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HEALTH The Next Gluten Plant proteins called lectins are an emerging source of confusion and fear
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  1. #1
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    The Next Gluten Plant proteins called lectins are an emerging source of confusion and fear

    The Next Gluten
    Plant proteins called lectins are an emerging source of confusion and fear.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/a...gluten/523686/
    JAMES HAMBLIN APR 24, 2017 HEALTH


    Two weeks ago, a publicist sent me an early copy of a book that claimed it would change everything I thought I knew about food.

    That happens a lot. This one caught my eye because it warned of the “hidden dangers lurking in my salad bowl,” and I was eating a salad.

    The book, The Plant Paradox, has an image of an artfully smashed tomato on the cover, and it tells readers that eating tomatoes is “inciting a kind of chemical warfare in our bodies, causing inflammatory reactions that can lead to weight gain and serious health conditions.”

    Tomatoes and ill-timed references to chemical warfare are, apparently, only a small part of the problem. The Plant Paradox urgently warns against eating wheat, beans, and peanuts, among other plants.

    The publisher—the “health, wellness, lifestyle, and inspirational” division of HarperCollins called Harper Wave—elaborates that readers will learn to be wary of compounds found in “grains of all kinds (especially whole wheat), beans and legumes (especially soy), nuts (especially almonds), fruits and vegetables (eggplant, tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, etc.)” in addition to “dairy and eggs.”


    That doesn’t leave much on the table. In the midst of soaring rates of obesity and diabetes that many experts believe are clearly linked to an abundance of low-nutrient, low-fiber, sugar-enhanced, heavily processed foods, it could seem an odd time to be warning people against fruits and vegetables. Yet the author, Steven Gundry, appears to be legitimately medically credentialed: a grey-haired, arms-folded, white-coat transplant surgeon whose biography touts a Yale degree. He holds patents on several medical devices, including cardiac cannulae and a suction retractor. He wears glasses. His book carries the endorsement of Dr. Oz.

    For readers who are experiencing “cravings, digestive issues, headaches, brain fog, lack of energy, aching joints, morning stiffness, adult acne, or a host of other conditions you just can’t shake,” the publisher’s sell is enticing: “Americans spend billions of dollars on gluten-free diets in an effort to protect their health. But what if we’ve been missing the root of the problem?”

    We have been, most health experts agree. But the root of the problem is ... plants?

    Come to think of it, I had recently read that Tom Brady and Gisele Bündchen’s diet guru severely limits their tomato intake. (“Tomatoes trickle in every now and then, but just maybe once a month. I’m very cautious about tomatoes. They cause inflammation.”) I thought that might have been an aberrant belief about the pro-inflammatory properties of one plant.


    But no. The common factor among foods on the book’s list is a broad category of proteins called lectins. And those proteins are where the author of The Plant Paradox really targets his ire. Gundry writes on his web site, “I believe lectins are the #1 Biggest Danger in the American Diet.”

    The book itself is equally severe. It whips readers back and forth between hyperbolic claims of danger and TED-style clichés that confer a sense of superiority upon believers—a promise of being privy to life-altering secrets. The preface begins with a sentence that has almost certainly been written before: “Suppose that in the next few pages I told you that everything you thought you knew about your diet, your health, and your weight is wrong?”

    Are you telling me, or is this an exercise in supposition? How do you know what I know? And why do you have access to a truth that no one else in the world has? Is it possible you’re able to presume that your argument will totally upend my understanding of nutrition because the argument is so far afield that no one could take it seriously?

    People do, though. In fact, the book seems to be a sort of culmination of a long-percolating hypothesis about the imminent dangers of lectins. It’s especially common among purveyors of dietary supplements. The story goes: We need nutrients to survive, but many plants makes us sick, so synthetic supplement pills and powders are the prudent approach.


    The idea is based in just enough evidence to be seriously convincing in the right hands. So for people concerned with “addressing the root of the problem”—unscrupulous marketing messages—and staving off another fad like the global gluten obsession, it’s worth considering lectins.

    In 1988, a British hospital served its staff a special lunch for “healthy eating day.” One dish contained red kidney beans. A medical journal recounts the aftermath. At 3:00 p.m. a surgical assistant vomited in the operating room. Over the next four hours, the hospital staff was rocked by vomiting and diarrhea. I can end the description there.

    Everyone recovered by the next day, and tests of the food didn’t reveal any of the common causes of food poisoning. Eventually the incident was traced to the red kidney beans, which have an especially high concentration of the lectin phytohaemagglutinin.

    This is a lectin that’s known to be dangerous, and it’s why people read that kidney beans are harmful when eaten raw. For example, a reader of Penn State University’s Home Food Preservation advice site writes: “I read that kidney beans are harmful when eaten raw. Several day care and nursery schools have dry beans (different varieties) out for kids to play with. What danger would there be if a child ate a few of these raw beans?”

    Possibly some danger. The site goes on to advise the parent—presumably a parent—that Kidney Bean Poisoning is caused by phytohaemagglutinin, and that different types of lectins are found in many species of beans. As few as four undercooked kidney beans can bring on symptoms, but lectins are inactivated with cooking, “so fully cooked or canned kidney beans are safe to eat.” (Though undercooking may actually increase lectin activity, making the beans more dangerous than were they eaten raw.)


    Lectins are a group of proteins that bind to carbohydrates. They are sometimes referred to as a type of “anti-nutrient,” a category that also includes fiber. This term refers to compounds in foods that aren’t nutrients, and whose role in human health is unclear, but may have evolved in plants to dissuade predators.

    David Jenkins, a professor of nutritional sciences and medicine at the University of Toronto, explained to me, “Lectins help protect plants from being digested, so they’ve been called anti-nutrients for a long time.” Lectins levels are especially high in legumes (e.g., black beans, soybeans, lima beans, kidney beans, and lentils) and grain products. When eaten in those foods, the lectins typically bind to carbohydrates and pass through the human digestive tract. But when the starches in the above plants haven’t begun to be hydrolyzed by cooking, unbound lectins are free to interact with cells in our intestines. That interaction can, in some cases, cause symptoms of food poisoning.

    “Presumably if you take a load of cooked food—with lectins, which may or may not be destroyed by the heat—you’ve also got some floating carbohydrates, so a lot of the lectins are effectively deactivated,” said Jenkins. “But if you eat raw food of certain types––the nightshade family especially and some of the legumes—then you may get a lot of lectins and not much of the carbohydrate that lectins can attack. But they can attack the carbohydrate on your cells. So maybe it’s not a good idea.”


    Stories of lectin poisoning are not especially rare. In The Independent the food writer Vicky Jones describes a dinner party in which she used Greek butter beans in a dish without boiling them first. Soon everyone was violently ill. It came on so quickly that before they could consider going to the emergency room, “death seemed preferable to [trekking to the] hospital.”

    Jones recovered fully, as most lectin-poisoned people do. Most. There are cases like that of the most famous person to be killed by an umbrella, the dissident journalist Georgi Markov. This was in 1978. He was standing at a bus top when something pierced the back of his thigh. It was an injection delivered through the tip of an umbrella carried by a man who ran off.

    Markov grew febrile and died four days later. Pathology reports said the cause of death was a microscopic dose of the poison ricin. Ricin is found in the seeds of the castorbean plant, a shrub-like entity with large, long-stemmed leaves. In a world that fetishizes natural products and remedies, ricin is as natural as natural gets. And it is, you guessed it, a type of lectin.

    Which then makes you think, maybe the bookseller’s reference to lectins inciting chemical warfare in our bodies isn’t far off?


    The author Steven Gundry left his position as chairman of cardiothoracic surgery at Loma Linda Medical Center 15 years ago to focus on food-based health interventions. The departure was occasioned by a personal bodily transformation that included shedding 70 pounds. According to his bio at the World Wellness Institute, he and his wife, Penny, now live in Palm Springs and Montecito, California, with their three dogs, Bella, Black Pearl, and Fanny Foo Foo.


    Gundry graduated from Yale in 1972 and went on to earn a medical degree from the Medical College of Georgia, though the latter affiliation is rarely mentioned when he gives interviews and does promotional videos about his “revolutionary new method.” Today he is, he says, in high demand from patients around the world. His list of patients includes the self-help entrepreneur and seller of dietary supplements Tony Robbins. I asked Gundry how that came about.

    “Tony called me up one day, says, ‘Hey, can I come and see you?’” he told me recently. “I go, ‘Oh, hi, Tony.’ He says, ‘I think I want you to be my doctor.’ And I say, ‘Okay.’ And I still remember the day.”

    The story wasn’t as good as I had hoped. But it ended with a captivating moment: “We sat in the exam room and we chatted, and he left and he said, ‘You know I’m a really good judge of character. I’m a judge of the real deal. And he says, you know something, you’re the real deal. And yeah, I want you to be my doctor.”

    The decision wasn’t clearly lectin-related. I asked Gundry when he became convinced that these were the leading danger in our food system. “I first studied the effect of plants on humans for my Yale thesis,” he said, “… and it was a 185-page thesis, and luckily I got honors on it.” From there he told of his personal transformation, when he was “so overweight despite running 30 miles a week and going to the gym one hour every day.”


    That’s an impressive amount of time in the gym for anyone, much less a surgeon. I didn’t get a clear picture of the origin of his lectin conviction, but he did assure me that he is reaching people.

    “The interesting thing about my whole program is that I have never advertised what I do,” he said, describing a long wait list at his practice. I pointed out that I had watched a YouTube infomercial that lasted almost an hour. I asked, “In what sense do you not advertise?”

    “Oh, I mean, my practice. I’ve never gone and spoken to an audience, you know, come and be my patient. I’ve never taken an ad in a newspaper, come and be my patient. And the YouTube is not to get patients into my office, it’s to have them try supplements.”

    Yes, he also sells supplements he recommends. The last 20 or so minutes of his infomercial is a string of claims about how supplies are running low, and it’s important that you act immediately, and that if you do manage to get through to a customer representative you should order as much as you have room to store—the shelf life is great, etc. And the necessity of supplements is the crucial argument of the book. He writes, “Getting all of the nutrients you need simply cannot be done without supplements.”

    The GundryMD line of products includes something he invented called vitamin G6. Another is a “lectin shield” that’s “designed to neutralize the effects of lectins.” These are available on his website for $79.99. There you can also get six jars of Vital Reds for $254.70. (Despite the name and claims to “boost energy and metabolism,” these reds claim not to be amphetamines.) I asked him when he got into the chemistry business.


    “For years and years and years and years, my patients would complain to me, ‘Why don't you come out with a line of powders?’” he said. “Because I hate swallowing pills, and I hate going to four different, five different stores and getting the supplements you want me to take. Why don't you just come up with your own line?’ And I’d go, yeah, yeah, yeah. And my first three supplements were powders, because I listened to my women patients say, ‘Please, don't make us swallow pills. They hate it.”

    Gundry assured me that the conflict of interest shouldn’t undermine his authority. “Unlike a lot of other books I've seen which are basically hawking products, this book is hawking getting yourself healthy with basically correct food choices.”

    “Right—”

    “Now, if they want to buy my products, that’s fine. You know, I’ll certainly tell people what they are.”


    This degree of conflicts of interest is, in science and journalism, the sort of thing that invalidates an expert opinion. But the books and YouTube videos succeed because they strike at a primal type of fear. It’s easy to reason that if there’s even a 1-percent chance that this doctor is right, why not play it safe and avoid lectins?

    For one, some research suggests that certain lectins could actually be beneficial in activating elements of the immune system. A lectin in mistletoe, for example, seems to inhibit growth of tumor cells. The evidence is very preliminary, but it’s enough to suggest that these proteins aren’t simply tolerable in small amounts, but that exposure to them serves a purpose.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  2. #2
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    https://www.amazon.com/Plant-Paradox...=plant+paradox



    “Dr. Gundry is a true trailblazer, always at the forefront of scientific knowledge. The Plant Paradox shows the world what pioneer thinking is about and is a must-read book for anyone interested in being as healthy as nature has designed them to be.” —Alejandro Junger MD, New York Times bestselling author of Clean, Clean Gut and Clean Eats

    “The Plant Paradox elegantly explains how plants defend themselves from being consumed by humans, and how eating the wrong ones at the wrong times immeasurably hurts our health. An eye-opening read.” —Mehmet Oz, MD, Professor of Surgery, New York Presbyterian/Columbia University

    Most of us have heard of gluten—a protein found in wheat that causes widespread inflammation in the body. Americans spend billions of dollars on gluten-free diets in an effort to protect their health. But what if we’ve been missing the root of the problem? In The Plant Paradox, renowned cardiologist Dr. Steven Gundry reveals that gluten is just one variety of a common, and highly toxic, plant-based protein called lectin. Lectins are found not only in grains like wheat but also in the “gluten-free” foods most of us commonly regard as healthy, including many fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, and conventional dairy products. These proteins, which are found in the seeds, grains, skins, rinds, and leaves of plants, are designed by nature to protect them from predators (including humans). Once ingested, they incite a kind of chemical warfare in our bodies, causing inflammatory reactions that can lead to weight gain and serious health conditions.

