal.

    “My dad’s best friend was calling and calling my parents, but they were completely asleep,” said Trina Grant, whose parents, Arthur and Suiko Grant, died at their hilltop property just outside Santa Rosa. “By the time my dad finally picked up and his friend said ‘You’ve got to get out,’ it was probably already too late.”

    The confirmed death toll reached 32 on Friday, making this the deadliest wildfire outbreak in California history, and the figure is likely to climb. Thousands of homes and businesses have been destroyed, hundreds of people who have been reported missing remain unaccounted for, and emergency workers have barely begun the grim work of combing through the blackened, smoking ruins of houses, cars, forests and businesses.

    On Sunday night and Monday, 50-mile-per-hour winds propelled the fires faster than people could run. Embers leapfrogged hundreds of yards, even jumping across Highway 101, six lanes wide, which ordinarily would have served as an ideal, built-in fire break.
    Continue reading the main story

    Search and rescue teams from around Northern California converged on the incinerated remains of Journey’s End on Friday, a mobile home park for seniors in Santa Rosa. They came with shovels, rakes and a cadaver-sniffing Australian cattle dog named Seven.

    They left with bone fragments.

    These were among the first steps in a painstaking process of finding the missing and the dead, under unusually difficult conditions. The fires were so hot that car wheels made of aluminum — which has a melting point of 1,221 degrees Fahrenheit — turned into puddles.

    “People have been cremated, for lack of a better term,” said Sgt. Ray Kelly, a spokesman for the Alameda County Sheriff’s Office, which has more than 40 experts helping in the forensic investigation. “Any DNA that was on the bones is gone — it’s consumed,” Sergeant Kelly said.

    At Journey’s End, technicians in bright orange and lemon yellow jackets raked through ash and fragments of household items. In the debris were the frame of a bed, the wire covering of a fan and magazines and books turned to ash that disintegrated when touched.

    “This will be without a doubt the most complicated identification process this area has ever seen,” said Jim Wood, an expert in forensic dentistry who was helping identify bodies through dental records. Mr. Wood, who now represents the area in the State Assembly, also helped identify victims of the Sept. 11 attacks.

    Officials have released names of about half of those confirmed killed; most were elderly, but not all. Christina Hanson, 28, who was disabled and used a wheelchair, died in her apartment in Santa Rosa. Kai Shepherd, 14, was killed in Mendocino County, trying to run from the fire.

    By Friday morning, more than 221,000 acres statewide had burned in the spate of fires that started on Sunday, said Ken Pimlott, chief of Cal Fire, the state firefighting agency, including more than 150,000 acres in Sonoma and Napa Counties, north of San Francisco. The causes of the fires are still unknown.

    Some survivors told of being roused Sunday night or early Monday by friends, or by police officers or sheriff’s deputies driving down their streets, honking or shouting through loudspeakers. But many said they got no official warning, or that one came too late.

    Questions have been raised about the effectiveness of emergency alert systems in telling people to evacuate. Sonoma, Napa and other counties have alert systems that send text messages to mobile phones, but those warnings generally go only to the people who have signed up to receive them, and the fires knocked out cellular service in many areas.

    The more aggressive “amber alert” system, with text messages and screeching alarms, can reach nearly every mobile phone in a region, but it was not activated on the night the fires broke out. Officials have said that they were concerned about setting off a panic and jamming roads.

    The authorities described a chaotic scramble to evacuate residents from Santa Rosa amid thick smoke and flying embers.

    “There wasn’t time to map out anything. There wasn’t time to make a plan,” said Sgt. Spencer Crum of the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office, one of a dozen officers on duty on Sunday night.

    Sergeant Crum said he and his fellow officers drove up narrow driveways, blaring horns and sirens. He remembers repeatedly screaming, “Get out of here now!”

    Some residents resisted. Some were in wheelchairs; he lifted them into his patrol car. “I said, ‘You are going to die if you stay here,’” Sergeant Crum recounted. “We did the best we could with the time we had.”

    The sheer speed at which the fire spread and jumped that first night also made it impossible to keep track of what was burning.

    One of those killed, Michael J. Dornbach, 57, who lives in Southern California, was visiting relatives and friends who live in the rugged, wooded hills near Calistoga, in Napa County. “He was saying how beautiful it was and how he wanted to move here,” said his sister, Laura Dornbach, who was with her brother an hour before the fire, and then drove to her own home.

    When the fire came Sunday night, “he didn’t want to leave without his brand-new pickup truck, and he couldn’t find the keys,” she said, her voice catching. “They were searching frantically, and everyone was begging him to get out. My son said ‘Uncle Michael, this is serious, we have got to get out, please!’ But my brother was a stubborn man. I’m just so confused that he wouldn’t leave. And I don’t understand why everyone else didn’t just drag him out.”

    The others drove away, but minutes later, she said, her son, Robert M. Lee, 18, “drove up the mountain again to get him, but he got stopped by authorities.” The next day, Ms. Dornbach got word that her brother was dead.

    Farther north, Sara Shepherd called her parents at 1 a.m. Monday to say that nearby hills were burning, so she, her husband, and their two children were evacuating their house in a remote area of Redwood Valley. “They didn’t think their lives were in danger,” said Mindi Ramos, Ms. Shepherd’s sister.

    But the conflagration advanced so fast that they could not make it down their mile-long driveway before the flames closed in. They abandoned their car and fled on foot, scattershot, unsure where to go. The Shepherds’ son, Kai — a shy 14-year-old who liked baseball, wrestling and playing saxophone — died.

    Ms. Shepherd, her husband, Jon, and their daughter, Kressa, were all seriously injured and still hospitalized on Friday, Ms. Ramos said. It was unclear whether they knew that Kai was gone.

    Carmen and Armando Berriz, Southern California residents, had rented a house just outside Santa Rosa for a wine country getaway with their daughter, son-in-law and granddaughter. Awakened by noise, the group ran out in their nightclothes and piled into three cars to flee through blinding smoke.

    The Berrizes, in the third car, never made it, their escape apparently blocked by a fallen tree, a family member said. They returned to the house and took refuge in the swimming pool, the flames raging around them for hours. Ms. Berriz, 75, died; Mr. Berriz, 76, suffered burns and smoke inhalation.

