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DISASTER 5 dead, 120 evacuated from Florida nursing home due to intense heat, loss of power
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  1. #1

    5 dead, 120 evacuated from Florida nursing home due to intense heat, loss of power

    http://email.foxnews.com/t?r=5&c=559...1848CF431EAB1&

    5 dead, 120 evacuated from Florida nursing home due to intense heat, loss of power


    By Travis Fedschun Published September 13, 2017
    Fox News

    [IMG]5 dead, 120 evacuated from Florida nursing home due to intense heat, loss of power[/IMG]
    More than 100 people were evacuated from a Florida nursing home after five people were reported dead at the Hollywood facility, whose residents were suffering from intense heat caused by a lack of electricity after deadly Hurricane Irma swept through.

    Hurricane Irma may have moved on from Florida, but lingering dangers caused by the storm, including carbon monoxide poisoning, remain in the Sunshine State as millions wait for power to be restored.

    In South Florida police evacuated several people from a nursing home without in Hollywood, where at least five people have died, WSVN reported.

    https://twitter.com/wsvn/status/9079...002240/photo/1

    Hollywood Fire Rescue and police told WSVN a total 120 people were evacuated at The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills due to intense heat and no power.

    Broward County Mayor Barbara Sharief confirmed five people have died, but it remains unknown whether the deaths are related to the heat.

    The mayor added three deaths occurred at the nursing home, and two deaths took place as they were transported to a nearby hospital.



    In Central Florida, three people were found dead inside an Orlando home Tuesday from apparent carbon monixide poisoning, officials said.

    Orange County Sheriff's Office spokesman Jeff Williams told the Associated Press a deputy responded to the the home following a 911 call from what sounded like a juvenile. The deputy was then overcome by fumes while approaching the home and called for fire rescue.

    Firefighters discovered two people dead inside the home, FOX 35 Orlando reported. Another person who tried to get out out of the home was found dead on the front lawn, while four others from inside the home were taken to a nearby hospital. Rescue workers found a portable gasoline generator running inside the home.
    Futher north in Daytona Beach, police said one person died and three others are being treated at a hospital Wednesday for carbon monoxide poisoning from an electric generator.

    The Daytona Beach Fire Department officials said on Twitter that a generator was running inside the home.

    A neighbor told Fox 35 Orlando that generators were not allowed in the community.

    Officials across Florida are warning people to keep generators outside their homes. Carbon monoxide from a generator is also suspected in the death of a man in Miami, while authorities say another dozen people were treated for carbon monoxide on Tuesday in Polk and Brevard counties.

    One Miami-area apartment building was evacuated Tuesday after authorities determined a lack of power made it unsafe for elderly tenants, while officers arrived at another retirement community to help people stranded on upper floors without access to working elevators.

    Elsewhere, a South Florida townhouse that weathered the storm was gutted by fire when power was restored, causing the stove to ignite items left on the cooktop.

    The number of deaths blamed on Irma in Florida climbed to 13 with the carbon monoxide deaths, in addition to four in South Carolina and two in Georgia. At least 37 people were killed in the Caribbean.

    "We've got a lot of work to do, but everybody's going to come together," Florida Gov. Rick Scott said. "We're going to get this state rebuilt."

    The number of people without electricity in the steamy late-summer heat dropped to 9.5 million — just under half of Florida's population. Utility officials warned it could take 10 days or more for power to be fully restored. About 110,000 people remained in shelters across the state.

    The Associated Press contributed to this report.

  2. #2
    How in HELL can a nursing home be allowed to exist in Florida without a working generator adequate to provide AC for it's frail residents (and sufficient fuel to ride out at least a 2 week state of emergency)?

    Summerthyme

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    How in HELL can a nursing home be allowed to exist in Florida without a working generator adequate to provide AC for it's frail residents (and sufficient fuel to ride out at least a 2 week state of emergency)?

    Summerthyme
    Many states' codes only require a 72 hour fuel supply and some require 96 hours. HOWEVER, many past onsite fuel requirements have changed and now require nat gas supply, which can and does eventually fail during an extended crisis like Irma. Then there are the water damage issues to gennies like occurred in N.O. hospitals and SNFs during Katrina

    I do not know the specifics of this case, but the above can give you an idea as to why with even the best plans, real life still happens.

  4. #4
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    They evacuated Weustoff Hospital in Rockledge a few days ago due to lack of electric.
    There's only so much, for so long, that a generator can do when you're servicing such a large system.
    AC is hard to sustain with gennie.
    Gennie are basically emergency stand by, not 24/7.....anything more like diesel would require such large fuel stores and would be cost prohibitive.
    ...that those "who having no appeal on earth to right them, they are left to the only remedy in such cases, an appeal to heaven." ~ John Locke
    *~* Appeal to Heaven *~*
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThorsHammer View Post
    Many states' codes only require a 72 hour fuel supply and some require 96 hours. HOWEVER, many past onsite fuel requirements have changed and now require nat gas supply, which can and does eventually fail during an extended crisis like Irma. Then there are the water damage issues to gennies like occurred in N.O. hospitals and SNFs during Katrina

    I do not know the specifics of this case, but the above can give you an idea as to why with even the best plans, real life still happens.
    Yep
    ...that those "who having no appeal on earth to right them, they are left to the only remedy in such cases, an appeal to heaven." ~ John Locke
    *~* Appeal to Heaven *~*
    ~Prepare for Our Valley Forge~

  6. #6
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    Not to be insensitive...but um...yep...it gets hot in Florida. With no electricity you have no A/C.