    At his waitlist-only clinics in California, Dr. Gundry has successfully treated tens of thousands of patients suffering from autoimmune disorders, diabetes, leaky gut syndrome, heart disease, and neurodegenerative diseases with a protocol that detoxes the cells, repairs the gut, and nourishes the body. Now, in The Plant Paradox, he shares this clinically proven program with readers around the world.

    The simple (and daunting) fact is, lectins are everywhere. Thankfully, Dr. Gundry offers simple hacks we easily can employ to avoid them, including:

    Peel your veggies. Most of the lectins are contained in the skin and seeds of plants; simply peeling and de-seeding vegetables (like tomatoes and peppers) reduces their lectin content.
    Shop for fruit in season. Fruit contain fewer lectins when ripe, so eating apples, berries, and other lectin-containing fruits at the peak of ripeness helps minimize your lectin consumption.
    Swap your brown rice for white. Whole grains and seeds with hard outer coatings are designed by nature to cause digestive distress—and are full of lectins.
    With a full list of lectin-containing foods and simple substitutes for each, a step-by-step detox and eating plan, and delicious lectin-free recipes, The Plant Paradox illuminates the hidden dangers lurking in your salad bowl—and shows you how to eat whole foods in a whole new way
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  3. #3
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    I have a couple of friends that were put on lectin free diets recently. Basically all of their fibro, RA, and other symptoms disappeared.

    One friend in particular has a type of MS where she's fine for weeks on end and then would wake up needing either a walker or a wheelchair and has stated that she has had some improvements now that she's mostly lectin free.

    I don't know that it's possible to go entirely lectin free, but maybe removing some of the major culprits from your diet, if you have fibro or RA, might improve your pain levels. I know when I went potato free it was like night and day for me, I went from chronic deep pain, swollen joints, and feeling like I was in a deep fog all of the time to almost pain free - still got osteoarthritis so that ain't going away anytime soon. My joints are no longer swollen either.

    Litmus test, anytime I come into contact with potatoes or potato by products my joints swell up within seconds, my asthma goes nuts, and the pain, OMG the pain we're talking 8.5 and higher within minutes of consuming potatoes or it's by products.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  4. #4
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    So why do you get hit by those horrible symptoms after eating potatoes (or other nightshades) and the rest of us do not?

    Our good luck/your bad? Do you have an unusual lectin sensitivity?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by FarmerJohn View Post
    So why do you get hit by those horrible symptoms after eating potatoes (or other nightshades) and the rest of us do not?

    Our good luck/your bad? Do you have an unusual lectin sensitivity?
    It has to do with the acid in the potatoes, solanic (???) acid I think it is??? I don't remember the name but my allergist was all over it like fleas on a dog! All of my docs were amazed at the transformation that occurred. I'm working on weight loss now that I can move, and breath, like a normal human once again.

    ETA I can eat other veggies in the nightshade family with no issues at all, it's only potatoes that cause me problems.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  6. #6
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    So we shouldn't eat Plants

    So we shouldn't eat Animals

    So we shouldn't eat Artificial foods

    What can we eat?!?!

    I personally eat what I grow or raise on land that is healthy. How do I know my land is healthy? I don't have some organic seal at the end of my drive....I know my land is healthy because I have frogs, toads, fireflies and squirrels.

    I am healthy:::: You know why?!??

    I stay on my feet and stay busy even when it hurts....I sleep good cause I work hard

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warm Wisconsin View Post
    So we shouldn't eat Plants

    So we shouldn't eat Animals

    So we shouldn't eat Artificial foods

    What can we eat?!?!

    I personally eat what I grow or raise on land that is healthy. How do I know my land is healthy? I don't have some organic seal at the end of my drive....I know my land is healthy because I have frogs, roads, fireflies and squirrels.

    I am healthy:::: You know why?!??

    I stay on my feet and stay busy even when it hurts....I sleep good cause I work hard
    Not at all. What the book goes into detail on is many people of european extraction cannot handle high loads of lectin in their diets, whereas indigenous peoples can... it all depends on how far you are, genetically speaking, from being indigenous. For most an elimination diet will inform them of what they need to get rid of in their diet. Another words, if you have joint pain, swelling, etc. stop eating nightshades for a month and see if this improves your situation. Then add one or two of the nightshades back in to see if it causes excessive pain, joint swelling, etc.,

    For some people like me it's potatoes, soy, and gluten.

    For my best friend it's apples, pears, and plums that cause her to swell up, and experience intense pain. For my other bestie it's anything in the allium family, which sucks and big time for her cause she really loves her garlic!

    There are all sorts of allergic symptoms that appear before anaphylaxis occurs that range from Fibro symptoms, to IBS, to swollen joints, or even acne.

    Fo
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  8. #8
    I read that if you cook your foods in a pressure cooker that it eliminates most of the lectins.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aunt Peg View Post
    I read that if you cook your foods in a pressure cooker that it eliminates most of the lectins.
    This was something else that was brought up in the discussion. Also the pressure cooker doesn't destroy all of the vital nutrients like a crock pot does.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  10. #10
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    I've consulted with Dr. Gundry, and have followed his diet for over two years. Honestly, he's the real deal. I have autoimmune issues and additional major health concerns; he runs a detailed panel of blood tests on his patients (including a number of inflammatory markers) that demonstrate the power of his diet and supplement program. Both my symptoms and my lab tests have shown remarkable improvement due to following his advice.

    Here is an incredible interview of Dr. G with Dave Asprey (the Bulletproof coffee guy) about the diet, the Plant Paradox book, and much more:

    https://blog.bulletproof.com/how-nut...en-gundry-417/

  11. #11
    From a family of omnivores, now working around an increasing list of problem foods among family and friends: lactose, chicken, peanuts, beans, kiwi, gluten intolerance (medically verified,) soy, grains, corn, some kinds of rice...geez Louise! Now if we go for lycopene rich foods we need to find out if lectins are causing chronic/acute inflammatory conditions? *sigh*

    Thanks, PW....I think...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjoi View Post
    From a family of omnivores, now working around an increasing list of problem foods among family and friends: lactose, chicken, peanuts, beans, kiwi, gluten intolerance (medically verified,) soy, grains, corn, some kinds of rice...geez Louise! Now if we go for lycopene rich foods we need to find out if lectins are causing chronic/acute inflammatory conditions? *sigh*

    Thanks, PW....I think...
    You may want to read the Plant Paradox book. Peanuts contain lectin and this is the protein that causes the allergy, ditto this on rice, corn, wheat, certain types of beans, etc. From your list it would look like the culprit is lectin.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  13. #13
    I don't know, I feel so good when I eat potatoes.

    I am getting kind of jaded because of all the crap and junk they are putting in our foods, but also because there is "fake new,s" all right: much of it concerning what is healthy, what is not.

    It feels like they are trying to confuse us, misinform us...on so many levels.

    I firmly believe that foods made the way God made them are very good for humans, and that Monsanto and other evil scientists, many of which are connected with the govt., are 'playing God' and messing with our food.

    I don't know what to think about all of this, but potatoes have a lot of pesticides applied to them. I have recently started buying organic potatoes, and they really are very tasty. Can taste a difference.

    Food allergies are becoming an issue for many, I believe caused by/related to many factors.
    “My religious belief teaches me to feel as safe in battle as in bed. God has fixed the time for my death. I do not concern myself about that, but to be always ready, no matter when it may overtake me. That is the way all men should live, and then all would be equally brave.” - Stonewall Jackson

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    Quote Originally Posted by TammyinWI View Post
    I don't know, I feel so good when I eat potatoes.

    I am getting kind of jaded because of all the crap and junk they are putting in our foods, but also because there is "fake new,s" all right: much of it concerning what is healthy, what is not.

    It feels like they are trying to confuse us, misinform us...on so many levels.

    I firmly believe that foods made the way God made them are very good for humans, and that Monsanto and other evil scientists, many of which are connected with the govt., are 'playing God' and messing with our food.

    I don't know what to think about all of this, but potatoes have a lot of pesticides applied to them. I have recently started buying organic potatoes, and they really are very tasty. Can taste a difference.

    Food allergies are becoming an issue for many, I believe caused by/related to many factors.
    Not everyone has a potato allergy like I do, but for those struggling with Fibro or RA it's a place to start to see if that is what's causing their reactions.

    Me I feel my best when eating salmon, trout, and other types of seafoods, green veggies, especially cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower, leafy greens, asparagus, pea pods, mushrooms of all types, sweat potatoes, rice, corn, squash of all types, and beans (except white beans which are very high in lectin and I react to them). Another words a typical North American indigenous diet.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  15. #15
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    All these disorders caused by foods is just natures way of weeding out the unfit. Makes a stronger breed of people.
    "When law and morality contradict each other, the citizen has the cruel alternative of either losing his moral sense or losing his respect for the law." ~ Frederic Bastiilt

    "Duty is ours; results are God's."

  16. #16
    Cant trust anyone who calls their dog Fanny foo foo.
    #Nottometheydon't.

  17. #17
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    All I can say is that the AIP diet (basically what Dr. Gundry recommends) has helped me a lot. I have psoriasis (stops itching and building up excess skin on the AIP diet); arthritis (don't have red, swollen, painful joints); Sjogren's syndrome (eyes and other mucous membranes are no longer dry); chronic constipation (no longer need stool softeners); dry, itchy skin (no longer need skin lotion or even chap stick most of the time); fibromyalgia (don't suffer muscle and joint pain, tiredness, brain fog, etc.);....and more. Daughter with lupus doesn't need plaquenil for her lupus, and her autism symptoms improve.

    It's not always easy to stick to the diet -- especially on a long trip, eating at different people's houses and eating snack foods while driving. My health deteriorated again until we got to my middle daughter's house -- she and her husband had made a real commitment to have foods that were safe for youngest daughter and me, and after a few days I was feeling a lot better. Now I have a grandson staying with me and we are again eating some things we shouldn't be eating (grandkids are all picky eaters and want things that really aren't healthy, sigh).

    I strongly suggest anyone with health issues to at least try the diet for a few weeks and see if they feel better. If it helps, then you can start adding back in one of the forbidden foods per week, and you should be able to tell which ones are going to be okay, and which ones your body does best without.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Warm Wisconsin View Post
    So we shouldn't eat Plants

    So we shouldn't eat Animals

    So we shouldn't eat Artificial foods

    What can we eat?!?!

    I personally eat what I grow or raise on land that is healthy. How do I know my land is healthy? I don't have some organic seal at the end of my drive....I know my land is healthy because I have frogs, toads, fireflies and squirrels.

    I am healthy:::: You know why?!??

    I stay on my feet and stay busy even when it hurts....I sleep good cause I work hard
    You nailed it right there. People are too lazy to get up off their backside and move. They blame their ailments on this or that when in fact it's their unwillingness to use their two legs. I hear so many excuses from people I know why they can't move. But, I think this is the major reason why some people use food as an excuse to diagnose what's wrong with them. I know of one person who is really far gone on this food allergy stuff. She's into snake oils (essential oils), anything and everything that ails you, just dab this oil on and you'll be cured. Oh, and she sells these oils too.

    http://www.timberlineknolls.com/eati...signs-effects/


    Orthorexia Symptoms and Effects

    What are the Signs and Symptoms of Orthorexia?

    Orthorexia is the term for a condition that includes symptoms of obsessive behavior in pursuit of a healthy diet. Orthorexia sufferers often display signs and symptoms of anxiety disorders that frequently co-occur with anorexia nervosa or other eating disorders.

    A person with orthorexia will be obsessed with defining and maintaining the perfect diet, rather than an ideal weight. She will fixate on eating foods that give her a feeling of being pure and healthy. An orthorexic may avoid numerous foods, including those made with:

    Artificial colors, flavors or preservatives
    Pesticides or genetic modification
    Fat, sugar or salt
    Animal or dairy products
    Other ingredients considered to be unhealthy

    Common behavior changes that may be signs of orthorexia may include:

    Obsessive concern over the relationship between food choices and health concerns such as asthma, digestive problems, low mood, anxiety or allergies
    Increasing avoidance of foods because of food allergies, without medical advice
    Noticeable increase in consumption of supplements, herbal remedies or probiotics
    Drastic reduction in opinions of acceptable food choices, such that the sufferer may eventually consume fewer than 10 foods
    Irrational concern over food preparation techniques, especially washing of food or sterilization of utensils

    Similar to a woman suffering with bulimia or anorexia, a woman with orthorexia may find that her food obsessions begin to hinder everyday activities. Her strict rules and beliefs about food may lead her to become socially isolated, and result in anxiety or panic attacks in extreme cases. Worsening emotional symptoms can indicate the disease may be progressing into a serious eating disorder:

    Feelings of guilt when deviating from strict diet guidelines
    Increase in amount of time spent thinking about food
    Regular advance planning of meals for the next day
    Feelings of satisfaction, esteem, or spiritual fulfillment from eating “healthy”
    Thinking critical thoughts about others who do not adhere to rigorous diets
    Fear that eating away from home will make it impossible to comply with diet
    Distancing from friends or family members who do not share similar views about food
    Avoiding eating food bought or prepared by others
    Worsening depression, mood swings or anxiety

    What are the Effects of Orthorexia?