    Ms. Grant, the daughter of Arthur and Suiko Grant, said her father, 95, and mother, 75, apparently got into their car and tried to leave, but it appeared that a fallen telephone pole and downed power lines blocked the sole, narrow route to or from their home. They hid with their dog in their wine cellar, where they asphyxiated as the fire, which burned their house to its foundation, consumed all the available oxygen.

    “The only thing that makes me feel any better is that they didn’t burn alive,” Ms. Grant said. “And they were at least together.”

    Doug and Tracy Hugill, of Santa Rosa, woke to the smell of smoke around 1 a.m. on Monday, and got an alert on their phones at 1:37 a.m. warning of fire. The alert did not say to evacuate, but they loaded their children and some belongings into their car.

    At 2:09 a.m., another alert came, saying “EVACUATE THAT AREA NOW.” By then, the house behind them was ablaze, the streets were thick with smoke, flaming embers were landing around them, and neighbors were banging on doors, telling people to leave.

    “By the time we got the push alert, the fire had crossed the freeway to our house,” said Mr. Hugill, a systems engineer. “We had barely enough time to get out.”

    On Friday more than 9,000 firefighters, using more than 1,000 fire trucks, more than 100 bulldozers and more than 100 aircraft — many of them supplied by other states and the federal government — were battling the fires, Chief Pimlott said.

    Though crews made some progress containing the blazes on Thursday and Friday, they continued to spread, with new neighborhoods added each day to the list of evacuation orders. Officials warned that dry, windy conditions expected over the next few days meant the flames could blow out of control again.

    “Everyone needs to be thinking right now,” Chief Pimlott said, “‘What is my evacuation plan? What am I going to take with me? How am I going to get out?’ And be prepared to do that literally on a moment’s notice. Not a half-hour, not an hour — you need to be thinking about that in minutes.”

    More huge pictures here:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/13/u...imes&smtyp=cur
    Attached Images
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bardou View Post
    Thanks for embedding that video, Bardou.

    Glad to hear you guys are safe.

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    KRON4 News‏Verified account @kron4news 11m11 minutes ago

    #BREAKING: One dead in #MendocinoCounty bringing fire death toll up to 35

    Updated: October 13, 2017, 5:23 pm

    (KRON) — The identities of those who perished in the North Bay fires are being released.

    In Sonoma County alone, 18 people have died. Across all of the North Bay, there have been 35 deaths.

    Fire officials warn that the death toll is expected to grow.

    Here is a list of those who have been identified so far:

    Christina Hanson, 28 years old, Santa Rosa
    Linda Tunis, 69 years old, Santa Rosa
    Sharon Robinson, 79 years old, Santa Rosa
    Carol Collins-Swasey, 76 years old from Santa Rosa
    Lynne Anderson Powell, 72 years old from Santa Rosa
    Arthur Tasman Grant, 95 years old from Santa Rosa
    Suiko Grant, 75 years old from Santa Rosa
    Donna Mae Halbur, 80 years old from Larkfield (Santa Rosa)
    Leroy Peter Halbur, 80 years old from Larkfield (Santa Rosa)
    Valerie Lynn Evans, 75 years old from Santa Rosa
    Carmen Caldentey Berriz, 75 years old from Apple Valley, CA
    Michael John Dornbach, 57 years old from Calistoga, CA
    Veronica Elizabeth McCombs, 67 years old from Santa Rosa
    Charles Rippey, 100 years old
    Sara Rippey, 98 years old
    Karen Aycock, 56 years old, Santa Rosa
    Kai Shepherd, 14 years old, Mendocino County
    Dr. George Chaney, 89 years old, Napa
    Edward Stone, 79 years old, Napa

    http://kron4.com/2017/10/13/north-ba...ms-identified/
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    Quote Originally Posted by Be Well View Post
    http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/10/1...cane-strength/

    California fire mystery: PG&E lines fell in winds that weren’t ‘hurricane strength’

    PUBLISHED: October 12, 2017 at 7:38 pm | UPDATED: October 13, 2017 at 12:15 pm

    The heavy winds that downed power lines Sunday night at the start of the deadly wildfires raging across Northern California were far from “hurricane strength,” as PG&E has claimed, according to a review of weather station readings.

    On Tuesday, the Bay Area News Group reported that Sonoma County emergency dispatchers sent fire crews to at least 10 reports of downed power lines and exploding transformers as the North Bay fires were starting around 9:22 p.m. In response, PG&E said that “hurricane strength winds in excess of 75 mph in some cases” had damaged their equipment, but they said it was too early to speculate what started the fires.

    However, wind speeds were only about half that level, as the lines started to come down, the weather station records show. At a weather station in north Santa Rosa where the Tubbs Fire started, the wind gusts at 9:29 p.m. peaked at 30 mph. An hour later, they were 41 mph.


    [Map with wind speeds and other details can't copy]

    Similarly, at another weather station east of the city of Napa, on Atlas Peak, where the Atlas Fire started, wind gusts at 9:29 p.m. peaked at 32 mph. An hour later they were 30 mph.

    Both speeds were substantially under the speed specified in state law: Power lines must be able to withstand winds of at least 56 mph.

    “This is classic PG&E — trying to spin things without first taking a look at the hard facts,” said Burlingame attorney Frank Pitre. “The winds were well within the threshold of design standards. If they failed, this was a failure in their system.”

    Investigators are looking at power line failures as a possible cause of the historic fires.

    PG&E officials did not respond to specific questions Thursday about the wind speeds and whether their power lines were in compliance with state safety laws.

    “There will likely be reviews of these wildfires by the appropriate agencies, but right now we are focused on life safety and service restoration,” said PG&E spokesman Donald Cutler.

    Pitre sued PG&E after the utility was found responsible by the state Public Utilities Commission for starting the Butte Fire in Amador County in 2015 because of the utility’s failure to maintain its power lines. That fire burned for 22 days, killing two people, destroying 549 homes and charring 70,868 acres. The PUC fined PG&E $8.3 million and Cal Fire sent PG&E a bill for $90 million to cover state firefighting costs.

