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ENVR The strange reason this part of Arkansas gets so many earthquakes
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  1. #1
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    The strange reason this part of Arkansas gets so many earthquakes

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/the...cid=spartanntp

    Ten*earthquakes in northern Arkansas in the past five days?*

    Blame it on Bull Shoals Lake, swollen by spring*floods.
    The lake, which straddles the Missouri-Arkansas border, has risen 42 feet since the first of March, adding more than 6 trillion pounds of water weight to the lake basin.
    That crushing weight triggered a 3.6-magnitude earthquake north of Harrison, Arkansas, on Sunday and at least nine more in the following days, according to David Johnston, earthquake geologist with the Arkansas Geological Survey.
    "That's a whole lot of weight — 6 trillion pounds of weight added to the local geologic column," Johnston said Friday. "That much weight can cause a tremendous amount of stress."

    The Harrison earthquake swarm — 10 quakes ranging from 3.6 magnitude to 1.5 magnitude on the Richter Scale *— aren't connected to the huge New Madrid fault zone at the juncture of Arkansas, Missouri and Tennessee, which produced massive earthquakes*when it unzipped*in the early 1800s.
    *
    Johnston said the lake-induced quakes near Harrison likely will remain small, but they might not end anytime soon.

    "It's the same process when you let the water out of the lake," he said. "When you lower the lake, you can then relax*that pressure and cause small earthquakes again."
    Johnston said a team from Arkansas Geological Survey will be placing more seismometers (ground-motion detection devices) in the quake zone to better record what is happening and to get a better feel for the depths underground where*the quakes are happening.

    The deepest so far has been about 3.7 miles, while the shallowest is estimated at just over a half mile underground.
    Johnston said there are no reports of damage from a 3.6 magnitude quake early Sunday morning. But some people reported houses creaking, china shaking on shelves, pictures rattling on walls and glasses of water sloshing on tables.
    "It shook the whole house, and the first thing I thought was that it was the sinkhole," Will Presley said. "It was just so loud. The shaking went on for 15 or 20 seconds or so.*I just knew my house was off in that sinkhole."

    Harrison resident Terri Willis said aftershocks from the bigger Sunday quake "sounded like thunder rumbling," far different from the first one.
    "That first one was like a big boom that shook the house," she recalled. "I thought something had hit the other end of our house, or a tree had hit the house."
    Despite the rumbling beneath her feet, Willis said she isn't worried.
    "My sister used to live in California, and she said it was like this every day," Willis said. "We had*dropped our*earthquake insurance, since we never needed it. But now it might be worth it."

    Johnston, the Arkansas Geological Survey geologist, said there's a reason many people heard an explosion with that first earthquake.
    He said earthquakes transmit energy through the ground with two different kinds of waves: a primary wave and a secondary wave.
    "The noise you hear is the P wave being converted to an acoustic (sound) wave when it hits the surface," he said.

    "Booming" earthquakes are common in Oklahoma, where fracking and injection wells have created*some quakes big enough to cause minor damage.
    Johnston emphasized that the Harrison earthquake swarm has nothing to do with fracking or injection wells, just the tremendous extra weight of nearby Bull Shoals Lake.
    "We call it reservoir-induced seismicity," he said.
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  2. #2
    I can see the dam and that lake from the top of my street.

    You are kidding me! That's why?

    Ok, let me ask some locals if they recall such activities in other heavy rain years.
    This blows my mind.
    "Why not stay awake now? Who wants to sleep now with so much happening, so much to see? Life used to be dull you see...and you don't have to sleep alone, you don't even have to sleep at all; and so, all you have to do is show the stick to the dog now and then and say, 'Thank God for nothing.'"

    Drusilla, "The UNVANQUISHED. William Faulkner

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by minkykat View Post
    I can see the dam and that lake from the top of my street.

    You are kidding me! That's why?

    Ok, let me ask some locals if they recall such activities in other heavy rain years.
    This blows my mind.
    I have lived here for 40 years, I remember water this high but never quakes.....

  4. #4
    Same here seen water this high and higher and not the quakes, so wonder why they are handing out the BS story.

  5. #5
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    Are they building underground bunkers and cities in that area? They seem to like the Ozark area so it would make much more sense.

