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CRIME Cobra with fastest-acting snake venom in the world accidently let loose in Florida
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  1. #1
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    Cobra with fastest-acting snake venom in the world accidently let loose in Florida

    A potentially dangerous cobra is now roaming the streets of north-central Florida and the worker who was supposed to prevent it from escaping is in trouble.

    Ian Nesmith, 28, was charged with a misdemeanor for letting the tan and yellow monocled cobra escape from its enclosure in a home in Ocala.

    According to court papers filed earlier in April, Nesmith was hit with a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission code violation after the snake disappeared from the home last month. After Nesmith opened the cover of the cage, the snake jumped at him and then slid away, police said.

    The cobra hasnít been seen since.

    The cobra, which is native to South Asia and Southeast Asia, has one of the fastest acting snake venoms in the world, according to Reptiles magazine. Its venom can kill within the hour.

    The owner of the snake was licensed to handle venemous reptiles. Nesmith was shadowing the owner with the hopes of eventually obtaining the license himself. But wildlife officials said he shouldnít have been left alone in the room with the animal.

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/04/20...orida.amp.html
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  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Millwright View Post
    licensed to handle venemous reptiles
    They don't even do spell check now.

  3. #3

    Want some of ours?



    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    Inland Taipan
    Oxyuranus microlepidotus




    Inland Taipan - Oxyuranus microlepidotus

    The Inland Taipan (Oxyuranus microlepidotus), is a venomous snake of the taipan genus commonly found in semi-arid regions of central east Australia.

    The inland taipan is not just a venomous snake it's considered the most venomous snake in the world by many people. When compared drop for drop and based on the median lethal dose (LD50) value in mice, its venom is by far the most toxic of any land snake or even sea snakes.

    Although extremely venomous and a very capable striker, contrary to the rather aggressive nature of its relative the coastal taipan, this serpent is usually quite a shy and reclusive snake species. With its placid disposition it prefers to escape from trouble, but it will defend itself and strike if mishandled, provoked or prevented from escaping.

    But it first makes a warning display by raising its forebody in a tight S-shaped curve with their head facing the threat if the warning is ignored it will strike. This is an extremely fast and agile snake species that can strike instantly and accurately, and will often strike multiple times in one attack, and it envenoms in almost every single case.


    Inland Taipan ready to strike
    Unlike most other snake species, the inland taipan evolved as mammal hunter so its venom is ultimately designed to kill warm-blooded prey, just like us.

    The maximum yield recorded from a single bite of Inland Taipan is 110 mg and the venom is so toxic that just one bite is enough to kill at least 100 human adults or 250 thousand mice.

    Depending on several factors a bite if left untreated as the potential to kill someone in as little as 30 to 45 minutes. Its venom is about 50 times more toxic that the king cobra venom.

    But since it lives in very remote regions, the inland taipan hardly ever comes in contact with humans. It is therefore definitely not regarded as the most deadly snake on the planet overall, specifically when it comes to temperament along with the number of human fatalities annually.

    This species is also known as western taipan, small-scaled snake or fierce snake.The word "fierce" from its common name fierce snake, is used to describe its venom, not their temperament.

    Despite the fact that the inland taipan has the most toxic snake venom in the world, they are hunted and killed by other animals. Like the king brown snake (Pseudechis australis) that is immune to most Australian snake's venom, and the perentie (Varanus giganteus), the largest Australian monitor lizard, which will attack large venomous snakes for prey.

    The species was first described in the late 1800's, but it became a bit of a mystery to science for the next 90 years, nothing was added to knowledge of this snake until its was rediscovered in 1972.

    It's one of the 3 species in its genus, the other are the Coastal taipan and the recently discovered (2007) the Central Ranges taipan.The species is primarily diurnal and are most active in the early morning, basking and foraging, but in cooler weather they may also be found active in the afternoon.

    The inland taipan averages a length of approximately 6 ft (1.8 m), but larger specimens can reach up to 8 ft (2,5m) in length. The inland taipan colour is dark tan, that ranges depending on season from a rich, dark hue to a brownish light-green.