    Meanwhile, the “hurricane strength winds” that PG&E referenced are not “hurricane strength,” according to the National Weather Service.

    “It’s not a good analogy,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Roger Gass in Monterey.

    To qualify as “hurricane strength,” winds must be sustained — lasting for more than 1 minute — at a minimum 74 mph. Such winds are the speeds in a Category 1 hurricane, the weakest of five categories.

    In the Napa-Sonoma area, one weather station used by the National Weather Service, on Hawkeye Peak near Geyserville, recorded gusts of 79 mph at 11:56 pm on Sunday night. But gusts are defined as lasting only 3 to 5 seconds, and the sustained wind speed there at that time was 48 mph. Also, Hawkeye Peak is 22 miles north of Santa Rosa and 50 miles north of Napa, far from where the major fires broke out.

    Under state law, utilities are required to maintain power lines safely and cut back trees to prevent fires. When they are found to have started fires, they are liable for fines and damages in court to people who have lost homes, businesses and family members in the blazes.

    If PG&E is found to be at fault in this fire, the utility could use an “act of God” defense, arguing that weather conditions were so bad it couldn’t do anything to stop power lines from coming down.

    “They could use that as a defense,” said Britt Strottman, an Oakland attorney representing victims in Calaveras County of the Butte Fire. “Then it will be up to the PUC and Cal Fire — along with any judge and juries in civil cases — to decide whether that holds water.”

    In 1994, PG&E was found guilty of 739 counts of negligence and fined nearly $30 million by state regulators when trees touched its high-voltage wires in Nevada County in the Sierra foothills, sparking a fire near the town of Rough and Ready that destroyed 12 homes and a 19th century schoolhouse. Afterward, prosecutors found that PG&E had diverted nearly $80 million from its tree-cutting programs into profits.

    “If PG&E is at fault or partially at fault for these fires, it could be devastating to the company,” Strottman said. “PG&E could face significant fines and penalties.”

    The company was fined $1.6 billion by the PUC after it was found negligent in causing the 2010 San Bruno gas line explosion, which killed eight people and destroyed 38 homes.

    Investigators continue to probe the cause of the more than 20 fires that are still burning across Northern California, killing at least 31 people, destroying more than 3,000 homes and charring 190,000 acres.

    “There isn’t anything we can talk about because those are active investigations,” Cal Fire Chief Ken Pimlott said Thursday. “We all want to get to the bottom of what caused the fires. But at the end of the day, they need to do their job and we need to do the job of putting these fires out — and that’s going to be our focus.”

    Despite strong winds this week, parts of the Napa and Sonoma valleys have experienced stronger winds this year. Atlas Peak had gusts of 66 mph last February, for example.

    “It was a strong wind event, but not unprecedented,” said Jan Null, a meteorologist with Golden Gate Weather Services in Saratoga.

    Strong wind storms commonly send trees into power poles, cutting off power to thousands of customers. But what was different on Sunday night was the time of year: In the winter, downed power lines don’t cause giant conflagrations.

    “Trees and power lines go down in winter winds all the time,” he said. “But that’s on wet ground, not ground that is tinder dry.”

    “We’ve had stronger wind events, but it was during a different time of year,” Null said. “This was a matter of everything lining up” to bring down poles and wires. “It was a very dry, warm wind from the northeast.”
    Interesting power pole - dispatcher calls of power poles down in Santa Rosa. Mark West - I've been on that road, it takes you to Calistoga.



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yTGa_TmeJ8

    video is about 2 minutes long

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    Wine Country fires: Gov. Brown vetoed 2016 bill aimed at power line, wildfire safety


    PUBLISHED: October 11, 2017 at 5:54 pm | UPDATED: October 12, 2017 at 10:18 am



    A year ago, a bipartisan bill aimed at reducing the risk of wildfires from overhead electrical lines went to Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk.

    It was vetoed.


    The author of the measure — passed unanimously by both houses of the Legislature — now says the governor missed out on a chance to tackle one of his state’s longstanding vulnerabilities: massive wildfires endangering residential communities. But the governor’s office and the California Public Utilities Commission say the bill duplicated efforts already underway among the CPUC, Cal Fire and utilities like PG&E.

    Now, as a series of deadly fires rages in Wine Country, serious questions are once again being asked about the safety of overhead electrical wires in a state prone to drought and fierce winds.

    On Wednesday, Cal Fire said that investigators have started looking into whether toppled power wires and exploding transformers Sunday night may have ignited the simultaneous string of blazes.



    The acknowledgment followed publication of a review by the Bay Area News Group of Sonoma County firefighters’ radio transmissions in the fires’ infancy that found that there were numerous downed and arcing wires. In the first 90 minutes Sunday night, firefighters were sent to 10 different spots where problems had been reported with the area’s electrical infrastructure. The crews reported seeing sparking lines and transformers.

    During that same time period, radio transmissions indicate 28 blazes — both vegetation and structure fires — breaking out, mostly in Sonoma County. Firefighters were sent to eight fallen tree calls, with many reports of blocked roadways.

    “Those were witnessed,” Cal Fire spokeswoman Lynne Tolmachoff said Wednesday, regarding the blown transformers and downed wires. “However, you have to go and look to see if it was a cause of the fire or as a result of the fire.”

    The state’s fire agency has said it has ruled out lightning, but said the investigation continues for an official cause of the blazes, which as of late Wednesday had killed 23 people and destroyed more than 3,500 structures in Sonoma, Napa and other Northern California counties.

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    PG&E acknowledges there were troubles with its equipment Sunday night, but says blaming the utility’s electrical system for the fires at this point would be “highly speculative.” It has labeled the conditions in the first hours of the fires a “historic wind event.”

    But meterologist Jan Null, owner of Golden Gate Weather Services in Saratoga, said that Sunday night’s winds, while strong, were not “hurricane force” and had been surpassed in previous storms. Atlas Peak had gusts of 32 miles per hour at 9 p.m. on Sunday night, Null said. By comparison, the peak had gusts of 66 mph in last February.

    SB 1463 had been introduced in last year’s legislative session by Sen. John Moorlach, R-Costa Mesa. The bill would have required the state to identify the places most at risk for wildfires and would have required the CPUC to beef up plans to prevent fires sparked by power lines — including moving lines underground if necessary.