  6. #6
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    Remember it is not called the Ozark uplift for nothing. Also next time you drive 35 from okc to Dallas look how twisted the Arbucles are. There was a lot of violent geologic activity in the Ozark,Washita, and Boston mountain areas
    “America is at that awkward stage; it's too late to work within the system, but too early to shoot the bastards.”
    ¯Claire Wolfe

  7. #7
    Yes. I thought it was because there is a volcano under the diamond mines that brought the diamonds up. They don't want to mention it much.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by LYKURGOS View Post
    Remember it is not called the Ozark uplift for nothing. Also next time you drive 35 from okc to Dallas look how twisted the Arbucles are. There was a lot of violent geologic activity in the Ozark,Washita, and Boston mountain areas
    Some of which was volcanic, there's a reason Arkansas has a Diamond State Park, and many areas with names that end in "Springs" as in volcanic springs..
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncmissouri View Post
    Yes. I thought it was because there is a volcano under the diamond mines that brought the diamonds up. They don't want to mention it much.
    that water feature in Ouachita Nat'l Forest looks a whole lot like a super volcano caldera on the sat images, and it's just west of Hot Springs, AR.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  10. #10
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    I call it Bull Shit. New Madrid Seismic Zone. From what I read the quakes are from 3-15 miles below the surface. Guess the next round will be with all the birds flying overhead the lift will be pulling the trees out of the ground. Read before Assuming. Makes an Ass out of U and Me

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    that water feature in Ouachita Nat'l Forest looks a whole lot like a super volcano caldera on the sat images, and it's just west of Hot Springs, AR.
    No geologic layers of volcanic ash, tuff, or lava flows in the Ozarks. Now lots in New Mexico and North Texas. Hot springs Ark is definitely got access to geothermal venting. We have a granite outcropping at Elephant Rock park, and the Bunker area has large lead deposits from hydro-thermal replacement. There is a seismic station at Meers Oklahoma that has been there probably over 100 years. We could be more active than we have been since 1812 just glad we aren't.
    “America is at that awkward stage; it's too late to work within the system, but too early to shoot the bastards.”
    ¯Claire Wolfe

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by techcas View Post
    I have lived here for 40 years, I remember water this high but never quakes.....
    Thank you!
    "Why not stay awake now? Who wants to sleep now with so much happening, so much to see? Life used to be dull you see...and you don't have to sleep alone, you don't even have to sleep at all; and so, all you have to do is show the stick to the dog now and then and say, 'Thank God for nothing.'"

    Drusilla, "The UNVANQUISHED. William Faulkner

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by LYKURGOS View Post
    No geologic layers of volcanic ash, tuff, or lava flows in the Ozarks. Now lots in New Mexico and North Texas. Hot springs Ark is definitely got access to geothermal venting. We have a granite outcropping at Elephant Rock park, and the Bunker area has large lead deposits from hydro-thermal replacement. There is a seismic station at Meers Oklahoma that has been there probably over 100 years. We could be more active than we have been since 1812 just glad we aren't.
    There's still an ancient volcano complex in Arkansas
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  14. #14
    There's still an ancient volcano complex in Arkansas
    There's no such thing as an extinct volcano. Someday it might let 'er rip and those hills will be moving again.

  15. #15
    not sure.......protecting fracking?

  16. #16
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    I don't know. Lake Ontario water levels have been the highest in a century, ruining everything along the shore from west of Rochester up to the St. Lawrence. We have had no earthquakes. And they can't really lower the lake level because the dam that controls it would ruin shipping up there, or so they say. Read this and look at the almost hundred pictures in the photo album near the bottom. It's crazy. Charlotte beach and Durand beach are basically gone, among other things. We have never "developed" our shoreline like they did in Chicago, so it's mostly all residential and small businesses; no skyscrapers.


    http://www.mlive.com/weather/index.s...o_rise_to.html
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  17. #17
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    Oops, the photo album is in this article:

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...ing/353818001/
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncmissouri View Post
    There's no such thing as an extinct volcano. Someday it might let 'er rip and those hills will be moving again.
    Look, I know this and you know this, now tell it to the idiot geologists who make these sorts of statements!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  19. #19
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    I hope the water stays in the Great Lakes.
    Shop Amazon At 35,000 Feet On JetBlue Airways With JetBlue's Fast WiFi And Earn TrueBlue Points https://trueblue.jetblue.com/web/trueblue/amazon

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sleeping Cobra View Post
    I hope the water stays in the Great Lakes.
    It was just fine the way it's always been.

    Now it's all ruined.

    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

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