    PERHAPS...more people should have that thought in the back of their mind before they choose to LIVE there.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwrobel View Post
    Not to be insensitive...but um...yep...it gets hot in Florida. With no electricity you have no A/C.

    PERHAPS...more people should have that thought in the back of their mind before they choose to LIVE there.
    I don't necessarily think you're wrong.
    Not any different than having to consider how to not freeze to death up north in the winter.

    I just don't understand how people survived down here in the dog days of summer before AC!

    Lack of AC for any extended length of time here in Florida is my biggest concern in life. There's only so much prep you can do, and no prep is fail safe and limitless for this scenerio.
    ...that those "who having no appeal on earth to right them, they are left to the only remedy in such cases, an appeal to heaven." ~ John Locke
    *~* Appeal to Heaven *~*
    ~Prepare for Our Valley Forge~

  8. #8
    In the days before A/C people built large porches and planted shade trees on the south and west sides of the house, built breeze ways, had large windows to allow for cross ventilation, used fans, often had tall ceilings and so on. There are methods to moderate the heat, but house and other structures built now in hot regions are uninhabitable without A/C.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Be Well View Post
    In the days before A/C people built large porches and planted shade trees on the south and west sides of the house, built breeze ways, had large windows to allow for cross ventilation, used fans, often had tall ceilings and so on. There are methods to moderate the heat, but house and other structures built now in hot regions are uninhabitable without A/C.
    I know, but I still don't understand how they lived like that, cause it's still so freaking hot!
    ...that those "who having no appeal on earth to right them, they are left to the only remedy in such cases, an appeal to heaven." ~ John Locke
    *~* Appeal to Heaven *~*
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  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by workerbee View Post
    I know, but I still don't understand how they lived like that, cause it's still so freaking hot!
    Yeah, the hellishly hot areas of the US were sparsely populated until A/C. In AZ for instance, there are ways to (somewhat) beat the heat - thick adobe walls and thick roofs for insulation, living with some natural feature to the west and south to provide shade, living near a stream etc. If there was a long term (meaning more than a week or two max) power failure in hot areas during summer, I cannot even imagine the death toll in the US.
    https://soundcloud.com/user-309670005
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    This knowledge is the king of education, the most secret of all secrets. It is the purest knowledge, and because it gives direct perception of the self by realization, it is the perfection of religion. It is everlasting, and it is joyfully performed.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by workerbee View Post
    I know, but I still don't understand how they lived like that, cause it's still so freaking hot!
    Yeah, and just think some of them did it in long sleeve shirts, and long pants for men, long dresses for women. There were, and still are, 2 reasons for that: 1) To keep from getting a sun burn, which makes the body even hotter, note the arabs 2) to make you sweat, shirts wet with sweat were cooler to wear, and gave an indication of when you had to much sun, when you stopped sweating, so as to prevent heat stroke. Them old folks weren't to dumb.

    On the winter side of things: don't need a genie for long term heat. It's called wood, and the best thing one can do to prep for winter is install a wood heater, stove. Makes for some cool to cold bedrooms which is great for sleeping in, under a ton of quilts, and some warm living areas.

  12. #12
    If there was a long term (meaning more than a week or two max) power failure in hot areas during summer, I cannot even imagine the death toll in the US.
    Most likely the same applies to winter power outages in colder areas.

    Houses are no longer designed for the areas in which they are constructed.

    Aesthetics and convenience are primary considerations... not practicality.

    Drive around any communities north of the 38th parallel.... especially in the affluent areas with the plastic mansions.

    Note the absence of chimneys.

    Note the presence of heat pumps and large electrical services in the communities.

    They are cold, dark, plastic mansions when the power goes off.

    Most of them are cold, dark, (vacant) plastic mansions if the power is off for extended periods.

    Electricity dependent all.

    I will not discuss the other utilities and services upon which they are also dependent.

    We have created a fragile society.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by workerbee View Post
    They evacuated Weustoff Hospital in Rockledge a few days ago due to lack of electric.
    There's only so much, for so long, that a generator can do when you're servicing such a large system.
    AC is hard to sustain with gennie.
    Gennie are basically emergency stand by, not 24/7.....anything more like diesel would require such large fuel stores and would be cost prohibitive.

    If in a nursing home, they are fragile people to begin with, but can't staff open the windows for a breeze cross draft ?
    Shouldn't Staff remove blankets and add cool damp sheets to lower body temps?

