Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 24, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


FARM Viability of converting gasoline genny to Propane?
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 40 of 59
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    A Multi-Demensional Quantum Environment.
    Posts
    49,594

    5 Viability of converting gasoline genny to Propane?

    I know it can be done, my actual experience with a generator is five minutes of being taught how t run it and the basics of calculating the load. So does anyone have experience with a propane genny as far as run time versus gas?

    Anyone ever actual done a conversion?

    Pros/cons?

    I bought 20 gals f gas in case Urma affected here. My calculations are it would give about 48hrs run time. That's not much whereas we have a 100lb propane tank for the stove/fireplace and it would not be an issue to get a larger one [[propane company provides it with a small yearly fee that is waived if you top it off every year]]

    Thoughts?
    "It ain't no secret I didn't get these scars falling over in church."


    Photography Portfolio

    GetMeOffDisability

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,358
    Your 100 pound tank holds less than 20 gals of propane when full. Takes about 1.2 gals of propane to equal 1 gal of gasoline. I would stick with gasoline and develop a generator management plan. Run it 1 hour on 3 off for example. The conversion is easy. It is just a kit. I have done several but unless you have a large tank I don't the no it is worth it.

  3. #3
    Propane might be a little less efficient, but it will store forever without degrading and is much safer and easier to use.

    It also will extend the life of the generator.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    1,007
    Quote Originally Posted by Satanta View Post
    I know it can be done, my actual experience with a generator is five minutes of being taught how t run it and the basics of calculating the load. So does anyone have experience with a propane genny as far as run time versus gas?

    Anyone ever actual done a conversion?

    Pros/cons?

    I bought 20 gals f gas in case Urma affected here. My calculations are it would give about 48hrs run time. That's not much whereas we have a 100lb propane tank for the stove/fireplace and it would not be an issue to get a larger one [[propane company provides it with a small yearly fee that is waived if you top it off every year]]

    Thoughts?
    20 gallons of gas is over 140 lbs and will run longer than 100lbs of propane in the same size generator. It is more energy dense.

    You lose a little power potential when using propane in the same genny. There are commercial conversion kits for most name brand engines so you can buy and bolt on the kit. A huge advantage is propane lasts forever. a 250 gallon tank would be great for a back up supply, 500 even better. You can have the tank buried so it is not a target for thieves or a stray bullet.

    I use diesel for mine. it is even more energy dense per gallon than gas and lasts 5-7 years with no issues. I have burned over 25 gallons of several year old diesel this week with flawless performance. I can (and do) use it in my truck.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Happy on the mountain
    Posts
    51,981
    The company that made the gennie should make a kit to convert it. Not a huge deal, if you are at all handy with tools.
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,643
    If I had a propane tank already for domestic use (cooking, heating) I would convert and ask for larger tank.
    20 gals of propane are much safer to store than 20 gals of gasoline. You will get a bit less of power out of the genny though.
    And propane runs very clean.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Cow Hampshire
    Posts
    15,283
    Owner looked into a propane fueled generator (but ended up with diesel)

    He found (I saw his search history) that propane conversion kits exist for most of the major one-lung engine brands - BUT - the price of such a conversion is about half the cost of a gasoline generator new and when added to the cost of said new generator brings the price up to diesel or propane fueled generator levels.

    So off the shelf there isn't much price advantage.

    Some DIY methods exist. Youtube may be a source for ideas. Also past issues of Mother Earth News from back in the day (before they sold out and the magazine became part of a media conglomerate.)

    For "survival" mode diesel has propane beat hands down. Propane when its gone ITS GONE. Not only is diesel fuel long term stable (good filters prevent organics from getting into your injectors) but if the big one hits, diesel engines can be run on biofuels, waste oil, or kerosene. So you may have numerous crank-case sources standing on your road when the gasoline runs out.

    Owner selected a 1980s vintage 1.6L VW diesel as his engine/generator motive source as it has been well documented it can run on "junk fuel." He has one of the Chinese "ST" generators.