    But Brown said the bill was unnecessary. “Since May of last year, the Commission and CalFire have been doing just that through the existing proceeding on fire-threat maps and fire-safety regulations,” he said in his veto message. “This deliberative process should continue and the issues this bill seeks to address should be raised in that forum.”

    But the senator isn’t buying it.

    “Up until my bill those guys were doing nothing,” Moorlach said Wednesday. “I think you got some false information.”

    He said his bill would’ve sped up what had become a cumbersome process and given local communities more of a voice by clarifying how fire risk is defined.

    Had the governor signed his bill into law, he added, “I think it would have changed things. … I think it would’ve given Cal Fire a whole different set of priorities.”

    Brown’s sister Kathleen, he pointed out, served on the board of the energy services holding company, Sempra. Power and utility companies, Moorlach said, “didn’t want to spend the money” making things safer by moving lines underground.

    That’s “so outrageous it doesn’t merit a response,” Evan Westrup, a spokesman for the governor’s office, said of the notion that the governor didn’t sign the bill to somehow help out Sempra. “It’s unfortunate this particular individual is trying to score political points by peddling inaccurate, self-serving claims at a time like this.”

    CPUC spokeswoman Terrie Prosper said the years-long CPUC and Cal Fire effort has already reached key goals.

    Phase One was completed in 2015 and Phase Two is nearly done as well, which will implement new fire safety regulations in high priority areas of the state.

    PG&E has paid millions of dollars in fines and settlements over the years for its failure to properly maintain vegetation clearance around its electrical lines when it led to massive fires.

    In April, the state Public Utilities Commission fined PG&E $8.3 million for failing to maintain a power line that sparked the Butte fire in Amador County in September 2015. That fire burned for 22 days, killing two people, destroying 549 homes and charring 70,868 acres.

    In the months before this week’s deadly conflagrations, PG&E has been active in Sonoma County.

    Just last month, responding to what it called California’s “tree mortality crisis” caused by the five-year drought, PG&E began flying helicopters over Sonoma County to identify dead trees “that could pose a wildfire or other public safety risk,” according to a Sept. 20 news release by the utility.

    The utility said in that statement that it patrols and inspects its overhead lines annually. Since the drought and spike in tree deaths, the energy company said it’s now inspecting trees twice a year. Last year, PG&E conducted secondary checks on 68,000 miles of electrical lines. Almost 11,000 of those inspections are done by helicopter, the utility said.

    The September helicopter inspections flew directly over Santa Rosa and other heavily impacted fire zones, according to the release.

    In March, PG&E launched a program to inspect Sonoma County’s 90,000 wooden power poles. It was expected to last through early next year, according to a March 13 news release. The utility started along Highway 101 in Santa Rosa, in the heart of what would be torched months later.

    Staff writers Paul Rogers, Lisa M. Krieger and George Avalos contributed to this report.

    http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/10/1...ldfire-safety/

    Pics and video at link

  29. #229
    From Mzkitty's article above:

    By Friday morning, more than 221,000 acres statewide had burned in the spate of fires that started on Sunday, said Ken Pimlott, chief of Cal Fire, the state firefighting agency, including more than 150,000 acres in Sonoma and Napa Counties, north of San Francisco. The causes of the fires are still unknown.
    If the fires were all downed power lines and transformers, they'd know and say so.
    https://soundcloud.com/user-309670005
    Audio Bhagavad Gita downloadable

    This knowledge is the king of education, the most secret of all secrets. It is the purest knowledge, and because it gives direct perception of the self by realization, it is the perfection of religion. It is everlasting, and it is joyfully performed.

  30. #230
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    Bardou, hope you guys can impeach Brown for his malfeasance of office. Won't bring back what is lost, but he needs to be actually punished.

    Be Well, thanks for the updates.

    It is beyond upsetting to see such a beautiful area, where I had so much fun and met such great people, friends of friends who lived there. They have a great spirit, evidenced during the severe weather they have suffered, the floods, lengthy power outages and so much inconvenience and clean up. They were great neighbors, helping each other out, having block parties, and banding together through the tough times.

    Only after this is over will we know what still stands.

    take care. BW, your husband is in my thoughts and prayers and those he works with. My DH has done forest fire fighting, and it sounds like it's still as tough as it ever was. 24 hour shifts and hope you may get a sandwich somewhere in there. Yep.

  31. #231
    Thank you for prayers, Almost ready, on his behalf. He said the grub is pretty good, and since he's a vegetarian, it often is not so great. It's the sleeping part that is more tricky, with 24 hour shifts, but they are not working all 24 hrs, thankfully. This is not like the mounain forest fires he's worked on, since there are so many towns and cities, and whatever mountains are not so wild. Structure protection as well as putting out spot fires and so on is what he is doing so far.
    https://soundcloud.com/user-309670005
    Audio Bhagavad Gita downloadable

    This knowledge is the king of education, the most secret of all secrets. It is the purest knowledge, and because it gives direct perception of the self by realization, it is the perfection of religion. It is everlasting, and it is joyfully performed.

  32. #232
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    But no one is going to impeach ole Jerry brown. They agree with his ideals in other areas. I would hope something like this would be their wake-up call, but his radical beliefs are what they like.

  33. #233
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    Liveleak video of Santa Rosa - "there's Nothing Left" - 5.5 minutes long

    https://www.liveleak.com/view?i=ea2_1507912589

    This is the Table Mountain Fire (Cherokee), that I spoke about above. Veritech has done videos on the Oroville Dam - he does a good job of reporting. This is what I saw yesterday. The video is about 5 minutes long. They saved the ranches!



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6h33Bj52yoc

    The winds are back and we're in red alert for fires.

  34. #234
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    For links, photos and videos see article source.....
    Posted for fair use.....
    https://apnews.com/962f708143144d2eb...re-evacuations

    Gusty winds fan California wildfires, force more evacuations

    By JANIE HAR and ANDREW DALTON
    Today

    SONOMA, Calif. (AP) — Rising winds fanned the California wildfires again Saturday, forcing hundreds more people to flee from their homes in the state’s fabled wine country and testing the efforts of crews who have spent days trying to corral the flames behind firebreaks.