  14. #14
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    It may have been the generators were overloaded with those who needed continous oxygen too.....

    We live with that here, and it is always on my mind, how to keep our generator going to provide oxygen, and to refill tanks if we have to evacuate.
    Last edited by Laurane; 09-13-2017 at 02:01 PM.
    True North Strong and Free

  15. #15
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    Check out regional architecture pre 1930s

    It wasn't until Levitte built the Levitowns post war housing boom that we all ended up
    In cookie cutter 3 bedrooms on slab mega suburbs and begat the city white flight

    Thoughtless architecture is still ongoing today with the Nationwide same McMansions that have same design one size fits all flaws from Maine to Washington to Cal to Florida and everywhere in between

  16. #16
    Hollywood Fire Rescue and police told WSVN a total 120 people were evacuated at The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills due to intense heat and no power.

    Broward County Mayor Barbara Sharief confirmed five people have died, but it remains unknown whether the deaths are related to the heat.

    The mayor added three deaths occurred at the nursing home, and two deaths took place as they were transported to a nearby hospital.
    HFR removed 120 elderly patients!!!!
    Three were dead and two more passed over being taken to the hospital....

    Just where in the hell were these elderly patient's family before this happened????

    How sick and despicable have way to much of our society become to ignore your elderly family before or during a hurricane or any other emergency....

    May God rain down justice on these sick individuals that did not take care of their elderly family....

    God help us....

    Texican....
    An American Christian....
    Live Free and Die Free....

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    How in HELL can a nursing home be allowed to exist in Florida without a working generator adequate to provide AC for it's frail residents (and sufficient fuel to ride out at least a 2 week state of emergency)?

    Summerthyme
    The article did not go into why they did not have back up power. I do not know, but there is a chance they did had a generator and plenty of fuel for a few weeks, but maybe it got damaged or flooded out from the hurricane. By state law, I would assume, it's monitory for nursing homes to have back up power for emergency.

    New Update Below!
    The nursing home did have a generator, but it is unclear if the generator was functional. Temperatures in Hollywood were expected to be around 86 degrees on Wednesday -- but feel about 10 degrees warmer. WSVN Report: http://wsvn.com/news/local/1-dead-30...-nursing-home/
    Last edited by Suzieq; 09-13-2017 at 02:29 PM.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Be Well View Post
    In the days before A/C people built large porches and planted shade trees on the south and west sides of the house, built breeze ways, had large windows to allow for cross ventilation, used fans, often had tall ceilings and so on. There are methods to moderate the heat, but house and other structures built now in hot regions are uninhabitable without A/C.
    The first 9 or 10 months I lived in Florida was without A/C, we had huge windows we could open, fans, and large shade trees-it's the humidity that reaches into every corner of every room that intensifies heat to the unbearable level. I noticed that once the humidity arrived, usually in late May or early June, and the temperature raised above 86F, it was blistering hot. I can take 100F+ heat here where I am now, but 87F in Florida in summer is painful.
    Now the Lord is that Spirit: and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is Liberty. II Cor. 3:17

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    Quote Originally Posted by workerbee View Post
    I know, but I still don't understand how they lived like that, cause it's still so freaking hot!
    People now are spoiled....That is why. Convenience vs necessity spoils. I still found it fasinating that older people still in many warm climate areas do not have A.C.. And still wear long sleeve shitrts working their gardens.
    יְשׁוּעָה
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by medic38572 View Post
    People now are spoiled....That is why. Convenience vs necessity spoils. I still found it fasinating that older people still in many warm climate areas do not have A.C.. And still wear long sleeve shitrts working their gardens.
    I have been on several mission trips to the Dominican Republic and Brazil and it is just a way of life. Being a spoiled American, I always appreciate coming back home.

  21. #21
    Moronic architecture IMO..........no NATURAL VENTILATION...America is totally seduced by electricity........it will be our downfall when that ubiquitous system fails.......I dread it...and we don't even use our AC here along front range much of the time....but hot water showering is lovely and one of the first things we'll all pine for.......
    Sapphire

    myopically challenged

  22. #22
    Going in and out of a/c is hard on a person. I have a friend that works out in the heat and he insists the a/c in their home is kept pretty close to the outside temperatures otherwise it makes him miserable when he has to go back out. The a/c gets rid of the humidity so the warmer temps are more bearable.

    Houses used to have screened sleeping porches that were utilized during hot weather. Adults spent evenings on the front porch and kids played outside until dark and it was not fun to go back into the hot house to sleep.

  23. #23
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    It's still the FUSA......
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwrobel View Post
    Not to be insensitive...but um...yep...it gets hot in Florida. With no electricity you have no A/C.