    Orthorexia symptoms are serious, chronic, and go beyond a lifestyle choice. Obsession with healthy food can progress to the point where it crowds out other activities and interests, impairs relationships, and even becomes physically dangerous. When this happens, orthorexia takes on the dimensions of a true eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia. One effect of this drive to eat only the right foods (and perhaps only in the right ways) is that it can give a person with orthorexia a sense of superiority to others. This can put a strain on relationships with family and friends, as relationships become less important than holding to dietary patterns.

    Maintaining an obsession with health food may cause a restriction of calories merely because available food isn’t considered to be good enough. The person with orthorexia may lose enough weight to give her a body mass index consistent with someone with anorexia (i.e., less than 18.5). If the dietary restrictions are too severe, malnutrition can result. In rare cases, particularly in the case of women with unaddressed co-occurring disorders or another addiction, orthorexia may result in severe malnutrition and weight loss, which can cause cardiac complications or even death.
    How are Anorexia Nervosa and Orthorexia Similar?

    Orthorexia is a term with varying levels of acceptance in the eating disorder treatment community. Some eating disorder specialists regard orthorexia as a discrete diagnosis like anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa. Others, however, believe that patients with orthorexia symptoms are actually suffering from anorexia. Sufferers of orthorexia and anorexia may show similarities such as:

    Desire to achieve control over their lives through control of food intake
    Seeking self-esteem and spiritual fulfillment through controlling food intake
    Citing undiagnosed food allergies as rationale for avoiding food
    Co-occurring disorders such as OCD or obsessive compulsive personality disorder
    Elaborate rituals about food that may result in social isolation

    How are Orthorexia and Anorexia Nervosa Different?

    Obsession with weight is one of the primary signs of anorexia, bulimia, and other eating disorders, but is not a symptom of orthorexia. Instead, the object of the orthorexic’s obsession is with the health implications of their dietary choices. While a person with anorexia restricts food intake in order to lose weight, a person with orthorexia wants to feel pure, healthy and natural. The focus is on quality of foods consumed rather than quantity.

    Signs and symptoms of eating disorders must be evaluated in the context of a person’s feelings, emotions, and self esteem. It’s crucial to seek appropriate clinical advice from a professional with experience treating orthorexia, anorexia and other psychiatric conditions. The obsessive tendencies associated with orthorexia can indicate a co-occurring disorder that should be diagnosed and treated by a psychiatrist.

    What Should Parents or Friends Say If They Are Concerned?

    Orthorexia is a very serious eating disorder, particularly if it is accompanied by co-occurring psychiatric or addictive disorders, and significant weight loss or dietary imbalance. Like anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders, orthorexia is a medical disease that can result in irreversible health complications, including death. Learn more about orthorexia treatment for women and girls (ages 12 and up) at Timberline Knolls Residential Treatment Center.
    Proud to be Deplorable, Irredeemable, a Scumbag and a bigot! Nothing wrong in being any of them.

  19. #19
    Seems someone is always got an idea that something is bad for you, then a few years later it is something else or the old something is now good for you.

    My take away is that I"m gonna just do the best I can with what is available to me.

    I probably avoid a lot of that stuff since I produce most of my own food beyond staples and "luxury" stuff like junk food that I will pick up if the urge hits me.

    Can't afford to buy and eat what the current trend is if it were even available so I"ll just not worry.

    God will either guide me to eat right or he will let me suffer and either live or die while I learn what works for me.

    Being dead ain't no big deal, but how you live your life and how you die can matter. I aim to do it with my own honor and freedom intact.

    Remember that old' saying about ya can't rule a free man, ya might kill him, but you can't rule him.

    That's freedom for ya; Ain't it?
    Dosadi

    III


    My family & clan are my country.

  20. #20
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    One more thing. This gluten thing is another FAD diet. I bet the food industry goes into a fit revery time a FAD food comes on board. Lo-carb, nonfat, low fat, sugar free, gluten free. What I see in the discount bins now are gluten free products discounted greatly. Why? Maybe the gluten scare has ran its course and it's time for a new food allergy to come on the market. I know there's a wheat intolerance in some people but not the majority of the population. I can't take too much turmeric, not that I'm allergic to it, too much sends me to the bathroom. Too much of anything is not good.
    Proud to be Deplorable, Irredeemable, a Scumbag and a bigot! Nothing wrong in being any of them.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bardou View Post
    You nailed it right there. People are too lazy to get up off their backside and move. They blame their ailments on this or that when in fact it's their unwillingness to use their two legs. I hear so many excuses from people I know why they can't move. But, I think this is the major reason why some people use food as an excuse to diagnose what's wrong with them. I know of one person who is really far gone on this food allergy stuff. She's into snake oils (essential oils), anything and everything that ails you, just dab this oil on and you'll be cured. Oh, and she sells these oils too..


    Look this thread is clearly not for someone like you or warm wisconsin who clearly have it all together. Hell ten years ago I was ****ing perfect too, now not so much! Who'd have thought I'd go from mountain climbing, canoeing, hiking for days on end, sailing out in Long Island Sound, to needing a bloody cane to walk around? I know who did, that ****ing deer tick that bit me almost 15 years ago and the doctors here insisted that lyme's disease didn't exist in Iowa so there was no way in hell I could possibly have lyme's disease. Now I live with the after affects of untreated lymes! Oh and the potato allergy is bonafide, every time I come into contact with potatoes now, or even potato by products the allergic reaction occurs not only faster but is more severe. Intolerance to vegetables in the nightshade family is a proven fact, btw.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bardou View Post
    One more thing. This gluten thing is another FAD diet. I bet the food industry goes into a fit revery time a FAD food comes on board. Lo-carb, nonfat, low fat, sugar free, gluten free. What I see in the discount bins now are gluten free products discounted greatly. Why? Maybe the gluten scare has ran its course and it's time for a new food allergy to come on the market. I know there's a wheat intolerance in some people but not the majority of the population. I can't take too much turmeric, not that I'm allergic to it, too much sends me to the bathroom. Too much of anything is not good.
    the gluten intolerance fad, as you call it, came into vogue about the same time as eating only whole wheat bread, turns out that lectin is the primary protein that everyone is reacting to, which is in the bran, not gluten... but the general public hasn't been made aware of this fact yet. Oh that and the use of round-up to dry off wheat for harvesting... yeah that won't hurt humans at all, even if it does destroy the guts of bugs, mice, and invertebrates... but it'll never destroy the guts of humans. wink, wink.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    the gluten intolerance fad, as you call it, came into vogue about the same time as eating only whole wheat bread, turns out that lectin is the primary protein that everyone is reacting to, which is in the bran, not gluten... but the general public hasn't been made aware of this fact yet. Oh that and the use of round-up to dry off wheat for harvesting... yeah that won't hurt humans at all, even if it does destroy the guts of bugs, mice, and invertebrates... but it'll never destroy the guts of humans. wink, wink.
    I'm against Roundup and the use of it. Hard to get away from that stuff. My daughter's MIL has adult muscular dystrophy from using Roundup when she was a child. They owned vineyards and her parents sent her out in the fields to spray for weeds barefooted. So, I see what that stuff does to people. What I'm only talking about are people who jump on the orthorexic path like my friend. They are out there too.
    Proud to be Deplorable, Irredeemable, a Scumbag and a bigot! Nothing wrong in being any of them.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bardou View Post
    I'm against Roundup and the use of it. Hard to get away from that stuff. My daughter's MIL has adult muscular dystrophy from using Roundup when she was a child. They owned vineyards and her parents sent her out in the fields to spray for weeds barefooted. So, I see what that stuff does to people. What I'm only talking about are people who jump on the orthorexic path like my friend. They are out there too.
    I belong to a health food co-op, they have great produce, and yeah they're out there and they're freakin nutz! That said my issues, and that of many members here with fibro and RA are legit issues. Makes me wonder if the use of round up on the wheat and the round up ready soy beans and round up ready corn is what caused the spike in fibro and RA issues? That is very sad about your daughter's MIL. I've often wondered if I suffered any ill side affects from working at a seed company, aside from coming up allergic to soy beans, used to work on round up soy beans, and corn. but I'm not allergic to corn, go figure.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  25. #25
    I believe the real culprit is something gone wrong with the methylation cycle which causes a train wreck cascade type impact on the body one of which is lack of glutathione which inhibits the bodies ability to be able to handle these types of foods properly. The foods are not the root of the problem it's the sensitivities which are caused by improper methylation which also impairs the ATP cycle. Many times a gene preventing proper folate enzymatic activity etc.

    One is always going to feel better if we can limit as many toxins as possible but the real answer is what went wrong with the bodies ability to deal with them in the first place. Something wrong with the methylation cycle. That is what has to be studied and investigated thoroughly.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mercury3 View Post
    I believe the real culprit is something gone wrong with the methylation cycle which causes a train wreck cascade type impact on the body one of which is lack of glutathione which inhibits the bodies ability to be able to handle these types of foods properly. The foods are not the root of the problem it's the sensitivities which are caused by improper methylation which also impairs the ATP cycle. Many times a gene preventing proper folate enzymatic activity etc.

    One is always going to feel better if we can limit as many toxins as possible but the real answer is what went wrong with the bodies ability to deal with them in the first place. Something wrong with the methylation cycle. That is what has to be studied and investigated thoroughly.
    I forget what it is called but this is exactly what a friend of mine was diagnosed with a year and a half ago, the diagnosis was finally made at John Hopkins there in Maryland. She's on a limited diet, and the issues will only get worse as she grows older. Her's is further complicated by chronic lyme's disease and fibro. The doctors told her her methylation issue is genetic.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  27. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    I forget what it is called but this is exactly what a friend of mine was diagnosed with a year and a half ago, the diagnosis was finally made at John Hopkins there in Maryland. She's on a limited diet, and the issues will only get worse as she grows older. Her's is further complicated by chronic lyme's disease and fibro. The doctors told her her methylation issue is genetic.
    Much apologies because I don't have the time (I work 12 hour shifts including today) to refresh my memory to explain more but methylation impacts every single bodily function there is and many things can go wrong with it. (especially as we age) In part it is due to a lot of toxins in our environment but also genetics. When you have time please try to research and study it as getting it optimized again or at least improved can go a long way to improving ones health which includes the bodies ability to better handle the foods mentioned in this topic. Chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia are just two of many other problems which can be improved. Literally methylation impacts everything.

    Fyi the genetic aspect is usually a gene (memory suck but I think 1/6th of people have it and it worsens with age) which inhibits the proper metabolism of folate which is critical. Anything that says it has "folic acid" should be thrown away as it's synthetic and people with this gene problem cannot convert it properly. This form then clogs up the receptor inhibiting folate uptake even if you eat salads etc.

    Active form of folate should be used along with active b6 and proper B12 are keys but it's VERY extensive and needs studied. Anyone looking to add active form of folate needs to proceed with caution because the body will begin to dexox (due to increased production of much needed glutathione) and feel much worse. Too much active folate can be countered with niacin.
    Last edited by Mercury3; 07-16-2017 at 02:37 PM.

  28. #28
    Fermenting Lentils
    Posted on Thu 19 Apr 2012 at 3:00 PM PST. Filed under Recipes.

    I wrote it before, and I will write it once more: The (proper) dairy is my No1 point of disagreement with mainline Paleo, with lentils being the No2. Lentils have too much iron, manganese, and folate, nutrients that are sorely missed when going too-low carb. They are essentially the best kinds of legumes in terms of nutrition. Unfortunately, they also have a lot of anti-nutrients: loads of lectins, to be exact.

    In the olden days, beans would only be eaten while they’ve been previously fermented (soy too). But in the fast-pacing modern days we live in, convenience rules, so people stopped fermenting foods. According to an experiment carried out by researchers, a 24 to 36 hours fermentation of lentils gets rid of most of the lectins! At the end of the fermentation, the lectins and anti-nutrients surviving are not more than the ones found on a carrot or spinach. So in my opinion, Paleo fanatics who are adamant about the no-legumes rule, need to ease up. Just like with dairy, there are exceptions to the rule.


    Lentils and Peas by Photobunny Earl. Licensed under the Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    So, how to ferment lentils? There are two ways to do this, either via pickling, or via lacto-fermentation (preferred).

    Common Steps (for 1 cup of lentils):

    A. Lentils are usually cross-contaminated with grains (since they grow in grass fields), so you must go through your raw lentils and remove anything that doesn’t look like a lentil.

    B. Wash the lentils thoroughly using your palms, and sift-strain them.

    Acidity Fermentation:

    1. Place in a bowl, and add double the amount of water than that of lentils. The water must be slightly warm, around 30 C. For this type of fermentation, any kind of water will do, but filtered is best.

    2. Add 1 tablespoon of raw vinegar, or the juice of a small lemon into the water. Stir, and cover (but not air-tight).

    3. After 12 hours, strain the water away, and repeat steps 1 & 2 (every 12 hours). Ferment for 24 to 36 hours.

    Lacto-fermentation:

    1. Place in a bowl, and add double the amount of water than that of lentils. The water must be slightly warm, but no more than 25-30 C. For this type of fermentation, non-tap water must be used. Use either filtered, or bottled water. The good bacteria we will use to ferment, can’t survive on tap water.

    2. Add 1.5 tablespoons of plain yogurt, or preferably, 1/4 cup of home-made goat kefir. Stir, and cover (but not air-tight).