    The back, sides or tail may be colored in different shades of brown and grey, with many of scales possessing a blackish edge. The head and neck are darker than their body. The inland taipan or fierce snake adapts to the surrounding environment by changing the colour of their skin during seasonal changes.

    They have a tendency to become lighter throughout summer and darker in the winter season. This helps with their thermoregulation, allowing the snake to absorb more heat in the colder months of the year.

    In captivity these snakes normally live for 10 to 15 years, in the wild is difficult to determine their longevity. Their fangs are between 3.5 to 6.2 mm long, being shorter than those of the Coastal taipan.

    Diet / Feeding

    The inland taipan feeds mostly on rodents, such as the long-haired rat, the plains rat or the introduced house mouse and other small to medium-sized mammals but also on birds.

    Despite the fact that many other venomous snake species strike with a single bite and then retreat, waiting for their prey to die, the fierce snake kills its prey with a series of rapid, accurate bites.

    ​It can deliver up to 8 venomous bites in a single attack by holding its prey, injecting the extremely toxic venom deep into the victim, the venom acts so quickly that it doesn't have time to fight back.

    Reproduction

    This snake species is oviparous, the female lays between 1 and 24 eggs, usually in abandoned animal burrows or deep crevices. The eggs hatch after two months. The hatchlings have a total length of around 47cm long. This species reproduction rate is dependent partially on their diet, when there isn't much food they will reproduce less.

    Conservation / Threats

    Like every other Australian snake species, the inland taipan is protected by law, but their conservation status has yet to be assessed by the IUCN Red List. Their conservation status according to various Australian official sources varies from least concern, near threatened to extinct or presumed extinct depending on the region.

    http://snake-facts.weebly.com/inland-taipan.html

  4. #4
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    15 so,??

    what were the little green snakes from nam , everyone called one steppers, got bit, made it about one step and you were down,

    this snake it says will kill you in 30 to 45min, kind of slow compared to the other green one

  5. #5
    Hopefully it is not a pregnant female.
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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Be Well View Post
    Hopefully it is not a pregnant female.
    ...or falls in love with a Florida rattlesnake.

  7. #7
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    I don't understand why someone can be licensed to handle venomous reptiles in his house.

    To me, this should be something that is handled in a proper facility to prevent a situation like this.

    This makes as much sense as giving a license to someone to handle hand grenades/bombs in his house.

    What could go wrong?
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  8. #8
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    This crap needs to be stopped. This will end badly.
    "His golden colored hair and beard gave to his appearance a celestial aspect, His eyes grey clear. He came from racial lines which had blue eyes and golden hair. This granted unlimited freedom provoked the Jews, Jesus of Nazareth spoke rather as a friend of the Romans than of the Jews." http://www.thenazareneway.com/likene...ur_saviour.htm

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooter View Post
    what were the little green snakes from nam , everyone called one steppers, got bit, made it about one step and you were down,

    this snake it says will kill you in 30 to 45min, kind of slow compared to the other green one
    IIRC that is the Krait...
    Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways - body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming "WOO HOO WHAT A RIDE!!!" - Unknown

  10. #10
    A lot of places in So. Florida are nick-named "God's Waiting Room." The cobra may shorten some waits.

  11. #11
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    Personally I think these kinds of snakes, critters, animals should NEVER even be allowed into this country....PERIOD!! And absolutely not allowed in an individuals home.

    Come on folks, we have enough NATIVE poisonous snakes and such in this country we don't need to be importing more! They don't belong here and when they get out....not if, BUT WHEN, you're not going to be able to put them back in their little box. Look at the mess the snakehead fish, asian pythons, walking catfish, brown recluse spider, fire ants, killer bees, jumping carp, zika virus, etc., etc., etc., are causing and will never be resolved. Pandora's box has been opened and now the damage can't be undone.
    We have done so much, with so little, for so long....We can now do anything, with nothing, forever.