    PERHAPS...more people should have that thought in the back of their mind before they choose to LIVE there.
    Yeah, I heard it over and over again to get out of California! Whether it was a threat of fire, the dam breaking, or an earthquake. Leaving is easier said than done. I choose to live here, I accept full responsibility for my decision. If my house burns down, I'm covered, my house will never ever flood unless a water heater breaks, I'm covered for water damage. I've been hearing about the big one coming to California, lived here for over 60 years, been in about 3 big shakers and no damage to any homes in my area. However, no way in hell would I live any where near hurricane or tornado territory, people who choose that likes living in the danger zone. BTW, it gets friggin hot here too, we run a evaporative cooler, cheaper and more dependable, but, that's my choice.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by medic38572 View Post
    People now are spoiled....That is why. Convenience vs necessity spoils. I still found it fasinating that older people still in many warm climate areas do not have A.C.. And still wear long sleeve shitrts working their gardens.
    Most wear long sleeves shirts, to keep bugs and sun off their arms.

  26. #26
    Regard to living in the south...you must remember that many died much younger in the time period you are referring to- the elderly *Did* die of complications of heat etc. Dont forget- so so many are kept "alive". (Pretty much a vegetative state) much longer these days due to medical intervention. (Lest I sound heartless I have seen first hand how dementia destroys. I'm not always sure "living" a long time is 100% worth it..).

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Be Well View Post
    In the days before A/C people built large porches and planted shade trees on the south and west sides of the house, built breeze ways, had large windows to allow for cross ventilation, used fans, often had tall ceilings and so on. There are methods to moderate the heat, but house and other structures built now in hot regions are uninhabitable without A/C.
    That's how we coped with it in the old days. It was miserable but we survived.
    "America is at that awkward stage, to late to work within the system, but to early to shoot the bastards"-- Claire Wolfe

  28. #28
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    Houses also had awnings that blocked the light of the summer sun from beaming directly into the windows. Eves and verandas kept some of the suns direct light and heat off the walls of the home. These now quaint architectural features had a purpose. The really old time houses had summer kitchens so the cooking and preserving of food did not heat up the main house and the danger of fire taking the main house was lessened. Swamp coolers were covered on another thread.
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  29. #29
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    These deaths in the nursing home remind me of what happened during Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana.

    Wasn't there similar reports?

  30. #30
    Evaporative cooling, (swamp coolers), works great here in NM, but swamp coolers don't work in high humidity.

    Adobe stays cool, but again, you need a dry climate for the house to remain standing. Basements are nice and cool, but the water table in most of FL is about a foot below ground.

    FL is mostly a swamp. Not knocking the place - the pics. are beautiful, but swamps aren't great for human habitation. I expect a hundred and fifty years ago, most people would have considered most of FL to be basically uninhabitable.

    Before electric AC, fragile people there would have died.
    Last edited by Faroe; 09-13-2017 at 08:04 PM.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Gray Mare View Post
    Houses also had awnings that blocked the light of the summer sun from beaming directly into the windows. Eves and verandas kept some of the suns direct light and heat off the walls of the home. These now quaint architectural features had a purpose. The really old time houses had summer kitchens so the cooking and preserving of food did not heat up the main house and the danger of fire taking the main house was lessened. Swamp coolers were covered on another thread.
    My house is an old farmhouse. This is exactly how this house was built and landscaped. All the trees are on the South and west side. The porch has a big overhanging roof for shade. Windows all over to move air through the house. I might add my house was built in 1889. The heat is directed upward and off the main floor, so in summer we hardly ever need the AC downstairs where we live during the day.
    At night we have a big ceiling fan in the bedroom and a balcony door that blows in cool night air from the west. All by design.

    I can safely say, there is hardly anything that relieves extreme humidity. Nothing feels worse than feeling wet and sticky all the time.
    The only thing I can think of is to have a fan that hardly draws any power off my solar generator. I have a fan I got from Amazon. It's called O2Cool. It runs on electric or batteries. I love it. It works really well.

    MM

  32. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by NC Susan View Post
    If in a nursing home, they are fragile people to begin with, but can't staff open the windows for a breeze cross draft ?
    Shouldn't Staff remove blankets and add cool damp sheets to lower body temps?
    If it's a newer multi story climate controlled building the windows probably aren't made to open.

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    High heat,humidity, and bad Hygiene. Yeah, the old days must have been something else...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vegas321 View Post
    High heat,humidity, and bad Hygiene. Yeah, the old days must have been something else...
    I bet a lot of Floridians, Texans and Georgians are rethinking the prepping thing. Perhaps planning for generators, solar stuff and back-up fuel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NC Susan View Post
    If in a nursing home, they are fragile people to begin with, but can't staff open the windows for a breeze cross draft ?
    Shouldn't Staff remove blankets and add cool damp sheets to lower body temps?
    Most medical facilities no longer have windows that open. They were considered a hazard for confused people that would escape or jump.

  36. #36
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    Everybody here is talking about heat and architechture.

    I think BOTH are a WRONG focus.

    SOMEHOW, our forebears here in the South managed---in UNairconditioned houses--and I'm NOT talking about the few rich people in 12-foot-ceilinged white-columned mansions, but little "shotgun" shacks with TIN roofs sitting up on rock supports 3 feet off the ground (to keep out snakes and moisture, not just for ventilation).

