Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 71, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


ENVR The scars of Alaska’s 1964 earthquake still have lessons for us
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1

    The scars of Alaska’s 1964 earthquake still have lessons for us

    https://www.adn.com/opinions/2017/08...essons-for-us/



    On March 27, 1964, at 5:36 p.m., the second largest earthquake ever recorded slammed Alaska with unimaginable force, triggering landslides and deadly tsunamis across thousands of square miles.

    The Great Alaska Earthquake had a "moment magnitude" one-tenth larger than the catastrophic 2011 Japanese earthquake, releasing close to 50 percent more energy while shaking the region for nearly five minutes and terrorizing tens of thousands.

    Tsunamis and landslides caused most of the 131 deaths. The toll would have been enormous in a heavily populated area. In Seattle, people atop the Space Needle could feel it sway, while the entire planet vibrated and Florida moved a couple of inches.

    ['It seemed to last forever': Memories of the Great Alaska Earthquake]

    There is much that every Alaskan should know about the Good Friday Earthquake and the most important legacy of the disaster — scientific work that helped unlock the mystery of plate tectonics.

    The evidence compiled in Alaska helped provide proof for the theory of plate tectonics, which New York Times reporter Henry Fountain says is as consequential in its own way as Darwin's theory of evolution.

    Fountain's new book, "The Great Quake: How the Biggest Earthquake in North America Changed Our Understanding of the Planet," is a powerful lesson that the term "solid ground" is one of humanity's greatest illusions.

    As the aftershocks of the giant earthquake continued, the U.S. Geological Survey could find no obvious faults on the surface for the quake, which began with a rupture about 15 miles underground, some 75 miles east of Anchorage.

    [VIDEO: The Great Alaska Earthquake]

    The book is in large part a story of how scientist George Plafker and others gained insights and developed conclusions based on first-hand observations, which included making hundreds of measurements in land changes.

    They could do this because the northern acorn barnacle, an organism that attaches to rocks on the coast, always left a record of the near high-water mark. The barnacle line offered key evidence of land heights before and after.

    More than 800 measurements, translated onto maps, showed that about 200,000 square miles either rose or dropped. Near Whittier the land had dropped by almost 7 feet, while Montague Island shot up 38 feet. That island also moved about 60 feet to the southeast.

    The theory of plate tectonics holds that the Earth has more than a dozen plates that move, including the Pacific plate south of Alaska, which is dipping under the North American plate at a rate of a couple of inches a year.

    Small movements become significant over a few centuries with the buildup of enormous pressure between the plates, compressing the land near the point at which they intersect. The periodic release of the pressure takes the form of giant "megathrust earthquakes," including the 500-mile rupture in 1964.
    The 1964 earthquake was the biggest ever recorded in the U.S. (USGS map)


    Fountain writes that it was near the end of the summer in 1964, when Plafker was in a car in downtown Anchorage, that he had his revelation about why that city and a big chunk of Southcentral Alaska, from Kodiak Island and the Kenai Peninsula to Glennallen, had dropped several feet in some areas.

    "When he was alone with his thoughts for a moment in the backseat of the car, it hit him," Fountain writes. "The sunken land had, in a sense, been along for the ride. It hadn't moved so much as it had been pulled, from one side, by the uplifted land as it was moving laterally to the southeast."

    "What happens when something is pulled like that? It stretches and thins out," Fountain writes. With the earthquake, the pressure between the plates released and the land rebounded like a coiled spring, the extension making it thinner and lower.

    With the release of the pressure, much of southern Alaska lurched toward the south, up to 20 yards in some spots, while the ocean floor jumped. The Pacific plate moved about 9 feet under the North American plate, according to one calculation.

    [1964 earthquake looms large in childhood memory of Valdez]

    The Good Friday Earthquake gave rise to many articles and books, some heavy with powerful anecdotes about the tsunami that destroyed Chenega, the dock collapse in Valdez, the fires in Seward and how Fourth Avenue in Anchorage went to pieces as children in Anchorage were watching "Fireball XL5" on TV.


    The strength of Fountain's book is that the veteran science reporter balances anecdotes with a clear explanation of the technical details and what has been learned during the past half-century.