    3. After 12 hours, strain the water away, and repeat steps 1 & 2 (every 12 hours). Ferment for 24 to 36 hours.

    Drain and wash them again, then cook your lentils according to your recipe (although probably they will require less cooking time).


    http://eugenia.queru.com/2012/04/19/fermenting-lentils/

  29. #29

  30. #30
    Are Traditionally Prepared Grains Healthy?
    By Mark Sisson


    “People from Africa, Asia, and Latin America eat lots of grains and manage to stay skinny, so what’s the deal?”


    You know this line of questioning. We’ve all heard it. We’ve probably all pondered it. It may have even stumped a few of you, left you stuttering and stammering for a quick explanation. But by the time you think of a reply (if you even have one), the moment has passed and they have “won” the argument. A briefly open mind was now closed.

    But let’s be honest: it’s a valid question, and a tough one at that. We can’t just avoid the tough questions. So let’s take this head on.


    Like always, the answer is multifaceted. Health is not reliant on a single feature. It’s not just diet, it’s exercise, stress, sleep, family, community, genetics, infectious burden. Within diet, it’s not just what is eaten, but also what isn’t eaten. It’s how food is prepared, whether it’s cooked or eaten raw. Find me a culture who thrived on grains as a staple food, and I’ll find you a culture who came up with some elaborate preparation method to mitigate the antinutrients and enhance the nutrient bioavailability of those grains. Find me a culture whose health thrived on toxin-rich grains as a staple without mitigating said toxins, and I’ll be waiting a long time (and observing the United States through smug Primal shades while I wait).

    In today’s post, I’m going to explore the primary reason for why so many traditional cultures who ate grains managed to stay thin and relatively free of degenerative diseases: traditional grain preparation, including soaking, sprouting, and fermentation. If you’re familiar with the Weston A. Price Foundation‘s stance on grains, you’re probably aware of these preparation methods. Each step alters the nutritional experience of the grain to varying degrees, making it more digestible, less toxic, and tastier. I for one am not willing to go through hoops to make grass babies go down easier, but the process is nonetheless extremely interesting. And in the future, if any of my readers want to give grains a shot, at least they’ll do it right, or as right as it can get. As I always say, the only reason to make grains any part of your diet is as a cheap source of calories that converts to glucose very quickly.

    You know how cool parents will drink or smoke with their teens to teach them mature consumption of potentially illicit substances before they learn to do it all wrong it in the wild world? This post is kinda like that.

    Let’s first do a quick rundown of what exactly we’re trying to avoid, deactivate, or mitigate. We gotta know what we’re up against.

    Phytic acid: Phytic acid is the main storage form of phosphorus in grains. That’s awesome for the grain, which needs phosphorus, but there’s a catch. Phytate also binds to many minerals, including zinc, magnesium, calcium, and iron, to name several. And, since non-ruminants don’t possess phytase, which digests phytate and releases the bound minerals for easy absorption, eating large quantities of phytate-containing foods results in mineral deficiencies for meat-eating apes. These deficiencies, taken to an extreme, can manifest as tooth decay, which might explain why early grain eating populations had worse teeth than the hunter-gatherers who preceded them.

    Enzyme inhibitors: Grains are seeds that require certain wet, nutrient rich conditions for proper growth. Spontaneous germination is counterproductive (you don’t want your children settling down in an area with high crime and high unemployment, do you?), so enzyme inhibitors prevent it. When moisture abounds (like, when soaking grains), the inhibitors are deactivated and sprouting occurs. So why should we care? Certain other enzyme inhibitors also inhibit our ability digest the grains. If you’re relying on grains as a dietary staple, you can’t afford not to wring every last drop of nutrition out of them.

    Lectins: I covered lectins fairly comprehensively in a previous post, so I’ll keep it brief. Lectins are nature’s pesticides, protecting the tiny grain from predation. They can perforate the intestinal lining, disrupt our immune systems, and there’s even evidence that they bind to leptin receptors in the hypothalamus (potentially triggering leptin resistance).

    Gluten: You know this guy. Found in wheat, rye, and barley, he’s a real bastard of a protein – and possibly not just to celiacs. There’s some evidence that true fermentation can break down gluten, but not all of it. Some Italian researchers used a unique blend of bacterial species to break down 99% of the gluten in sourdough bread, but it was under strict, extremely contrived laboratory conditions. More on that later.

    So, how do traditional cultures take care of the aforementioned?
    Soaking and Sprouting

    I’ve written about soaking nuts and seeds before, and soaking grains is the same idea. The grains are covered with water, placed in a preferably warm place, and soaked for between 12 and 24 hours. There’s not much more to it than that. After soaking, you drain them, rinse them, and let the grains sit out for a couple days. To get grains to sprout, rinse and drain them a couple times each day until sprouts emerge.

    Effect on phytate: If the grain contains phytase, some of the mineral-binding phytic acid will be deactivated, but not much. And if the grain has been heat-treated, which destroys phytase, or it contains very little phytase to begin with, the phytic acid will remain completely intact. Overall, neither soaking nor sprouting deactivates a significant amount of phytate.

    Effect on enzyme inhibitors: Well, since the seed has been placed in a wet medium and allowed to sprout, the enzyme inhibitors are obviously mostly deactivated. Digestion is much improved (cooking will improve it further).

    Effect on lectins: The evidence is mixed, and it seems to depend on the grain. Sprouted wheat, for example, is extremely high in WGA, the infamous wheat lectin. As the wheat grain germinates, the WGA is retained in the sprout and is dispersed throughout the finished plant. In other grains, sprouting seems more beneficial, but there’s always some residual lectins that may need further processing to deactivate.

    Effect on gluten: Sprouting reduces gluten to some extent, but not by very much. Don’t count on it. A little bit goes a long way.
    Fermentation

    After soaking and grinding, grains are traditionally mixed with a starter culture or allowed to wild ferment. Starter cultures often include whey, kefir, yogurt, or left over fermentation medium from the previous batch. Wild fermentation occurs when the grain mixture employs bacteria already present on the grains, or picks up wild yeasts and bacteria from the environment. Both methods are far more effective than just soaking and sprouting at deactivating antinutrients and improving digestibility. Plus, fermentation lends interesting flavors to and enhances the shelf-life of the resultant food (which was extremely valuable in the days before refrigeration and canning).

    Effect on phytate: Remember phytase? It’s the enzyme that deactivates phytate, and it really gets cooking during fermentation. In grains that contain high amounts of phytase, like wheat, rye, and buckwheat (technically a pseudo-cereal, but close enough), a day of fermentation deactivates most of the phytate. To degrade the phytate in low-phytase grains, however, the fermentation time must be extended. Adding small amounts of phytase-containing grain to the mix will also speed up the process. Increasing the temperature also improves phytate breakdown. In millet, a low-phytase grain, it took 72 hours to completely degrade the phytate. In wheat, it took ten hours to reach a maximum of 88.8% phytate reduction using a specific bacterial strain. Other strains resulted in reductions of between 28% and 86% (with most reaching above 80%). Standard quick rise baker’s yeast only reduced 16% of phytate (that’s what 99% of wheat eaters are eating nowadays, remember!). Ten hours may not always be enough, however – another fermentation study found that at 48 hours, phytate in wheat was still degrading.

    Effect on enzyme inhibitors: Fermentation also significantly reduces enzyme inhibitor activity. A few examples would be prudent, since fermentation has different effects on different enzyme inhibitors in different grains. In 24 hour traditional sorghum fermentation, both trypsin inhibitor and amylase inhibitor (which impedes starch digestion) were reduced by up to 58% and 75%, respectively. In millet, a 48 hour fermentation was required to completely deactivate amylase inhibitor. As I mentioned in the last section, one study found that 48 hours of fermentation resulted in maximum wheat starch digestibility, presumably by deactivating amylase inhibitor.

    Effect on lectins: Fermentation reduces lectin load fairly comprehensively across the board, but it might take longer than you can spare. In lentils (I know, not a grain, but with similar antinutrient issues), 72 and 96 hours of fermentation at 42 degrees C eliminated 98% and 97.8% of the lectins, respectively. Specific info on grain lectin breakdown due to fermentation is sparse. Overall, fermentation appears to be pretty effective at reducing lectins (and cooking reduces them further).

    Effect on gluten: No store bought garden variety sourdough you find is going to be gluten-free. A team from Italy was able to produce a gluten-free sourdough wheat bread by using specific bacterial strains from all over the world and subjecting the bread to many days of fermentation. The process was totally unfeasible for the home or average commercial baker. There’s also a guy who sells monthlong fermented sourdough bread out of LA-area farmers’ markets and claims celiacs can eat it without issue. Reviews on Yelp seem to corroborate. Maybe I’ll swing by his stand and give it a shot, but I’m skeptical. And besides, I’m personally more worried by WGA, which is biologically active at nanomolar concentrations and which may not be fully degraded by fermentation.
    To Eat, or Not to Eat

    Some may turn up their noses at agrarian people for relying on a “sub-optimal” grain as staple food, but not me. Yeah, I’m definitely no fan of grains, and I think avoiding them is one of the biggest positive steps a person can take for their overall health. That’s beside the point. As a technical feat, I find the taming of the grain incredibly impressive, a testament to mankind’s awesome ability to adapt to and overcome adversity. Any other animal that switches over to a new staple food that prevents nutrient absorption, causes intestinal perforation, and increases inflammation had better develop some physiological adaptions to deal with the antinutritive factors, and quickly, if it doesn’t want to die out or be forced to move to a new habitat. A human, though? Humans figured out a way to preserve the toxic food, make it palatable, drastically reduce its antinutrient content, and make it more digestible, thanks to the big efficient brain inside our skulls. It’s not physiology (well, kind of), it’s not some advantageous mutation that’s naturally selected and saves the day. It’s human ingenuity, knowhow, knowledge, and wisdom. It is manipulation of the environment to suit our immediate needs. That gets us into trouble on occasion, but you can’t say it isn’t impressive.

    That said, will I start soaking, sprouting, and fermenting big batches of grains in my kitchen? No. It’s way too much work and it’s unclear whether the toxins are fully mitigated (and in the case of wheat, they almost certainly are not). I’ll admit that crusty sourdough bread can be a nice occasional treat when eating out, but it’s not something I’m interested in eating on a regular basis. Furthermore, I’m not missing out on any magic nutrient by avoiding grains, but I am avoiding the elaborate prep work required to make them moderately edible (and the toxins that may or may not be deactivated). For the billions that rely on grains for sustenance, these traditional preparation methods are necessary. Choosing between potentially toxic food and starvation, you choose the food – no question – and then you do your best to make it more nutritious. For those of us who don’t need to make that choice, for whom bread is an extracurricular treat, I think removing the risk altogether by simply avoiding the potentially toxic food is a better move. And if it’s carbohydrate you’re after, stick with safe starch sources like roots, tubers, or even white rice (the sole grain that requires no elaborate processing).

    But at least you know there’s a better way than what most people do with grains nowadays. At least there’s somewhat of a middle ground for people who won’t relinquish the grass babies.

    What about you guys? Do you think you’ll ever experiment with traditional grain preparation?




    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/soake...mented-grains/

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by China Connection View Post
    Fermenting Lentils
    Posted on Thu 19 Apr 2012 at 3:00 PM PST. Filed under Recipes.

    I wrote it before, and I will write it once more: The (proper) dairy is my No1 point of disagreement with mainline Paleo, with lentils being the No2. Lentils have too much iron, manganese, and folate, nutrients that are sorely missed when going too-low carb. They are essentially the best kinds of legumes in terms of nutrition. Unfortunately, they also have a lot of anti-nutrients: loads of lectins, to be exact.

    In the olden days, beans would only be eaten while they’ve been previously fermented (soy too). But in the fast-pacing modern days we live in, convenience rules, so people stopped fermenting foods. According to an experiment carried out by researchers, a 24 to 36 hours fermentation of lentils gets rid of most of the lectins! At the end of the fermentation, the lectins and anti-nutrients surviving are not more than the ones found on a carrot or spinach. So in my opinion, Paleo fanatics who are adamant about the no-legumes rule, need to ease up. Just like with dairy, there are exceptions to the rule.


    Lentils and Peas by Photobunny Earl. Licensed under the Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    So, how to ferment lentils? There are two ways to do this, either via pickling, or via lacto-fermentation (preferred).

    Common Steps (for 1 cup of lentils):

    A. Lentils are usually cross-contaminated with grains (since they grow in grass fields), so you must go through your raw lentils and remove anything that doesn’t look like a lentil.

    B. Wash the lentils thoroughly using your palms, and sift-strain them.

    Acidity Fermentation:

    1. Place in a bowl, and add double the amount of water than that of lentils. The water must be slightly warm, around 30 C. For this type of fermentation, any kind of water will do, but filtered is best.

    2. Add 1 tablespoon of raw vinegar, or the juice of a small lemon into the water. Stir, and cover (but not air-tight).

    3. After 12 hours, strain the water away, and repeat steps 1 & 2 (every 12 hours). Ferment for 24 to 36 hours.

    Lacto-fermentation:

    1. Place in a bowl, and add double the amount of water than that of lentils. The water must be slightly warm, but no more than 25-30 C. For this type of fermentation, non-tap water must be used. Use either filtered, or bottled water. The good bacteria we will use to ferment, can’t survive on tap water.