    Dobbin
    I hinnire propter hoc ecce ego

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Behind Enemy Lines
    Posts
    141,442
    Right. Get the conversion kit for the genset. If no such kit exists, do not attempt.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    A Multi-Demensional Quantum Environment.
    Posts
    49,594
    Thanks for the input so far.

    I can always get a larger tank.

    The gas issue is-weight, feasabilty of storage, cost of having to go get it like this time, got it, did not need it and yes, I can use it in the jeep or mower otherwise it is sitting under cover where eventually it would degrade otherwise then I'd have to stretch the budget to go get more, find a place to store it and hope it maintains.

    I've seen duel and trifuel kits so you can run the genny off gas or propane.

    Thinwater, have you looked at running that Diesel off of biofuel as well as diesel? I kicked that idea around-trade this gas for a diesel and set it to run off diesel, bio, kero, whatever.?
    "It ain't no secret I didn't get these scars falling over in church."


    Photography Portfolio

    GetMeOffDisability

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    A Multi-Demensional Quantum Environment.
    Posts
    49,594
    Dobbin, thanks, ask owner for an extra helping of Sweet feed. I will have to look at your last seentence as I am unfamiliar with the VW engine, assuming it comes from a car? Or the Chinese ST.
    "It ain't no secret I didn't get these scars falling over in church."


    Photography Portfolio

    GetMeOffDisability

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    33,095
    There are some conversion kits and if it will fit your generator depends on the make and model and if its one of the chinese made generators you may be in luck!
    They sell kits that allows you to have a duel fuel setup and they even sell complete ready to go generators setup this way.
    There are pros and cons to both gasoline and propane as you see above.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    A Multi-Demensional Quantum Environment.
    Posts
    49,594
    Quote Originally Posted by Publius View Post
    There are some conversion kits and if it will fit your generator depends on the make and model and if its one of the chinese made generators you may be in luck!
    They sell kits that allows you to have a duel fuel setup and they even sell complete ready to go generators setup this way.
    There are pros and cons to both gasoline and propane as you see above.
    Mine is a Briggs/Stratton 5500w with a Troybilt engine. About ten years old and never run-in fact I had to take it in as it was froze up when I pulled it out of the shed this past year to try and use it. Had it repaired and it cranks fine now.

    [[FL bought it but never used it and for me it was just some bigassed heavy genny sitting under a tarp in the shed.]]
    "It ain't no secret I didn't get these scars falling over in church."


    Photography Portfolio

    GetMeOffDisability

  13. #13
    http://www.uscarburetion.com

    I bought a kit several years ago from them and it works great. There is more security in having more fuel sources available. Your generator will run on gasoline, propane, natural gas and even syngas.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Southwest (enjoy it!)
    Posts
    2,411
    In some areas of the nation, propane sells for around a dollar a gallon while gasoline is over Two dollars per gallon. If you store gasoline you would need to add stabilizer which is an added cost. Gasoline can be stolen from you while no one is going to steal a 250 or 500 gallon propane tank.
    In very cold (way below zero) propane does not work so well.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Cow Hampshire
    Posts
    15,283
    Quote Originally Posted by Satanta View Post
    Dobbin, thanks, ask owner for an extra helping of Sweet feed. I will have to look at your last seentence as I am unfamiliar with the VW engine, assuming it comes from a car? Or the Chinese ST.
    His particular engine is the NA (normally aspirated - no turbo) VW 1.6 liter which is from (IIRC) a 1981 VW Jetta. The engines are still around having out-survived the 1980 original rabbits/jettas which tended to be rot-boxes. Owner paid $125 for an engine with 113K miles - about half worn out as the life of these engines go.