    That science gives strong indications that the region from British Columbia to Northern California, where 10 million people live, has conditions similar to those in Alaska. Over the last 300 years, the stresses have been building, "just as they did in Alaska until March 27, 1964."

    "Alaskans were caught unawares back then; but thanks to the scientific understanding gained from that event, today the people of the Pacific Northwest know they need to prepare," he writes.

    Columnist Dermot Cole can be reached at dermot@alaskadispatch.com.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    In the Comedy Relief Bunker
    Posts
    7,461
    A friend of mine was in Alaska during that earthquake. It lasted for minutes and was so bad he fell to the ground and could not stand, no matter how hard he tried, until it was over. He said the power lines were twirling around like jump ropes.

    Worse the upper west coast and Canada is way overdue for a mega thrust earthquake and tsunami event. The most recent one to occur was off the coast of Chile, and that was a 9.0 plus event.
    Official TB2K Comedy Relief ; I resemble that remark! ; Aloha Snackbar; Nuke a Gay Whale For Christ and other Political Incorrectness
    Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.
    I've had a perfectly wonderful evening. But this wasn't it. FRA

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    32,876
    I was a little kid living in Hampton bays and knew nothing about this until many years later.

  4. #4
    a couple of video's that will shed some light on the 1964 Alaska earth quake.




    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9ZA6-Mc09s





    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lE2j10xyOgI

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N. Minnesota
    Posts
    9,691
    I was just a young kid, but I remember it distinctly - The Good Friday Quake. In fact, it made such an impression that not one Good Friday has passed since that I don't think of it. I remember the National Geographic magazines that came out afterward - the pictures and illustrations were amazing.

    When/not if something like that happens further down the coast - look out.

  6. #6
    I was also very young, but I still remember looking at the black and white photos from either Life or Look Magazine that my parents bought right after it happened; back then those were the two "go-to" news sources if you wanted pictures.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Between Holy & Crap
    Posts
    111,771
    I remember. The pictures were mind-boggling. People were aghast and talked about it for weeks. It was bad.

    One I was even more horrified by was the Northridge quake in CA though. Shivers.

    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  8. #8
    I still get tense every Good Friday--and when I was in my teens and twenties I was that person that bolted for the door when a little one went longer than normal. Usually met other folks at the doorway, doing the same thing.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    13,082
    I've heard that they're re-building houses on the same slopes that were hardest hit in 1964, the slopes where some people apparently literally rode slabs of land sliding down the hillsides. So one has to wonder who is learning what lessons.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    11,525
    One of my neighborhood friends told me about how he survived the 1964 quake, the shaking was Horrific and he said that he saw a naked lady running down the street with a shower cap on.

    So apparently she was bathing at the time. Bad timing!

    I totally remember the Seattle quake of 1965.


    I was four, living in the Surrey Downs neighborhood in Bellevue, Wa., sitting on the couch and the earthquake hit Exactly right after I think, a "Quisp and Quake" cereal commercial.

    In these commercials, Quisp and Quake were Always going at each other.

    So I shout at my mom above the roar of the earthquake (it was really loud, she was in the kitchen and stares at me with a look like someone had just goosed her), to stop Quisp and Quake from fighting.

    As I literally imagined that they were up in the sky above us fighting.

    Dad came running out of the bathroom and cut himself shaving and right behind him was my baby sister's crib with her in it, gently rolling halfway into the hall from her bedroom. Mom kept the wood floors pretty slick and the crib had wheels on it.

    Don't know where my middle sister was, but my brother was on his way to the Surrey Downs Elementary School just a few blocks away with his group of friends.

    The jolts from the quake were so hard that they knocked my brother Bob and the other boys off their feet and Bob fell onto a big pile of dog doo and had to come straight home and change his pants. V
    Last edited by vessie; 08-13-2017 at 02:18 PM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Klamath County, Oregon
    Posts
    8,908
    We lived in Alaska during the Good Friday earthquake, and I remember it (I was almost seven). We lived in Delta Junction, about three hundred miles north of Anchorage, and we felt it strongly there. There were cracks in the frozen ground, which scared one of my younger brothers, who was playing outside. My mother was in the trailer house we lived in, leaning against the wall while feeding one of my baby sisters, and at first she thought someone was pushing on the trailer, possibly with a bulldozer.