    Just a day after firefighters reported making significant progress, the winds kicked up several hours before dawn and pushed flames into the hills on the edge of Sonoma, a town of 11,000. About 400 homes were evacuated as the fires threated Sonoma and a portion of Santa Rosa that included a retirement community that evacuated earlier this week, authorities said.

    Dean Vincent Bordigioni, winemaker and proprietor at the Annadel Estate Winery awoke at 3 a.m. with flames erupting on the ridge above his property. “Things went to hell last night,” he said. “They’ve got a good fight going on.”

    Nearly a week after the blazes began, the fire zone had swollen to an area as long as 100 miles on a side. The flames have left at least 35 people dead and destroyed at least 5,700 homes and businesses, making them the deadliest and most destructive group of wildfires California has ever seen.

    On Saturday, an unknown number of additional structures burned down in a rural area, said Daniel Berlant, a spokesman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

    Judy Guttridge, who was evacuating for the second time this week, said her daughter saw flames advancing over the side of a hill around the same time Bordigioni did and told the family to get out.

    “I have good insurance, everything,” she said. “All the kids, grandkids, great-grandkids are fine. I’m OK with that.”

    Firefighters spent much of the last week digging defense lines to keep the flames from spreading. On Friday, they tried to fortify the edge of Sonoma using bulldozers and other heavy equipment.

    But if winds push the flames over that barrier, neighborhoods including some of the town’s costliest homes were in the path, along with a historic central plaza built centuries ago when the area was under Spanish rule.

    The renewed strength of the winds was “testing the work that we accomplished,” Berlant said. The greatest risk was that winds would blow embers across the firebreaks and ignite new blazes.

    Winds gusting up to 40 mph were expected to continue throughout the day and into the evening.

    Also Friday, a lucky few of the nearly 100,000 people who have fled from their homes got to return, and examples of charity were everywhere, along with a sign that began popping up in more and more places: “The love in the air is thicker than the smoke.”

    Astonishing video released from the fire’s hellish first night showed the courage of the deputies and firefighters working amid the flames.

    “Go! Go! Go! Go! Go!” an unidentified Sonoma County deputy can be heard yelling in the body-camera video released by the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office. The footage was recorded as he urged hesitant drivers to speed out of a town that was being devoured by flames.

    The deputy is shown lifting a disabled woman out of her wheelchair and into an SUV to rush her out of town. And he drives through walls of flame looking for more people to help.

    “And that’s just one person,” Sonoma County Sheriff Rob Giordano said at a news conference.

    At an RV evacuation site at Sonoma Raceway, evacuees counted their blessings, trying not to think about what they had lost and what they might yet lose.

    The mood at sunset Friday was upbeat, even cheerful, as children and dogs played in the twilight. More than 100 campers were parked by the side of a highway. There were portable bathrooms and tables groaning from donated water bottles, stuffed animals and food.

    Ron Vitt, 75, and Ellen Brantley, 65, sat in chairs watching the cars go by, a small table between them holding drinks: gin with cocktail onions for him and gin with lime for her. They joked as their dog bounced about happily.

    “There is a sun that’s going to set. There’s a dog who is really happy,” Vitt said. “So you got to bring some sanity into this whole thing.”

    At Sonoma Valley High School, the parking lot was packed with cars and vans. Middle school Principal Will Deeths supervised volunteers and made sure people had plenty of water and a filter mask. He said more than 100 people spent Thursday night at the school, which has been converted into a shelter.

    He said the community response has been phenomenal. Hairdressers from Oakland came to fix people’s hair and a young man played guitar to entertain families, he said. They even had a birthday party for a 5-year-old boy, complete with a donated cake from a local bakery.

    “Two days ago we were in need of size 5 diapers,” he said. “Someone put it on Facebook and within an hour, four or five cars pulled up, two or three boxes. Boom, boom, boom, here you go.”

    More than a dozen fires broke out nearly simultaneously on Oct. 8 and people had little time to escape. Most of the deaths were elderly people.

    In all, 17 large fires still burned across the northern part of the state, with more than 9,000 firefighters attacking the flames using air tankers, helicopters and more than 1,000 fire engines.

    ___

    Dalton reported from San Francisco. Associated Press writers Paul Elias in Sonoma, Olga R. Rodriguez, Jocelyn Gecker and Daisy Nguyen in San Francisco and Martha Mendoza in Santa Cruz also contributed to this report.

    ___

    Follow the AP’s complete wildfire coverage here: https://apnews.com/tag/Wildfires .

  35. #235
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    why these fires spread so quickly: 1:15 min https://www.facebook.com/abc7news/vi...5996776292079/
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  36. #236
    When the Chetco Bar and Eagle Creek fire were active (SW OR and Columbia Gorger fires), I checked Inciweb daily, and they would usually give updates on how far embers were blowing. Sometimes a mile or even further, worse in hills too. High winds are horrible in fires.

    BTW DH is still near Lake Berryessa doing structure protecion but may be moved to Sonoma later today.
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    Audio Bhagavad Gita downloadable

    This knowledge is the king of education, the most secret of all secrets. It is the purest knowledge, and because it gives direct perception of the self by realization, it is the perfection of religion. It is everlasting, and it is joyfully performed.

  37. #237
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    For links see article source.....
    Posted for fair use.....
    http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/articl...d-12277244.php

    Live updates: Feinstein says ‘dollars have to come’ for California wildfires; death toll hits 38

    By Annie Ma, Hamed Aleaziz, Bob Egelko, and Melody Gutierrez Updated 4:33 pm, Saturday, October 14, 2017

    These are developments in the Northern California wildfires as of 3:35 p.m.; click here for more recent updates:

    3:25 p.m. Two Napa victims ID’d: Two bodies found on the 1900 block of Soda Canyon Road in Napa County are believed to be Sally Lewis, 90, and her caretaker, Teresa Santos, 50, according to the Napa County sheriff. The bodies were found at 10 a.m. Saturday. Their discovery brings the death toll from fires in the county to six.
    Sonoma County sheriff's deputy responds to fire on October 8
    Body cam footage of a Sonoma County sheriff's deputy responding to a wildfire on October 8.