    2. Add 1.5 tablespoons of plain yogurt, or preferably, 1/4 cup of home-made goat kefir. Stir, and cover (but not air-tight).

    3. After 12 hours, strain the water away, and repeat steps 1 & 2 (every 12 hours). Ferment for 24 to 36 hours.

    Drain and wash them again, then cook your lentils according to your recipe (although probably they will require less cooking time).


    http://eugenia.queru.com/2012/04/19/fermenting-lentils/
    This is one of the points Dr. Gundry and Dr. Weil argue about the modern diet that it is woefully lacking in fermented foods, and sprouted fermented grains that are then cooked into mash, breads, etc. our bodies were better able to process them when they are fermented.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    31,835
    Quote Originally Posted by China Connection View Post
    And if it’s carbohydrate you’re after, stick with safe starch sources like roots, tubers, or even white rice (the sole grain that requires no elaborate processing).

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/soake...mented-grains/
    90% of the world eats rice, and don't have the lectin and gluten issues that those in the west, particularly the US, have.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  33. #33
    There is something to Dr. Gundry's work. A longtime friend is a patient and these days sees him twice a year essentially for maintenance. He has completely changed their life for the better. His book is intriguing, although his YouTube presence can be excessively commercial. His Plant Paradox book is a worthwhile read.

  34. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Mercury3 View Post
    Much apologies because I don't have the time (I work 12 hour shifts including today) to refresh my memory to explain more but methylation impacts every single bodily function there is and many things can go wrong with it. (especially as we age) In part it is due to a lot of toxins in our environment but also genetics. When you have time please try to research and study it as getting it optimized again or at least improved can go a long way to improving ones health which includes the bodies ability to better handle the foods mentioned in this topic. Chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia are just two of many other problems which can be improved. Literally methylation impacts everything.

    Fyi the genetic aspect is usually a gene (memory suck but I think 1/6th of people have it and it worsens with age) which inhibits the proper metabolism of folate which is critical. Anything that says it has "folic acid" should be thrown away as it's synthetic and people with this gene problem cannot convert it properly. This form then clogs up the receptor inhibiting folate uptake even if you eat salads etc.

    Active form of folate should be used along with active b6 and proper B12 are keys but it's VERY extensive and needs studied. Anyone looking to add active form of folate needs to proceed with caution because the body will begin to dexox (due to increased production of much needed glutathione) and feel much worse. Too much active folate can be countered with niacin.
    I don't understand it but Google MTHFR mutation, my good friend has it.

  35. #35
    I know that a white rice meal sends my blood pressure down.

    I have a friend with Eczema who can't handle gluten etc in his diet. This will interest him.

  36. #36
    Are you Lectin Sensitive?

    I’m a firm proponent of understanding how people are different. When I first realized that lectins were the issue in plant foods, I assumed that I couldn’t assume people are sensitive to lectins simply because I am. But after helping hundreds of people, I started to see patterns which allow me to determine who is and isn’t lectin sensitive – and more importantly to what degree people are lectin sensitive.

    Note that when I say lectin sensitivity, I am also including other immunostimulatory agents in foods such as tannins.
    thelifestylecafe_lectins-300x300

    If you want to interpret your genes, you can use SelfDecode (being released in Feb 2016).


    Background

    It’s been about two years since my theory of lectins as being a significant cause of issues stemming from food. The theory started out by self-experimentation with foods and then seeing patterns. Foods with more lectins caused more problems.

    I then set out to see who else discovered this and found some scattered info here and there but almost nothing seriously studied. I found the only clinical trial available done by Dr. Steven Gundry. The study wasn’t published because Dr. Gundry says he simply lacks time, but I was able to interview him for my podcast.
    Skepticism

    If I could’ve read this information ten years ago, it would’ve helped me out so much. The problem was that I was too skeptical about listening to others – and for good reason.

    I’m the type of person who will be skeptical about ideas such as lectin sensitivity unless I understand concretely why someone like me is lectin sensitive, while someone else can seemingly eat lectins without any significant problems. At the very least, I’d need to see clear distinctions between myself and others that are objective, rather than listening to someone say that legumes are horrible for everyone (even if that is right).

    This post is meant for the skeptics who will rightfully ask: How do I know if I’m lectin sensitive? Why is it other people don’t seemingly have issues? Which biomarkers are important to indicate that you are more lectin sensitive?

    The Lectin Sensitive Spectrum

    Lectin sensitivity is on a spectrum. Some people are extremely sensitive, such as myself, while others are not significantly sensitive.

    This post is my current thinking on how to know if you’re lectin sensitive and how to figure out where you lie on the lectin sensitivity spectrum.

    This post combines information from myself, my research and patterns observed from clients over time. I would never have been able to figure these things out without seeing consistent patterns from my clients – so this post is devoted to them.

    The vast majority of my clients happen to be lectin sensitive, but how lectin sensitive has for a long time been a question mark in my head that I found hard to be precise about.

    You can identify lectin sensitivity by a combination of symptoms, blood tests, and genes. The more of these that you have, the surer you can be that you’re lectin sensitive and the more, you’ll be affected by lectins.

    I happened to have all of the biomarkers, and unsurprisingly I am extremely lectin sensitive. So knowing this will make you somewhat less skeptical.

    In time, I will keep adding additional ways of knowing if you’re lectin sensitive, but so far this is by far the most cutting edge diagnostic method.
    Three Classes of People Who Are Lectin Sensitive

    Since my theory, I started to look for patterns from my clients on who was and wasn’t lectin sensitive.

    Initially, my theory was that I shouldn’t assume that others had the issue simply because I did. But with experience, I started to see patterns emerge.

    There are three main classes of people:

    Those whose health issues were significantly started by lectins because of genetic predispositions in combination with heavy lectin consumption (vegans, vegetarians or people who had grown up with a lot of whole grains such as myself). People in this class will have family members with lectin sensitivity – and almost always at least one parent.

    Those who developed lectin sensitivity after a period of acute or chronic stress.
    Those who developed lectin sensitivity after chronic immune activation -either from biotoxins, infections, chronic injury, excess exercise, sleep deprivation, chronic circadian disruption, etc….

    Most of the time people will have a mix of these.

    So for example, people will often have some genes in combination with a stressful period -as well as latent infections picked up throughout life.

    Health issues starting after psychological stress or chronic immune activation are some of the best predictors of lectin sensitivity.

    If someone has intermittent brain fog, that’s a symptom that lectin sensitivity is a more important cause. This happens because lectins wreak havoc on the hypothalamus.

    Chronic brain fog is a symptom that an infection or biotoxin is present. But most of the time, people with a chronic infection or biotoxin will automatically increase sensitivity to lectins both directly (via immune activation) and indirectly by chronic sympathetic or fight or flight activation (caused by inflammation).

    Risk Factors For Lectin Sensitivity

    The biggest risk factors for developing lectin sensitivity are:

    Psychological stress,
    Marathons/Excess exercise,

    A vegan/vegetarian diet – which is lower in Vitamin A and other nutrition and higher in lectins. Retinol is critical for immune tolerance and a high lectin load for a sustained period will create chaos.

    Less sun exposure (UV and infrared are the best ways to shut the immune system down. UVB also helps create vitamin D3, which is necessary for immune tolerance),

    Less consumption of fish (DHA is critical for immune balance),
    Chronic circadian disruptions, which imbalances the gut immune system,
    Infections/Biotoxin exposure,
    Sleep deprivation, which will disturb your immune system.
    Antibiotics, which will disturb your gut flora…
    Possibly EMF exposure – some animal studies show that EMFs increases the nervous system and affect sleep (R). So growing up in a big city with lots of cell and wifi signals…I’m skeptical but open-minded about this.

    Why Do These Risk Factors Increase Lectin Sensitivity?

    Anything that activates your immune system, and nervous system will increase lectin sensitivity.


    So chronic infections will cause both immune activation and an activation of the nervous system. However, in these people, staying away from lectins won’t cure their problems because lectin sensitivity is just a terrible side effect, not the cause.

    Immune activation will increase cytokines, stimulate your nervous system, activate Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs)-alarm bells for the immune system, lower Tregs and stimulate MHC/costimulatory molecules.

    Various plant lectins also activate TLRs – especially wheat lectins (R).

    One possibility is that when a threshold of TLR or immune activation is reached, you start getting more problems from lectins.

    Immune activation will also activate your nervous system, which itself has a bunch of negative effects on the gut.

    Activation of Your Nervous System

    Over-activation of your nervous system is one of the biggest risk factors for lectin sensitivity. I have many theories why this is the case.

    1) Over-activation of your nervous system will cause a ‘leaky gut‘ via the wide variety of effects of the hormone CRH. CRH effects include slower gut flow, less cannabinoid activation (in the amygdala and I suspect in the gut as well) and local inflammation in the gut. Also, CRH will directly cause hormonal dysregulation. The result is lower GnRH, LH, FSH, Pregnenolone, DHEA, Testosterone, Growth Hormone, Thyroid Hormones (T3, T4, TSH) and higher Prolactin and Estrogen.

    2) Over-activation of your nervous system will cause lower oxygen or hypoxia in your gut, which will disturb the local gut immune system. This is because blood flow is reduced to your gut when your nervous system increases. Less blood flow also causes less nutrient delivery…Your blood gets shunted to your heart and muscles, while your stomach and liver don’t have what it ideally needs.

    3) It will disrupt your sleep. This causes a bunch of downstream problems because sleep is critical to so many other functions.

    4) It will disrupt your circadian rhythm (which causes a bunch of downstream problems).

    5) It will cause excess glutamate and histamine and less serotonin. This will slow gut flow and cause SIBO (via Kynurenine pathway).

    6) It will cause HCL production to decrease. The result is food sensitivities and even more inflammation.

    7) It will decrease levels of good hormones and increases some bad ones because they get shunted to cortisol, and indirectly because of circadian and sleep disruption.
    Mechanisms

    In general, oxidative stress and inflammation will cause lectin sensitivity in the gut.

    Some mechanisms include:

    Poor mitochondrial function and Oxidative stress,
    Less blood flow,
    Background inflammation….TLR activation, Cytokines, and Nf-kB. TLR activation is a feature of IBS (R), and my guess is that lectins cause this absent infections or biotoxins. MHC I and II/costimulatory molecule activation – which causes immune activation in the gut
    Lower methylation
    Lower Cannabinoid/CB1 activation– explains why people are more likely to be thin and anxious.
    Lower PPAR gamma -explains why people are more likely to be thin,
    Higher STAT3 -explains why people are more likely to be thin and have gut inflammation,
    Lower NAD+/SIRT1– caused by hypoxia, superoxide, worse mitochondrial function, etc…
    Lower Tregs
    Micro biome imbalance
    Lower growth factors: IGF-1, HGH
    Leptin
    Lower serotonin – causes slowed gut flow…Tryptophan gets converted to kynurenine instead of tryptophan. This happens in IBS (R), and my guess is that lectins and stress cause this.
    Higher kynurenine. This happens in IBS (R), and again lectins and stress both cause this.
    Higher CCK…Read: The Positives and Negatives of CCK and Its Role In Lectin Sensitivity

    Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs)

    Cytokines and various components of the immune system activate TLRs.

    As I mentioned, various plant lectins also activate TLRs, especially wheat lectins (R).

    Alcohol, morphine and sleep loss in young but not old adults (R) activate TLR4, which is one reason why people with lectin sensitivity will do worse with these.
    How to Know If You’re Lectin Sensitive

    There is no ‘smoking gun’ for lectin sensitivity. There are only markers that make you more likely to be lectin sensitive.

    Here’s a list of symptoms that are common in people with lectin sensitivity. Lectin sensitivity is on a spectrum, where people are sensitive to it in varying degrees. The more symptoms you have, the higher the likelihood of lectin sensitivity. This list is not comprehensive:

    Gut problems– IBS, IBD…This includes Gas/Abdominal discomfort/Irritated GI tract….This is why an elemental diet has a high cure rate for Crohn‘s.
    Bloating – as a result of inflammation and CCK.
    Autoimmune conditions – IBD, arthritis and Hashimoto’s are probably the most common…

    The following are other common symptoms. My current thinking is that lectins are similar to tissues in the hypothalamus, brain stem and other areas in the limbic system. Lectins may cause some autoimmune reaction, which dysregulates the hypothalamus.

    I am reasonably confident that dysregulation of the hypothalamus is taking place in most of my sensitive lectin clients. I’m just not sure if it’s because lectins are binding to sugars in these tissues or if our immune system starts getting confused and attacks them.