    And the ladies in the 1800's were EXPECTED to wear at least 3 petticoats--anything less was very immodest--yet somehow they survived.

    No, focusing on clothes and architecture is wrong.


    I heard today that CRIMINAL CHARGES ARE BEING CONSIDERED AGAINST THE NURSING HOME STAFF.



    i am hearing today that a HOSPITAL WAS LESS THAN 500 YARDS AWAY.




    YET THE STAFF LEFT THOSE OLD PEOPLE TO LAY THERE----AND DIE.




    COMMON SENSE would seem to dictate that--in a CRISIS situation---you forget "the. rules." and GET THOSE PEOPLE OUT OF THOSE STUFFY BUILDINGS and out into some FRESH AIR!!!

    Even OUTSIDE temps would be better than holding them PRISONER inside the (probably) LOCKED DOORS of a nursing home (with windows that WILL NOT OPEN---for fear the Alzheimer's patients will wander off).

    I've worked -- long ago, when I considered nursing as a career-- in one of those nursing homes.

    They are often long, low, single-story, flat-roofed buildings (at least here in GA) with low ceilings, sealed-shut windows, and locked doors to prevent patients "wandering" off----and hot as hades if the AC goes off.

    COMMON SENSE---get them OUT of the BUILDING!


    Instead, the STAFF LEFT THEM THERE to DIE.



    Now.


    My local news here in Atlanta DID NOT EVEN COVER this story tonight.


    Which makes me wonder............


    (sorry--but I'm basing this on WHAT I SEE IN MOST Georgia nursing homes)---


    Was the STAFF black?

    And most of the PATIENTS white?


    Did the staff vamoose and LEAVE the patients to their fate??? (especially since the staff THEMSELVES would want to get out of the heat?)



    Remember---there was an (apparently OPEN) HOSPITAL "less than 500 yards away" per WSB radio news reports----


    AND THIS STAFF IS NOW HAVING CRIMINAL CHARGES CONSIDERED AGAINST THEM.




    I'd really like to know what exactly the STAFF was DOING--if anything---while their patients DIED of heat prostration........
    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubled…Let no man deceive you by any means…..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved….for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie….
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


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    Criminal probe opened into 8 heat-related deaths at Florida nursing home
    Doug Stanglin and Alan Gomez, USA TODAY Published 10:04 a.m. ET Sept. 13, 2017 | Updated 9:44 p.m. ET Sept. 13, 2017

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...rma/661228001/

    8 die at Fla. nursing home in Irma's aftermath

    Eight patients at a sweltering nursing home died in Hurricane Irma's aftermath, raising fears Wednesday about the safety of Florida's 4 million senior citizens amid widespread power outages that could go on for days. (Sept. 13) AP




    HOLLYWOOD, Fla. — Federal, state and local authorities have opened a criminal investigation into the deaths of eight nursing home residents who died of apparent heat-related causes after their facility lost air conditioning during the power outage triggered by Hurricane Irma.

    The Florida Agency for Health Care Administration on Wednesday ordered the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills temporarily closed, CBS12 and Fox reported. The development came less than a day after emergency teams descended on the nursing home early Wednesday when police got a 911 call about a heart attack.

    Hollywood Police Chief Tomas Sanchez said 115 people were evacuated, some in critical condition. Three people were found dead at the scene, one died during the evacuation, four were pronounced dead at a hospital.

    Randy Katz, the medical director of Hollywood Memorial Hospital's emergency department, said he found a chaotic scene when he first entered the facility, which is directly across the street.

    "When we were called to help, we mobilized at least 50 to 100 of our employees that left the hospital, ran down the street and pulled all of these patients out of the facility and made sure that they got to a safe place," Katz said.

    He said most of the patients were being treated for respiratory distress, dehydration and other heat-related issues. About a dozen remained in emergency care by midday Wednesday.

    The Broward County medical examiner released a statement identifying the victims as Bobby Owens, 84, Manuel Mario Medieta, 96, Miguel Antonio Franco, 92, Estella Hendricks, 71, Gail Nova, 71, Carolyn Eatherly, 78, Betty Hibbard, 84, and Albertina Vega, 99.

    Sanchez said his office is working with the state attorney general's office and federal agencies to determine what kind of criminal charges may be filed against operators of the facilities.

    He said they are determining exactly when the power went out and whether an on-site generator was used after losing power.

    Some windows were closed when officers arrived, and they are trying to figure out whether that was an oversight or the windows were unable to open.

    The police chief said investigators are focusing on the second floor of The Rehabilitation Center, which was "extremely hot" when officers arrived. "We're examining all possibilities," he said.

    In recent years, the facility had been cited by Florida Agency for Health Care Administration for problems with temporary generators.

    During a February 2016 inspection, “the facility was not able to produce any written documentation, to substantiate” use of a temporary generator, according to an inspection document from the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration data base.

    In a December 2014 inspection, the remote generator alarm located near a nurses’ station “failed to function” when tested. The inspectors also noted in a 2014 report that it was the “second temporary generator in at least 3 or more year which did not have any approval blue prints,” as required by the agency.