  12. #12
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    Oh boy, gotta get one of those for the kids to play with

    How come they don't use those in the "snake handling" churches, got figure if you're gonna do it might as well go big.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooter View Post
    what were the little green snakes from nam , everyone called one steppers, got bit, made it about one step and you were down,

    this snake it says will kill you in 30 to 45min, kind of slow compared to the other green one
    Bamboo Viper.
    "They wanted to be left alone to face challenges head-on, and to prosper from their own hard work and ingenuity...harsh country tends to produce strong people."-John Erickson

  14. #14
    I don't know the rules in Florida, but from what Nightwolf has told me in order to get a license to handle "hots" in the UK; you have to not only have certain qualifications; you need to have a safe room pretty much within another safe room (both snake proof with no way to the outside) in addition to a locked enclosure that the snakes live in.

    While a few people do keep snakes like this as "pets" (shudder) in the UK it is mostly researchers or scientists who keep their "subjects" at home for reasons of feeding, daily research or collecting venom (which is also used for research, making anti-venom and even pain killers).

    I am not sure the regulations on transport but I suspect it is a smaller version of the box, within the box within box idea -because snakes are escape artists; that's the major reason I won't have any in my house.

    If the cats get one of husband's "wee widdle snakeies" then that's life, but the thought of something that can do more than just give a human (or other pet) more than a nasty normal bite is not something I even want to think about.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  15. #15
    We have a couple pet snakes at our house. Like them. Anything that looks venomous scares the carp out of me! I always thought living in Australia would be nice, but they have way too many snakes and spiders that can kill you! And I guess now Florida does too.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Melodi View Post
    I don't know the rules in Florida, but from what Nightwolf has told me in order to get a license to handle "hots" in the UK; you have to not only have certain qualifications; you need to have a safe room pretty much within another safe room (both snake proof with no way to the outside) in addition to a locked enclosure that the snakes live in.

    While a few people do keep snakes like this as "pets" (shudder) in the UK it is mostly researchers or scientists who keep their "subjects" at home for reasons of feeding, daily research or collecting venom (which is also used for research, making anti-venom and even pain killers).

    I am not sure the regulations on transport but I suspect it is a smaller version of the box, within the box within box idea -because snakes are escape artists; that's the major reason I won't have any in my house.

    If the cats get one of husband's "wee widdle snakeies" then that's life, but the thought of something that can do more than just give a human (or other pet) more than a nasty normal bite is not something I even want to think about.
    Bryan Frye (spell?), author of Venom Doc, is an interesting speaker. These animals are fascinating from a scientific point of view.

    Don't know about Florida regulations specifically, but there are plenty of people there who keep hots, within varying degrees of safety. Lots of videos to watch. I don't think there are many regulations for most of the US. This only seems to have become a visible hobby recently. There are some permits, etc. required in some areas. Viper Keeper of YouTube talks about it some. These old timers expect that private possession won't be legal for much longer. He is careful who his hots go to, but others aren't, and keeping them suddenly seems to be much more fashionable. He has warned about carelessness and disregard of the laws.

    We are just one dumbass move and one tragic innocent death away from sweeping laws. I just hope that the idiots mishandling these animals don't take down the whole snake/herp keeping hobby with them.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Displaced hillbilly View Post
    We have a couple pet snakes at our house. Like them. Anything that looks venomous scares the carp out of me! I always thought living in Australia would be nice, but they have way too many snakes and spiders that can kill you! And I guess now Florida does too.
    Easy keepers, and VERY beautiful!
    I stick to the North American species, so I don't have to worry so much about keeping them warm in winter.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by cooter View Post
    what were the little green snakes from nam , everyone called one steppers, got bit, made it about one step and you were down,

    this snake it says will kill you in 30 to 45min, kind of slow compared to the other green one
    The difference between 'stopping power' and 'dead.' ... most of the 'bad' venom is neurotoxic, works on your nervous system. You can't move, etc. But your heart and brain might function for some time after that prior to death. A very unpleasant way to die. Most snakes in the US are hemotoxic, they weaken blood vessels and you die from internal bleeding. Thus, you have a much better chance of surviving one of those. Get to the hospital in less than 2 hours and you will likely be ok.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob1313 View Post
    Oh boy, gotta get one of those for the kids to play with

    How come they don't use those in the "snake handling" churches, got figure if you're gonna do it might as well go big.
    A member of the NC Herp society is often called as an expert witness for cases involving such 'churches' and he did a presentation one year on same. The snake handlers generally never feed the snakes, or give them water. Unfed snakes produce less venom, and are far less likely to waste it on defense- it's primary use is procuring a meal. He told me privately he'd love to give 'em the use of some of his Gaboon Vipers for a service and see how well it'd work out.