    Fatigue in the day – even with 8 hours of sleep. Especially post-meal fatigue.. as a result of hypothalamic dysregulation.
    Brain Fog- as a result of hypothalamic dysregulation,
    Lower BMI – usually….Sometimes people with excess BMI have it…those who try to lose weight but can’t no matter what they do or how little they eat…People with mold issues will sometimes gain weight as a result of lower MC4R.
    Cold intolerance- as a result of low T3, increased sympathetic nervous activity and hypothalamic dysregulation,
    Low blood pressure– as a result of hypothalamic deregulation and brain stem oxidative stress,
    Immune imbalances (Th1 dominant or Th2 dominant or Th17 dominant) or any autoimmune condition- very common.
    Excessive anxiety, perfectionism, procrastination, paranoia, OCD and in the inability to let go of thoughts – as a result of hypothalamic dysregulation. These are also indicative of high glutamate and low serotonin.
    Skin problems – indicative of an immune imbalance. Skin problems can include various fungi, eczema, psoriasis, etc…
    Not handling glucose or carbs well (getting hypoglycemic often). Lectins cause havoc on your limbic system, including your hypothalamus, which controls glucose homeostasis.
    Some joint discomfort, even if small… Dr. Gundry says that synovial tissue is very similar to lectins and your immune system gets confused.
    Pain in random places like back aches, etc…. (that aren’t a result of a serious injury, obviously)…This is from increased inflammation.
    Water retention, puffiness around the eyes, extremities- from increased inflammation.
    Some types of headaches/migraines – from increased inflammation.
    Sleep and circadian issues – as a result of hypothalamic dysregulation and increased inflammation.
    Post-nasal drip
    Tonsilitis
    Th1 OR Th2 dominant

    e6f7469ed7d75a7ed8a4b1807a4c4aa8

    Blood Markers

    People with lectin sensitivity tend to have:

    Higher Adiponectin (over 16) (R).
    Higher TNF-alpha (over 3) (R).
    Higher IL-6 (over 3)- Dr. Gundry has independently noticed this with his lectin sensitive patients.
    Lower White Blood Cells (under 5) – Dr. Gundry has independently noticed this with his lectin sensitive patients. My WBC count went up as I stayed away from lectins. Dr. Gundry and I suspect that the white blood cells are being caught somewhere in the gut, spleen or elsewhere.
    Low free and total T3 (under 3 for free T3) and often higher TSH- Dr. Gundry has independently noticed this with his lectin sensitive patients. Low T3 is a cause and a symptom of lectin sensitivity. Low T3 is because of inflammation and oxidative stress. Dr. Gundry claims that the thyroid tissue is remarkably similar to the lectin proteins and our immune systems get fooled…So we’ll start attacking our thyroid tissue.
    Lower Ferritin (under 70 for men and under 50 for women). Lectins seem to create an inflammatory environment in the gut that reduces iron absorption.
    Lower Insulin (under 4)- in the lectin sensitive who aren’t also leptin resistant.

    You can check these markers.
    My Theory On Why Elevated Adiponectin is Associated With Lectin Sensitivity

    Dr. Gundry has pointed out that he’s noticed adiponectin as a marker for lectin sensitivity. I have two theories as to why this is the case.

    I’ve identified a variation in the Cannabinoid 1 receptor SNP (rs1049353) in my clients with lectin sensitivity. This variation causes the CB1 receptor to not function as well. This SNP is associated with higher adiponectin. Then I found a study showing that Adiponectin increases when you block the CB1 receptor (R).

    Hence, Adiponectin is a marker of lectin sensitivity because of the CB1 receptor genetic variations.

    In short, when the CB1 receptor doesn’t work well, you will have more gut inflammation and higher adiponectin is a byproduct.

    Another variation in the MTHFR genes (mainly rs1801133) are also common in my lectin sensitive clients, which can contribute to under-methylation. One of the effects of under-methylation may be higher adiponectin – as obesity is associated with over-methylation of adiponectin and lower adiponectin production (R). Hence under methylators are more prone to both intestinal issues and higher adiponectin.
    Genes

    As you can imagine, since lectin sensitivity isn’t even a term, there will be absolutely no information on the genetic basis for this issue.

    There are many SNPs that can increase risk the for lectin sensitivity, but I will list only a partial list.

    The general concept is that lectin sensitivity will increase from variations in SNPs that increase gut inflammation and/or permeability, activate your nervous system, contribute to inflammation, oxidative stress, and circadian rhythm dysregulation.

    There are thousands of such SNPs out there, which is why I’m tempted to only list the top two, but the others are meant to give you an idea of what I mean.

    Realize that if you have a chronic infection, you needn’t have a strong genetic basis for lectin sensitivity.

    Get your 23andme to see which genes you have.
    Cannabanoids-CNR1: The Lectin Sensitive Gene (rs1049353)

    This is the most significant gene that causes lectin sensitivity in my view.

    This SNP is so correlated to lectin sensitivity that I call it the “Lectin Sensitivity Gene.”

    Studies indicate that the gut nervous system is the main site of CB1 receptors (R).

    Only about 14% of the global population will have a T allele, but about 40% of whites have a T allele.

    About 85% of my clients who don’t have an infectious issue have the T or minor allele. Even among my white clients who have infections, they are still more likely to have the minor allele.

    I have TT or two minor alleles, which will be pretty rare (less than 2% of the global population).

    See my post on The Lectin Sensitive Gene.
    MTHFR (rs1801133, rs1801131)

    This is the second most important gene involved in lectin sensitivity.

    Usually, people will have two minor MTHFR C677T alleles OR one minor allele of this SNP and a minor allele of MTHFR A1298C.

    I have two minor alleles of the MTHFR C677T SNP, which maybe 8% of the population has.

    There’re many ways that this could cause lectin sensitivity. Folate is very important for gut function (R) and the MTHFR SNPs require higher methylfolate intake.

    Methylation supposedly breaks down histamine in the gut. Histamine in the gut causes increased intestinal permeability.

    So under methylation will increase the likelihood of lectin-sensitivity.

    Since these SNPs are associated with anxiety disorders, it could also have some indirect effects through over-activation of the nervous system.
    COMT V158M (rs4680)

    I suspect the A allele of this COMT SNP causes more psychological stress, which leads to an overactivity of the nervous system.
    SOD2

    The SOD2 SNPs will contribute to lectin sensitivity risk via increasing superoxide.
    Glycine

    Glycine decrease gut inflammation and oxidative stress. Problems with the glycine transporter are common amongst my clients.

    rs3791124 Glycine A=0.1619 AG
    STAT3

    STAT3 gene will cause increased gut inflammation and also make you more likely to be thin.

    rs9891119 STAT3 C=0.3714 CC
    JAK2 (rs10758669)

    C=intestinal permeability.
    MHC

    MHC SNPs will increase likelihood of immune activation….

    rs2395185 MHC/HLA-DR T=0.2929 TT
    rs10484554 MHCI…HLA-C T=0.1112 CT
    rs3135388 MHCI…HLA DRB1*1501 A=0.0429 AG
    rs3135391 MHCI…HLA-DRB1*1501 A=0.0463 AG

    NRF2

    NRF2 genes – mice without Nrf2 have increased intestinal permeability (R).
    Circadian SNPs

    rs1801260 CLOCK G=0.2181 AG – this SNP…

    Each G=higher activity levels in the evening, lower motility, lower HR, lower diastolic BP, delayed breakfast time….these are common features in people who are lectin sensitive.
    Others

    There are many other SNPs that I found more likely in lectin sensitivity, but they’re beyond the scope of this post. Suffice it to say that there’s a wide range of genes that play into the degree of lectin sensitivity that you may have.

    The point in bringing down examples of SNPs is so that you can get an idea of different classes of SNPs that will be more likely in the lectin sensitive.

    To learn more about your SNPs, run a 23andme test and upload your raw data into SelfDecode.


    https://selfhacked.com/blog/are-you-...d-blood-tests/

  37. #37
    The Lectin Avoidance Diet: The Safest Foods for People Sensitive to Everything

    https://selfhacked.com/blog/eliminat...ve-everything/


    Lectins are probably one of the most significant sources of food sensitivity (there are more). Therefore, the lectin avoidance diet has many proven benefits.

    download

    Contents [hide]

    Executive Summary of the Lectin Avoidance Diet
    The Lectin Avoidance Cookbook
    What Are Lectins?
    Different Types of Plant Lectins
    Are You Lectin Sensitive? Genetic Factors That Predispose You to Lectin Sensitivity
    Table: Genetic SNPs that Contribute to Lectin Sensitivity
    Harmful Effects of Dietary Lectins
    1) Lectins Are Resistant to Digestion and Are Absorbed Into the Bloodstream
    2) Lectins Damage the Gut Lining Causing Leaky Gut
    3) Lectins Stimulate the Immune System
    4) Lectins Causes Autoimmunity
    5) Lectins Affect the Gut Microbiota
    6) Lectins Causes Abnormal Cell Growth
    7) Other Links Between Lectins and Health
    Lectins and Insulin
    Lectins and Obesity
    Lectins and Brain Functions
    Lectin Avoidance Cures Autoimmune Disease
    A Diet To Avoid The Most Harmful Food Compounds
    19 Major Compounds That Can Cause Inflammation
    Proteins
    Carbs
    Fats
    Vegetables
    Condiments/Other
    Nutrients To Add
    Food Groups Excluded on the Lectin Avoidance Diet
    Food Groups to Pay Special Attention To
    Seafood
    Raw Honey
    Hi-Maize
    Eggs
    How to Reduce the Lectin Levels in Food
    Technical
    Classification of Plant Lectins
    Animal Lectins

    Executive Summary of the Lectin Avoidance Diet

    My lectin avoidance diet has a simple formula: Eat meat and seafood, as much as you want, mainly during the day. Supplement with the Life Extension Mix Powder for basic nutrition.

    The lectin avoidance diet excludes grains, beans, nuts, seeds, most potatoes, and all dairy.

    https://selfhacked.leadpages.co/leadbox-1484955113.js

    Allowed foods include all seafood, meat, chicken/turkey (all fowl), eggs (if not allergic), and most fruits and vegetables.

    Romaine lettuce, cruciferous veggies, cucumbers, and celery are the best vegetables to include. Raw honey, citrus fruits, berries, and pineapple are the recommended fructose-containing foods.

    Japanese and purple sweet potatoes are the best starch to include in your diet, but it’s probably better if they’re pressure-cooked. Other sweet potatoes, nightshade vegetables (like tomatoes), and squash could be consumed if pressure-cooked.

    However, even if you get rid of lectins, you won’t get rid of all the anti-nutrients. For example, tannins are found in many plants and are considered anti-nutritional because they can alter nutrient digestion and absorption (R).
    The Lectin Avoidance Cookbook

    Due to frequent queries about how to implement this diet, I have released the Lectin Avoidance Cookbook. This cookbook will help you overcome autoimmune issues, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, histamine intolerance, chronic inflammation, or simply make you feel optimal.

    In the Lectin Avoidance Cookbook, we have 51 84 recipes and counting. The price is $27.

    After you pay for the book, you will be redirected to a link where you can download it. The redirect takes about 5-10 seconds, so be patient. If you have any issues, email info@selfhacked.com.

    Try the cookbook, and if you don’t start feeling better within 30 days, I will give you 100% of your money back!

    If you are not happy with the cookbook for any reason, email me within 30 days of your purchase, and I will refund your money!

    What Are Lectins?

    shutterstock_174898304

    Do not confuse lectins with leptin, lactose, or pectin.

    Lectins are proteins that bind to carbohydrates or glycoproteins (proteins that contain carbohydrate chains) (R).

    Proteins termed lectins (from the Latin legere, “to select”) have the ability to bind to specific carbohydrate molecules (R).

    Lectins allow cells to bind or communicate with each other (R).

    They are found in every living organism, including viruses, bacteria, and most foods, to one degree or another, but most of them are harmless (R). Scientists have been studying lectins since 1884.

    Some scientists believe that lectins are part of a plants’ protection mechanisms (R). Plants also use lectins to communicate with their environment, for cell organization, and as reserve proteins, among other functions (R).
    Different Types of Plant Lectins

    In plants, lectins are concentrated in seeds, early stage leaves, and roots. Leaves typically contain fewer lectins, although this may vary from plant to plant (R). A great example of a leaf is romaine lettuce.

    The types of lectins that are often found in foods and can produce sensitivity include (R, R2):

    Legume lectins such as white kidney beans. On average, 15% percent of a bean’s proteins are lectins.
    Cucurbitaceae lectins, found in the sap or juice of cucumber, melon, and squash.
    Prolamins, such as gluten and gliadin, are the alcohol-soluble lectins found in cereal grains.
    Agglutinin or hemagglutinin is so-called as it can cause blood agglutination (clumping of blood cells). Examples include wheat germ and soybean agglutinins (R).

    Plant agglutinins have been characterized by testing their ability to clump blood cells of certain blood types (R), which suggest that people with certain blood types may be more susceptible to health problems due to lectins than others.

    Some plant lectins, such as castor bean ricin and white kidney bean agglutinins, are very toxic to humans and rats. Ricin can cause blood agglutination and might be used in chemical warfares and genetically engineered herbicides (R).

    White kidney bean hemagglutinins can cause acute nausea, followed by vomiting and diarrhea (R).

    Other plant lectins are less toxic, but they can cause damage in other ways.

    https://selfhacked.leadpages.co/leadbox-1484955113.js
    Are You Lectin Sensitive? Genetic Factors That Predispose You to Lectin Sensitivity

    To learn if you are genetically susceptible to lectins, sequence your genes with 23andme ($99) and use SelfDecode. SelfDecode is the best genetics app out there and is the market leader in giving you recommendations based on your genes, symptoms, and (soon) blood tests.

    With our new system in place, we can tell you which systems in your physiology are not working and how to fix it.