    The 2014 inspection — conducted by the Florida agency to determine if the facility was fulfilling safety and other requirements for nursing homes participating in the Medicare and Medicaid programs — found the facility Rehabilitation Center was “not in substantial compliance” and the operators were required to take a number of corrective measures, according to a letter to the facility from Florida AHCA.

    Larkin Community Hospital and Jack Michel, a Miami-area doctor, are listed as having the largest ownership stakes in the nursing home, according to government documents.

    In 2006, Larkin, Michel and three other doctors agreed to pay $15.4 million to settle a civil lawsuit filed by the U.S. Justice Department alleging that in 1997 Larkin paid kickbacks to physicians in return for patient admissions.



    Jorge Carballo, the rehabilitation center’s administrator, Jorge Carballo, said the home “is cooperating fully with relevant authorities to investigate the circumstances that led to this unfortunate and tragic outcome. Our hearts go out to the families and friends of those who were affected."

    “The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills has evacuated this morning due to a prolonged power failure to the transformer which powered the facility’s air conditioning system as a result of the hurricane," he said. "Unfortunately, early this morning several patients experienced distress and there were three fatalities at the facility and three at the hospital they were transferred to."

    Florida Gov. Rick Scott said he will "aggressively demand answers on how this tragic event took place."

    "Every facility that is charged with caring for patients must take every action and precaution to keep their patients safe – especially patients who are in poor health," Scott said.

    On Wednesday afternoon in North Miami Beach, some 80 patients at the Krystal Bay Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, which also was without power, were evacuated by bus, trolley and other vehicles, WPLG-TV reports.


    Health care workers walk down streets filled with emergency equipment near Memorial Regional Hospital after five people reportedly died and more than 100 were evacuated at The Rehabilitation Center in Hollywood Hills because of intense heat and no power after Hurricane Irma. (Photo: Jack Gruber, USA TODAY)

    In Hollywood, Fla., Broward County Mayor Barbara Sharief said the victims died from the lack of air conditioning after the storm knocked out electrical power for several days.

    Raelin Lohse-Storey, a spokeswoman for the city of Hollywood, said emergency crews quickly decided they needed to get everyone out.

    "Once we determined that we had multiple deaths at the facilities, and that the facilities are extremely hot, we made the decision to evacuate all of the patients," Lohse-Storey said.



    Jean Lindor, a kitchen worker, said through a Haitian Creole translator that the air conditioner had not been working since the storm and it had been hot inside.

    Paulburn Bogle, a member of the housekeeping staff, said the place had been hot but manageable the past few days. The staff used fans, put cold towels and ice on the patients and gave them cold drinks.

    Crews also began checking the status of the other 42 nursing homes and assisted living facilities in the city.

    Relatives started showing up at the nursing home Wednesday afternoon trying to find out whether their loved ones were among the victims.

    With the center surrounded by crime scene tape, they didn't know where to go. Police started escorting relatives behind the tape, walking them to a mobile command center set up across the street.

    Gloria Flora Mitchell was looking for her sister, a 58-year-old stroke victim who can't talk.

    "We don't know if she's there," she said. "We don't know nothing."

    Hollywood Mayor Josh Levy called on government agencies around the state to initiate immediate welfare checks of elderly and other vulnerable people in their communities.

    Temperatures were in the 90s in much of the state on Wednesday as nearly 2 million people were still out of power on Wednesday, according to Florida Power & Light.

    "I'd really like to implore upon everyone in Florida to check on your elderly neighbors and do what you can to make sure everybody is safe," Levy said.

    The Florida Health Care Association issued a statement calling the deaths in Hollywood a "profound tragedy."

    It said the association, throughout the storm,was in regular communication with its facilities to coordinate needs. That included flagging facilities without power to oversight agencies so that utilities companies could prioritizes locations with the greatest needs.

    It noted that about 150 facilities out of nearly 700 in the state still did not have full power as of Wednesday.
    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubled…Let no man deceive you by any means…..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved….for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie….
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


  38. #38
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    Eight Dead From Sweltering Nursing Home as Florida Struggles After Irma

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/13/u...a.html?mcubz=1

    Eight Dead From Sweltering Nursing Home as Florida Struggles After Irma

    By NEIL REISNER, SHERI FINK and VIVIAN YEESEPT. 13, 2017


    Emergency workers at Memorial Regional Hospital in Hollywood, Fla., on Wednesday, where residents of a sweltering nursing home were taken. Credit Jason Henry for The New York Times

    HOLLYWOOD, Fla. — The first patient was rushed into the emergency room of Memorial Regional Hospital around 3 a.m. on Wednesday, escaping a nursing home that had lost air-conditioning in the muggy days after Hurricane Irma splintered power lines across the state.

    Another arrived at 4 a.m. After a third rescue call, around 5 a.m., the hospital’s staff was concerned enough to walk down the street to check the building themselves.

    What they found was an oven.