    His generator he bought from a seller on Ebay who imports the Chinese "ST" generators in various sizes. See http://stores.ebay.com/Central-Georg...p2047675.l2563

    His only difficulty in making a direct connected setup was in coupling the generator to the flywheel of the VW. Various methods are shown on the Internet but he chose to make his own Lovejoy coupling half tailor made to fit the VW clutch mount in the center of the flywheel. A belted coupling is easier.

    Owner doesn't always do things "the easy way."

    Dobbin
    I hinnire propter hoc ecce ego

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,358
    Quote Originally Posted by Satanta View Post
    Thanks for the input so far.

    I can always get a larger tank.

    The gas issue is-weight, feasabilty of storage, cost of having to go get it like this time, got it, did not need it and yes, I can use it in the jeep or mower otherwise it is sitting under cover where eventually it would degrade otherwise then I'd have to stretch the budget to go get more, find a place to store it and hope it maintains.

    I've seen duel and trifuel kits so you can run the genny off gas or propane.

    Thinwater, have you looked at running that Diesel off of biofuel as well as diesel? I kicked that idea around-trade this gas for a diesel and set it to run off diesel, bio, kero, whatever.?
    You wont get much in trade for your gas genny. Couple hundred bux unless it is a Honda and you wont touch a decent diesel generator for under 1500 bux. I got a diesel generator because my back up heat is oil and I could run a diesel a long tome off a couple hundred gals of diesel/HHO. I actually went back to gas because I never used the diesel and it was a lot of money just sitting in the shed. We dont lose power much. There is an art to making biodiesel and unless you have a free source of good used oil and a local place to get the other supplies, it doesn't make money sense to produce it. We made a few batches and it ran fine in my buddys tractor but then the local store where we got our fry grease strted using a recycling company who would come in and clean their grease traps etc in exchange for the oil. He sold his biodiesel rig to a guy who family owns a couple of stores so he had a good supply of free oil.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Behind Enemy Lines
    Posts
    141,442
    The issue with home-built gensets is that RPM IS EVERYTHING. For a two-pole alternator, the engine must spin at PRECISELY 3600 rpm. For a four-pole alternator, it must spin at PRECISELY 1800 rpm. Any load increase or decrease must be compensated for within a few milliseconds by the engine. This precise speed is necessary to maintain 60 cycle alternating current. Home equipment will fry if the power frequency varies by more than a couple of percent.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Blazen View Post
    http://www.uscarburetion.com

    I bought a kit several years ago from them and it works great. There is more security in having more fuel sources available. Your generator will run on gasoline, propane, natural gas and even syngas.
    . . . and alcohol, with proper carb jetting, though the energy density of alcohol is a bit more than half of what gasoline is rated - but one could manufacture fuel-alcohol, in a pinch.

    Alcohol runs very clean, too, and can be used to run high compression engines better than regular grade pump gasoline due to its natural cooling capabilities when encountering a hot combustion chamber that may be pre-igniting due to lower octane rating of most pump-available gasoline grades. Recall that some number of go-fast racing cars use alcohol as their primary fuel, for this reason and others.

    Dobbin's reference to a 1980s vintage naturally aspirated 1.6L VW diesel 4-cylinder refers to the diesel motor used in that early 1980's VW Rabbit and Jetta - anvil reliable, parts still available - if considering older school small diesel motors, may want to also take a look at the older 3-cylinder Kubota industrial diesel engines - they, too, will run on many different filtered fuel source materials - i.e., brake fluid, automatic trans fluid, gear oils that are thinned a bit, etc., and parts are also readily available for these older Kubota's, too.

    intothegoodnight
    Last edited by intothatgoodnight; 09-13-2017 at 06:06 PM.
    "Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light."

    — Dylan Thomas, "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night"

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by hiwall View Post
    In very cold (way below zero) propane does not work so well.
    Nor does alcohol - engines running in a cold environment using alcohol must be started with starting fluid (ether spray can) or gasoline first, then "switched over" to alcohol while running.

    This is also true with diesel engines running on waste oil products, per se - start on regular diesel fuel, then switch over to waste oil fuel source, once running.


    intothegoodnight
    "Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light."