    You can see how substances interact with your problematic genes, which genes you should be careful about, and which substances best fit you.

    Most important, you can see if you have the lectin sensitive gene, and if you do, find out ways to reduce lectin sensitivity.

    With using SelfDecode, I’ve been able to figure out that the cannabinoid gene is the most important for lectin sensitivity. I drew on multiple lines of evidence to figure this out. After seeing the gene in all of my clients with this food sensitivity (and I have 2 bad alleles), I was able to confirm the important role of this gene.

    It’s a perfect fit when it comes to the evidence implicating this gene. SelfDecode (with 23andme) will tell you if you have it.
    Table: Genetic SNPs that Contribute to Lectin Sensitivity
    Show
    10

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    entries
    Search:
    Gene Name (Gene Symbol with SelfDecode Link) SNPs Problematic
    Allele
    or Genotype
    Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CNR1) rs1049353 T
    Methyl Tetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) rs1801133 and rs1801131 C677T and A1298C
    MHC (MHC) rs2395185
    rs10484554
    rs3135388
    rs3135391 TT
    CT
    AG
    AG
    Showing 1 to 3 of 3 entries
    PreviousNext

    Read this post to learn more about other markers and symptoms of lectin sensitivity.
    Harmful Effects of Dietary Lectins
    1) Lectins Are Resistant to Digestion and Are Absorbed Into the Bloodstream

    Lectins can withstand heat and digestion in both rats and humans. Plant lectins have also been recovered intact in human feces (R, R2).

    They can be readily transported through the gut wall into the blood (R).

    In the blood, lectins may stimulate the immune system and modify hormone functions or get deposited in blood and lymphatic walls (R, R2).
    2) Lectins Damage the Gut Lining Causing Leaky Gut

    Lectins bind to surface glycoproteins and gut lining cells causing damage to the villi, increasing the uptake of intestinal content by the cells, and shortening the microvilli (R).

    Some dietary sources of lectins, such as wheat, can directly break tight junctions in gut cells (R).

    Lectins cause leaky gut, allowing increased exposure of both dietary and bacterial antigens (inflammatory agents) to the immune system (R, R2).

    Lectins can also interfere with nutrient absorption (R).
    3) Lectins Stimulate the Immune System

    As lectins cause leaky gut and are readily absorbed into the bloodstream, most people develop antibodies against dietary lectins (R, R2). These antibodies don’t necessarily protect you from harmful lectins. Whether this causes disease depends on individual susceptibility.

    In mice, administration of lectins through the nose or by feeding stimulates IgG and IgA production similar to that of the cholera toxin (R).

    Lectins can potentiate the immune response to antigens that wouldn’t be inflammatory by themselves. For example, mice fed with wheat germ agglutinin and egg white protein develop much stronger antibody responses to egg white protein than if they are fed egg white protein alone (R, R2). Therefore, consumption of lectin-containing food concomitantly with other products can increase the likelihood of developing sensitivity to other food products.

    As lectins can potentiate the immune response to other antigens, it is proposed that lectins might be used along with oral vaccines (R).

    Lectins can induce mast cell reactions suggesting that they can aggravate allergies (R) and histamine intolerance.
    4) Lectins Causes Autoimmunity

    As lectins can act as immune system and leaky gut triggers, lectins can cause autoimmunity in susceptible people (R).

    Lectins trigger autoimmunity by binding to glycoproteins and glycolipids (sugar molecules attached to proteins and fat), such as sialic acid, on the surface of the cells. Interestingly, the brain and gut are rich in sialic acid (R).

    In humans, sialic acid is present in body fluids (blood, breast milk, gallbladder excretions, synovial fluid, sweat, gastric juices, and urine) and tissues (red and white blood cells, platelets, salivary glands, throat, stomach, cervix, colon, cartilage, etc.). In the blood, it’s found in fibrinogen, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, α1 -antitrypsin, complement proteins, and transferrin (R).

    Lectins also increase inflammation by stimulating IFN-gamma, IL-1, and TNF-alpha production as well as HLA class II expression in gut cells (R).
    5) Lectins Affect the Gut Microbiota

    The presence of lectins affects the composition of the gut bacteria and may cause dysbiosis (microbial imbalance) predisposing to autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanism by which lectins affect gut bacteria is not fully understood.

    Lectins reduce intestinal heat shock protein (iHSPs) levels, an anti-inflammatory protein that is important for the healthy interaction with the gut bacteria. Also, lectins interfere with iHSP functions, thus reducing the gut lining’s sensitivity to oxidation and inflammation (R).

    In rats, dietary lectins increase gut levels of E. coli and Lactobacillus lactis, both of which have proteins similar to HLA and are associated with autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (R).

    Kidney bean lectins can cause E. coli overgrowth in the gut, while snowdrop lectins and mannose-specific lectins can block this effect (R).
    6) Lectins Causes Abnormal Cell Growth

    Lectins can cause enlargement and overgrowth of cells in many tissues, including the intestine, pancreas, and liver (R, R2).

    They can trigger lymphocyte growth and activation in cell-based studies (R).
    7) Other Links Between Lectins and Health

    In addition to autoimmunity, there are also other links between lectins and health.

    However, most of these studies are cell-based or model organism-based, so additional animal or human studies are necessary to confirm these findings.
    Lectins and Insulin

    At low doses, wheat germ agglutinin can mimic the insulin function in fat cells. However, at higher doses, wheat germ agglutinin can cause insulin resistance in a cell-based study (R).

    Enlargement of the pancreas due to dietary lectins may reduce insulin levels in rats (R).
    Lectins and Obesity

    Wheat germ agglutinin and ricin from castor oil can increase fat synthesis in fat cells (in a cell-based study) (R).
    Lectins and Brain Functions

    In roundworms, lectins can be transported from the gut to dopamine neurons, and interfere with neuronal and dopamine functions, suggesting that it may contribute to Parkinson’s disease in humans (R).
    Lectin Avoidance Cures Autoimmune Disease

    shutterstock_130533281

    A study of 800 autoimmune patients evaluated a diet that avoided grains, sprouted grains, pseudo-grains, beans and legumes, soy, peanuts, cashews, nightshades, melons and squashes, non-Southern European cow milk products (Casein A1), and grain/bean fed animals.

    Most of these patients started with elevated levels of TNF-alpha (an inflammatory molecule), which were reduced to normal after 6 months on this diet.

    The study concluded that increased adiponectin is a marker for lectin and gluten sensitivity, while TNF-alpha can be used as a marker for gluten/lectin exposure in sensitive individuals (R).

    Dr. Steven Gundry, the author of the study, frowns upon foods that originated from America.

    See my podcast with the author of the study: Dr. Steven Gundry.

    To download a list of allowed and banned foods on the lectin avoidance diet, click on the bottom below.

    https://selfhacked.leadpages.co/leadbox-1484955113.js
    A Diet To Avoid The Most Harmful Food Compounds

    shutterstock_144537737

    I see myself as a canary in a coal mine as I’m sensitive to many foods.

    Over time, I’ve built up a list of food products that cause an insignificant level or no inflammation.

    At some point, I realized that many of my health problems resulted from lectins.

    I understand that not everyone is the same, but I notice that others who are very sensitive to foods can handle these foods as well.

    This doesn’t mean you won’t be able to eat anything else for the rest of your life.

    This diet is just to inform you about the foods that are relatively safe. Personally, I live off of these foods and try not to stray.

    I mention to cut out some products if after a few weeks you still have inflammation. It takes around five days of total abstinence to unmask a food or chemical but at least two weeks to remove the residual traces. It can take longer for autoimmune disease symptoms to normalize.

    Lectins are mainly concentrated in the skin and seeds of plants.
    19 Major Compounds That Can Cause Inflammation

    The name of the diet is somewhat of a misnomer because there are many compounds in food that can cause inflammation. But I believe lectins are the worst culprits. The key here is to eliminate the items that cause you problems. Read this post to see a full list of this 19 compounds.

    https://selfhacked.leadpages.co/leadbox-1484955113.js
    Proteins

    You should get a good amount of protein in the morning – about 30 grams.

    Your diet should consist of 20-30% protein if you are suffering from an autoimmune or chronic inflammatory disease.

    Fish – My top 5 are frozen wild-caught salmon, fresh wild sardines, roe (fish eggs), oysters, and anchovies (any low-toxicity seafood is ok)
    Meat products
    Beef – Preferably grass-fed
    Chicken – I eat the whole chicken except for the sharp bone fragments, which I chew to get the marrow out
    Pork
    Cricket Flour
    Hemp Protein
    Liver – Beef or chicken (without additives)
    Bone broth – Best to make your own
    Brewer’s Yeast or Nutritional Yeast (without synthetic folate)
    Glycine
    Cooked tempeh – Some people can’t handle this. This is probably not allowed on Dr. Gundry’s diet.

    Eggs are fine from a lectin standpoint, but people easily develop egg allergies in stages of chronic gut inflammation.
    Carbs

    My favorite source of safe carbs is raw honey. Not all raw honey is good. Two of them that work for me are Clover Honey and Orange Honey.

    Fruits aren’t rich in lectins, but they have tannins. I eat fruit occasionally, even though they spike my immune system. My favorites are pineapple and citrus. Dr. Gundry looks at melons unfavorably.

    Starch – I find purple sweet potatoes the least inflammatory whole food starch. Japanese sweet potatoes aren’t too bad either. Any sweet potato is fine as long as they are pressure cooked. I would still pressure cook the purple sweet potatoes.
    Fruits – Blueberries, pineapple, citrus, golden berries, papaya, mulberries, and mango
    Fiber – Hi-Maize resistant starch is my main source of resistant starch these days. Nice, clean, hypo-inflammatory starch. 25 g/day to start.
    Trehalose
    Carob
    I use Raw Honey and Hi-Maize for all of my carbs.

    Fats

    Use Caprylic acid, Black Cumin Seed Oil, extra virgin olive oil and ghee for your oils.

    Cut omega-6 oils out (except black seed oil).

    Try to have a couple of tablespoons of caprylic oil daily. Space it right, and you shouldn’t have gastrointestinal effects. Use 1 tbsp Black Cumin Seed Oil and extra virgin olive oil daily.

    Caprylic acid – The best oil. Try to have 3-5 tablespoons daily (1-1.5 with each meal). Reduce dosage if you get gastrointestinal problems and work up. MCT oil is also good.
    Black Cumin Seed Oil – Anti-inflammatory oil with thymoquinone.
    Avocados or guacamole (without additives)
    Extra virgin olive oil
    Ghee – In moderation for sauteing, stir-frying, and using for sleep.
    Avocado Oil
    Hemp seeds – This is the only seed that I tolerate.

    To some people seeds cause problems, but they are better than nuts. In the beginning, stick with the above mentioned and eventually try the seeds. I don’t eat seeds since I get some degree of inflammation from them.
    Vegetables

    Romaine lettuce
    Steamed or boiled or stir-fried cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, kale, or brussels sprouts)
    Cucumber
    Celery
    Sprouts – broccoli, alfalfa, etc.

    Other non-night shade vegetables are fine.
    Condiments/Other

    Dulse Powder or Nori for iodine
    Sunflower Lecithin – After meals for PS and PC
    Mustard
    Italian Seasoning
    Stevia
    Xylitol
    Nutritional yeast (no folic acid)

    Other spices are ok in general.

    Chili, paprika, or cayenne pepper are part of the nightshade family, so some people might react to them.
    Nutrients To Add

    For missing nutrients and copper excess as a consequence of a lifetime of plant-based diets, you can use the Life Extension Mix Powder.

    Life Extension Mix Powder or Multivitamin + Multimineral

    If you need more calcium and potassium (which will be missing if you don’t eat dairy and plant-based foods), you can take the following supplements:

    3 capsules 2X a day Calcium and magnesium
    1g 2X a day Potassium citrate

    Food Groups Excluded on the Lectin Avoidance Diet

    All grains
    Nightshades including tomato, peppers, potato, and eggplant
    Gluten from wheat, rye, barley, malt, and maybe oat
    Legumes – All beans including soy and peanut. Cashews are part of the bean family and are not allowed. The Pythagorean code prohibited the consumption or even touching any bean (R). People with an enzyme deficiency that increases oxidative stress can’t eat certain beans such as broad beans (R).
    Dairy including milk, and milk products as cheese, cottage cheese, yogurt, and kefir
    Yeast (except brewer’s and nutritional)
    Fruits should be avoided during the trial period but can be added back in.

    Look for symptoms of intolerance: bowel, sleep, or mood changes, memory impairment or any other significant changes you can relate to the ingestion of the food group. It may take a week or so for the symptoms to appear.

    To download a full list of foods to eat or avoid on the lectin avoidance diet, click on the button below.

    https://selfhacked.leadpages.co/leadbox-1484955113.js
    Food Groups to Pay Special Attention To
    Seafood

    Seafood is an important dietary component for lectin-sensitive people. Like any food, it may cause health issues to a minority of people. However, the DHA from fish oil is critical in the modulation of the immune system and decreasing lectin sensitivity.

    I do well with very mildly cooked wild-caught salmon (less well with fully cooked), fresh very mildly cooked wild sardines (not canned), and fresh oysters. Other kinds of seafood are good as well.