    The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills needed to be evacuated immediately. Rescue units were hurrying its more than 100 residents out. Dozens of hospital workers established a command center outside, giving red wristbands to patients with critical, life-threatening conditions and yellow and green ones to those in better shape.

    Checking the nursing home room by room, the hospital staff found three people who were already dead and nearly 40 others who needed red wristbands, many of whom had trouble breathing. The workers rushed them to Memorial’s emergency room, where they were given oxygen. The rest went to other hospitals nearby.

    Four were so ill that they died soon after arriving. In the afternoon, the authorities learned that another had died early in the morning, and was initially uncounted because the person had been taken directly to a funeral home.


    In all, eight were dead.

    “We had no idea the extent of what was going on until we literally sent people room to room to check on people,” said Dr. Randy Katz, the hospital’s chairman of emergency medicine.

    Three days after the hurricane had howled through South Florida, some of the most vulnerable people in the state were dying, not of wind, not of floods, but of what seemed to be an electrical failure.

    Florida was still staggering to its feet on Wednesday, and millions of people across the Southeast were facing days or weeks without power in temperatures that, in the Fort Lauderdale area, climbed to as high as 92 degrees in recent days. The nursing home appeared to have electricity, but the hurricane had knocked out power in a critical spot: A tree had apparently hit the transformer that powered the cooling system, intensifying the subtropical heat from oppressive to fatal.

    State officials, utility executives and the Rehabilitation Center spent Wednesday trading blame over why and how its patients were left to endure such conditions, even though state and federal regulations require nursing home residents to be evacuated if it gets too hot inside.

    The Hollywood Police Department opened a criminal investigation into the deaths of the eight residents, who ranged in age from 71 to 99, and investigators from the state attorney general’s office were also involved. Gov. Rick Scott ordered a moratorium on admissions at the nursing home.

    By day’s end, the unanswered questions were still outstanding, even as the deaths magnified scrutiny on other facilities for the old and disabled.

    More than three million customers in Florida still lacked power Wednesday, including roughly 160 nursing homes, according to the state’s tracking system. After generators fizzled at the Krystal Bay Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, in North Miami Beach, 79 people were evacuated as a precaution.

    “I am going to aggressively demand answers on how this tragic event took place,” Mr. Scott said in a statement. “Although the details of these reported deaths are still under investigation, this situation is unfathomable. Every facility that is charged with caring for patients must take every action and precaution to keep their patients safe — especially patients that are in poor health.”

    Dr. Katz said Memorial’s emergency room had been busy for days treating chronically ill patients who were not coping well with the loss of electricity; some were having trouble breathing in the heat, while others needed access to dialysis. At least one came in from the Rehabilitation Center on Tuesday.
    Photo
    The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, which was evacuated on Wednesday. Eight of its residents died. Credit Jason Henry for The New York Times

    But not until Wednesday morning was there any hint that others there might be in trouble.

    “I don’t know how many more I’m going to get,” said Craig T. Mallak, the chief medical examiner for Broward County, referring to the rising death toll, in an interview. “These are really sick people.”

    The home’s administrator, Jorge Carballo, said in a statement that the transformer connected to the air-conditioning system had experienced a “prolonged power failure,” prompting the staff to contact Florida Power & Light. While waiting for a fix, he said, they set up mobile cooling units and fans and tried to make sure residents were hydrated and comfortable.

    “We are devastated by these losses,” he said. “We are fully cooperating with all authorities and regulators to assess what went wrong.”

    He did not say whether the home had considered evacuating its residents sooner.

    Mr. Scott said that the Rehabilitation Center was responsible for the safety of its patients, and that state health officials had told the home’s administrators to call 911 if they believed patients’ health was at risk.

    One relative who visited on Tuesday afternoon said she had been so alarmed by the conditions inside that she herself called Florida Power & Light four times. The relative, Eli Pina, said the power company told her that help was on the way. But none came.

    “It felt like 110 degrees,” said Ms. Pina, whose 96-year-old mother, Mirelle Pina, was evacuated from the nursing home on Wednesday. “I think it’s the fault of FPL,” she added. “They said they were going to come but they didn’t.”

    In an interview with the local ABC station, Dave Long, who worked for an air-conditioning company that serviced the nursing home, said he had been asking Florida Power & Light since Monday to fix a fuse in the system that had “popped” out because of damage from the hurricane.

    “We’ve been calling and calling,” Mr. Long said. “I can’t do anything until we get that fuse popped back in.”

    Rob Gould, a spokesman for the power company, said at a news conference Wednesday that the company met in March with Broward County officials to discuss hurricane preparations, but that the officials had not flagged the nursing home as “top-tier” critical infrastructure that would need power first. Memorial Regional Hospital, where many residents were taken, was in the top tier.

    Broward County officials, though, said in a statement that they had relied on a Florida Power & Light document saying that nursing homes were “non-critical, but play a decisive role in community recovery,” suggesting they were considered a high priority for restoration but not the highest. On Tuesday morning, after the nursing home reported that the air-conditioning was out, county officials asked the utility to make it, along with other nursing homes, a higher priority, the officials said.