    — Dylan Thomas, "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night"

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    33,095
    Quote Originally Posted by Satanta View Post
    Mine is a Briggs/Stratton 5500w with a Troybilt engine. About ten years old and never run-in fact I had to take it in as it was froze up when I pulled it out of the shed this past year to try and use it. Had it repaired and it cranks fine now.

    [[FL bought it but never used it and for me it was just some bigassed heavy genny sitting under a tarp in the shed.]]



    Ok; you have a Troy Built generator with a Briggs & Stratton engine probably a 10Hp.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Just west of cut & shoot
    Posts
    473
    Go on line look up US generator. scroll down and you see generator conversions. make contact with them. You will have to send them your carb. DO NOT try to do it yourself. With natural gas and LP you will need a regulator At the unit. You can't pipe it rigid, you will need a flex hose. I would buy a 100 gal LP tank. LP is the most efficient, followed by nat gas, Gasoline the lest. If you use LP do not run it out of gas, the motor will lean out and burn up.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    5,222
    I purchased a Troy Bilt 5550 watt gas generator before one of the 2004 hurricanes.

    Back in mid 2016 I was alerted by someone (maybe on Timebomb) that U.S. Carburetion was offering a 50% off sale for a MOTOR SNORKEL TRI-FUEL (Natural Gas Propane and Gasoline) Conversion Kit. I also purchased a 12' PORTABLE PROPANE HOSE KIT WITH REGULATOR AND FITTINGS.

    They have kits to match most generator makes and my total cost was around $165.00.

    Cranked it up with propane the day before Irma was due in town and it started up like a champ.

    Thankfully we still had power so did not have to use it.

    I'd read that gas over propane is more efficient but wanted to have both on hand if I had to go weeks without power.

    Not to mention I'd rather have 10 propane tanks around the property than 150 gallons of gasoline.
    A 1965 To The Present Dime Is Worth $.10 Today.
    A 1964 To The Present Dollar Bill Is Worth $1.00 Today.
    A 1964 Or Earlier Silver Dime Is Worth Over $1.25 Today.

    A lie told often enough becomes the truth - Lenin

  23. #23
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    In CLE again
    Posts
    48,655
    Just a basic comment:

    Remember that diesels do NOT use SPARK for ignition in the cylinder like gas does. Diesels work with pressure, air, and diesel, no spark......
    Mookie War Creed
    "I am the Sword of my Family and Shield of my Nation. If sent, I will crush everything you have built, burn all that you love, and kill every one of you."
    Welcome to dar al harab -dar al kufre.


    Gentle reminder: It is entirely possible to think that generalizations are true and to judge each real live person you meet as an individual

  24. #24
    funny nobody brought up wood gas yet

    Wood Gas 12KW Generator Cambodia Made by Chanthy, 3:15

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJbWnU7FIrE

  25. #25
    Purchased a tri-fule kit from here for Honda Eu2000i

    https://www.propanecarbs.com/honda-t...rsion-kit.html

    Works great, about an hour to install, already had a natgas line plumbed out on the deck for a grill, so having mulifuel generator was nice prep layer
    "The winds of Thor are blowing cold.
    They're wearing steel that's bright and true
    They carry news that must get through."

  26. #26
    Before buying a conversion kit. Why don't you price a propane generator. Never hurts to have two. Especially when they use different fuels.

  27. #27
    you might want to look at this wood gas powered genny ..


  28. #28
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    25,897
    Quote Originally Posted by Satanta View Post
    I know it can be done, my actual experience with a generator is five minutes of being taught how t run it and the basics of calculating the load. So does anyone have experience with a propane genny as far as run time versus gas?

    Anyone ever actual done a conversion?

    Pros/cons?