    00:00
    05:25
    Body cam footage of a Sonoma County sheriff's deputy responding to a wildfire on October 8.
    Media: San Francisco Chronicle

    3:15 p.m. Mendocino compiling survivor list: The Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office issued an urgent request for people who were evacuated from Redwood Valley, Potter Valley and Willits to contact the emergency operations center for the area and report themselves safe. The county has been overwhelmed by missing persons reports and though most of those people have been found safe, it’s a time-consuming process, the sheriff’s office said. Evacuees should call (707) 467-6428 and be prepared to give their full name, address and phone number; confirm that all residents at that address are safe; and provide the name of anyone who was not able to leave the property during the fire.

    2:50 p.m. Sebastopol evacuation center closes: Analy High School in Sebastopol, which had been opened as an evacuation center earlier this week and reopened Saturday morning, has now shut down again, officials said.

    2:39 p.m. State, federal officials talk relief: Gov. Jerry Brown joined U.S. Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Kamala Harris at a short press conference in Santa Rosa after the three were briefed on the North Bay fires. Feinstein, 84, told reporters these fires were unlike anything she’d ever seen. “There is no question that this is about the worst fire we’ve had in my lifetime,” she said. “It ought to be treated as such. The dollars have to come.”

    2:10 p.m. Red flag warning extended: The National Weather Service extended the red flag warning for the North Bay hills to 8 a.m. Sunday. The previous warning was to end Saturday at 11 p.m.

    1:33 p.m. New Napa County death toll: Two additional deaths have been reported in the Atlas Fire in Napa County, officials say. That brings the number killed in fires in that county to six, and the death toll in all the Wine Country and other Northern California fires to 38.

    1:23 p.m. Sutter Hospital to stay closed: Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital will not reopen Saturday. Officials had earlier said the hospital would reopen at 3 p.m., but announced a delay in lifting the evacuation order. The hospital is located near Highway 101 on Mark West Springs Road.

    1:15 p.m.: Death toll rises: The death toll in Sonoma County is now up to 20, bringing the total from the fires in the Wine Country and elsewhere in Northern California to 36, according to Sgt. Spencer Crum, a spokesman with the sheriff’s office. There are 223 people missing in Sonoma County. In Napa County, 74 people are unaccounted for.

    12:35 p.m. Evacuation lift: Officials in Sonoma County will lift the evacuation order for Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital at 3 p.m. The hospital is located just off Highway 101 on Mark West Springs Road. Other areas around the hospital will remain under a mandatory evacuation order.

    12:10 p.m. Spot fire explodes in Sonoma: Winds kicked up a small fire at Lovall Valley Road and Wood Valley Road, causing it to explode in 30- to 40-foot flames that marched downhill toward the town of Sonoma. In a matter of minutes the fire had chewed up several acres. A helicopter swooped in to dump water on the blaze, and ground crews rushed to the attack.

    Noon. Aid secured: The Trump administration has approved the state’s request for direct aid to families and individuals impacted by the fires in Butte, Lake, Mendocino, and Yuba counties. Such assistance was approved Friday for residents in Napa and Sonoma. To request aid: https://www.disasterassistance.gov/
    11:25 a.m. Food donation call: Santa Rosa city officials report on Twitter that food usually given to local homeless shelters has been diverted to the wildfire shelters in the area and now homeless shelters are in “critical need” of unprepared food.
    10:50 a.m. Football game postponed: A high school football game in Santa Cruz County has been postponed because of poor air quality. The game between St. Francis High and Soquel High has been rescheduled for November.

    10:30 a.m. Mail pickup: People who have been displaced by the wildfires in Santa Rosa can pick up their mail this weekend at two U.S. Postal Service locations in town. The Santa Rosa Fire Department is listing specific locations on its Facebook page.

    10:10 a.m. Brown, Feinstein and Harris: Gov. Jerry Brown and California’s U.S. senators, Democrats Dianne Feinstein and Kamala Harris, will attend a community meeting Saturday afternoon at Santa Rosa High School, the governor’s office said. The meeting will start around 2 p.m. at the school, 1235 Mendocino Ave. The meeting will follow a private briefing involving the governor, senators and local emergency officials and community leaders, as well as a news conference, Brown’s office said.

    9:10 a.m. Napa County update: Napa County fire officials say there was only minimal growth in the Atlas Fire overnight, and that overnight winds in the area were not as strong as feared. The fire has burned more than 50,000 acres and is 45 percent contained. Officials say they have investigated 224 missing-person reports since the fires began, and that 74 people are still unaccounted for.

    8:35 a.m. Sebastopol evacuation center: The main gym at Analy High School in Sebastopol has been reopened as an evacuation center. The gym, at 6950 Analy Ave., can accommodate about 400 people.

    8:12 a.m. Power restoration update: Pacific Gas and Electric Co. say it has restored electricity to 93 percent of the 279,000 customers who had lost service because of the fires before Saturday. Gas service has been restored to 13,000 of the 36,000 customers who have lost service since Sunday night.

    8:06 a.m. Homes burned in Sonoma: Several homes have burned within a mile east of the Sonoma town square. Capt. Jordan Motta of the state Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said homes were burned on Wood Valley and Lovall Road, but that the exact number was not known.

    7:15 a.m. Scene from Sonoma: The town square in the city of Sonoma was deserted early Saturday as firefighters battled heavy flames nearby, causing brown smoke to kick up in the air. Cars were seen leaving the town and a sign in one wine tasting room read: “The love in the air is thicker than the smoke.”

    7:10 a.m. Residents evacuated: A flare up on two portions of the Nuns Fire early Saturday caused crews in Sonoma County to evacuate an estimated 3,000 residents in Santa Rosa and another 250 in the town of Sonoma, according to Cal Fire.

    6:50 a.m. Update on the weather: Strong winds are expected to continue from Santa Rosa to Sonoma through Saturday afternoon, forecasters said. A red flag warning for the North Bay region will remain in place through Saturday evening, and winds of 20 mph have already been documented in Santa Rosa within the past hour, said Scott Rowe, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Monterey. “We do expect winds to sustain — and maybe even increase — over the next few hours,” he said.