    This guy has offered more than once to lay down and let his Hella monsters crawl over him- they are that easy to get along with. But the Gaboon Vipers? Any time the cage is open- for cleaning, what ever- he had 3 people present. One to move the snake (Him) another to serve as back up, and a third standing by with a ready kit of anti-venom. Yeah, those are not good pets.

  20. #20
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    http://www.capefearserpentarium.com/

    Used to go down there every other weekend or so for a hand to hand group meetup to practice Southnarc/Craig Douglas' ECQC stuff. A very different place, and the owner is a very different sort of human as well.

    See the PDF at http://www.capefearserpentarium.com/...Jan2014pdf.pdf to discover just how different.
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  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by BetterLateThanNever View Post
    I don't understand why someone can be licensed to handle venomous reptiles in his house.

    To me, this should be something that is handled in a proper facility to prevent a situation like this.

    This makes as much sense as giving a license to someone to handle hand grenades/bombs in his house.

    What could go wrong?

    Actually, you can get a license/permit/tax to handle grenades and bombs and various explosives in your house. Additionally, you can own and handle all kinds of dangerous things with no license whatsoever. Reloaders keep and handle various powders and primers, painters keep all manner of volatile (and potentially explosive) solvents, mechanics usually keep potentially-explosive ether-based engine starter and countless home owners keep gasoline in a shed for their lawnmowers. There are literally thousands of other examples.

    My point is that it's (usually) people, not things, that are potentially dangerous.

    Best regards
    Doc

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    http://www.capefearserpentarium.com/

    Used to go down there every other weekend or so for a hand to hand group meetup to practice Southnarc/Craig Douglas' ECQC stuff. A very different place, and the owner is a very different sort of human as well.

    See the PDF at http://www.capefearserpentarium.com/...Jan2014pdf.pdf to discover just how different.
    I've been working with reptiles my entire life, or almost all... and the first time I visited there I nearly couldn't handle it. Yeah, he's got some good stuff...

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc1 View Post
    Actually, you can get a license/permit/tax to handle grenades and bombs and various explosives in your house. Additionally, you can own and handle all kinds of dangerous things with no license whatsoever. Reloaders keep and handle various powders and primers, painters keep all manner of volatile (and potentially explosive) solvents, mechanics usually keep potentially-explosive ether-based engine starter and countless home owners keep gasoline in a shed for their lawnmowers. There are literally thousands of other examples.

    My point is that it's (usually) people, not things, that are potentially dangerous.

    Best regards
    Doc
    I can partially agree with you.

    I keep a half dozen or so propane tanks and and 5 gal gas cans separated in different areas and they are secure and away from the house.

    People don't have to worry about my tanks and gas cans rolling around the neighborhood and blowing them up.

    I don't have a problem with primers, ammo, gun powder etc., but with a non-native cobra in the area....I do.
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    A 1964 To The Present Dollar Bill Is Worth $1.00 Today.
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  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    http://www.capefearserpentarium.com/

    Used to go down there every other weekend or so for a hand to hand group meetup to practice Southnarc/Craig Douglas' ECQC stuff. A very different place, and the owner is a very different sort of human as well.

    See the PDF at http://www.capefearserpentarium.com/...Jan2014pdf.pdf to discover just how different.
    First I've heard of them. Thanks for posting!

    I have NO time whatsoever today. Saving for later. Among similar literature is a piece called, Dairy of a Snake Bite. A scientist's account of getting bitten by a Boomslang (?). It didn't end well for the scientist.

  25. #25
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    Not far from where I lived in Florida. My only interest in the snake, were I there, would be as a venom producer for hollowpoints.

    It's cage would be inside a refridgerator set on about 50 or so-just a bit above it's cold tolerance but not enough to kill it.
    "It ain't no secret I didn't get these scars falling over in church."


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