    I bought 20 gals f gas in case Urma affected here. My calculations are it would give about 48hrs run time. That's not much whereas we have a 100lb propane tank for the stove/fireplace and it would not be an issue to get a larger one [[propane company provides it with a small yearly fee that is waived if you top it off every year]]

    Thoughts?
    Mine is converted.

    Had it done (professionally) by a local company that works with propane-fueled engines.

    I have a small tank (not the 12-foot long ones, but one about 6-feet long).

    It burns clean, so I don't need to worry about gunking up the oil in my portable genny.

    I have been told I could run it CONTINUOUSLY for 30 days if I wanted to before running out, as opposed to getting about 8 hours of power off a tankful of gas. (Plus, you have the danger of storing multiple containers of gasoline around).

    We are VERY happy about having had it converted.

    That said---is ANYONE HERE knowledgeable about gennies (portable ones) and can advise me as to the voltage?

    We have had so much contradictory info---seems I can either get someone who knows the "mechanical" side of things (how to maintain the genny itself) OR the "electrical" (how to hook up the WIRING for it to the house) BUT NOT BOTH.


    The guy I had check it before the storm said it was idling WAY too high--he checked it with a voltmeter and said it was putting out the equivalent of 230 volts, and that if we'd plugged it in it would have "blown up" our house wiring and the two freezers on the subpanel the genny was initially set up for and wired to.

    BUT---unless it somehow "vibrated" itself into a highter setting, I KNOW that when the electrician initially set it up, AND when we had it checked LAST YEAR, that they DID plug it in, AND ran our subpanel off it, wtih NO ill-effects.

    This last guy (a mechanic more than an electrician) idled it back down to about 130 volts--but after he did so I remember that ONE OF THE DEVICES WE HAVE TO POWER IS A WELL PUMP--and that requires 220 volts---and THAT may be why it was initially set so high.

    Fortunately, we didn't lose power, so didn't have to try to use the genny during the storm--but this question (of how high to "set" the genny) NEEDS to be answered, and NOW.

    Another question---HOW can the SAME genny power, at the SAME time, devices meant to run on 110 power and those meant to run on 220? Is there some device installed IN the "switch" that I pull to convert "house power" (i.e., from the grid) to "genny power", that acts as a "step-up" (or "step-down") inverter to compensate? For that matter, how do "whole house" gennies do it? They, also, have to power devices demanding differing "loads" of power.

    If someone could please answer me via PM re this, since I can't seem to get my "genny mechanics" and "electricians" on the same page re this, I would be most grateful.
    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubled…Let no man deceive you by any means…..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved….for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie….
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


  29. #29
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    In CLE again
    Posts
    48,655
    Does your genny have 110 AND 220 plugs on its panel??

    AND was there anything unusual about how you were to plug it into the sub-panel??
    Mookie War Creed
    "I am the Sword of my Family and Shield of my Nation. If sent, I will crush everything you have built, burn all that you love, and kill every one of you."
    Welcome to dar al harab -dar al kufre.


    Gentle reminder: It is entirely possible to think that generalizations are true and to judge each real live person you meet as an individual

  30. #30
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    25,897
    Quote Originally Posted by night driver View Post
    Does your genny have 110 AND 220 plugs on its panel??

    AND was there anything unusual about how you were to plug it into the sub-panel??
    As far as I know, just one plug--but then I admit to never having looked at it that closely.

    It's a small, portable genny, converted to propane power (professionally, as I said).

    An electrician came to our home and re-wired our basement to put a few items on a sub-panel---our well pump, and two outlets, off one of which our chest freezer runs.

    The genny is not hard-wired into the house, but has a special (very large & heavy) 'extension cord' that plugs into a special outlet on the outside of the house.

    This outlet goes directly to a very large SWITCH (a "Square-D Double-Throw Non-Fusible Safety Switch", per its label)---which has a "throw-arm". If it's up, it's on "house" (grid) power. In the middle, it's "off" -- no power. Pull the arm to the bottom, it's on genny power.