    My maternal grandparents lived in Valdez, where a bunch of people died on one of the docks, and it was a couple of days before we were able to get ahold of Grandma and Granddad to be sure they hadn't been on that dock, too (people were watching a ship come in). Grandma worked at the state mental hospital, which was in Valdez at the time, and she was at work when the earthquake hit. She said she was in the dining hall; she grabbed hold of a pillar to keep from sliding around as the building rocked back and forth. A patient in a wheelchair was rolling from one side of the room to the other; Grandma was able to catch hold of the wheelchair and anchor them. When the quake stopped, she and other employees loaded all the patients into their personal vehicles and took them to higher ground, and eventually on to Anchorage, a three hundred mile trip.

    One of my dad's friends was driving truck between Anchorage and Fairbanks; he was near Anchorage when the earthquake hit, and had to put boards down in order to drive across some of the cracks in the road. I will add that a more recent earthquake farther into the Interior of Alaska shifted a section of road sideways several feet. They've repaired that, but you can still see where the road jogs.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    35,033
    Fat Man constantly babbles about the Ketchup Man, which I've pinned down to one of three locations... and Ketchikan, Alaska fits the description the closest, as he has mentioned Queen Charlie more than once when talking about the ketchup man.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Freeholder View Post
    We lived in Alaska during the Good Friday earthquake, and I remember it (I was almost seven). We lived in Delta Junction, about three hundred miles north of Anchorage, and we felt it strongly there. There were cracks in the frozen ground, which scared one of my younger brothers, who was playing outside. My mother was in the trailer house we lived in, leaning against the wall while feeding one of my baby sisters, and at first she thought someone was pushing on the trailer, possibly with a bulldozer.

    My maternal grandparents lived in Valdez, where a bunch of people died on one of the docks, and it was a couple of days before we were able to get ahold of Grandma and Granddad to be sure they hadn't been on that dock, too (people were watching a ship come in). Grandma worked at the state mental hospital, which was in Valdez at the time, and she was at work when the earthquake hit. She said she was in the dining hall; she grabbed hold of a pillar to keep from sliding around as the building rocked back and forth. A patient in a wheelchair was rolling from one side of the room to the other; Grandma was able to catch hold of the wheelchair and anchor them. When the quake stopped, she and other employees loaded all the patients into their personal vehicles and took them to higher ground, and eventually on to Anchorage, a three hundred mile trip.

    One of my dad's friends was driving truck between Anchorage and Fairbanks; he was near Anchorage when the earthquake hit, and had to put boards down in order to drive across some of the cracks in the road. I will add that a more recent earthquake farther into the Interior of Alaska shifted a section of road sideways several feet. They've repaired that, but you can still see where the road jogs.

    Kathleen
    I remember seeing photos of that last quake's damage. There were photos on the wall at Wilbur's when I was working on my license, showing Joe Wilbur looking down into one the big cracks that opened up down by Portage. Of course, some smart alec had captioned it "Ann....are you there?"

    My strongest memory is watching the house swaying--it was built on pilings, and being terrified because my father was going back inside to put out the stove, in case it fell over.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    zone 6a
    Posts
    24,276
    Bf's aunt was living in a small trailer with her children in Anchorage when that quake hit, she said that when it was over she peeked out the windows and saw that the land had fallen all around the trailer many feet, but the trailer was unharmed, it was sitting on a mesa of land that didn't crumble.
    Now the Lord is that Spirit: and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is Liberty. II Cor. 3:17

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    11,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Flippper View Post
    Bf's aunt was living in a small trailer with her children in Anchorage when that quake hit, she said that when it was over she peeked out the windows and saw that the land had fallen all around the trailer many feet, but the trailer was unharmed, it was sitting on a mesa of land that didn't crumble.
    Phew!

    She sure had a 'Wylie Coyote' moment back then.

    And a mesa added in to boot! V

  16. #16
    I was in Fairbanks, AK in 64 during the quake but was in or starting 1st grade. We were out in the bush on very rough gravel roads. We didn't know there was a quake until we got back into town and turned on the radio. The roads were so bad, my parents just thought we were being jostled by the road. Not much of a tale to tell, fortunately.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.