    6:30 a.m. Atlas Fire update: The blaze in Napa County has grown by more than 2,000 acres to 50,383 acres, according to Cal Fire. The fire is 45 percent contained.

    5:55 a.m. Fire battle intensifies: Fire crews early Saturday are “extremely concerned about” the evacuated areas along Highway 12 and evacuated spots in the northeastern portion of the city of Sonoma, said Jonathan Cox, a Cal Fire battalion chief. Fires were burning “near and around structures” in both spots, he said.
    Firefighters are contending with heavy winds that resurfaced in the area overnight.

    5:20 a.m. Recent evacuation order cause: The orders released early Saturday by the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office are “due to the #NunsFire,” according to a tweet sent by Cal Fire.

    4:55 a.m. New evacuation order: A new mandatory evacuation order was sent early Saturday for spots in eastern Santa Rosa. Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office has Highway 12 between Adobe Canyon Road in Kenwood and Calistoga Road in Santa Rosa, under a mandatory evacuation order, which includes both sides of the highway and all side roads. “Everybody needs to evacuate westbound on Hwy 12 to Santa Rosa immediately,” the order read.

    4:45 a.m. Evacuation order in Sonoma: Officials in Sonoma County issued a mandatory evacuation order for the Sonoma Valley at around 2:45 a.m. Saturday. The areas under mandatory evacuation order include the following — from Seventh Street East from East Napa Road to Denmark Street, the north side of Denmark Street from Seventh Street East to Napa Road, Eighth Street East north of Denmark Street, East MacArthur Street east of Seventh Street East, along with Quail Run Way and Hamblin Road.

    11:39 p.m. Firefighters prepare for battle: A crew of firefighters have taken a stand to protect the Napa Valley tourist town of Calistoga, which is threatened by the Tubbs Fire only two miles away. High winds are expected overnight and the town remains evacuated.

    10:50 p.m. Mendocino County update: The Redwood and Potter fires, burning north of Highway 20, were at 34,000 acres and 20 percent containment Friday.

    10:35 p.m. Evacuation advisory in Sonoma: An evacuation advisory was issued for the east side of East Seventh Street between East Napa Street and East MacArthur Street in Sonoma. While the order is not mandatory, Sheriff Rob Giordano said at an earlier press briefing that residents in advisory areas should consider packing up regardless.

    “Remember, an advisory in this kind of fire? Leave,” he said.

    9:31 p.m. The missing in Napa County: The Napa County Sheriff’s Office is categorizing the people reported missing since the fires began Sunday as “unaccounted for” instead of missing, said Kristi Jourdan, a spokeswoman for the sheriff’s office, as some may be just unable to get in touch with their loved ones to let them know they are safe. Since Sunday, deputies have received 156 reports, which can involve more than one individual, she said. Of those 156 reports, 105 reports have been cleared and 47 remain outstanding.

    Four people have been confirmed dead and seven people declared officially missing. Jourdan said deputies elevate a person from unaccounted for to missing when they come across information that the person may not just be unable to get in touch with a loved one.

    9:20 p.m. Mendocino corrects death toll: The county sheriff in Mendocino County said officials had double-counted one fatality and that the correct number is eight, not nine.

    9:14 p.m. Pocket Fire update: The fire threatening Geyserville grew almost 1,000 acres to 10,996 acres, according to Cal Fire. The blaze remained at 5 percent contained.

    8:14 p.m. Tubbs Fire is 44 percent contained: Cal Fire made significant progress getting the Tubbs Fire under control. It’s now 44 percent, up from 25 percent.

    8:06 p.m. Evacuations reduced in Santa Rosa: State fire officials called off mandatory evacuations this evening in portions of Santa Rosa but said residents were still advised to leave their homes. The areas are east of Fulton Road, from Francisco Avenue to Guerneville Road and Highway 101, and east of 101, from Steele Lane and Chanate Road to Calistoga Road. But evacuation remains mandatory on fire-damaged streets leading up to the Fountaingrove area, fire officials said.

    7:55 p.m. Atlas Fire is 45 percent contained: The most recent information from Cal Fire shows significant progress in getting control of the Atlas Fire that has been burning in Napa and Solano counties. It’s now 45 percent contained, from 27 percent. The other big Wine Country fire, the Tubbs Fire, is 25 percent contained.

    6:49 p.m. Governor to visit Sonoma County: Gov. Jerry Brown announced earlier this evening that will be heading to the disaster zone along with Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Kamala Harris Saturday afternoon.

    6:28 p.m. Horrific deputy body-cam video: The Sonoma County Sheriff’s office released a deputy’s body-cam footage that captured the evacuation scene and the danger and difficulties people faced when the fires began raging on Sunday.

    6 08 p.m. Fire sends mountain lion to Fairfield: A mountain lion, apparently driven from its usual habitat by fire, was spotted walking in Fairfield Thursday afternoon, police said. Officers got the call around 3:15 and said they headed to the area but saw no sign of the lion, which apparently had wandered off. Wildfires and smoke tend to displace such creatures from their usual surroundings, said police, who offered advice to anyone who encounters a mountain lion far from home: Call the police, don’t approach the puma, and, if confronted, stand upright, wave your arms, and make noise to try to scare it away.

    5:14 p.m. 4.0 earthquake hits Mendocino County: A magnitude 4.0 earthquake rattled Redwood Valley Friday at 4:10 p.m., where fires have burned over 34,000 acres.

    The U.S. geological survey first reported the quake as a 3.7 before upgrading it to a 4.0.

    Yulisa Naba was helping a customer check out at the register at Redwood Valley Market when the quake started. She and everyone else in the store ran outside to avoid getting hit by falling objects.

    “All of a sudden, it was like something popped or fell really loud,” Naba said. “Everything started shaking and stuff started falling off the shelves.”

    Redwood Valley Market has stayed open despite being in an evacuation zone. Naba said the store has been donating food and providing meals to firefighters and the community while the fires continue to burn.

    4 p.m. At least 35 confirmed dead in Northern California wildfires: Two more people have died in Napa County wildfires, bringing the death toll there to four. As of Friday afternoon, a total of 35 confirmed deaths have been reported by law enforcement agencies in fire ravaged areas of Northern California.