    To reduce the risk of parasites, I buy frozen wild salmon, defrost it in your fridge over 24 hours, and warm it up or cook it lightly. Industrial freezers should kill all the parasites, and if they don’t, 145 degrees for 5-10 minutes will. I also use a lot of spices. Additionally, the immune system protects against parasites as well, so I’m personally not concerned about them.

    I’ve experimented with having up to 18 oz of wild salmon a day, without any problem. I currently take 6 oz a day.

    If you’re worried about mercury, you can take NAC or R-Lipoic acid to prevent heavy metals accumulation and to activate detox pathways to eliminate toxins.

    The point of the diet is to get good quality DHA, iodine, less omega-6, adequate protein quantity, and nutrition.
    Raw Honey

    Raw Honey has some great benefits that starch doesn’t have. It’s the healthiest carb source for lectin-sensitive people.

    Is a mucilage, which means it coats the stomach.
    Is a very powerfully anti-microbial, which means it should help SIBO.
    Has beneficial prebiotics, such as FOS and GOS.
    Has low glycemic index.
    Contains little lectins.
    Has both immune boosting and anti-inflammatory properties.
    Combats mold toxins.

    Hi-Maize

    Hi-Maize has two different types of starch. Approximately 40% is slowly digestible starch, which is digested in the small intestine and slowly absorbed as glucose. More importantly, it contains approximately 60% resistant starch, which is digested in the large intestine and produces butyrate. Butyrate works magic for the brain. I’ve been using this for a year off and on, but I am a big fan.
    Eggs

    Eggs are extremely nutritious and are considered a superfood. However, in some people, eggs can cause other health issues – not from lectins, but because it has proteins that you can easily become intolerant to if you’ve been on a heavy lectin diet for a while or if you suffer from excessive stress.

    I developed an allergy to eggs in my early 20’s, but most people are fine with them. If you feel fine, then indulge because eggs are a truly healthy food. If you can include eggs, you can reduce your need for supplements.

    https://selfhacked.leadpages.co/leadbox-1484955113.js
    How to Reduce the Lectin Levels in Food

    Soaking for 2 hours and cooking destroys bean lectins. In common beans, the lectin content declines from 820 to 3.2 (hemagglutinating activity), while in fava beans it declines from 51.3 to 6.4 (R).
    Pressure-cooking destroys lectins in some foods, such as beans, sweet potatoes, and some squashes.

    Technical
    Classification of Plant Lectins

    There are 4 different types of plant lectins according to its overall structure and specificity in carbohydrate binding: merolectins, hololectins, chimerolectins, and superlectins (R).

    There are 7 botanical families of plant lectins (R):
    1. Legume lectins
    2. Monocot mannose-binding lectins
    3. Chitin-binding proteins containing hevein domains
    4. Type 2 ribosome inactivating proteins
    5. Cucurbitaceae phloem lectins – Most Cucurbitaceae species contain high concentrations of lectins that bind to oligomers of N-Acetylglucosamine.
    6. Jacalin family – from jackfruit seeds
    7. Amaranthaceae lectins
    Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10884708

    Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10884708
    Chemical and Biological Properties of Some Plant Lectins, source: http://www.scielo.br/pdf/mioc/v86s2/...2)_196-203.pdf

    Chemical and Biological Properties of Some Plant Lectins, source: http://www.scielo.br/pdf/mioc/v86s2/...2)_196-203.pdf
    Animal Lectins

    Examples of animal lectins include snake venom (another agglutinin), lactoferrin receptors, and blood-type antigens.

    Selectins, a type of lectins, bind to injured sites and mediate immune cells binding (R).

    Galectin-3 plays a role in obesity and impairs blood sugar control (R).

    Influenza virus infects humans by binding to sialic acid, a type of glycoprotein that is present in many human cells.

    Want to get started on the Lectin Avoidance Diet? Get a copy of the cookbook for $27.


    https://selfhacked.com/blog/eliminat...ve-everything/

  38. #38
    All about lectins:
    Here's what you need to know.

    By Ryan Andrews

    What are lectins?


    Lectins are a type of protein that can bind to cell membranes. They are sugar-binding and become the “glyco” portion of glycoconjugates on the membranes. Lectins offer a way for molecules to stick together without getting the immune system involved, which can influence cell-cell interaction.

    Lectins are abundant in raw legumes and grains, and most commonly found in the part of the seed that becomes the leaves when the plant sprouts, aka the cotyledon, but also on the seed coat. They’re also found in dairy products and certain vegetables. While lectin content in food is fairly constant, the genetic altering of plants has created some fluctuations.

    Lectins in plants are a defense against microorganisms, pests, and insects. They may also have evolved as a way for seeds to remain intact as they passed through animals’ digestive systems, for later dispersal. Lectins are resistant to human digestion and they enter the blood unchanged.
    500px-legume_lectin_quat
    The diagrams of these legume lectins probably don’t mean much to you, but they look neat.
    Why are lectins so important?

    Lectins are thought to play a role in immune function, cell growth, cell death, and body fat regulation.
    Immune response and toxicity

    Because we don’t digest lectins, we often produce antibodies to them. Almost everyone has antibodies to some dietary lectins in their body. This means our responses vary. Certain foods can even become intolerable to someone after an immune system change or the gut is injured from another source. The presence of particular lectins can stimulate an immune system response.

    There are some lectins that no one should consume. Ever wonder why you don’t see sprouted red kidney beans?

    It’s due to phytohaemagglutinin – a lectin that can cause red kidney bean poisoning. The poisoning is usually caused by the ingestion of raw, soaked kidney beans. As few as four or five raw beans can trigger symptoms.

    Raw kidney beans contain from 20,000 to 70,000 lectin units, while fully cooked beans usually contain between 200 and 400 units.
    Beneficial lectins

    While many types of lectins cause negative reactions in the body, there are also health promoting lectins that can decrease incidence of certain diseases. Furthermore, the body uses lectins to achieve many basic functions, including cell to cell adherence, inflammatory modulation and programmed cell death.
    What you should know about lectins

    Ingesting lectins can cause flatulence. Consuming legumes and grains in their raw form can even result in nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. Indeed, researchers speculate that many apparent causes of bacterial food poisoning may actually be lectin poisoning.
    Lectins and the intestinal wall

    This GI distress happens because lectins can damage the intestinal lining.

    As food passes through the gut, it causes very minor damage to the lining of the GI tract. Normally the cells repair this damage rapidly. Since the purpose of the gut lining is to let the good stuff past and keep the bad stuff contained, it’s important for the cellular repair system to be running at full efficiency.

    But lectins can blunt this speedy reconstruction. Our cells can’t regenerate as fast as they need to in order to keep the intestinal lining secure. Thus, our natural gut defenses are compromised after the damage occurs and the gut can become “leaky,” allowing various molecules (including stuff we don’t want) to pass back and forth amid the gut wall. We may also not absorb other important things, such as vitamins and minerals, properly.

    When enough lectins are consumed, it can signal our body to evacuate GI contents. This means vomiting, cramping and diarrhea. It’s similar to consuming large amounts of alcohol, which can damage the GI lining and cause GI evacuation.
    Lectins and immune response

    When lectins affect the gut wall, it may also cause a broader immune system response as the body’s defenses move in to attack the invaders.

    Symptoms can include skin rashes, joint pain, and general inflammation. Other chronic disorders may be correlated with leaky gut — for example, researchers have even noted that children with autism have very high rates of leaky gut and similar inflammatory GI tract diseases.

    leaky-gut-picture_web

    When someone suffers from Crohn’s disease or irritable bowel syndrome, the gut lining seems to be more sensitive to food lectins. This might be due to the high turnover of cells and greater population of the immature variety. These immature cells have plenty of spots for lectins to attach.

    The effects of dietary lectins only extend for as long as they are in the body, and the effects can be reduced by eating a variety of fruits, vegetables (rather than high amounts of one type) and foods with beneficial bacteria (e.g., fermented foods).
    Lectins and grains

    Unrefined grains are more nutritious than refined versions because they contain more nutrients. However, they also provide more lectins (and other anti-nutrients).

    While this was likely never a problem when we grew and harvested our own grains, we now have access to MANY whole grain products. Before the invention of modern agriculture, grains were a minor and seasonal crop. Now we can go to the market for 15 minutes and have a cart full of whole grain pasta, bread, rice, quinoa, kamut, amaranth, oats, barley and chips.

    The average North American diet is highly grain-based: bread, pasta, rice, cereals, etc. are everywhere, especially in processed foods.

    Was the body ever equipped to deal with that type of grain onslaught?

    bulk-bins

    Our ancestors grasped the concept of “survival of the fittest,” and found a solution to the problem of lectins. Soaking, fermenting, sprouting and cooking will decrease lectins and free up the good nutrients. The content of lectins in foods differs year to year and crop to crop.

    Grain, cereal, dairy, and legume (especially peanut and soybean) lectins are most commonly associated with reports of digestive complaints. Legumes and seafood are the most abundant sources of lectins in most diets.
    How can we reduce or neutralize lectins?
    Sprouting

    Sprouting seeds, grains or beans decreases the lectin content.

    Generally, the longer the duration of sprouting, the more lectins are deactivated. In some cases the lectin activity is enhanced by sprouting (like alfalfa sprouts). The lectins in some grains and beans are in the seed coat. As it germinates, the coat is metabolized – eliminating lectins.

    sprouting
    Soaking and cooking

    Even wonder why grandma bothered with the long soak, rinse and boil session when preparing beans and grains? Lectin reduction. This is probably the most classic method of preparing beans and grains.

    Soak beans and legumes overnight, and change the water often. Drain and rinse again before cooking. Adding sodium bicarbonate (aka baking soda) to the soaking water may help neutralize the lectins further.

    soaking
    Fermenting

    Fermentation allows beneficial bacteria to digest and convert many of the harmful substances.

    This might be why the healthiest populations stick with fermented soy products like tofu, miso, tempeh, tamari and natto. Even some vegetables, such as cabbage, may have fewer antinutrients when fermented. Cultures with a history of grain eating traditionally have used some form of fermentation to treat grains. If you’ve had sourdough bread or beer, you’ve had fermented grains.

    Not all lectins are completely destroyed by these methods, and some particularly stubborn lectins in beans remain no matter how lengthy the treatment. Thus, these techniques don’t totally reduce the negative effects for everyone.

    Some have argued that since agriculture is a relatively recent invention, humans did not evolve to tolerate grains nor beans well in any case. For some susceptible people, consuming a “Paleo-style” diet, where carbohydrates come from fruits and vegetables, rather than grains and beans, may be beneficial.

    in pot
    Summary and recommendations

    Since lectins are so widely distributed in food items commonly consumed by humans, and have been for many centuries, most nutrition experts assume they don’t pose a significant risk to human health.

    Still, it does appear that chronic ingestion of untreated high-lectin foods may warrant further consideration. If you consume a diet with plenty of lectin-rich foods, try to reduce the amount by soaking, fermenting, sprouting and/or cooking.
    Extra credit

    Certain seaweeds and mucilaginous vegetables have the ability to bind lectins in a way that makes them unavailable to the cells of the gut.

    Lectins are resistant to dry heat, so using raw legume flours in baked goods should be done with caution.

    The “Blood Type Diet” is based on how our blood cells react with lectins in foods.

    Some experts hypothesize that it’s no coincidence the top 8 allergens also contain some of the highest amounts of lectins (including: dairy, egg, wheat, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish).

    Some experts theorize that lectins cause urinary tract infections.

    Some experts theorize that the reason anemia is higher in developing countries is due to excessive levels of lectin consumption.
    Eat, move, and live… better.

    Yep, we know… the health and fitness world can sometimes be a confusing place. But it doesn’t have to be.

    Let us help you make sense of it all with this free special report.

    In it you’ll learn the best eating, exercise, and lifestyle strategies — unique and personal — for you.

    Click here to download the special report, for free.


    http://www.precisionnutrition.com/all-about-lectins

  39. #39
    I grew up with a mother who had chronic health issues. Her diet of Pepsi, black coffee, and cigarettes probably didn't help. Having me at 41 probably didn't help either. However, I think she avoided food because she had trouble digesting most of it.

    After I left home, I worked on organic farms. Laurel's Kitchen was the cookbook everyone used, and I pretty much took it as gospel. The more my health deteriorated, the more I thought I just needed to eat more fresh fruits, veggies, beans, and whole wheat bread. This line of thought went on for over a decade, and for while, in a renewed effort to fix the problem, I was trying mostly raw, mostly vegan. Things only got worse - my mother's diet would have been an improvement.

    Life got better after I learned about gluten intolerance. Not perfect, but better. Gluten intolerant, or not, avoiding gluten was a BIG change for the better. Avoiding wheat is not a fad! Something is very wrong with much of our staple food. I wouldn't wish feeling sick most of the time on anyone. Chronic belly aches suck.

    Thanks, Packy. Going to read this book.

    On an interesting note about "powders," BF has always started the morning with a protein powder smoothie. I shunned them for a decade..Fake Food!! ...actually, I feel better now that I drink them for breakfast too. Yep, an artificial processed powder; who knew.

  40. #40
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluelady View Post
    I don't understand it but Google MTHFR mutation, my good friend has it.
    What is MTHFR?
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

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