    The wire from the switch leads to the subpanel---and ONLY the subpanel is powered when this switch is thrown--ONLY the pump and those two outlets.


    I do not know if there is something "inside" either the "switch" OR the "subpanel" (OR the connection where it plugs into the house, for that matter--it is a VERY weird plug---NOT your typical 220 plug and certainly not like a 110---"is" there such a thing as a PLUG that can differentiate between 110 and 220?) that takes care of properly "stepping up or down" the power for the two different items?


    And--AGAIN--for a "whole-house" genny---how are THEY made to simultaneously accommodate items of varying voltage within a house? Surely the homeowners don't have to install separate "inverters" or whatever they're called for EVERY SINGLE item the genny is meant to power? And if that's true on a macro-scale, wouldn't it also be true on a micro-scale?
    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubled…Let no man deceive you by any means…..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved….for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie….
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


  31. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    A Multi-Demensional Quantum Environment.
    Posts
    49,594
    What about carbon monoxide?

    I know the gas genny has to be outside away from the building. Problem is the ****er is heavy as hell and I have to manhandle it, yes it has wheels but the house is off ground level by at least 3ft, which means I have to fight it in and out-no real good place to store it outside so it is in the living room for now, so in crappy weather I have to ddrag it outside, figure out where to put it and fill/refill with gas-the cans are heavy enough but they are those ****ing California cans that make it even more of a PITA.

    If it were propane I'm thinking under the crawlspace-nice, dry and temperate, more than enough room to nearly stand so cranking it up would be easy, muffle the noise and be tough to steal.
    "It ain't no secret I didn't get these scars falling over in church."


    Photography Portfolio

    GetMeOffDisability

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    33,095
    Quote Originally Posted by Countrymouse View Post
    As far as I know, just one plug--but then I admit to never having looked at it that closely.

    It's a small, portable genny, converted to propane power (professionally, as I said).

    An electrician came to our home and re-wired our basement to put a few items on a sub-panel---our well pump, and two outlets, off one of which our chest freezer runs.

    The genny is not hard-wired into the house, but has a special (very large & heavy) 'extension cord' that plugs into a special outlet on the outside of the house.

    This outlet goes directly to a very large SWITCH (a "Square-D Double-Throw Non-Fusible Safety Switch", per its label)---which has a "throw-arm". If it's up, it's on "house" (grid) power. In the middle, it's "off" -- no power. Pull the arm to the bottom, it's on genny power.

    The wire from the switch leads to the subpanel---and ONLY the subpanel is powered when this switch is thrown--ONLY the pump and those two outlets.


    I do not know if there is something "inside" either the "switch" OR the "subpanel" (OR the connection where it plugs into the house, for that matter--it is a VERY weird plug---NOT your typical 220 plug and certainly not like a 110---"is" there such a thing as a PLUG that can differentiate between 110 and 220?) that takes care of properly "stepping up or down" the power for the two different items?


    And--AGAIN--for a "whole-house" genny---how are THEY made to simultaneously accommodate items of varying voltage within a house? Surely the homeowners don't have to install separate "inverters" or whatever they're called for EVERY SINGLE item the genny is meant to power? And if that's true on a macro-scale, wouldn't it also be true on a micro-scale?


    Yeah so what the electrician gave you a safety switch required by building code (law) that will completely disconnect the power company and switch over to the generator. The sub-panel your are talking about is a transfer switch and will only run a limited number of items that its wired to.