    The remains of 89-year-old Dr. George Chaney and a 79-year-old man believed to be Edward Stone were found at their home in the 2300 block of Atlas Peak Road in Napa about 9:30 a.m. Thursday by the county’s forensic search team, according to a statement from Sheriff John Robertson.

    In addition to the Napa County deaths, wildfires have claimed nine lives in Mendocino County, four in Yuba County, and 18 in Sonoma County.

    3:50 p.m. An estimated 5,700 structures destroyed in California wildfires: The series of deadly wildfires burning across the state have wiped out an estimated 5,700 structures, according to Cal Fire officials. Wildfires raging across California have marked the deadliest week in modern state history with at least 35 fatalities as flames blackened more than 221,000 acres. At least 90,000 people have been displaced by the fires.

    3:25 p.m. Mandatory evacuation ordered for northern Geyserville: Everyone in areas north of Highway 128 from Geysers Road to Chalk Hill Road must evacuate immediately due to an approaching wildfire, according to Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office.

    Geyserville is being threatened by the Pocket Fire, which started about 3:30 a.m. on Monday near Pocket Ranch and Ridge Ranch roads to the northeast of Geyserville. The fire has burned nearly 10,000 acres and is only 5 percent contained, according to Cal Fire.

    3:15 p.m. City of Napa air quality now at most dangerous EPA classification: The city of Napa air quality — already the worst in the nation due to wildfires — has now reached the “hazardous” level — the most dangerous level on the Environmental Protection Agency scale.

    The city’s combined measurements of particulate matter and ozone recorded an air quality index of 312, according to the EPA. An air quality index above 300 designates “hazardous” levels, the highest of the six air quality classifications.

    At such an alarming poor air level, the EPA warns of “emergency conditions” that will most likely affect all residents in the area, especially those already experiencing respiratory problems. The majority of the United States is at “good” levels, the lowest classification, which has an index value between 0 and 50.

    The city of Fairfield recorded the second worst air quality in the country with an index value of 211, a “very unhealthy” level, according the EPA standards. Oakland came in third with a value of 177, an “unhealthy” level.

    2:50 p.m. Wildfire death toll at least 33 with additional Mendocino County victim: The fatality count in Mendocino County wildfires rose to nine on Friday, according to Capt. Greg Van Patten, a sheriff’s office spokesman. Northern California wildfires have now claimed at least 33 lives with 18 killed in Sonoma County, two in Napa County and four in Yuba County, marking the deadliest week in modern history for California wildfires.

    2:20 p.m. FEMA aid available for Napa and Sonoma County residents: Wildfire victims can now apply for federal aid following White House approval of California’s request for disaster assistance, according to Gov. Jerry Brown.

    “We’ll keep working day and night with our local and federal partners to fight these fires and help residents get back on their feet in these trying times,” Brown said in a statement.

    To apply, visit disasterassistance.gov or call (800) 621-3362. Additional contact numbers and more information is available online.

    1:55 p.m. Wildfires destroyed at least 5 percent of housing stock in Santa Rosa: An estimated 3,500 homes destroyed by wildfires ravaging Santa Rosa account for 5 percent of the city’s housing stock, said Mayor Chris Coursey. About 400,000 square feet of commercial space in the Sonoma County town of 175,155 people was also lost in blazes since Sunday night.

    “It’s a huge hill that we have to climb,” Coursey said at a Friday afternoon news conference. “Our job right now is to get though this emergency. Then we’ll start taking the next steps.”

    1:20 p.m. Death toll hits at least 32 in Northern California wildfires: Another fatality has been confirmed in Sonoma County, bringing the number of deaths in the county to 18, Sheriff Rob Giordano said at a Friday afternoon news conference. Wildfires that broke out in Northern California have also claimed eight lives in Mendocino County, four in Yuba County and two in Napa since Sunday.

    Giordano said the number of missing people in Sonoma County has fallen to 256. Of the 1,308 missing persons reports filed since the fires began Sunday, 1,052 of those people have been located safe.

    12:45 p.m. Wildfires leave nearly 30,000 without power statewide: An estimated 29,500 people remain without power after a series of deadly California wildfires downed power lines, according to California Office of Emergency Services. Power has been restored to about 17,500 homes and businesses, most of them in Northern California, and all but eight of the 77 damaged cell towers in the fire zones are operating again, officials said.

    “We’re not out of this emergency. Not even close,” Mark Ghilarducci, the state’s director of emergency services, said at a Friday news conference. “We continue to address current and future needs.”

    Click here for past updates from the Wine Country fires.

    Chronicle staff writers Steve Rubenstein and Jenna Lyons contributed to this report.
    Hamed Aleaziz, Bob Egelko, Annie Ma, and Melody Gutierrez are Chronicle staff writers. Email: haleaziz@sfchronicle.com, begelko@sfchronicle.com, ama@sfchronicle.com, mgutierrez@sfchronicle.com

  38. #238
    12:10 p.m. Spot fire explodes in Sonoma: Winds kicked up a small fire at Lovall Valley Road and Wood Valley Road, causing it to explode in 30- to 40-foot flames that marched downhill toward the town of Sonoma. In a matter of minutes the fire had chewed up several acres. A helicopter swooped in to dump water on the blaze, and ground crews rushed to the attack.
    I wonder if the small fire was a hot spot from an existing fire, or embers blown by the wind, or a new fire.
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  39. #239
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Be Well View Post
    BTW DH is still near Lake Berryessa doing structure protecion but may be moved to Sonoma later today.
    Prayers to keep him safe and healthy. I have several friends on this one.
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  40. #240
    Thank you, marsh. I hope all the firefighters are safe and no accidents happen. Last article I read said 9000 firefirghters. Hard to even imagine such a huge number. He called me briefly this evening and I think they are still in the hills around Lake Berryessa. Tomorrow may go somewhere else. I am hoping there will be enough rain at the end of the week to knock the fires down considerably.
    https://soundcloud.com/user-309670005
    Audio Bhagavad Gita downloadable

    This knowledge is the king of education, the most secret of all secrets. It is the purest knowledge, and because it gives direct perception of the self by realization, it is the perfection of religion. It is everlasting, and it is joyfully performed.

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