    The utility “said there were too many to escalate all of them,” Barbara Sharief, the Broward County mayor, said in an interview.

    Kristen Knapp, a spokeswoman for the Florida Health Care Association, an advocate for nursing homes, said she was encouraging other facilities to “go ahead and think about moving” residents if they did not think they could keep them safe from the heat.

    Florida requires nursing homes to ensure emergency power in a disaster as well as food, water, staffing and 72 hours of supplies. A new federal rule, which takes effect in November, adds that the alternative source of energy must be capable of maintaining safe temperatures.

    In general, nursing homes are required to keep temperatures between 71 and 81 degrees, according to the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration. That rule applies to nursing homes certified for the first time after October 1990. However, facilities certified before that time “still must maintain safe and comfortable temperature levels,” the agency’s guidance says.

    The causes of death had not been determined Wednesday. Medical professionals said there could be other reasons besides intense heat. Portable generators, as well as other appliances, can cause fatal carbon monoxide poisoning if used indoors.
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    “It is reasonable to suspect,” said Dr. Beau Briese, an emergency physician at Houston Methodist Hospital who has treated many cases of carbon monoxide poisoning.

    One of those who died on Wednesday, Carolyn Jo Eatherly, 78, was living at Rehabilitation Center because of Alzheimer’s she developed many years ago, a close friend, Linda Carol Horton, 65, said Wednesday.

    “She couldn’t be by herself, no way,” especially under extreme circumstances, Ms. Horton said. “She would die.”
    Photo
    Carolyn Jo Eatherly, left, with her friend Linda Horton in a photo provided by Ms. Horton. Ms. Eatherly, a resident of the Hollywood nursing home, died Wednesday.

    As Ms. Eatherly’s dementia progressed, Ms. Horton took her in for as long as she could. But about 10 years ago, Ms. Eatherly had to go into nursing care. Ms. Horton took care of her friend’s four cats until they died.

    She hated thinking of Ms. Eatherly helpless in the overwhelming heat.

    “I’m really saddened at what happened,” she said.

    The 152-bed nursing home was acquired in 2015 by Larkin Community Hospital, a growing Miami-area network that includes hospitals, nursing homes and assisted living facilities.

    Florida officials had cited a deficiency related to the building’s generator as recently as February 2016. An inspection called for backup power systems to be “installed, tested and maintained” by March 2016, records show.

    While praising the nursing home for above-average staffing, Medicare assigned it an overall “below average” rating, with two of five stars. A health inspection report dated from March raises issues with housekeeping, food service and resident cleanliness, but not with the heating or cooling system.

    Dr. Jack Michel, the health-care network’s current chairman, did not respond to requests for comment. Dr. Michel and Larkin Community were among defendants who paid $15.4 million in 2006 to settle federal and state civil claims that the hospital paid kickbacks to doctors in exchange for patient admissions.

    Elsewhere in Florida, the grim work of clearing debris and identifying people who had died during the storm was continuing. President Trump planned to visit the Naples area on Thursday.

    Besides the nursing home deaths, at least 14 deaths in Florida have been tied to the storm and its aftermath, with six more in South Carolina and Georgia. Across the Caribbean, 38 had died.

    At least eight died in the Florida Keys, and authorities feared that many more had drowned as they tried to ride out the storm in their boats. One man died of a stroke while emergency services were unavailable and the hospital was closed.

    Among the dead from the Hollywood center was Gail Nova, 71, who had worked as an X-ray and mammography technician before her own health declined.

    Her son, Jeffrey Nova, 48, said they had chosen the Rehabilitation Center for its round-the-clock skilled nursing care and proximity to the hospital.

    “People died under circumstances where it could have been prevented,” he said. “I want accountability. I think that’s something everyone will want.”


    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubled…Let no man deceive you by any means…..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved….for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie….
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


  39. #39
    Relatives started showing up at the nursing home Wednesday afternoon trying to find out whether their loved ones were among the victims.


    Now, you are concerned....
    Just where the hell were you before the hurricane hit????

    Sad....

    May God help those that survived and keep those that died in His arms....

    Texican....
    An American Christian....
    Live Free and Die Free....

  40. #40
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texican View Post

    Now, you are concerned....
    Just where the hell were you before the hurricane hit????

    Sad....

    May God help those that survived and keep those that died in His arms....

    Texican....
    An American Christian....
    Live Free and Die Free....
    I don't entirely blame THEM.

    They ENTRUSTED their relatives to MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS whom they BELIEVED would TAKE CARE OF their folks---


    not just flat ABANDON and IGNORE them dying like flies around them when a crisis hit---


    WITH A FUNCTIONING HOSPITAL ONLY FIVE-MINUTES' WALK AWAY!!!!!



    THERE IS NO EXCUSE FOR WHAT THOSE NURSING-HOME STAFFERS DID!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubled…Let no man deceive you by any means…..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved….for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie….
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


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