    To answer the question of different plugs! Yes they make various different size plugs with matching receptacles most are of the twist-lock design where you stick in and it is made so it has to line up but one way and you give a 1/4 turn and its locked in and cannot pull out unless you give it a 1/4 turn the opposite direction. There is also the kind that very same as the plug for a clothes dryer and its heavy duty 50+ Amp service.
    So the most common plugs there a 120 volt 30 Amp twist lock this is a three prong, and the next two are four prong 240 volt 30 Amp twist lock and a 240 volt 50 Amp twist lock and both are different sizes or spacing so the two are in noway interchangeable.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Behind Enemy Lines
    Posts
    141,442
    I have a whole house genset, though it's in storage. It was direct-wired to the house electrical system through a 200 amp transfer switch. Once thrown, the house acted just like it was on city power. No additional equipment required.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    199
    Deleted
    Last edited by Sodbuster; 09-14-2017 at 09:40 PM.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,358
    Quote Originally Posted by Satanta View Post
    What about carbon monoxide?

    I know the gas genny has to be outside away from the building. Problem is the ****er is heavy as hell and I have to manhandle it, yes it has wheels but the house is off ground level by at least 3ft, which means I have to fight it in and out-no real good place to store it outside so it is in the living room for now, so in crappy weather I have to drag it outside, figure out where to put it and fill/refill with gas-the cans are heavy enough but they are those ****ing California cans that make it even more of a PITA.

    If it were propane I'm thinking under the crawlspace-nice, dry and temperate, more than enough room to nearly stand so cranking it up would be easy, muffle the noise and be tough to steal.
    Don't even think about running any internal combustion engine, regardless of fuel, in or under your house. That is a great recipe to wind up dead. They all produce CO when they burn.

  36. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Tennessee's version of Gotham (Knoxville)
    Posts
    3,840
    Quote Originally Posted by Snyper View Post
    Propane might be a little less efficient, but it will store forever without degrading and is much safer and easier to use.

    It also will extend the life of the generator.
    For longer term solutions, this is your best bet. A full on propane generator is on my list of longer term buys.
    1 Corinthians 18:20 “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise;
    the intelligence of the intelligent I will frustrate.”

  37. #37
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Little cabin in da big woods.
    Posts
    26,641
    Quote Originally Posted by mecoastie View Post
    Don't even think about running any internal combustion engine, regardless of fuel, in or under your house. That is a great recipe to wind up dead. They all produce CO when they burn.
    THIS ^ !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    They just hauled out a bunch of dead bodies down south from a house with the genset IN THE HOUSE...... DO NOT, put it in your crawlspace. Better to build it a small shed to live in next to the house but not too close.


    In his heart a man plans his course, but the Lord determines his steps.

    Proverbs 16:9




  38. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    415
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    Right. Get the conversion kit for the genset. If no such kit exists, do not attempt.
    Dennis, you know you are talking to Satanta. If no kit exists, do not attempt. Be careful Sat..

  39. #39
    I would recommend sticking with gasoline, but it doesn't hurt to have a propane conversion kit on hand for your generator for longer term prep situations and to have an extra alternative for your genset.

    I strongly recommend getting an inverter generator of some kind instead of a regular generator. They have tremendous advantages over standard generators: higher fuel efficiency, lighter and MUCH more portable, MUCH quieter, and generally put out higher quality electricity. Their only major drawback is that they are more expensive on a dollar per watt output basis. IMO, the best of the inverter generators are those manufactured by Honda (EU-2000i, EU-3000i, etc.). They have a reputation for engines lasting 10,000 hours of run time or longer, sometimes even 20,000 hours. We have an EU-2000i that was heavily used during the aftermath of the southeast tornado outbreak of 2011, and we used less than 4 gallons of fuel over 4 days of being without power. It kept our fridge running and cold and also provided enough additional power for some lights and a computer. These things are very quiet (< 60 dB) and your next door neighbors will barely be able to hear you have it running, unlike a standard generator that can easily be heard over 400 yards away!

    A propane conversion kit is readily available for the EU-2000i as well.

  40. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,358
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Owl View Post
    THIS ^ !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    They just hauled out a bunch of dead bodies down south from a house with the genset IN THE HOUSE...... DO NOT, put it in your crawlspace. Better to build it a small shed to live in next to the house but not too close.
    If it was the story I heard, they were running it in the garage because the HOA did not allow for generators.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.